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1 CITY OF OAKLAND CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2015–17 Adopted Policy Budget

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3 CITY OF OAKLAND 2015- D POLICY BUDGET 17 FY ADOPTE Mayor Libby Schaaf Members of the City Council Lynette Gibson McElhaney (District 3) Council President (District 7) Larry Reid Pro Tem President (At Rebecca Kaplan -Large) -Mayor Vice (District 1 Noel Gallo (District 5) Dan Kalb ) ) (District 2 Desley Brooks (District 6) Abel J. Guillen (District 4 ) Annie Campbell Washington City Administrator B. Landreth ina Sabr Prepared by the Budget Office Kiran Bawa Osborn K. Solitei Finance Director / Controller udget Director B K irsten LaCasse ler Assistant Control Analytical Staff Janelle Montu Bernadette de Leon Margaret O’Brien Lucius Hatcher, Jr. Bradley Johnson Sarah Schlenk Michael Kek Michelle Soares Tiffany Kirkpatrick Emma Virtucio Additional Support Provided by Debbie Comeaux Harry Hamilton

4 Elected Officers City Attorney Barbara Parker , Brenda Roberts City Auditor , Administration , City Administrator Sabrina B. Landreth Claudia Cappio , Assistant City Administrator Christine Daniel , Assistant City Administrator , Deputy City Ad ministrator Stephanie Hom Directors LaTonda Simmons Michele Byrd City Clerk Housing & Community Development Mark Sawicki Gera rd Garzon Economic & Workforce Development Library Osborn K. Solitei -Taylor Audree V. Jones Controller Parks & Recreation Teresa Deloach Reed Rachel O’Dwyer Flynn Fire Planning & Building Anil Comelo Sean Whent Human Resources Management Police Sara Bedford Brooke A. Levin Human Services ks Public Wor Katano Kasaine Katano Kasaine Treasu rer (Interim) gy Information Technolo

5 Mission Statement The City of Oakland is committed to the delivery of effective, courteous and responsible service. Citizens and employees are treated with fairness, dignity and respect. Civic and employee pride are accomplished th rough constant pursuit of excellence and a workforce that values and reflects the diversity of the Oakland community.

6 The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to the City of Oakland for its biannual budget for the fiscal 2013 years and 2014 -15 . -14 In order to receive this a ward, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as an operations guide, as a financial plan and as a communications device. The award is valid for a period of one budget cycle only. We believe our current budget for fiscal years 2015 -16 and 2016 -17 , continues to conform to program requirements, and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award.

7 CITY OF OAKLAND CALIFORNIA H. OGAWA PLAZA • 3RD FLOOR • OAKLAND, FRANK 94612 ONE Office of the City Administrator (510) 238 - 3301 -2223 Sabrina B. Landreth FAX (510) 238 City Administrator 2015 October -17 ADOPTED POLICY BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF OAKLAND FISCAL YEAR 2015 Honorable Mayor Schaaf , City Council and Residents of Oakland: On behalf of the entire City Administration, I am transmitting the City of Oakland’s Adopted Policy Budge t for the period of July 1, 2015 through June 30, 2017. This biennial budget demonstrates a strong, long -term commitment to growing responsibly and takes additional steps to address the City’s long- . This budget takes term financial obligations responsible and strategic investments , while advantage of a growing economy by making services to levels that residents need and can afford. restoring City This budget is a collaboration and comprehensive in its focus of allocating resources based on the priorities of the residents’ needs. As a result, it focuses on investments to grow the permanent fostering economic development. public safety and revenue base of the City through improving across all demographic groups a re improving public safety, The key priorities for Oaklanders City infrastructure investment in job training and housing, maintaining roads, and preserv ing and rs, and vulnerable populations. This budget preserves and programs serving our youth, elde services , while making substantial investments in public safety, the top priority of expands Oaklanders. As in the previous biennial budget documents, this FY 2015- 17 Adopted Policy Budget reflects the budget as it was adopted by the City Council on June 30, 2015. It does not capture changes made af . Funds were set aside in ter budget adoption, including the approval of labor agreements the Non Departmental budget for labor costs and future budget reports will provide information about how labor costs were spread throughout departments, as well as the impacts of other . budget decisions subsequent to the adoption of this Budget BUDGET SUMMARY The FY 2015- 17 Adopted Budget contains a two -year appropriation of approximately $2.4 billion, . The with approximately $1.2 billion in each fiscal year, across all funding sources General Purpose Fund (GPF) accounts for a little over 40 percent of the City’s total budget at $524.7 million in FY 2015- 16 and $519.9 million in FY 2016- 17. The GPF appropriation in FY 2015- 16 is higher than the next fiscal year due to use of one -time funds identified from savings

8 HONORABLE CITY AND OAKLAND RESIDENTS COUNCIL : FY 2015- 17 Policy Budget Subject Adopted Page 2 Date: October 2015 to accelerate the repayment of negative fund balances in various other funds or fund balance . The GPF appropriation includes $33.4 million in one -time funds earmarked for one -time expenditures over the two years, thereby eliminating the reliance on one -time sources of revenue for ongoing expenses. Funds comprising the remainder of the City’s budget are restricted for funded projects, capital projects, special purposes, such as grant programs, sewer services, bond- and debt payments. FY 2015 -16 Category 2016 -17 FY General Purpose Fund $534, 378 , Unrestricted 6 $ 530 , 689 , 270 78 Restricted Special Funds $668, 581 , 423 $651, 448 , 411 - All Funds TOTAL $1,20 2 , 960 , 209 $1,182, 137 , 681 Full - Time Equivalent Positions (FTEs) – GPF 2,285 FTEs 2,285 FTEs Full - Positions (FTEs) – All Funds 4, 127 FTEs 4, 113 FTEs Time Equivalents BUDGET BALANCING PRINCIPLES -17 Proposed Policy Budget Budgeting Principles underlying the development of the FY 2015 include: Appropriate use of one -time Principle 1: -up on- going funding for City’s core funds to free priorities . Principle 2: No reduction in service or staffing levels . Principle 3: and revenue collection (must Maximize cost recovery through service charges . adhere to Proposition 26) to grow the permanent revenue base Reduce expenditures by delivering services more efficiently and effectively . Principle 4: Principle 5: Strategically address long- term unfunded obligations including negative fund balances . Principle 6: Align services to appropriate funding sources . Principle 7: Help strengthen the City's position in the financial and capital markets. BUDGET BALANCING MEASURES Using the above guiding principles, the City was able to close the funding gap identified in the GPF , meet obligations, and make some new strategic investments by finding both expenditure savings and revenue enhancements.

9 HONORABLE CITY AND OAKLAND RESIDENTS COUNCIL : FY 2015- 17 Policy Budget Subject Adopted October 2015 Page 3 Date: -16 FY 2016 -17 FY 2015 GPF Projected Shortfall ($ millions) ($ millions) 15 Q2) ($17.93) ($18.64) March (based on FY 2014 - One - Time -17 FY 2015 -16 FY 2016 FY 2016 -17 -16 FY 2015 Changes and Solutions ($ millions) ($ millions) ($ millions) ($ millions) $28.96 $10.64 $0.14 Saving Measures $38.14 Enhancements $50.16 $20.30 $38.23 $7.47 Revenue Addition of Services ($36.53) ($48.00) ($8.48) ($64.46) Total $5.91 ($5.91) $0.87 ($0.87) Net FY 2015 - 17 surplus/(deficit) $0.00 $0.00 the gap included (two -year totals) Some significant contributors to closing : Using one funds through financing, rather than ongoing funds for IT license renewal -time • Post -Employment ($6.5 million) and paying down O unfunded ther Benefits (OPEB) with contribution to the OPEB trust fund ($14.9 million); liability Re vis ing fees and improved revenue collections including landlord audits, fire code • ($ inspections, special enforcement and various other fees ; 15 million) Utilizing projected from FY 2014- 15 ($19 million); • available fund balance Using of Deferred Pension Credits ($9.7 million); • • -GPF funds ($8.4 million); Transferring previous GPF costs to eligible non • Freezing or eliminating vacant positions ($8.2 million); • Selling property ($4.4 million); • Paying down three negative fund balances (approximately $7 million); • Decreas ing workers compensation rate for sworn ($3 million) ; • ; Using reduced interest rates to refinance debt ($3 million) ing unemployment premiums ($2.5 million); • Reduc million was identified in one -time funds for one A total of $45.6 -time uses, primarily from Deferred Pension Credits ($9.7 million); planned sale of property ($4.4 million); projected available fund balance from FY 2014- 15 ($19 million); transfers from other funds ($7.3 million) ; reimbursement from the state for historical mandated services ($3.2 million); litigation payment ($0.5 million); and delinquent revenue collections ($1.6 million). The primary uses include one - time expenditures such as 6.5 million); one -time set -asides for the City Council public safety ($ million); paying down long -term obligations ($ 14.9 million); and community priorities ($3.7 negative fund balances ($7 million); internal services ($ 3 million); providing subsidies for community services grants ($5.4 Maintenance million); adding personnel or Operations and (O&M) for additional services ($3.8 million); increasing Oakland -Alameda Coliseum operating

10 HONORABLE CITY AND OAKLAND RESIDENTS COUNCIL : FY 2015- 17 Policy Budget Subject Adopted Page 4 October 2015 Date: contribution to the emergency reserve and subsidy to pay debt service ($3.2 million) required ($3.7 million) -- net of one -time savings including increased abilization Fund Vital Services St recoveries ($4.2 million) and reduced unemployment contribution ($2.5 million). identified over the two years include transferring costs to non- GPF to better align uses Savings with the sources of funds ($8.4 million); increas ing recoveries to offset certain expenditures, ; decreasing on rate for sworn ($3 PFRS prepayment discount ($7.3 million) workers compensati million); reduc ing ongoing internal service funds costs ($10.6 million); unemployment premium ($2.5 million); freezing or eliminating vacant positions to minimize the impact to service levels exchanging ongoing funds with one -time sources for IT internal service funds ($8.2 million); and ($13 million) and long -term obligations ($14.9 million). On Revenues and Fund Balance reflect continued improvements in local tax revenues -going -time sources, as included and collections and other one in the proposed budget. These include revenues from – one -time sources as described above ($45.6 million); revised fees and collections ($ 15 million) including landlord audits, fire code inspections, special enforcement and various other fees; and transfe rs from other unrestricted funds ($5 million). Additions reflect City service enhancements based on priorities of the residents. and Changes After addressing the shortfall, the remaining funds were utilized to add critical and desired services based on collaborative priorities of the City Council and residents resulting from extensive outreach and engagement process by the Mayor and the Administration. , City Council, Significant additions over the next two years include funds for compensation increases and -time employees to full- time conversion of exempt part million); public safety ($8.7 ($24.5 million); and one -time appropriations as described above. MAYOR AND COUNCIL PRIORITIES The FY 2015- 17 Adopted Policy Budget was built on the priorities set forth by the Mayor and the City Council: • A Safe City: that invests in Holistic Community Safety strategies. • that makes strategic investments in infrastructure, public works , and A Vibrant City: the arts to protect and enhance the quality of life for all neighborhoods. • A Just City: that promotes equitable jobs and housing that protects and nurtures a diverse and inclusive community that cares for its youth, elderly, families, and the vulnera ble. • A Prosperous City: that values workers and fosters a diverse economy that creates equitable economic growth, jobs, and housing. • Trustworthy Government: that provides quality municipal services, efficiency, transparency, and accountability, as well as respects municipal employees.

11 HONORABLE CITY AND OAKLAND RESIDENTS COUNCIL : FY 2015- 17 Policy Budget Subject Adopted October 2015 Page 5 Date: BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS -2017 Adopted Policy Budget provides a framework through which The Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 the City’s goals and objectives are achieved in line with the Mayor and Council priorities , : including the following A Safe City Expand OPD’s ability to investigate crimes, including robberies and child trafficking, and improve responsiveness to calls for service. Funding to complete five (5) police academies over in the second) the next two years (three (3) in the first FY and two will bring the sworn staffing level within the Oakland Police Department (OPD) from the current budgeted staff level of 722 to 762 (by the end of FY 2016- 17) by adding 35 officers and 5 sergeants. Sworn OPD officers are budgeted with no ass umed vacancy rate and funding is provided year round with no assumed savings from attrition. Expand the City’s Ceasefire Violence Prevention Strategy using Measure Z restricted funds, including the addition of six (6) case managers (City and contract empl oyees) brin ging the total number of case managers to ten (10). OPD’s ability to analyze, predict, and address trends in crime, which will inform the Enhance Department’s strategic and tactical approach to combating crime by allocating resources to purchase , update, and maintain Crime Trend Analysis Software . Implement a “Pipeline Pilot Program” to support 40 OPD Cadets who have graduated from Oakland public schools, to provide a path for residents to serve as sworn officers and in OPD . civilian positions illegal gun dealing with additional resources provided for special Reduce gun violence and investigations . Provide one -time funding for additional Crossing Guards at schools with most significant pedestrian safety and traffic safety problems . Increase eng agement in the community policing organizations with one -time funding for outreach and events in each police beat. Enhance violence prevention efforts for the implementation of recommendations in the Comprehensive Public Safety Plan with additional one -time funds. Potential strategies include Ceasefire and support for City -County Re -Entry employment services . Strengthen community development and health and safety by implementing the R2 inspection pilot program to provide proactive and comprehensive fire, h ealth and safety inspections for Oakland residents . Boost fire prevention inspection services and mitigation efforts, and create a vegetation management plan with one -time funding . Provide security services and safety equipment at recreation centers to increase the safety of

12 HONORABLE CITY AND OAKLAND RESIDENTS COUNCIL : FY 2015- 17 Policy Budget Subject Adopted October 2015 Page 6 Date: -time funds. The security staff is children and adults participating in OPR programs using one intended to improve safety for employees, parents and participants , as well as a deterrent to . criminal activity A Vibrant City -service, Reorganize existing staff and resources from several departments to create a new full vertically integrated Department of Transportation, which will bring projects to completion, and work with the community to improve pedestrian safety, conditions for transit riders, access for disabled people and safety for bicyclists and drivers . Invest over $72 million in infrastructure repairs and improvements: $36 million for sewer $25.5 million for streets and sidewalks, $8.6 million for traffic improvements and rehabilitation, $2 million on buildings and facilities upgrades. Pave 117 city blocks annually using ava ilable transportation funding, and i ncrease the repaving and repair of streets and sidewalks. Augment the City’s ability to repair deteriorating streets and fill potholes by adding a pothole/seam sealing crew and other personnel resources. Create a revolving fund program for the repair of sidewalks , for which the adjacent property owner is responsible . . Dedicate funding for Lake Merritt Park maintenance to preserve this improved public space Create a new recreation center model through the establishment of magnet and mega centers at existing Oakland Parks & Recreation (OPR) sites. The new model will allow parents to enroll their children in specific high quality programs, allow for enhanced development of programs, and increase public participation across all program areas. ptual plans that will increase Prepare a park prioritization study and the development of conce OPR’s ability to receive grants and in upgrades to -kind services for needed repairs and neighborhood playgrounds and community parks utilizing one -time funds . Provide grants to the Oakland Parks & Recreation Foundation for ca pacity building and increased fundraising capabilities and to the Feather River Camp with one -time funds . Fund City initiatives to conserve water during the persistent California drought using one -time funds . Establish an anti -graffiti pilot program in Council Districts 2 and 3 to create a "ceasefire -type" focus on high impact corridors to eliminate blight and prevent future graffiti from repeat offenders . Maintain attorney positions in the Neighborhood Law Corps program and add two (2) positions for legal support of tenant protection/anti -displacement efforts and code enforcement activities.

13 HONORABLE CITY AND OAKLAND RESIDENTS COUNCIL : FY 2015- 17 Policy Budget Subject Adopted October 2015 Page 7 Date: A Just City aside 25 percent of the City’s share of the residual Redevelopment Property Tax Trust Fund Set (former tax increment) on an ongoing basis for affordable housing development beginning in FY 16, to fund affordable housing projects through the annual Notice of Funds Available. 2015- 25 percent from the 12th Street remainder land sale proceeds will be set aside for Additionally, affordable housing development in FY 2015- 16. Support the Kiva Zip small business program for direct program support through vendor loans and to establish a revolving/matching loan fund. Continue services through the City’s Day Laborer Program using one -time funds. Support Workforce Investment Board service providers, and augment employee training and placement services with additional one -time funds . Purchase and provide operating funds for the Dream Catcher facility for transitional housing services that supports homeless and sexually exploited youth. Enhance library service hours effective July 2016 for branches that serve the greatest number of youth from under -served and disadvantaged communities and are geographically dispersed throughout the C ity . Provide funding for the design and implementation of a K -to-College savings program for every Oakland public school kindergartner enrolled in Oakland Public Schools in partnership with the -17. Oakland Unified School District starting FY 2016 Support the recommendations of the Oakland Permanent Access To Housing (PATH) strategy, which is a roadmap for ending homelessness in the City over the next fifteen years . Provide one -time funding for legal services and support to child asylum seekers . Support for the City -County Neighborhood Initiative (CCNI), which is focused on improving public health and safety in impoverished neighborhoods utilizing one -time funds . Enhance teachers’ skills and tools as part of a collaborative effort with philanthropic partners to increase the availability of Head Start service to Oakland youth and improve education outcomes with one -time funding for training. Assist in the establishment of a direct- pay program for formerly incarcerated persons on probation or parole in partnership with the County by providing one -time matching funds . Provide personnel and O&M resources to establish the Department of Race & Equity. The role of this department is to assist the City in the application of equity and social justice practices and integra te them into the City's strategic, operational and business plans; management and reporting systems for accountability and performance; and budgets in order to eliminate inequities and create opportunities for all people and communities.

14 HONORABLE CITY AND OAKLAND RESIDENTS COUNCIL : FY 2015- 17 Policy Budget Subject Adopted Page October 2015 8 Date: ity A Prosperous C Improve support for code enforcement activities to improve the health, cleanliness, and livability of Oakland neighborhoods with the restoration of inspectors and administrative support positions. Increase staffing support for new construction permit inspections demand and meet the higher and workload for building application review and processing. Restore support for large complex planning projects, and the historic preservation unit in order to meet statutory requirements and to achieve the City’s e conomic development goals. Provide essential training and operations management for all staff reviewing building permits and inspecting construction projects. Rebuild the administrative, fiscal and planning capacity of Planning and Building, which will ist with coordination of development projects through the process to its completion. ass Contribute $16 million in funds to the repayment of long -term liabilities of Other Post- Employment Benefits (OPEB). These contributions will reduced the City’s Unfunded Ac tuarial Accrued Liabilities and improve its financial position . Restore support for real estate services and asset management with the addition of one (1) Real Estate Agent. Trustworthy Government -time f Add one unding for community engagement services related to future budget priorities and the development of potential ballot measures to improve fire safety, public health, and City infrastructure. Support employee training and development to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of City ance employee morale using one- time funds . staff and enh Provide one -time funds for Contracts & Compliance to support and assess the workload -approved local minimum associated with the enforcement and compliance of the 2014 voter wage law provisions (Measure FF) . de consistent, independent management, as well as aid with sustaining improvements to Provi policing made under the Negoti ated Settlement Agreement (NSA) by adding a civilian director of OPD Internal Affairs , and two (2) Internal Auditor positions . Improve polic e accountability and facilitate access to residents by providing the Citizen’s Police Review Board with three (3) additional intake technicians. Add one -time funding to a ssist the Equal Opportunity Program with investigation of complaints and increase Cit y staff training. Restore prior year cuts to Council Offices to improve constituency services and analysis of legislation. Use o ne-time resources to support enhanced audit services f or the Office of the City Auditor .

15 HONORABLE CITY AND OAKLAND RESIDENTS COUNCIL : FY 2015- 17 Policy Budget Subject Adopted Page 9 October 2015 Date: Challenges and Improvements its financial obligations, there continue to be major While the City is making progress to meet challenges that impact City finances and create structural imbalance. During this budget , it has become clear that the City need s to consider ongoing strategies to address development term challenges before they become unmanageable in the future . these long- Growing costs , As of July 1, 2014, total unfunded liability is close to • medical and pension ees , which $1.8 billion for CalPERS, OPEB and PFRS for both active employees and retir funding for other priorities. Th is budget propose reduces appropriat e approximately $ 16 s to million -as-you -go amount over the next two years ; to fund OPEB in addition to the pay it still falls short by $19 million of the Actuarially Required Contribution (“ARC”) . however, The City must find an ongoing funding solution to meet our ARC payments , so future required contributions do not paralyze the The City is committed to City’s operations. developing this plan before Oakland’s next budget cycle. The City has numerous unfunded capital needs along with deferred maintenance of • exceeding $2 billion. The budget includes funding infrastructure, buildings and technology a professional poll for a potential bond measure to secure a funding stream for conducting in the next general election . he , the City needs to plan for future economic uncertainties. • For financial sustainability T City ’s new Rainy Day Policy takes effect this budget cycle, therefore $1.4 million is added to the newly established Vital Services Stabilization Fund based on the excess Real Estate increase Transfer Tax (RETT) need s to further . The City the reserve to mitigate the formula impact on services and staffing in future years when economic growth slows . • Subsidy for key programs should be viewed as an on- going commitment. The proposed budget includes a two and other grant programs using one -time -year subsidy for Head Start funds, which will require seeking ongoing funding at the next biennial budget cycle development from the GPF or an increase in grant funding . Otherwise, the program scope would need to be adjusted down.

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17 TABLE OF CONTENTS OF TRANSMITTAL LETTER MAYOR & COUNCIL PRIORITIES ... A-1 SERVICE IMPACTS ... B-1 C-1 ... BUDGET GUIDE C-1 Budget Overview ... C-2 ... The Budget Process CITY FACTS ... D-1 D-1 General Information ... D-1 Statistical Profile ... D-2 City ... Government D-2 mic Base Oakland’s Econo ... D-3 A Brief History ... D-4 Transportation ... Infrastructure ... D-5 ... D-6 Human Services Education D-7 ... D-7 Library System ... Medical Facilities ... D-7 ... D-8 Public Safety D-9 ... Recreation D-9 Other Attractions ... D-12 ... Key Facts/Accolades ... E-1 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES oduction ... Intr E-1 to Financial Summaries Revenue and Expenditure Forecast Methodology ... ... E-1 City Revenue Forecast ... ... E-2 Expenditure Forecast ... E-2 ... ... Basis of Budgeting . E-3 Planning for Two -Year Budget ... E-3 Summary Tables ... E-5 2015 Summary of Significant Adopted Chang es and Revenue Enhancements for FY Budget -17 ... E-7 i

18 Fund Sources and Descriptions ... E-27 2015 -16 d Budget Summary by Fund ... E-43 FY Adopte -17 FY ... E-55 Adopte d Budget Summary by Fund 2016 7 E-6 Revenue Tables ... s Revenue s ... E-69 All Fund ... E-71 General Purpose Fund Revenues ... ... E-73 Summary of the General Purpose Fund Revenues Expenditure Tables ... E-9 1 ... All Funds Expenditures E-93 General Purpose Fund Expenditures E-95 ... ... Summary of the General Purpose Fund Expenditures .. E-97 ... ... Other ... E-103 Budget Information E-10 ... ... 5 Negative Funds -Year Repayment Plan for Funds with Negative Balances E-11 1 Ten ... E-11 3 ... Long -Term Liabilities ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMAR Y City of Oakland Organization Summary ... F-1 Summary of Positions by Department FY 2009-10 17 ... F-2 through FY 2016- mary by Department ... Classification Sum F-3 DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARIES ... G-1 Mayor ... G-3 City Council City Administrator ... G-5 Attorney G-9 City ... ... City Auditor G-11 City Clerk ... G-1 3 Public Ethics Commission ... G-15 Finance ... 7 G-1 Bureau G-19 Controller’s ... Management Bureau ... G-22 Revenue Treas ury Bureau ... G-25 Human Resources Management ... G-2 7 G-2 9 ... Information Technology Race & Equity ... G-33 Police Department ... G-3 5 ii

19 Fire Department ... G-3 9 ... 3 G-4 Human Services Oakland Parks & Recreation ... G-47 ... G-51 Oakland Public Library Economic & Workforce Developmen ... G-53 t & Community Development ... Housing G-57 Planning & Building ... G-61 Oakland Public Works ... G-6 5 Transportation ... G-75 -Departmental ... Non G-77 Capital Improvement Program ... G-89 FINANCIAL POLICIES ... H-1 LEGISLATION I-1 ... GLOSSARY ... J-1 INDEX ... K-1 iii

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21 MAYOR & COUNCIL PRIORITIES 2015 -17 FY CITY OF OAKLAND PRIORITIES ROCESS P As part of the biennial budget development process, t Mayor and City Council establish priorities based on the he needs of the residents of Oakland. In compliance with the City’s policies on Budge t Process , Fiscal concerns and and Public Participation , the City conducted an extensive priority setting process for FY Planning, Transparency, -17 budget development 2015 that included feedback from: ; • Strategic planning sessions conducted by a professional facilitator • Both Citywide and District Specific Community Forums ; Council Budget Workshops ; • • roups , City Staff, and Other Stakeholder Groups ; and Meetings with Community G The results of a professional poll/survey with questions developed in conjunction with the City ’s Budget • Advisory Committee. Residents were also encouraged to provide feedback through electronic forms of communication and the members of the City Council were encouraged to develop their own expenditure priorities. RIORITIES P -17 Budget provides the framework All City activities are structured to support these priorities; and the City’s FY 2015 through which the City’s goals and objectives are achieved. • A Safe City: that invests in Holistic Community Safety strategies . • A Vibrant City: that mak es strategic investments in infrastructure, public works and the arts to protect and enhance the quality of life for all neighborhoods . • A Just City: that promotes equitable jobs and housing that protects and nurtures a diverse and inclusive community that cares for its youth, elderly, families, and the . vulnerable • that values workers and fosters a diverse economy that creates equitable economic A Prosperous City: growth, jobs, and housing . • Trustworthy Government: that provides quality municipal services, efficiency, transparency, and accountability, as well as respects municipal employees . A - 1

22 MAYOR & COUNCIL PRIORITIES NOTES A - 2

23 SERVICE IMPACTS SERVICE IMPACTS This section anticipated service changes as a result of allocations and priorities set in the summarizes the (FY) -2017 Adopted Policy Budget . Year Fiscal 2015 Police Services Expan OPD ’s ability to investigate crimes , including robberies and child trafficking, and improve • d omplete Funding to c (5) police academies over the next two years responsiveness to calls for service. five (three (3) in the first FY and two in th e second ), will bring the sworn staffing level within the Oakland Police to 762 (by the end of FY 201 6-17) Department (OPD) from the current budgeted staff level of 722 by adding 35 officers and 5 sergeants . Sworn OPD officers are budgeted with no assumed vacancy rate and funding is provided year round with no assumed savings from attrition. Aid with sustaining improvements to policing made under the N egotiated Settlement by • Agreement (NSA) itors to OPD Office of Inspector General . adding two (2) Aud Provide consistent, independent management, as well as aid with sustaining improvements to policing made • under the Negotiated Settlement Agreement (NSA), by adding a civilian director of Internal Affairs . PD’s ability to analyze, predict, and address trend s in crime, which will inform the Department’s • Enhance O strategic and tactical approach to combating crime by allocating resources to purchase, update, and maintain Crime Trend Analysis Software . • Improve OPD’s capacity to investigate, analyze, respond to, and ultimately solve crimes by adding two (2) crime analysts and two (2) police evidence technicians . • Implement a “Pipeline Pilot Program” to support 40 OPD Cadet s who have graduated from Oakland public school s, to provide a for residents to serve as sworn officers and in OPD civilian positions. path Reduce gun violence & illegal gun dealing . • with additional resources provided for special investigations Provide one schools with most significant pedestrian safety • -time funding for additional Crossing Guards at and traffic safety problems . Improve police accountability and facilitate access to residents by providing the Citizen’s Police Review • . Board with three (3) additional intake technicians Increase engagement in the co mmunity policing organizations with one -time funding for outreach and events • in each police beat . • Enhance violence prevention efforts for the implementation of recommendations in the Comprehensive Public Safety Plan with additional one -time funds. Potential strategies include Ceasefire and support for City - County Re -Entry employment services. Fire & Emergency Services inspection pilot program • Strengthen community development and health and safety by implementing the R2 s for Oakland residents to provide proactive and comprehensive f ire, health and safety inspection . • Expedite Fire Plan Check Requests to facilitate economic development by adding one (1) Fire Protection Engineer. • Support regional risk and management planni by adding an Emergency Planning Coordination ng activities position with duties including: updating and maintaining the Emergency Operations Plan; identifying gaps in incident specific plans/annexes; and conducting emergency operations training/exercises. • Boost fire prevention inspection services and mitigation efforts, and create a vegetation management plan with one -time funding . B - 1

24 SERVICE IMPACTS Library Services Enhance library • s ervice hours effective July 2016 for branches that serve the greatest number of youth from under- served and disadvantaged communities and are geographically dispersed throughout the city. Human Services & Education the City’s Ceasefire Violence Prevention Strategy us ing Measure Z restricted funds, i • the Expand ncluding addition of six (6) case managers bringing the total number of case managers to ten (10). Purchase and provide operating funds for the Dream Catcher facility • that for transitional housing services homeles . supports s and sexually exploited youth Design and implement a K to College savings program for every Oakland public school kindergartner • ation of enrolled in Oakland Public Schools in partnership with the Oakland Unified School District starting FY 2016 - . E nsure every Oakland kindergartner is given 17 a 529 Savings Account established in their name, with an initial deposit of at least $50 . Enhance teacher as part of a collaborative effort with philanthropic partners to increase the • s’ skills and tools with one -time funding availability of Head Start service to Oakland youth and improve education outcomes for training . Add two (2) social workers starting in October 2015 to work with students in the Oakland Unified School • reduce the District (OUSD) to school -to- prison pipeline. likelihood of delinquencies; and interrupt the -pay program for formerly incarcerated persons on probation or parole • ment of a direct Assist in the establish in partnership with the County by providing one -time matching funds . • Support the recommendations of the Oakland Permanent Access To Housing (PATH) strategy , which is a roadmap for ending homelessness in the City over the next fifteen years . Provide one funding for legal services and support to child asylum seekers. • -time Support the City -County Neighborhood Initiative (CCNI) , which is focused on improving public health and • for in impoverished neighborhoods utilizing one -time funds safety . Parks & Recreation Services Create a new recreation center model through the establishment of magnet and mega centers at existing • Oakland Parks & Recreation (OPR) sites. The model will align recreation centers to specialize in one or more key program areas such as dance, arts, sports, cultural arts, or programs for Pre -K children. The new model will allow parents to enroll their children in specific high quality programs, allow for enhanced development Mega and m agnet sites include of programs, and increase public participation across all program areas. partnerships with the Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) for middle school programs, and the Chabot Space and Science Center for weekly programs to enhance the “Science in the Hood” Magnet curriculum offered through Striving to Redirect Individuals in a Difficult Environment (ST RIDE). • Provide security services and safety equipment at recreation centers to increase the safety of children and adults participating in OPR programs using one . The security staff is intended to improve safety -time funds ticipants, as well as a deterrent to criminal activity for employees, parents and par . Enhance OPR’s Ace Kids Golf program through the addition of a golf specialist position thereby enabling the • department to continue services with Camp Sween ation centers citywide. The focus of ey, OUSD, and recre the program is to keep at -risk youth off the streets and help them develop good character through understanding every aspect of golf from maintaining the course to playing the game. • Offer camp grants for low income youth to participate in OPR p rograms and additional outreach to youth who may not have participated in OPR camps or programs due to lack of resources -time funds . using one • Provide grants to the Oakland Parks & Recreation Foundation for capacity building and increased fundraising capab ilities and to the Feather River Camp with one -time funds. B - 2

25 SERVICE IMPACTS • Prepare a park prioritization study and the development of conceptual plans that will increase OPR ’s ability in-kind services for needed repairs & upgrades to neighborhood playgrounds & to receive grants and community parks utilizing one -time funds. Dedicate funding for Lake Merritt Park maintenance to preserve this new public space. • • To streamline operations and coordination, transfer ball field maintenance to Oakland Public Works (OPW) from Oakl and Parks & Recreation. Animal Services Provide critical support to the Animal Shelter as planned during the decision to reorganize this program • within the City Administrator’s Office. -15 and incorporated into this budget, the position During FY 2014 composition for Oakland Animal Services is further refined by converting two (2) positions to appropriate Additionally, one (1) administrative classifications to support the unit outside of the Police Department. time Animal Control Attendants are Animal Control Officer is upgraded to a Supervisor and seven (7) part- erted to full -time positions. The budget also provides ongoing funds to improve animal shelter staffing , conv in and increased hours of operation . particularly the area of customer service Housing Services Continue the operation of the Housing Assistance Center (initiated using one -time grant funds) by a dd ing • two (2) Home Management Counselor positions. The Center provides housing support and referral services to of Oakland residents. thousands • Increase support for the Rent Adjustment Program (RAP) by adding three (3) positions for the duration of the two -year budget (limited duration) . This will address the recent increase in O akland landlords and renters seeking assistance, filing petitions and the resulting hearings. • -16, 25 percent (25%) of the City’s share of the residual Redevelopment Property Tax Beginning in FY 2015 Trust Fund (former tax increment) is set aside for affordable housing development. This will fund $3.5 million and $4.2 million of affordable housing projects through the annual Notice of Funds Available (NOFA) . over the next two years th • Set of the 12 Street remainder land sale proceeds for affordable housing -aside 25 percent (25%) development . Economic & Workforce Development anager position from Workforce Development to the International Boulevard Transit- • Transfer one (1) m Oriented Development (TOD) grant program and funding. The loss to Workforce will result in eligible work being shifted to lower and higher level positions further reducing the capacity of remaining staff. The – position will instead support the International Boulevard Corridor project through business incubation and growth, job creation and increased job opportunities for East Oakland residents by partnering with various loc al organizations and businesses. • -15 midcycle for a year - As a result of the Workforce reductions above, the position added during FY 2014 around internship program will be restructured to meet Workforce Investment Act (WIA) requirements and the mandates as sociated with transitioning to the Workforce Innovations & Opportunities Act (WIOA). • Continue special projects support related to catalyst development projects, such as reconstituting the Kaiser Convention Center and the Brooklyn Basin development project, and completion of an Economic Development strategy with the addition of one (1) Project Manager . • Restore support for the Cultural Funding grants program, which will help dozens of artists through the application, grant agreement and distribution process time (permanent) position. with the addition of a part- • Restore support for real estate services and asset management with the addition of one (1) Real Estate Agent. • Support the Kiva Zip small business microloan program with direct program support and to e stablish a B - 3

26 SERVICE IMPACTS revolving/matching loan fund -time funds. Kiva Zip is currently raising $1 million in grants and utilizing one $1.2 million in loan commitments to support small Oakland businesses. This expansion to Kiva City in January 2016 will focus on supporting at least 10 small businesses in each Council D istrict in securing a zero interest $5,000 loan. using one -time funds . • Continue services through the City’s Day Laborer Program Workforce Investment Board service providers, and augment employee training and placement • Support services with additional one -time funds. Planning & Building Improve support for code enforcement activities to improve the health, cleanliness, and livability of Oakland • neighborhoods s an d administrative support positions. with the restoration of inspector Increase staffing support • new construction permit inspections . for • To fulfill the demand and workload for building application review and processing, three (3) Process d to help with the coordination of development projects through the process to its Coordinators are restore completion . • Restore support for Major Projects, which are the largest and most complex planning projects , such as MacArthur Village. T wo (2) additional positions will be used t o process major projects development permit . applications in order to meet statutory requirements and to achieve the City’s economic development goals • support for the Historic Preservation unit in order to meet statutory requirements related to Reestablish by adding historic preservation, especially in support of the Landmarks Preservation Advisory Board (LPAB) . one (1) Planner III • Provide essential training and operations management for all staff reviewing building permits and inspecting construction projects by adding o ne (1) Building Manager . • Rebuild the administrative and fiscal capacity of Planning and Building, which will assist with inspector scheduling, billing , and revenue collection and addressing the backlog in records management with the ition of seven (7) positions add . Public Works & Transportation • Reorganize existing staff and resources from several departments to create a new full -service, vertically integrated Department of Transportation , which will bri ng projects to completion, and work with the community to improve pedestrian safety, conditions for transit riders, access for disabled people and safety for bicyclists and drivers . • ales tax funding (Measure B B) Resource efforts to ensure Oakland gets its fair share of new transportation s with , and expand the City’s ability to deliver repaving and other capital projects, projects that are competitive and seek grant funds to improve and expand affordable and sustainable transportation choices, including transit passes for Oakland’s , as well as car , bike and on -demand ride -sharing . youth • Leverage new and existing transportation funds to develop a project pipeline to build the transportation infrastructure need ed to support community safety, housing and economic development. over $72 million in infrastructure repairs and improvements: $36 million for sewer rehabilitation, • Invest million for streets and sidewalks, $8.6 $25.5 and $2 million on buildings and million for traffic improvements facilities upgrades . Pave 117 city blocks annually usi ng available transportation funding. Increase the repaving and repair of streets and sidewalks . • Augment the City’s ability to repair deteriorating streets and fill potholes by adding a pothole/seam sealing crew and other personnel resources . • Create a revolving fund program for the repair of sidewalks for which the adjacent property owner is responsible . B - 4

27 SERVICE IMPACTS • Improve customer service and City response time to resident requests by adding one (1) Public Service . Representative to the OPW call center Establish a pilot program in Council Districts 2 and 3 to create a "ceasefire- type" focus on high impact • corridors to eliminate blight and identify/arrest repeat offenders. Finance, Administration, and General Government Support employee training and deve lopment to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of City staff and • using one -time funds . enhance employee morale Ensure a smooth transition of the City’s public safety radio system to the multi- • agency East Bay Regional -time funding. Communications System Authority (EBRCSA) with additional one Establish an internal service fund for Information Technology (IT) to pay tware licenses debt service for sof • and registration, and other major IT project costs provide one -time funding for this . Debt will be issued to capital and operational requirement. The software licenses include the office, financial, and customer critical service applications that support itywide. the operations of departments c Add contracted support services -tim e funds to Human Resources to aid in recruitment efforts • utilizing one This will facilitate continued attention to high priority during peak recruitment & testing periods. recruitment efforts such as those for police officers and civilian police personnel. • Aid in the proper implementation of the City’s new Zero- Waste contract provisions related to enforcement of by adding two (2) positions . public health and safety standards • prior year cuts to Council Offices to improve constituency services and analysis of legislation. Restore ffice of the City Auditor. -time resources are added to support en hanced audit services from the O • One • Enable increased collection of delinquent revenues by funding four (4) positions to the Revenue Management Bureau . • Expand capacity in the City Attorney’s Office to enhance advice and support to City economic development and planning initiatives , and aid the resolution of tasks associated with the Negotiated Settlement Agreement. two (2) additional City Attorney positions Additionally, the Rent Adjustment Program continues funding for to support the increased workload for that program. utilizing one -time funds positions for legal Maintain program and a two ( 2) attorney positions in the Neighborhood Law Corps • dd displacement efforts and code enforcement activities . support of tenant protection/anti- • services related to future budget priorities and the development of Funding for community engagement potential , and City infrastructure is added using one -time ballot measures to improve fire safety, public health . funds Assist the Equal Opportunity Program with investigation of complaints and increase City staff • with training additional one -time funding. • Provide one -time funds for Contracts & Compliance to support and assess the workload associated with the enforcement and voter -approved local minimum wag e law provisions (Measure FF). compliance of the 2014 City -Wide Contribute $16 million in funds • -term liabilities of Other Post- Employment Benefits to the repayment of long (OPEB). These contributions will reduced the City’s Unfunded Actuarial Accrued Liabilities and improve its financial position. • Ongoing contribution of $0.67 million annually for OPEB an d $1.39 million annually for CalPERS pension liabilities from the Recognized Obligation Payment Schedule (ROPS) for liabilities related to the Oakland Redevelopment Successor Agency (ORSA). • Per the Rainy Day Policy, 25 percent of the calculated excess R eal Estate Transfer Tax, or $1. 35 million, is set aside in the Vital Services Stabilization Fund (VSSF), which will result in a total of $ 3. 37 million set aside in the VSSF to date. B - 5

28 SERVICE IMPACTS • Use one- time funds to pay down negative fund balances to improve the City’s financial health, and to preserve million for accelerated repayment of the negative ongoing funds for key City services. This includes $4 und (4400) and the complete repayment of the negative balance s in the Contract balance in the Facilities F Administration Fund (1791) and the Henry J Kaiser Convention Center Fund (1730). Provide personnel and • resources to establish the Department of Race & Equity. The role of this O&M department is to assist the City in the application of equity and social justice practices and integrate the m into the City's strategic, operational and business plans; management and reporting systems for accountability and performance; and budgets in order to eliminate inequities and create opportunities for al l people and communities. Fund City initiatives to conserve water during the persistent California drought using one • . -time funds content writers and editors to ensure information is clear and user- friendly, web funding for website • Provide designers to improve navigation and consistency across departments, open source programming, and continual testing. B - 6

29 BUDGET GUIDE BUDGET OVERVIEW budget is an approved revenue and spending plan that authorizes a municipality to use At its core , a local government Local governments use their purposes , including services. public dollars to provide budgets for a variety of additional communication, planning, accountability, and evaluation. fiscal For the City of Oakland (biennial) budget cycle. a two , the fiscal year The City of Oakland has -year and end 30 . The current b udget is being proposed for fiscal years (FY) 2015- begins on July 1 s on June -17. This same fiscal year calendar is used by the State of California, and most cities, 16 and 2016 chool counties, and s The City policy of adopting a two -year budget is intended to improve the districts. ’s long -term planning unding stability, and to create greater efficiency in the budget City , enhance f . While the ’s budget is adopted for a 24 -month period, appropriations are development process City -year spending plans. During the second year of the two- year cycle, the Mayor and divided into two one Council conduct a midcycle budget review to address variances in estimated revenue s, estimate d City and . expenditures, other changes to the City’s financial condition City of Oakland’s budget presents two princip The projected revenues and planned expenditures. al types of data: Expenditures can be divide d by type (e.g. salaries, retirement contributions, debt service, supplies, capital projects, etc.) , and by the department that spends them (e.g. Police, Fire, Librar y, Public Works , etc. ). Revenues are monetary resources that the City anticipates will become available during the fiscal evenues can be categor ized by year. City r property tax, tax, permit fees, etc.). City revenues may also be divided into those that can be expended sales type (e.g. s Measure Q parcel tax revenues can only be used for , the City’ on general or restricted purposes. For instance eas the City’s business tax revenues can be used for all governmental purposes. libraries, wher appropriate expenditures , the City accounts for its financial To ensure that restricted revenues are used only for .” ederal Department of Transportation for road resources in different “funds For instance grants from the f construction are held in a different fund than are revenues from the City’s Public Safety & Services Measure. The which can be used for all public purposes over which the City has largest City fund is the General Purpose Fund, . General Purpose Fund revenues are generally unrestricted and include most taxes . The budget document jurisdiction present s data related to the G eneral Purpose Fund only and to “all funds” (including the General Purpose Fund) . In addition to the City also issues a Proposed Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for City the Proposed Policy Budget, documents Council consideration. Both are later finalized as the Adopted Policy Budget and Adopted Capital s operating budget and includes the projected revenues and Improvement Program. The Policy Budget is the City’ expenditures for the provision of most City operations and services. For instance, the operating budget includes revenues from general taxes and expenditure on police services, fire & emergency medical services, youth & recreation programs, library services, minor repairs, etc. The CIP, by contrast , presents planned expenditures on projects to improve discrete elements of the City’s infrastructure, buildings, and environment as well as major purchases such as land, buildings and equipment. For instance, the CIP includes water quality projects around Lake Merritt, complete repaving of streets and roads, construction of sewer infrastructure, and construction or renovation of City buildings. The CIP is also summarized in the Policy Budget in accordance with best practices. There are also other special budgets such as the Oakland Redevelopment Successor Agency, which is a separate legal entity of the City , responsible for the wind down and completion of the activities of the former Oakland Redevelopment Agency. C - 1

30 BUDGET GUIDE THE BUDGET PROCESS through which the City formally develops, deliberates and adopts its budget. procedure The budget process is the Through the budget the City Council approves revenue estimates and authorizes expenditures. A budget is a reflection of a city’s priorities and policies. The budget process consists of several important stages: 1) Budget Development, 2) . The City’s Consolidated Fiscal Policy, Ordinance 13279 CMS provides Budget Adoption, and 3) Budget Amendment the legal framework that guides the budget process. Budget Development Dec 2014: Nov - year In fall of 2014, the Controller’s Bureau created a “baseline budget,” which is a draft two - Baseline Budget budget that estimates revenues and expenditures if the City maintains its current staffing, Development programs, and policies. The baseline budget is the foundation upon which the proposed budget is developed. The Controller’s Bureau worked in conjunction with departments to create the baseline budget, taking into account the latest economic projections and increases, such as fringe benefit information on likely expenditure rates for retirement and balance health care. The of expected revenues and expenditures in the baseline budget is what helps th e City assess whether it will have a surplus or shortfall to address. - development of the baseline was complete it became the foundation of the City’s Five Once February 2015: Five-Year Financial Year Financial Forecast published in February 2015. The Five - Year Financial Forecast is a Forecast Report planning level estimate of revenues and expenditures that surfaces all major budget issues -term financial environment. It assumes no policy changes others and contextualizes the long than those already pre scribed by law. Jan - Mar 2015: After the development of the baseline budget, the City Administrator’s Office directs, through Internal Analysis “budget instructions,” the departments to submit requests for changes to the baseline budget. Departmental requests can include changes such as new programs, inc reased appropriations, reduced expenditures, reorganizations, or shifting appropriations from one Budget Department, program or service to another. The City Administrator’s Office – , and Revenue Management Bureau conduct in -depth analys is of each Controller’s Bureau , budget request to assess the value and confirm the fiscal feasibility. Based on the analysis recommendations are provided to the City Administrator. The City Administrator and key staff hold internal budget hearings with department directors and their staff to discuss proposals. The City Administrator makes preliminary budget decisions based on the internal hearings, additional analysis, and the Mayor’s priorities. dated Fiscal Policy - an assessment of stakeholder needs, , Feb Mar 2015: In accordance with the City’s Consoli Community & concerns and priorities is conducted prior to the finalization of the Proposed Budget. This Council Input takes the form of a statistically valid poll developed in conjunction with the City’s Budget Advisory Committee. The Council members were also invited to provide a list of key expenditure priorities for the Mayor’s consideration for the Proposed Policy Budget . Mar - Apr 2015: to the Mayor. The Mayor l The City Administrator provided a preliminary budget proposa Proposed Budget Council, community, and weighed options, conduct ed additional analysis, considered City Finalized oth er stakeholder input, and issued a final Proposed Policy Budget in late April. C - 2

31 BUDGET GUIDE Budget Adoption May - June 2015: The Administration and City Council h eld seven (7) Community Budget Forums at Community Input were a varied times in different neighborhoods away from City Hall. These meetin gs -17 forum for City Councilmembers to obtain input from constituents on FY 2015 budget priorities and to understand questions and concerns pertaining to the Mayor’s Proposed B udget. - June 201 5 : a Upon presentation of the proposed budget, the Mayor and City Council conduct May ed Council Deliberations c hearings to review the FY 2015 - 7 Proposed Budget. The Council heard 1 series of publi budget. answers to questions regarding the proposed additional reports and received Councilmembers submitted proposed Amendments to the Mayor’s Proposed Budget d analytic support to for discussion and consideration. The Administration provide assist Councilmembers in this process. ed : June 30, June 201 5 a balanced budget by As required by the City Charter, the City Council adopt Council Budget Adoption preceding the start of the fiscal year commencing July 1. The adopted budget provides two -year appropriation authority for all funds, and first- -year and second appropriations for the Capital Improvement Program (CIP). The CIP appropriations are outlined in two annu - 17 . al spending plans for FY 2015 Budget Amendment - June 2016 : Mar Council City Toward the end of the first year of the two - year cycle, the Mayor and Midcycle Budget conduct a mid - cycle budget review to address variances in estimated revenues, Amendment estimated expenditures, and other changes to the City’s financial condition . For the FY 2016 -17 budget cycle, the mid- cycle review will take place in March -June 2016, and will pertain to revenues and expenditures for FY 2016 -17 (i.e. the second year of the biennial budget). Round: - Year The Ci ty Council can make amendments to the budget throughout the two - year period. Budget Amendments Appropriation of new money, or changes to the allocation of appropriations between funds or departments require Council approval. Transfers between divisions within a between spending accounts, or between projects may be made at the department, administrative level. These transfers can be authorized by the City Administrator, Controller’s Bureau , or department directors, depending on the nature of the transfer. C - 3

32 BUDGET GUIDE NOTES C - 4

33 CITY FACTS GENERAL INFORMATION The City of Oakland (“City”) is located on the east side of the San Francisco Bay in the County of Alameda. Oakland is bordered by 19 miles of coastline to the west and rolling hills to the east, which provide unparalleled vistas of th e Bay and the Pacific Ocean. In between are traditional, well- kept neighborhoods, a progressive downtown, and superior cultural and recreational amenities. Oakland serves as the administrative hub of the County of Alameda, the regional seat for the federal government, the district location of primary state offices, and the center of commerce and international trade for the Bay Area. Oakland is the eighth largest city in the State of California, with an estimated population of 404,355 , and a wealth of The Port of Oakland handled approximately 2.4 million ces and opportunities. It is home to the Port of Oakland, resour 20 -foot freight containers in 2014, valued at more than $40 billion. Oakland International Airport has undergone a $300 million Terminal Improve ment program including construction of a new concourse with seven boarding od/beverage gates/waiting areas, centralized fo and and retail shopping areas, as well as expanded ticketing, security, baggage claim facilities. The Center (the former Oakland Army Base ) is engaged in a Oakland Global Trade & Logistics $400 million revitalization and redevelopment process; and $115 million of new construction and improvements have been completed in Oakland City Center. eff orts, the City strives to maintain a balance between old and new. In concert with ongoing economic development Historic structures continue to be preserved and revitalized while new buildings are constructed. The City has completed its part in a $350 million revitalization effort to create a multifaceted government center that links major and Kaiser Permanente, historical landmarks with new developments. Major corporate headquarters include Clorox which are in close proximity to many new businesses and various small retail shops that have sprung up i n the downtown area. Oakland is a mature city that has been able to preserve its abundant natural beauty and resources. The City has over 100 parks (totaling over 2,500 acres) within its borders, as well as several recreational areas along its perimeter. L ake Merritt, the largest saltwater lake within a U.S. city, borders the downtown area. Its shoreline is a favorite retreat for joggers, office workers and picnickers. At dusk, the area sparkles as the Lake is lit with the “Necklace of Lights.” Lake is the oldest officially declared wildlife sanctuary in the United States, dating back to 1870. Merritt Statistical Profile Date of Incorporation May 4, 1852 Form of Government Mayor - Council Population (20 1 4 )* 404,355 Land Area 53.8 square m iles Lake Area 3.5 square m iles Lane Miles of Streets 2,293 * California Dept. of Finance 2014 estimate. D - 1

34 CITY FACTS CITY GOVERNMENT -Council form of government. The Mayor is elected at- large for a four -year term, and The City of Oakland has a Mayor The Mayor is not a member of the City C righ t to vote as -elected only once. can be re ouncil; however, he or she has the one if the Council members are evenly divided. The City Council is the legislative body of the City and is comprised of eight Councilmembers. One Councilmember is ” while the other seven Council members are elected members represent specific districts. All Council elected “at large, -ye to serve four ar terms. Each year the Councilmembers elect one member as President of the Council and one member to serve as Vice Mayor. The City Administrator is appointed by the Mayor and is subject to confirmation by the City Council. The City Administrator is responsible for the to- day administrative and fiscal operations of the City. day- ’S ECONOMIC BASE OAKLAND Oakland has diversified its economic base significantly in the past few decades. The economy offers a healthy mix of trade, government, financial, medical, information technology, publishing and service -oriented occupations. Industries with the largest growth in jobs in the last several years are professional and business services, education and healthcare, government, leisure and hospitality, traditional and specialty food production, and . technology Oakland offers abundant resources to its businesses and residents: state -of-the -art transportation, a vibrant dining and entertainment scene , and utility facilities keep the City running smoothly. Several new office and mixed- use buildings, public facilities, hotels, convention facilities, park enhancements and outdoor art have creat ed a cosmopolitan environment in the downtown area. Waterfront restaurants and shops at Jack London Square, as well as the burgeoning Old Oakland and Uptown districts provide lively nighttime attractions. The City ’s neighborhood retail s continue to gr d by Oakland ’s 10 Business Improvement Districts. While manufacturing remains area ow, as evidence an important segment of the City ’s economy, some industrial land has been converted to residential and work/live use. ’s Foreign Trade and Recycling Market A variety of incentives are available to companies located in the City Development Zones. The Economic Development staff links businesses with the many services available to them throughout the area and serves as an ombudsman for companies dealing with the City. City staff work with merchants in each commercial district to promote the district, obtain loans, expedite permits and arrange for City services. Oakland plays a pivotal role in the East Bay Trade Area; it is a city of rich history, impressive growth and a promising future. Located within one of the nation ’s largest metropolitan areas, California ’s eighth most populous city is the economic heart of the East Bay. Oakland has the infrastructure and economic base to support and attract a diverse mix of advance d industries and value -oriented retail. Downtown Oakland offers competitive office space, a fiber- optic infrastructure and the amenities for both traditional -maintained freeways, the mass transit systems and the ferry service make getting and emerging enterprises. The well to and from downtown Oakland a relatively quick and easy process —travel times to San Francisco, San Jose and other Bay Area cities are surprisingly short. Oakland is the county seat for Alameda County. The U.S. Census Bureau has estimated the county population at 1,610,921 for 2014 and a median household income of $72,112. In the City of Oakland itself, some 154,780 households have a median income of $52,583 and spend about $3 billion on r etail sales annually. City departments take a proa ctive approach and use streamlined processes to best serve the needs of the business community. D - 2

35 CITY FACTS A BRIEF HISTORY . Ohlone Indians settle in the area that would become Oakland. 1200 B.C East Bay. 1772 Spanish explorers are the first Europeans to visit the 1797 Established in Fremont, Mission de San José extends Spanish jurisdiction over the area that would become Oakland. 1849 During the California Gold Rush, Oakland becomes the mainland staging point for passengers and cargo traveling b etween the Bay and the Sierra foothills. Oakland was chartered as a city and almost immediately thereafter, construction of shipping 1852 wharves began. Building the large wharves and dredging a shipping channel positioned Oakland as an independent point o f destination. The Central Pacific Railroad selected Oakland as the terminus of the new transcontinental 1869 railroad, providing a vital link to the East. 1910 Oakland ’s population more than doubles in ten years from 66,960 to over 150,000 as peopl e and -ravaged San Francisco. Oakland regains control of the long businesses relocate from earthquake - lost waterfront by final settlement of litigation, which had lasted over half a century and cost several millions of dollars. 1936 -San Fran cisco Bay Bridge, one of the engineering wonders of the world, opens The Oakland months before the Golden Gate Bridge. 1942 The Permanente Foundation Hospital is dedicated in Oakland, the first in the chain of Henry J. Kaiser ’s health plan hospitals. dren’ s Fairyland opens in Lakeside Park. Swelled by huge numbers of workers who flocked 1950 Chil to the city for WWII jobs, the U.S. Census puts Oakland’ s population at 384,575. Oakland ’s African American population soars from 8,462 in 1940 to 47,562 in 1950. The m ilitary makes substantial ’s facilities. improvement to the Port World War II brought tremendous changes to Oakland. Huge numbers of workers moved to the Bay Area to work in local shipyards, and many of these people, as well as large numbers of military pe rsonnel who mustered out at Treasure Island and the Oakland Army Base, chose to remain in the Bay Area. As a result, the City ’s population increased by nearly one third between 1940 and 1950. 1950s – 1970s Under the Urban Indian Relocation Program, Oakland saw large numbers of Native Americans move to the city. 1970s Following the end of the Vietnam War, Oakland welcomed Cambodians, Vietnamese and Muong from war -torn Southeast Asia. 2010 nia, with a population of The U.S. Census ranked Oakland as the eighth largest city in Califor 390,724. According to a University of Wisconsin study, Oakland is the most ethnically diverse city in the United States. There are at least 100 different languages and dialects spoken here. A new generation of restaurateurs and s pecialty food producers has fueled an epicurean renaissance. Oakland’s sizzling arts and dining scene is no longer a local secret as national media outlets spread the word on our vibrant city. Oakland has a rich literary and cultural heritage. Such historical notables as writers Bret Harte, Jack London, Joaquin Miller, Ina Donna Coolbrith, Jessica Mitford, Narman Jayo, Ishmael Reed and Gertrude Stein; architect Julia Morgan; and dancer Isadora Duncan are just a few who have left their cultural mark on the City. It is also the birthplace of the West Coast Blues. D - 3

36 CITY FACTS TRANSPORTATION Located in the geographic center of the Bay Area, Oakland has been recognized as a vital transportation hub for more ntra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), the Bay Co than 100 years. Oakland is also the headquarters of the Alameda- Area Rapid Transit (BART) system, and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission that oversees transit and transportation for the Bay Area. Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system guarantees The combination of train, bus, marine, aviation, freeway and the ease of travel for local residents and efficient channels of commerce for businesses relying on the City ’s easy access. ted States and the Pacific ’s Port is a primary sea terminal for transporting cargo between the w Oakland estern Uni Rim, Latin America and Europe. Access to air cargo services is minutes away at the Oakland International Airport. Local and trans AC Transit s service is offered by Alameda -Contra Costa (AC ) Transit, the third largest . bay bu ic bus system in California serving the East Bay since 1960: publ ♦ Serves all 13 cities and adjacent unincorporated communities in 364 square miles along the east shore of San Francisco Bay. Annually, AC Transit buses drive 19.2 million service miles. Serves app ♦ 192, 000 daily riders with a fleet of 586 buses and a network of more than 1 49 bus lines roximately with approximately 5, 5 500 bus stops. The bus lines connect with nine other public and private bus systems, 2 rry terminals. BART stations, six Amtrak stations, and three fe ♦ Bus routes serve the Oakland International Airport, the Amtrak Station and ferry terminal located at Jack London Square, downtown San Francisco and other major Bay Area attractions. All buses are accessible to people with disabilities. All buses are equipped with bicycle racks. ♦ BART. -mile, computer -automated rapid transit system: The Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) is a 104 ♦ .5 million people in the three BART counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, and San Francisco, Serving more than 3 as well as northern San Mateo County. ♦ Electric -powered trains traveling up to 80 mph connect 44 stations , including 8 stations in Oakland. Travel time between downtown Oakland and downtown San Francisco averages only 11 minutes on BART. d an a verage of 403,680 passengers each weekday , with about 122 million trips made ♦ In 2014, BART carrie annually. In Oakland, f ive BART stations – West Oakland, Lake Merritt, MacArthur, Fruitvale and Colis eum — ♦ are catalysts for transit- ign or construction. oriented development projects that are in des -mile extension of BART from the Coliseum/Oakland Airport Oakland Airport Connector (OAC) is a 3.2 ♦ The Opened in November 2014, the BART Station to Oakland International Airport. s a seamless OAC provide connection with driverless trains that travel the alignment in eight minutes and depart every 5 to 20 minutes. OAK . The Oakland International Airport (OAK) is the second largest San Francisco Bay Area airport offering over 300 daily passenger and cargo flights. .3 m illion passengers in 201 4. ♦ Hosted more than 10 ♦ Handled more than 1.1 billion pounds of air freight. ♦ Served by 11 domestic and international air carriers. ♦ Features 29 board ing gates in two terminals . Roadways, Bicycles, Car Sharing ♦ The Alameda/Oakland Ferry Service that links Oakland with San Francisco, Angel Island and South San Francisco . D - 4

37 CITY FACTS Nine major U.S. and California highways pass through Oakland. ♦ Daily service to rail destinations throughout the U.S. is offered at the Oakland Amtrak Station in Jack London ♦ Square and serv ice along the Capitol Corridor also stops at the Coliseum Amtrak Station. ♦ . MegaBus.com offers Greyhound Bus Lines also offers daily bus service to cities throughout the United States service between Oakland and Los Angeles. Car City CarShare and Zipcar. ♦ -sharing is offered by shared -lane pavement markings to indicate ♦ Oakland was one of the first cities to pilot the “sharrow” lane – road lanes shared by cyclists and motorists. ♦ The Metropolitan Transportation Commission’s Bay Area Bike Share program will bring 850 bikes to Oakland in 2016. INFRASTRUCTURE Oakland Public Works plans, builds and maintains Oakland’s physical and environmental infrastructure for residents, businesses and visitors, making Oakland a sustainable and desirable place to live, work, invest and visit. Local Streets & Roads 2,293 lane miles ♦ ♦ 146 miles of bike lanes & routes Sidewalks, Curb Ramps, Stairs & Paths 1,100 miles of sidewalks ♦ ♦ 17,800 curb ramp locations ♦ 400,000 linear feet of crosswalks 232 developed stairs & pathways ♦ Bridges ♦ 38 bridges Traffic Signals & Signs ♦ 677 traffic signal intersections ♦ 200,000 street signs Street Lighting ♦ 37,000 streetlights with 30,000 of them converted to LED lights Stormwater ♦ 400 miles of storm drains ♦ 7,500 structures ♦ 80+ miles of open creek Wastewater Collection ♦ 919 miles of sewer pipes ♦ 7 pump stations ♦ 27,000 structure D - 5

38 CITY FACTS Public Buildings 309 public buildings ♦ Parks, Trees & City Landscapes 134 City parks ♦ 100+ street medians ♦ 42,600 official street trees ♦ ♦ Plus all open space & park trees Fleet & Equipment ♦ pieces of equipment including fire trucks & police cars 1,489 vehicles & HUMAN SERVICES HSD offers various services to assist Oakland residents including seniors, youth, families and the homeless. In FY -14, the most recent year with complete data, HSD served 83,557 unduplicated clients, of which 4,270 have 2013 disabilities, with varied programs and services. ♦ Serves 1,747 low -income children and their families at 25 sites throughout Oakland with comprehensive early childhood educat ion and family support services through the Oakland Head Start & Early Head Start programs. ♦ Over 8,000 seniors enjoy a broad range of classes and special events as well as free or low -cost meals at four (4) senior centers operated by the City and four ( contracted centers for monolingual seniors. 4) Provides over 29,000 trips annually for frail seniors and disabled persons through its Oakland Paratransit for ♦ the Elderly and Disabled Program (OPED). ♦ Serves over 379 frail and disabled seniors through its Multipurpose Senior Services Program (MSSP) by helping them live independently in their homes through in -home case management and health services. Trains and prepares over 160 low income seniors for the workforce today through subsidized training and ♦ job placement via the ASSETS Sr. Employment Program. Eliminated 38,300 in -crisis episodes of hunger through food distribution services provided by the Hunger ♦ Program . ♦ Serves over 622,000 lunches to children, youth and seniors through Head Start, the Summer Food Serv ice Program, and Senior Centers. ♦ Serves more than 28,700 youth through the locally mandated Oakland Children’s Fund (Kids First! Oakland Fund for Children and Youth) and the federally funded grant programs that address the educational, youth development an d safety needs of children in Oakland. ♦ Awarded and managed over $25 million dollars in 179 grants to public and community based agencies for various community service programs , including $8 million dollars in violence prevention and intervention programs. ♦ Alameda County – Oakland Community Action Partnership’s 2014 EITC Campaign prepared 1,156 free tax returns in Oakland for middle and low income families returning $4,954,217 in Earned Income Tax Credits -- (EITC); $1,711,338 captured in Child Tax Credits ( CTC). ♦ Provided 61,000 bed nights for people without permanent housing through shelter vouchers to three shelters: EOCP, St. Mary’s and Henry Robinson BACS Winter Shelter. D - 6

39 CITY FACTS HSD, in partnership, has successfully housed 241 hardest to reach individuals and families through the ♦ -- H’s Rehousing Initiative (OPRI) 89 percent of clients retained housing after twelve months and Oakland PAT 96 percent of those enrolled 36 months ago are still housed. -around services to 500 youth involved in the juvenile justice system to help ♦ Offered comprehensive wrap -enroll in school, find a job, and access other needed supports. them successfully re ♦ e participants have shown an 83 percent reduction in arrests for violent crimes after receiving Oakland Unit services. EDUCATION ementary, Middle, Special, a nd Secondary Education El There are 86 public , 38 charter ♦ 39 private schools in Oakland. and Colleges Holy Names University – disciplinary study college. ♦ an undergraduate and graduate inter- Mills College – rivate women ’s liberal arts college founded in 1852, also offering co -ed graduate programs. ♦ a p Patten University ♦ dedicated to providing high -quality, accessible, and affordable undergraduate and – graduate education ffers online programs designed to specifically for workin g adults . and o ♦ Samuel Merritt University – offers degrees in nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and podiatric medicine and is the largest source of new registered nurses in California. ♦ California College of the Arts – known fo r its broad, interdisciplinary programs in art, design, architecture, and writing, it offers studies in 21 undergraduate and 1 3 graduate. Merritt College, and Laney College – rts, ♦ part of the Peralta Community College District, these colleges offer a liberal arts, college preparatory and vocational trade programs. LIBRARY SYSTEM 1 main library and 1 6 library branches ♦ ♦ Second Start Adult Literacy Program ♦ Tool lending library African -American Museum and Library ♦ ♦ 290,630 Registered Borrowers ♦ 58% of Oakland residents have an active library card ♦ Books Held 967,205 2,174,567 ♦ Library Visits ♦ 2,171,458 Virtual Visits to Library Website ♦ 2,722,974 Circulation (including e -books) ♦ 303,384 Uses of Public Internet Computers ♦ 183,452 Program Attendance of which 145,544 w ere at Children’s Programs MEDICAL FACILITIES Oakland ’s medical facilities are among the best in the nation. The medical community provides the latest and most sophisticated medical technology for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. There are now four hospitals providing D - 7

40 CITY FACTS Together, these hospitals have invested more than $2 billion in new construction and seismic full service in Oakland. upgrades. ’s Hospital Oakland delivers high quality pediatric care for all children through regional primary UCSF Benioff Children -art research and subspecialty networks, strong education and teaching program, a -of-the diverse workforce, state programs and facilities and nationally recognized child advocacy efforts. Alta Bates Summit Medical Center offers comprehen sive services designed to meet the health care needs of the diverse communities of the greater East Bay. Highland Hospital provides comprehensive, high -quality medical treatment, health Health System’s Alameda promotion, and health maintenance through an integrated system of hospitals, clinics, and health services staffed by individuals who are responsive to the diverse cultural needs of our community. ’ care, including preventive care suc h as well- baby Kaiser Permanente organizes and provides or coordinates members and prenatal care, immunizations, and screening diagnostics; hospital and medical services; and pharmacy services. Kaiser ’s Oakland Medical Center is the flagship of the national system of hospitals headquartered here along with the ’s first health maintenance organization (HMO), founded by Henry Kaiser. nation PUBLIC SAFETY Oakland ’s diverse residential and business ’s public safety providers actively engage all segments of the City communities in efforts to increase public safety and quality of life. Current police initiatives partner law enforcement agencies with local community -based social service organizations to create / enhance programs that offer ex- d mental health counseling), offenders services (training and education) and support (substance abuse recovery an while maintaining strict accountability and supervision of parolees and those on probation. Oakland ’s first responders, committed to proactive emergency preparedness, response, and mitigation, continue to develop and enhance their skills, assess local risks, and prepare strategies to ensure the safety and security of the City ’s residential and commercial sectors in the event of a natural disaster or terrorist attack. Police ♦ 722 authorized sworn officers ( 712 filled as of Sep tember 2015 ) ♦ -sworn employees (full & part time) (3 87 filled as of September 2015) 409 authorized non ♦ Assignments range within comprehensive 24/7 public safety service and response ● Patrol Crime analysis ● ● Administration Criminal Investigations ● ● Communications ● Tactical Operations Teams (S.W.A.T. and Negotiations) ● Traffic Enforcement & Investigations Youth or Community Services ● ● Criminal Intelligence ● Vice ♦ Receives and processes nearly 600,000 calls for service annually ♦ Handled over 2 50 ,000 law enforcement incidents in 201 4 D - 8

41 CITY FACTS Fire 50 8 authorized uniformed personnel to fill three complete shifts of response personnel ♦ 25 Fire Stations ♦ , which includes equipment and resources such as: ● 24 engine apparatus 7 aerial apparatus ● hazardous materials response team ● technical rescue team ● ● airport rescue company water rescue team ● ● specialized wild land response apparatus Over 60,000 response calls annually, 80% are calls that include medical service ♦ RECREATION & Recreation (OPR) Department The O akland Parks offers critical quality of life programming in areas of enrichment, cultural arts, prevention and intervention, sports and physical activities, health and wellness, youth violence abatement, and other leisure activities for adults, youth, and children. Programs and Camps at recreation centers, pools and parks are part of the efforts to promote health, stem obesity, and encourage civic participation, personal development, and empowerment. OPR the best of Oakland and connect communities . preserves OPR operates: 140 parks ♦ 66 b all fields ♦ ♦ 44 tennis courts ♦ 38 Recreation Facilities 24 Recreation Centers ● 5 Pools ● 2 Boating Centers ● 2 Discover Science Centers ● ● 1 Digital Arts and Culinary Academy (DACA) Center y apartments available for rent -single room occupanc ● 1 Malonga Casquelourd Center for the Arts with 74 to local artists ● 1 Studio One Art Center ● 1 Sports Complex with Indoor Water Park ● 1 Inclusion Center with 3 Extension Programs ♦ 14 rental venues 17 community gardens ♦ ♦ 5 fenced dog play areas, 22 dog friendly parks ♦ 3 golf courses ♦ 2 ska te parks ♦ and a host of other public facilities and programs which are designed for tiny tots to seniors, collectively serving over 95,000 enrolled participants and over a million drop -in users annually. Oakland is at the heart of the East Bay Regional Park District, a splendid system of 65 parks covering more than 119,000 acres and 29 regional hiking trails stretching 1,200 miles in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties. D - 9

42 CITY FACTS OTHER ATTRACTIONS loca l residents and visitors. Oakland is home to many world -class and unique attractions for – Chabot Space & Science Center The City of Oakland is home to Chabot Space & Science Center (CSSC), an 86,000 square foot, award- winning facility featuring hands -on science and astronomy exhibits, a state -of-the -art planetarium, for a large -format domed screen theater, a simulated space mission experience, and the largest telescopes available public use in California. The renovated Fox Theater in downtown Oakland reopened its doors in February 2009 with a run of Fox Theater – ’s wrap -around building will also be the permanent home for performances from entertainment ’s top acts. The theater -free charter school dedicated to artistic and academic excellence. the Oakland School for the Arts, a tuition – A mainstay of the community since its construction in 1926, this first- run movie theater is Grand Lake Theater graced with a colorful, lighted marquee and a sweeping staircase in the main hall. Look for the ornately decorated walls, brass chandeliers, and faux opera boxes. Prior to cu rtain on Friday and Saturday nights, an organist serenades the audience on a Wurlitzer. The Lake is the largest lake located within an urban area and is set in Lakeside Park, Lake Merritt which is home to – and a Bonsai Garden the Garden Center, Sailboat House, Rotary Nature a Center, Junior Science Center, . Bordered by , Lake Merritt is a favorite location for joggers, walkers, and strollers. Lake Merritt is being transformed 3.4 mile trail llion bond measure passed by 80 percen by Measure DD, the $198.2 mi t of voters in November 2002. – -dimensional fantasy world where popular Children's Fairyland Young children will enjoy this enchanting, three nursery rhymes come to life, set in picturesque Lakeside Park. Jack London Square Located along Oakland’s wat erfront, Jack London Square is home to Yoshi’s Jazz Club, a – cineplex, numerous restaurants, and other local attractions. A developer has announced plans to open the Water Street Market in early fall of 2016. USS Potomac Affectionately dubbed the Floatin g White House by the press, Franklin Delano Roosevelt's – -foot vessel, a national historic presidential yacht is one of the few floating museums in the country. The restored 165 landmark, is a memorial to FDR and his accomplishments. – Oakland Chi natown dates back to the arrival of Chinese immigrants in the 1850s, making it one of the Chinatown oldest Chinatowns in North America. Oakland’s Chinatown is bustling with activity. The Asian Branch Library is one of many of Oakland Public Library’s branches and is located in Chinatown’s Pacific Renaissance Plaza. Convention Center – George P. Scotlan Offering 64,000 square feet of exhibition and meeting space and adjoining the Oakland Marriott City Center, this convention center has t of flexible meeting space an additional 25,000 square fee and 483 deluxe guest rooms. An h istoric Old Oakland – ’ Market takes district with beautiful buildings and a thriving commercial strip. A Farmers place every Friday . Oakland Museum of California – This is the state’s only museum devoted to the arts, history and natural sciences of California. The Museum provides unique collections, rotating exhibitions and educational opportunities designed to generate a broader and deeper understanding of and interest in California ’s environment, history, art and people. Oakland Zoo Founded in 1922 by naturalist Henry A. Snow, the Oakland Zoo is an 85 year -old regional treasure . – Many of its animals are kept in relatively “natural” habitats, and expanded natural habitats are planned. The Zoo i s nationally known for its excellent elephant exhibit and has been praised for allowing its elephants to roam freely. Paramount Theat re of the Arts – This beautiful Art D eco theater opened in 1931 and was authentically restored in 1973. The theater hosts an impressive variety of popular attractions, including the Oakland East Bay Symphony, Broadway shows, R&B concerts, gospel performers, comedy, and special engagements. D - 10

43 CITY FACTS Oakland Located at the Airport ’s North Field, showcases aviation history through ’s Western Aerospace Museum – -on displays incorporating 13 vintage airplanes, photographs, special exhibits, multimedia presentations, hands replicas and other artifacts, and classes for students of all ages. Malonga Casquelourd Center for the Arts – This resto red 1920s building is a popular multicultural, -arts complex sponsored by the city. The 400 -seat theater and five rehearsal and class multidisciplinary performing -standing arts organizations spaces showcase drama, ballet, and African and contemporary dance. Several long -Axis Dance Company, Bay Area Blues Society, CitiCentre Dance Theater, Dimensions Dance Theater, and Oakland Youth Orchestra -call the center home. – The Crucible -profit educational facility fosters a collaboration of Arts, Industry Located in West Oakland, this non and Community. Through training in the fine and industrial arts, The Crucible promotes creative expression, reuse of materials and innovative design while serving as an accessible arts venue for the general public. Professional/Ama teur Sports – Oakland is a magnet for sports fans of all types. Whatever the season, Oakland pro and amateur games frequently garner large crowds and broad national media coverage. In the last three decades, Oakland world championships in three major sports. ’s professional sports teams have won six continue to showcase exciting basketball. – The Warriors ♦ In 2015 , the Warriors won Golden State Warriors first NBA Championship in 40 years . The celebratory parade and rally marking the victory was held in their downtown Oakland on Friday, June 19. ♦ Oakland Athletics – The Oakland Athletics have won six American League Championships and four baseball World Series titles. ♦ Oakland Raiders – From dominance in three Super Bowl victories to improbable come- from -behin d victories, the Raiders have been involved in some of professional football's most incredible moments. D - 11

44 CITY FACTS Oakland, California Key Facts/Accolades: Lonely Planet, December 2014 Among the Top 10 U.S. Destinations for 2015 - - New York Times, January 2012 the World Among Top 5 Places to Visit in 25th Best City for Sports Fans - WalletHub, September 2015 USA Today, August 2015 No. 7 on roster of cities with the Best Local Food Scene - NerdWallet, June 22, 2015 No. 5 among Best Cities for Foodies - est City for Baseball Fans - WalletHub, June 2015 9th B Redfin, May 14, 2015 No. 14 among most Bikeable Cities of 2015 - No. 4 on Trulia's top 5 most pet- friendly rental markets - Trulia, April 30, 2015 1 in California, No. 12 in Nation - Oakland's American Indian Public High School ranked No. U.S. News & World Report, May 2015 -Sized American Cities of the Future and No. 1 in Connectivity - No. 2 Overall in Mid fDiIntelligence.com, April/May 2015 No. 2 among America's Next Hot Food Cities - Zagat, April 201 5 10 of the world's most beautiful sky gardens - CNN, April 15, 2015 10 Best New Food Cities - Jetsetter, April 2015 No. 9 most walkable City - Walk Score, April 2015 Among the Top 10 Destinations to you some Serious Wanderlust - ViewTheVibe.com, March 26, 2015 give SmartAsset, March 26, 2015 Oakland Ranked 7th Most Interesting Cities in America - 4th Most Bike - BetterDoctor, March 23, 2015 -Friendly City 20th Best City for Basketball Fans in the U.S. - WalletHub, March 2015 No. 3 among Best Startup Cities in America - Popular Mechanics, February 2015 No. 5 for Most Friendly & Engaged NFL Fans, No. 15 among 2015’s Best Cities for Football Fans - WalletHub, January 29, 2015 Priceonomics, December 15 , 2014 Oakland Named the Most Diverse City in America - Among The 15 Hottest American Cities For 2015 - Business Insider, November 19, 2014 No 8. in Digital Cities large city category - Government Technology, November 13, 2014 Treat, November 2014 Most Grateful City - No. 6 among Top 20 US Cities for Tech Startup Funding - National Venture Capital Association, October 24, 2014 D - 12

45 CITY FACTS WalletHub, October 16, 2014 18th Best Foodie City for Your Wallet - USA Today, October 15, 2014 No. 10 'Best Sports Town' - Uptown Named Among Nation’s Great Neighborhoods – American Planning Association, October 1, 2014 Oakland No. 8 among Top 10 U.S. Retail Markets - National Real Estate Investor, September 2014 No. 2 on list of 7 Underrated but Intriguing U.S. Cities You Need to Visit - Yahoo Travel, August 25, 2014 No. Complete Solar, August 2014 10 among California Cities on the Solar Ease Index - Forbes, August 6, 2014 No. 12 among America's Coolest Cities 2014 - No. 9 Among Top 10 Metros for Millennial Population Growth - Trulia, June 26, 2014 Major Tech Center with the 2nd highest number of Women in Tech - RJMetrics, June 24, 2014 No. 3 Best US City to Celebrate Gay Pride - Jack'd, June 11, 2014 15 Cities for Creative 20 -Somethings That Aren't New York or Los Angeles - PolicyMic, May 27, 2014 No. 4 on Most LGB Friendly Cities - NerdWallet, May 27, 2014 T- No. 10 among 15 Large Cities with the Highest Percentage of Bicycling to Work - U.S. Census Bureau, May 8, 2014 WalletHub, May 8, 2014 2nd Best Californian City to Start a Career - Citi es for Tech Entrepreneurs - The MoneyTree Report by PricewaterhouseCoopers and the No. 5 Among the Top 10 National Venture Capital Association with data from Thomson Reuters, April 29, 2014 Oakland Ranked #14 Among 24 Places To Visit For Fantasy Food Travel - Food Republic, Feb ruary 24, 2014 Roads & Bridges magazine, February 2014 12th Street Reconstruction Honored with a 2013 Top 10 Roads Award - #8 Tech Hub in the U.S. - Trulia, February 2014 Oakland Recognized as National 2013 Community Pacesetter - Campaign for Grade -Level Reading, January 15, 2014 9th Gayest City in America - The Advocate, January 6, 2014 D - 13

46 CITY FACTS NOTES D - 14

47 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL SUMMARIES This section contains tables summarizing revenue and expenditure data for the entire City. Summaries are presented and by department . Tables are also presented on fund balances and fund descriptions. by fund CITY R EVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FORECAST METHODOLOGY The City prepares revenue and expenditure forecasts for its biennial budget. The fore casts are based on current istorical budgetary performance , prevailing general economic expenditure spending and revenue collection trends, h conditions and department input . A detailed forecast is prepared for the General Purpose Fund (GPF), and for other funds selected . To prepare the forecast, a comprehensive analysis of the components of the C s ity's revenues and expenditures i to- -year period on the basis of various rel evant performed. These major components are projected into the two- five For example, projections for property tax , the single largest source of revenues for the Ci assumptions. ty's General Purpose Fund (GPF), ar e done based on the projected growth in the net assessed value of locally assessed property and projected changes to the tax delinquency rate. Similarly, forecast of the expenditures is performed by separately analyzing individual expenditure categories ( e.g. salaries, retirement, benefits, utility expenses) based on forecast cost increases (e.g. pay -step increases, PERS retirement rates, benefit cost inflation, energy prices). Forecasting Techniques wo Citywide revenues and expenditures are projected using t forecasting techniques: qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis . Qualitative analysis projects future revenues and/or expenditures us ing non -statistical techniques. These techniques rely on human judgment rather than statistical analysis to arrive at revenue projections. Qualitative forecasting is essential for projecting revenue or expenditure components that are unstable, volatile, or for which there is limited historical information . To facilitate sound qualitative analysis, the City of Oakland seeks input from outside experts in economic forecasting, municipal finance, and other relevant fields. Just two examples of this is the City’s reliance on the League of Cities’ analysis and recommendations relating to legislative issues impacting cities, and the Legislative Analyst Office for their expertise and analysis of the State of California budgetary issues that may potentially affect the City of Oakla nd. Quantitative analysis involves looking at data to understand historical trends and causal relationships. One kind of time series analysis ; it is based on data that have been collected over time and can be shown quantitative analysis is chronologically on graphs. When using time series techniques, the forecaster is especially interested in the nature of seasonal fluctuations that occur within a year, the nature of multiyear cycles, and the nature of any possible long -term trends. Causal analysis is another type of quantitative analysis; it deals with the historical interrelationships between two or more variables. One or more predictors influence, directly or indirectly, the future revenue or expenditure. The causal forecasting techniques are predicated upon selecting the correct independent variables, correctly defining their interrelationsh ip to the dependent variable, i.e. the projected revenue or expenditure item, and, finally, collecting accurate data. E - 1

48 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Revenue Forecast that anticipates changes in revenues triggered by new Citywide revenues are projected using dynamic forecasting ic development, economic growth, changes in the levels of service of departments and agencies, (in the case of econom Master Fee Schedule changes approved by the City Council), changes in governmental policies at the state or federal level, and various economic a nd demographic changes. The purpose of this dynamic forecast is to demonstrate the potential impact of various events and actions on the selected revenue sources. Under this scenario: Tax Revenues are projected to grow at rates that are responsive to dynamic forces in the economy. Generally, • the assumption is the local economy will be affected by national and state trends, with some deviation expected due to specific characteristics of regional business and labor markets. • Fee increases will likely follo w the projected inflation and changes in the local population due to increased service costs and changes in demand. as a result of potential changes in state revenue streams • Any known or anticipated changes in revenues and/or legislation are reflected in the analysis. economic factors and trends , including changes in economic The revenue forecast takes into consideration a number of , income, sales and C onsumer Price Index (CPI), among other factors . Additionally, anticipated changes in State growth or local policy are also considered. Expenditure Forecast the City's expenditures involves analyzing, at the d epartment and by category . Forecasting level, , which represents the cost of maintaining the cur rent level of The expenditure forecast begins with the baseline budget services, while taking into account all unavoidable costs necessary to continue at that current level. Examples of -negotiated MOU salary levels, as well as health care and retirement costs that the City pays unavoidable costs are pre lf of its employees. on beha The baseline budget is then modified to reflect changes to programs and services that the Mayor and the City Administrator decide to include as part of the Proposed Budget. These modifications could include additions or reductions above. Changes to debt service are less discretionary, and are made based in any of categories discussed on changes in the Treasury Division's debt payment schedules. The expenditure forecast follows the guidance of the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA), which recommends that expenditures be grouped into units of analysis that are meaningful to the organization, such as departments and standard budget categories of expenditures. As such, staff grouped proposed budget expenditures by departmen t and by expenditure category consistent with the City’s chart of accounts . Future expenditures are forecasted from the FY 20 15 -17 proposed budget. This forecast generally assumes that expenditures will only grow due to inflationary cost escalation. C also change due to changes in service or staffing levels, as described in the osts “Significant Changes” summary for each d epartment and “Service Impacts” section of this document. E - 2

49 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BASIS OF BUDGETING The City of Oakland’s basis of budgeting for its major f und groups (General Funds, Special Revenue Funds, Enterprise Capital Project Funds) are the Generally Accepted Accounting Principals (GAAP), and Funds, Internal Service Funds . and the modified accrual basis of accounting Revenues are budgeted according to when they are both measurable and available. Revenues are considered to be available when they are collected within the current year , or soon enough thereafter to pay liabilities of the current period. The City considers property tax revenues to be av ailable for the year levied if they are collected within 60 days of the end of the current fiscal year . All other revenues are considered to be available if they are collected within 120 days of the end of the current fiscal year . Expenditures are budgeted according to when the liability is incurred, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. The exceptions are debt service, compensated absences, claims and judgments, which are budgeted as expenditures according to when the payments are due. ity’s basis of budgeting is the same as the basis of accounting used in the City’s audited financial statement, the The C mprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR). Co -YEAR BUDGET PLANNING FOR THE CITY OF OAKLAND’S TWO Planning for the Two -Year Budget The City’s budget development process begins over a year in advance of the actual adoption of the two- year budget. During this advance planning process, the City identifies factors (known or anticipated) that may have a significant effect on future revenues, expe nditures , or staffing levels . The analysis is based on actual City revenue and expenditure trends, general and relevant economic trends and outlooks, input from the City Departments who oversee those specific expenditure and revenue streams, and input from outside economists and revenue experts. two reparing a five also aided by p The -year financial forecast according to the City’s -year budget projections are . The five -year forecast was presented to the City Council at a budget workshop (held for Consolidated Fiscal Policy the FY 20 15 -17 Budget on March 2, 2015 ). At th e workshop , the Council was provided with information regarding the City’s financial situation, including the five -term liabili ties, -year financial forecast, a report on debt portfolios and long results from a budget priorities poll, and the FY 20 14 -15 S econd Quarter Revenue & Expenditure report. E - 3

50 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NOTES E - 4

51 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES SUMMARY TABLES E - 5

52 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NOTES E - 6

53 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 2015 FY ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 GENERAL PURPOSE FUND (GPF) FTE FY 2016-17 On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (continued) Significant Revenue Changes $0.97 Landlord Compliance Audit $0.97 $0.97 $1.09 Increase fees to full cost recovery $1.09 RPTTF bond cost reduction $0.03 $0.40 $0.10 $0.13 Add net Master Fee Schedule changes $0.83 $0.83 Increase in Fire Code Inspections Extension of SAFER Grant $3.08 Revenue received from Piedmont and Emeryville for Library $0.59 Services Fee (FY 2014-15) Realign revenue (and associated expenditures) to OPR Self- ($0.27) ($0.27) Sustaining Fund (1820) Reduction in Cannabis Revenue based on historical receipts ($0.21) ($0.21) Repayment of bridge funds for West Oakland Job Resource $0.21 Center operations (Y2) Increase special events and other fee revenues based on $1.66 $1.83 historical receipts (O PD) $0.40 $0.40 Scotlan Convention Center net revenue Transfer Garage Revenue from the Multipurpose Reserve Fund $2.00 $2.00 (1750) Use of projected available Fund Balance $15.68 Additional FY 2015-16 projected RETT $3.01 $4.16 $3.60 Revenue from Transfer of RDA Garages $3.20 Deferred Pension Credit $9.72 Sale of 12th Street Remainder $4.40 25% of 12th Street Remainder to Affordabl e Housing Trust Fund ($1.10) (1870) Increase RPTTF from RO PS Reduction (DO F) $1.90 $0.61 Airport Rescue Fire Fighter (ARFF) Services $0.83 $1.03 Increase TO T from short term rentals $0.50 $0.50 E - 7

54 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS FY -17 2015 ($ in millions) GENERAL PURPOSE FUND (GPF) FTE FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 One-Time On-Going On-Going Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (continued) Significant Expenditure Changes CITYWIDE Fund debt service for IT licensing and maintenance and other $1.46 $1.53 major IT projects through one-time financing MAYO R No Significant GPF Changes CITY COUNCIL 1.12 Increase each Council District by 0.14 FTE $0.17 $0.17 0.44 $0.07 $0.07 Increase Council President by 0.44 FTE, City Councilmember's Assistant Increase City Council Administration O&M $0.06 $0.06 CITY ADMINISTRATOR (continued) Eliminate a Performance Audit Manager, and two Performance ($0.39) (3.00) ($0.38) Auditor positions resulting from no longer civilianizing Internal Affairs within the City Administrator's Office $0.24 Funding for community engagement services related to future budget priorities and the devel opment of potential bal l ot measures to improve public health & safety and City infrastructure Provide funds for Contracts & Compliance to support and assess $0.15 the workload associated with monitoring and compliance of the voter-approved local minimum wage law provisions (Measure FF) Add funding for the Equal O pportunity Program to assist with $0.10 investigation of complaints and increase training for City staff Set aside one-time funds for the implementation of a $0.25 Comprehensive Public Safety Strategy $0.22 CPRB: Add Intake Technician; transfer an Intake Technician from 2.00 $0.22 OPD; downgrade Investigator to an Intake Technician; Increase O&M Animal Shelter: Add 2.00 Public Service Rep and 0.50 Public 2.50 $0.19 $0.20 Service Rep, PPT positions Add one-time funding for l egal support grant to assist $0.30 unaccompanied minors E - 8

55 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 FY 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 GENERAL PURPOSE FUND (GPF) FTE On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (cont'd) Significant Expenditure Changes CITY ATTORNEY (continued) 1.00 Add Deputy City Attorney III (NSA Compliance) $0.24 $0.24 Transfer Deputy City Attorney III to Development Services Fund (1.00) ($0.23) ($0.24) (2415) Add 1.00 FTE Deputy City Attorney III, 1.00 FTE Paralegal and 4.00 $0.46 $0.47 2.00 FTE Neighborhood Law Corps Attorney $0.43 Transfer Deputy City Attorney IV from Successor 1.00 $0.42 Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement Fund (1610), Oakland Municipal Employee's Retirement System Fund (7120), & Police & Fire Retirement System Fund (7100) CITY AUDITOR Add O &M to expand capacity of audit function $0.10 CITY CLERK No Significant GPF Changes PUBLIC ETHICS COMMISSION 2.00 $0.35 $0.36 Publ ic Ethics was restructured as a stand al one department per voter approval of Measure CC. Positions and O &M Transferred from the City Administrator's O ffice $0.51 $0.50 4.00 Add positions for Public Ethics resulting from the successful voter initiative, Measure CC, to augment the responsibilities, structure and staffing for the Publ ic Ethics Commission FINANCE Administration Add Finance Director 1.00 $0.32 $0.32 Controller's Bureau Freeze vacant Accounting Supervisor (1.00) ($0.15) ($0.15) Add Accounting Technician to Accounts Payable $0.10 $0.10 1.00 Revenue Management Bureau Transfer Tax Enforcement O fficer II from Mandatory Refuse $0.12 1.00 $0.12 Program Fund (1700) ($0.10) ($0.10) (1.00) Transfer Revenue Assistant to Mandatory Refuse Program Fund (1700) E - 9

56 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 FY 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 GENERAL PURPOSE FUND (GPF) FTE On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (cont'd) Significant Expenditure Changes FINANCE Revenue Management Bureau (cont'd) 3.00 Add Tax Enforcement Officers (FY 2015-16 for 6 months only) $0.17 $0.35 Treasury Bureau ($0.10) Increase in accounting recoveries ($0.10) HUM AN RESO URCES Add funding for public safety personnel recruitment contract $0.20 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ($0.13) (0.50) Transfer Manager, Information Systems to Radio / ($0.12) Telecommunications Fund (4200) Transfer Information Systems Supervisor to Radio / (0.60) ($0.11) ($0.12) Telecommunications Fund (4200) RACE & EQ UITY Establish a Dept. of Race & Equity (add 1.00 Director, 1.00 $0.31 2.00 $0.30 Program Analyst II and O &M ) PO LICE continued) $1.56 Add O&M - 175th Police Academy $2.04 Add Police Officer Trainee (175th Academy) 50.00 $5.24 Add Police O fficer (PERS) 35.00 5.00 Add Sergeant of Police (PERS) $1.04 Add O&M for new officers $0.42 Add O &M for Crime Trend Analysis Software $0.08 $0.08 Add O&M Police Helicopter $0.40 Add Pipeline Pilot (Cadet Program) $0.45 Add Project Manager III Internal Affairs - NSA Compliance 1.00 $0.25 $0.25 Add Internal Auditor III positions $0.27 $0.27 2.00 Freeze vacant Criminalist II positions in crime lab (2.00) ($0.28) ($0.29) Reduce Compliance Director carry-forward balance ($1.18) Transfer Grants Coordinator from Department of Justice Fund $0.17 1.00 $0.16 (2112) E - 10

57 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 FY 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 GENERAL PURPOSE FUND (GPF) FTE On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Expenditure Changes (cont'd) POLICE (cont'd) $0.05 $0.05 Upgrade Captain to Deputy Chief for NSA Sustainabil ity (1.00) Transfer an Intake Technician to CPRB ($0.10) ($0.10) $0.82 $0.08 $0.08 Shotspotter (Phase I ongoing; Phases II and III one-time) Reduce OPD overtime due to increased staffing ($0.50) ($0.50) $0.50 Add Special Investigation to reduce gun violence & illegal gun $0.50 dealing Add Crime Analyst (Administrative Analyst II) $0.23 $0.24 2.00 2.00 $0.21 $0.21 Add Police Evidence Technicians Restore funding for NCPC Community Engagement and Outreach $0.09 and West O akland Biz Alert FIRE (continued) 1.00 $0.21 $0.21 Transfer Assistant Fire Marshal-Non Sworn from Hazardous Materials Inspections Fund (1740) ($0.27) ($0.28) Freeze vacant Fire Marshall, Sworn Assistant (1.00) 1.00 Add Fire Protection Engineer $0.13 $0.13 Wildfire Prevention Funding $0.50 Extension of SAFER Grant Fund (2124); charge GPF-funded Fire ($3.08) Fighters to Grant HUM AN SERVICES O&M for Kindergarten to College $0.15 Reduce Overhead Recovery from Grants $0.16 $0.26 $0.11 2.00 Funds to reduce chronic absenteeism to strengthen partnership with O USD $0.35 Matching funds to establ ish City/County Re-entry Job Corps Pil ot Program Q uality Preschool for all $0.20 Funding for City/County Neighborhood Initiative $0.05 Homeless/PATH report high priority areas $0.26 $0.26 Housing services for Commercial Sexual Exploited Children $0.11 $0.11 E - 11

58 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 FY 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 GENERAL PURPOSE FUND (GPF) FTE On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Expenditure Changes (cont'd) OAKLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY (continued) $0.50 Use of Council set-aside reserve to balance (transfer to Measure $0.50 Q - Fund 2241) Expand Library Services to branches serving disadvantaged $0.50 youth and geographical dispersed throughout the City - beginning July 2016 OAKLAND PARKS & RECREATION Security contract and safety equipment for recreation centers $0.25 Reduction in Zoo Subsidy ($0.12) ($0.12) (5.00) Freeze Recreation Leader II PPT ($0.31) ($0.33) Transfer Pools and Boating personnel to OPR Self-Sustaining (4.19) ($0.18) ($0.18) Fund (1820) $0.08 Grants and scholarships for low income youth to participate in O PR programs $0.05 Administrative Grant to O PR Foundation O PR subsidy for Feather River Camp $0.04 ECO NO M IC & WO RKFO RCE D EVELO PM ENT 0.50 Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from $0.11 $0.11 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement Fund (1610) (1.00) Transfer Urban Economic Analyst III to HUD - CDBG Fund ($0.14) ($0.14) (2108) Transfer Urban Economic Analyst IV, Projects from HUD - CDBG 1.00 $0.17 $0.18 Fund (2108) Add Project Manager III, PPT 1.00 $0.25 $0.26 Add Real Estate Agent $0.14 $0.14 1.00 Direct program support for Kiva Zip small business microloan $0.10 program and to establish a revolving/matching loan fund Investment in Workforce Investment Strategies & Programs to $0.20 leverage additional support $0.21 $0.21 1.90 Transfer Administrative Services Manager II, Account Clerk III, Administrative Anal yst II and Administrative Assistant I to the GPF from the WIA Fund (2195) and the Oakland Redevelopment Successor Agency Fund (1610) E - 12

59 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 FY 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 GENERAL PURPOSE FUND (GPF) FY 2016-17 FTE FY 2015-16 One-Time On-Going On-Going Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Expenditure Changes (cont'd) HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT - No Significant GPF Changes $0.00 $0.00 PLANNING & BUILDING (4.00) ($0.46) ($0.46) Transfer 2.00 Special ty Combination Inspector to Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720), and 2.00 to Development Services Fund (2415) ($0.03) (0.33) Transfer Planning Service Representative to Development ($0.03) Services Fund (2415) (CONT'D) OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS Transfer Landscape and Maintenance personnel to ($0.37) ($0.37) (8.50) Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) Transfer Public Works Maintenance Workers and O &M to ($0.33) (2.00) ($0.32) Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) Transfer Public Works Supervisor I to State Gas Tax Fund (2230) ($0.11) ($0.11) (1.00) (1.00) ($0.10) ($0.10) Transfer Painter to Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) ($0.10) ($0.10) Reduction in Overhead NON-DEPARTMENTAL $14.91 $1.10 $0.00 Unfunded Liability Payment Reduce PERs costs based on pre-funding discount ($3.00) Set-aside for employee compensation (including unrepresented) $10.32 $13.20 Water Conservation Program $0.10 O&M for Civic Design Lab $0.04 Day Laborer Program $0.31 Employee Appreciation & Training Program $0.50 Transfer Insurance Premium Payment to Self Insurance Liability ($1.75) ($1.75) Fund (1100) Transfer one-time amount to partially off-set increased $1.00 insurance cost in Self Insurance Liability Fund (1100) $0.95 $0.40 Vital Services Stabil ization Fund (transfer to Fund 1020) Reduce contributions Unemployment Compensation Fund ($2.50) E - 13

60 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 2015 FY ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 GENERAL PURPOSE FUND (GPF) FY 2015-16 FTE FY 2016-17 On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Expenditure Changes (cont'd) NON-DEPARTMENTAL (cont'd) Increase subsidy to the Human Services Department (Head Start, $5.09 Senior Aides, etc.) Exempt Part-Time Position Conversion $0.30 $0.70 $0.10 Graffiti Evidence Collection & Enforcement Program $0.40 $0.40 Lake Merritt Maintenance (transfer to LLAD Fund 2310) Library System Support (transfer to Measure Q Fund 2241) $1.00 Wildfire Prevention (transfer to WPAD Fund 2321) $0.50 Increase transfer to Kids First! Fund (1780) $1.06 $1.48 Pay-Off negative fund balance in Kaiser Convention Center Fund $1.76 (1730) using one-time funding to eliminate on-going repayment ($0.58) ($0.58) Eliminate on-going repayment of negative fund balance in Kaiser Convention Center Fund (1730) $1.21 Pay-Off negative fund balance in Contract Administration Fee Fund (1791) using one-time funding to eliminate on-going repayment ($0.58) ($0.58) Eliminate on-going repayment of negative fund balance in Contract Administration Fee Fund (1791) Pay down negative fund balance in Facilities Fund (4400) using $4.00 one-time to reduce on-going repayment Reduce on-going repayment of negative fund balance in Facilities ($0.58) ($0.55) Fund (4400) ($0.27) ($0.24) Reduce GPF Internal Service Fund contribution to Facilities Fund (4400) based on Fund 4400 reductions Adjust overhead recovery (increase in non-GPF positions) ($1.03) ($0.72) Additional set-aside for 7.5% Emergency Reserve $2.29 CAPITAL IMPRO VEMENT PRO GRAM ADA Improvements - Woodminster $1.00 E - 14

61 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED BUDGET CHANGES AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS FY 2015 -17 ($ in millions) FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 ALL OTHER FUNDS FTE FY 2015-17 On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Revenue Changes Reduction in Recycling Fund (1710) revenue as a result of new ($4.10) ($4.00) contract $2.26 $1.68 Increase in Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) revenue as a result of new contract Increase in OPR Self-Sustaining Fund (1820) revenue $1.60 $1.60 Increase in State Gas Tax Fund (2230) revenue $1.14 $1.14 Reduction in State Gas Tax: Prop 42 Replacement Fund (2231) ($3.01) ($3.40) revenue Increase in Development Services Fee Fund (2415) revenue $5.87 $5.68 Transfer from General Purpose Fund (1010) one-time amount to $1.00 partially off-set increased insurance cost in the Self Insurance Liability Fund (1100) Subsidy for Human Services to cover CSO and maintain level of operations: Head Start $3.57 All Other Funds $1.52 Affordable Housing Trust Fund (1870) 25% of 12th Street $1.10 Remainder Revenue reduction in Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund ($1.81) ($1.79) (1610) due to DOF disallowance of ROPS items Decrease grant revenue based on actual grant award ($0.19) ($0.19) notification for CDBG Fund 2108 Decrease grant revenue based on actual grant award ($0.26) ($0.26) notification for Home Fund 2109 Increase transfer from the GPF to the Kids First! Fund (1780) $1.48 $1.06 Correction to State Grant Fund 2159 - revenue transfer in from $0.10 1010 for overhead subsidy Significant Expenditure Changes (continued) MAYOR No significant non-GPF Changes CITY COUNCIL No significant non-GPF Changes E - 15

62 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 2015 FY ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 ALL OTHER FUNDS FTE FY 2016-17 On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (cont'd) Significant Expenditure Changes CITY ADMINISTRATOR Add funding for website content writers, editors, designers, $0.10 $0.10 programming, and continual testing - 50% from the Telecommunications Land-Use Fund (1770), 25% from the Development Services Fund (2415) and 25% from the Public Works Clearing Fund (7760) CITY ATTORNEY ($0.43) ($0.42) (1.81) Transfer Deputy City Attorney IV from Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement Fund (1610), Oakland Municipal Employee's Retirement System Fund (7120), & Police & Fire Retirement System Fund (7100) to General Purpose Fund (1010) Transfer Deputy City Attorney III to Development Services $0.24 1.00 $0.23 Fund (2415) from General Purpose Fund (1010) Added Paralegal to the Rent Adjustment Program Fund (2413) $0.12 $0.12 1.00 CITY AUDITOR No significant non-GPF Changes CITY CLERK No significant non-GPF Changes PUBLIC ETHICS COMMISSION No significant non-GPF Changes FINANCE Administration No significant non-GPF Changes Controller's Bureau Add Buyer to Purchasing Fund (4550) 1.00 $0.12 $0.12 Transfer Accountant II from Workforce Investment Act Fund (0.25) ($0.03) ($0.03) (2195) to General Purpose Fund (1010) Revenue Management Bureau (cont'd) Add Revenue Assistant to Mandatory Refuse Program Fund $0.09 1.00 $0.09 (1700) E - 16

63 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES MMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED BUDGET CHANGES SU AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS FY -17 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE FY 2015-17 ALL OTHER FUNDS On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Expenditure Changes (cont'd) FINANCE Revenue Management Bureau (cont'd) Add Office Manager to Mandatory Refuse Program Fund (1700) $0.11 $0.11 1.00 ($0.12) (1.00) Transfer Tax Enforcement Officer II from Mandatory Refuse ($0.12) Program Fund (1700) to General Purpose Fund (1010) Transfer Revenue Assistant to Mandatory Refuse Program Fund 1.00 $0.10 $0.10 (1700) from General Purpose Fund (1010) Treasury Bureau Reduce O&M in Police & Fire Retirement System Fund (7100) ($0.54) ($0.67) and 7120 ($0.02) (0.15) ($0.02) Transfer Retirement Systems Accountant from Oakland Municipal Employee's Retirement System Fund (7120) to General Purpose Fund (1010) HUMAN RESOURCES No significant non-GPF Changes INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY $2.50 Fund debt service for IT licensing and maintenance and other $2.98 major IT projects through one-time financing within the Information Technology IS Fund (4600) $0.13 Transfer Manager, Information Systems to Radio / 0.50 $0.12 Telecommunications Fund (4200) from General Purpose Fund (1010) Transfer Information Systems Supervisor to Radio / $0.12 0.60 $0.11 Telecommunications Fund (4200) from General Purpose Fund (1010) RACE & EQUITY No significant non-GPF Changes POLICE Transfer Grants Coordinator from Department of Justice Fund (1.00) ($0.16) ($0.17) (2112) to the GPF Reduce O&M for Red Light Camera Enforcement Traffic Safety ($0.27) ($0.27) Fund (2416) E - 17

64 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS FY -17 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 ALL OTHER FUNDS FTE On-Going One-Time On-Going Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Expenditure Changes (cont'd) POLICE (cont'd) 2.00 Add positions (Project Manager II and Volunteer Specialist) offset with reductions in miscellaneous personal expenditures in Measure Z Fund (2252) 4.35 $0.20 $0.20 Funding for Crossing Guards at schools with most significant pedestrian safety and traffic, safety problems within the Traffic Safety Fund (2416) FIRE (continued) (1.00) Eliminate Administrative Assistant I Hazardous Materials ($0.09) ($0.09) Inspections Fund (1740) Eliminate Hazardous Materials Inspect, Senior Hazardous (1.00) ($0.14) ($0.14) Materials Inspections Fund (1740) Eliminate Hazardous Materials Inspector II Hazardous ($0.14) (1.00) ($0.14) Materials Inspections Fund (1740) Transfer Assistant Fire Marshal-Non Sworn from Hazardous ($0.21) (1.00) ($0.21) Materials Inspections Fund (1740) to General Purpose Fund (1010) ($0.35) ($0.35) Remove O&M Budget related to the CUPA Program close out in the Hazardous Materials Inspections Fund (1740) Reduce O&M Services: Contract from Wildland Fire Prevention ($0.72) ($0.72) Assessment District Fund (2321) Reduce O&M Contract Contingencies FEMA Fund (2124) ($0.14) ($0.15) Extension of SAFER Grant Fund (2124) (Charge Fire Fighters to $3.08 $0.00 Grant) Reduce O&M Supplies: Miscellaneous and Commodities ($0.35) ($0.34) Measure N Fund (2250) Increase O&M Supplies: Miscellaneous and Commodities $0.37 $0.27 Measure M Fund (2412) HUMAN SERVICES Add Head Start Supervisor to Dept of Health & Human Services 1.00 $0.13 $0.13 Fund (2128) Add Health and Human Services Program Planner to California $0.07 1.00 $0.07 Board of Corrections (2152) Increase contract O&M in Kid's First Fund (1780) due to $1.06 $1.48 additional revenues E - 18

65 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 FY 2015 ($ in millions) ALL OTHER FUNDS FTE FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 On-Going One-Time On-Going Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (cont'd) Significant Expenditure Changes HUMAN SERVICES (cont'd) ($0.51) ($0.51) Decrease in contract O&M due to grant requirements in HUD- ESG/SHP/HOPWA Fund (2103) $0.12 $0.15 Increase funding for Paratransit in Measure BB Fund (2216) OAKLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY Add Library Asst, PPT to Measure Q Fund (2241) $0.07 $0.07 0.80 OAKLAND PARKS & RECREATION Transfer Pools and Boating personnel to OPR Self-Sustaining 4.19 $0.18 $0.18 Fund (1820) from General Purpose Fund (1010) $0.09 1.00 Add Senior Public Service Representative to OPR Self- $0.09 Sustaining Fund (1820) Add Public Service Representation PT to OPR Self-Sustaining 2.00 $0.10 $0.10 Fund (1820) Add Facility Security Assistant PT to OPR Self-Sustaining Fund $0.11 2.00 $0.11 (1820) Add Recreation Program Director to Golf Fund (3200) $0.09 $0.09 1.00 ($0.40) ($0.39) Transfer Ball Fields crew from Oakland Parks & Recreation to (6.29) Oakland Public Works (continued) ECONOMIC & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT 0.50 $0.05 $0.05 Add Program Analyst I, PPT to the Measure C - Transient Occupancy Tax Surcharge Fund (2419) to support the Cultural Arts grants program Eliminate Administrative Analyst II from Workforce ($0.12) (1.00) ($0.12) Investment Act Fund (2195) (2.00) ($0.29) ($0.29) Eliminate Urban Economic Analyst III from Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) & Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (2129) Transfer Administrative Services Manager II, Account Clerk III ($0.06) ($0.06) (0.45) and Administrative Analyst II from Workforce Investment Act Fund (2195) to General Purpose Fund (1010) Transfer Administrative Services Manager II, Account Clerk III, ($0.15) ($0.15) (1.45) Administrative Analyst II and Administrative Assistant I from Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) to General Purpose Fund (1010) E - 19

66 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED BUDGET CHANGES AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS FY -17 2015 ($ in millions) ALL OTHER FUNDS FY 2015-16 FTE FY 2016-17 FY 2015-17 One-Time On-Going On-Going Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Expenditure Changes (cont'd) ECONOMIC & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT (cont'd) Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from ($0.11) (0.50) ($0.11) Workforce Investment Act Fund (2195) to State of California Fund (2159) Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from (0.50) ($0.11) ($0.02) Army Base Leasing Fund (5671) to State of California Other Fund (2159) (partial 0.08 FTE in Y2) $0.13 Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager to $0.21 1.00 State of California Fund (2159) (partial 0.58 FTE in Y2) from Workforce Investment Act Fund (2195) and Army Base Leasing Fund (5671) ($0.21) ($0.22) Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from (1.00) Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) to the General Purpose Fund (1010) and Central City East Taxable Bond Fund (5643) Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager to $0.11 0.50 $0.11 Central City East Taxable Bond Fund (5643) from Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) Transfer Program Analyst II from Public Art Capital Fund (0.25) ($0.03) ($0.03) (5505) to Measure C Fund (2419) Transfer Program Analyst II to Measure C Fund (2419) from 0.25 $0.03 $0.03 Public Art Capital Fund (5505) Transfer Urban Economic Analysis II and Urban Economic (2.00) ($0.28) ($0.28) Analyst IV from Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) to Central City East Taxable Bond Fund (5643) Transfer Urban Economic Analysis II and Urban Economic $0.28 $0.28 2.00 Analyst IV to Central City East Taxable Bond Fund (5643) from Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) $0.14 $0.14 Transfer Urban Economic Analyst III to HUD-CDBG Fund 1.00 (2108) from General Purpose Fund (1010) Transfer Urban Economic Analyst IV, Projects from HUD-CDBG (1.00) ($0.17) ($0.18) Fund (2108) to General Purpose Fund (1010) Reprogram O&M in Oakland Base Reuse Authority Fund (5670) $0.51 $0.51 Reduce O&M in Workforce Investment Act Fund (2195) ($0.65) ($0.65) Add O&M in Army Base Leasing Fund (5671) for CCIG leasing $0.51 $0.31 activities (revenue supported) E - 20

67 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 FY 2015 ($ in millions) ALL OTHER FUNDS FTE FY 2015-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 On-Going One-Time On-Going Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (cont'd) Significant Expenditure Changes HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (continued) Reallocate O&M for DreamCatcher facility in HUD-CDBG Fund $0.50 (2108) 2.00 $0.20 $0.20 Add Home Management Counselor II to HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) 1.00 Add Accountant II to HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) $0.11 $0.11 $0.12 $0.12 1.00 Add Program Analyst II to Rent Adjustment Program Fund (2413) -- Limited Duration, 2 years only 1.00 Add Hearing Officer to Rent Adjustment Program Fund (2413) -- $0.19 $0.19 Limited Duration, 2 years only Add Administrative Assistant I to Rent Adjustment Program 1.00 $0.08 $0.08 Fund (2413) -- Limited Duration, 2 years only O&M for Development Projects Affordable Housing Trust Fund $3.55 $4.11 (1870) Eliminate vacant Administrative Analyst I from Successor ($0.11) (1.00) ($0.11) Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) & HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) Freeze vacant Project Manager II from Successor (1.00) ($0.22) ($0.22) Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610), HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) & HUD-HOME Fund (2109) (0.53) ($0.10) ($0.10) Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) to Affordable Housing Trust Fund (1870) Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager to $0.10 0.53 $0.10 Affordable Housing Trust Fund (1870) from Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) Transfer Loan Servicing Specialist from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) (0.35) ($0.04) ($0.04) to HUD EDI Grant Fund (2105) Transfer Loan Servicing Specialist to HUD EDI Grant Fund $0.04 0.35 $0.04 (2105) from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) Transfer Administrative Analyst I from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) (0.15) ($0.02) ($0.02) to HUD EDI Grant Fund (2105) 0.15 $0.02 $0.02 Transfer Administrative Analyst I to HUD EDI Grant Fund (2105) from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) Eliminate vacant Project Manager III from HUD-CDBG Fund ($0.27) (1.00) ($0.26) (2108) ($0.11) Eliminate vacant Loan Servicing Specialist from HUD-CDBG (1.00) ($0.11) Fund (2108) E - 21

68 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS FY -17 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 ALL OTHER FUNDS FY 2016-17 FTE FY 2015-16 One-Time On-Going On-Going Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (cont'd) Significant Expenditure Changes HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (cont'd) ($0.15) (1.00) ($0.15) Eliminate Management Assistant from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) & Development Services Fund (2415) Transfer Program Analyst III from Miscellaneous Grant Fund (1.00) ($0.07) $0.00 (2999) to Affordable Housing Trust Fund (1870) Transfer Program Analyst III to Affordable Housing Trust Fund $0.15 $0.15 1.00 (1870) from Miscellaneous Grant Fund (2999) (extend position to Y2) Transfer Community Development Program Coordinator from (0.30) ($0.04) $0.00 HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) to State of California Fund (2159) Transfer Community Development Program Coordinator to 0.30 $0.04 $0.00 State of California Fund (2159) from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) Eliminate Community Development Program Coordinator from ($0.15) $0.00 (1.00) State of California Other Fund (2159) & HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) in Y2 Eliminate Community Development Program Coordinator from ($0.15) ($0.15) (1.00) State of California Other Fund (2159) (1.00) Eliminate Program Analyst III from State of California Fund $0.00 ($0.11) (2159) Transfer Director of Housing and Community Development (0.15) ($0.04) ($0.05) from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) to Rent Adjustment Program Fund (2413) Transfer Director of Housing and Community Development to 0.15 $0.04 $0.05 Rent Adjustment Program Fund (2413) from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) Transfer Executive Assistant to the Director from HUD-CDBG ($0.09) (0.80) ($0.09) Fund (2108) to Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) Transfer Executive Assistant to the Director to Successor $0.09 0.80 $0.09 Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) (1.00) ($0.12) ($0.12) Transfer Home Management Counselor III from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) to Affordable Housing Trust Fund (1870) Transfer Home Management Counselor III to Affordable $0.12 1.00 $0.12 Housing Trust Fund (1870) from HUD-CDBG Fund (2108) PLANNING & BUILDING (continued) Add Manager, Building Services to the Development Services $0.22 1.00 $0.22 Fund (2415) E - 22

69 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS -17 FY 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 FY 2016-17 ALL OTHER FUNDS FY 2015-16 FTE On-Going One-Time On-Going Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (cont'd) Significant Expenditure Changes PLANNING & BUILDING (cont'd) 2.00 $0.23 $0.23 Add Process Coordinator II to the Development Services Fund (2415) 1.00 Add Process Coordinator III to the Development Services Fund $0.13 $0.14 (2415) Add Planner IV to the Development Services Fund (2415) $0.31 $0.32 2.00 1.00 $0.13 $0.13 Add Planner III to the Development Services Fund (2415) $0.34 5.00 Add Office Assistant II to the Development Services Fund $0.34 (2415) Add Account Clerk II to the Development Services Fund (2415) $0.07 $0.07 1.00 Add Public Service Representative to the Development Services 1.00 $0.08 $0.08 Fund (2415) Add Executive Assistant to the Director to the Development $0.12 1.00 $0.12 Services Fund (2415) Repayment of negative fund balance in the Development $0.65 $0.53 Services Fund (2415) Add and reprogram O&M to the Development Services Fund $0.88 $0.61 (2415) Upgrade Business Analyst II to Business Analyst IV in the $0.06 $0.06 Development Services Fund (2415) $0.23 2.00 Transfer Specialty Combination Inspector to Development $0.23 Services Fund (2415) from General Purpose Fund (1010) Transfer Specialty Combination Inspector to Comprehensive 2.00 $0.23 $0.23 Clean-up Fund (1720) from General Purpose Fund (1010) Transfer Public Service Representative to Development 0.50 $0.04 $0.04 Services Fund (2415) from Recycling Fund (1710) & General Purpose Fund (1010) Transfer Public Service Representative from Recycling Fund ($0.01) (0.17) ($0.01) (1710) to Development Services Fund (2415) (1.00) ($0.17) ($0.18) Transfer Engineer, Civil (Office) to OPW OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS (cont'd) Add Civil Engineer Office and Engineer Assistant II to Measure $0.06 0.40 $0.06 B Fund (2211) $0.46 $0.46 Add and reprogram O&M in Measure B Fund (2211) Add Program Analyst III to Measure B Bicycle/Ped Fund (2212) 1.10 $0.15 $0.15 E - 23

70 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS 2015 -17 FY ($ in millions) ALL OTHER FUNDS FY 2016-17 FTE FY 2015-16 FY 2015-17 On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Expenditure Changes (cont'd) OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS (cont'd) $0.49 $0.49 Add O&M for increase in utility costs in LLAD Fund (2310) $0.42 $0.42 Add O&M with offsetting increase in revenues in Development Services Fund (2415) $0.40 Add Lake Merritt Maintenance funding to LLAD Fund (2310) $0.40 (transfer from the GPF) Add O&M for Parks Prioritization Study in LLAD Fund (2310) $0.17 $0.02 $0.02 (transfer from the GPF) $0.02 $0.02 Delete Project Manager and Electrician and add Program Analyst III and Maintenance Mechanic in Sewer Service Fund (3100) Add and reprogram O&M in Sewer Service Fund (3100) $0.19 $0.02 Add O&M for fuel and other supplies and equipment in the $0.49 $0.49 Equipment Fund (4100) Freeze Stationery Engineer, Custodians and Maintenance ($0.30) (3.50) ($0.29) Mechanic PT in Facilities Fund (4400) 3.60 $0.50 $0.51 Add Civil Engineer Office and Engineer Assistant II in Public Works Clearing Fund (7760) 1.00 $0.08 $0.08 Add Public Service Representative in Public Works Clearing Fund (7760) 0.90 Add Program Analyst III in Public Works Clearing Fund (7760) $0.12 $0.12 4.00 $0.54 $0.54 Add Pothole and Seam Sealing Crew 1 FTE Street Maintenance Leader and 3 FTE Public Works Maintenance Workers and O&M to Measure BB Fund (2216) Transfer Landscape and Maintenance Personnel to $0.37 $0.37 8.50 Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) from General Purpose Fund (1010) Transfer Public Works Maintenance Workers and O&M to $0.32 $0.33 2.00 Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) from General Purpose Fund (1010) 1.00 $0.10 $0.10 Transfer Painter to Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) from General Purpose Fund (1010) ($0.86) ($0.86) (3.00) Transfer of Environmental Personnel - Management Intern, Program Analyst II, Program Analyst III and O&M from Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) to Recycling Fund (1710) Transfer of Environmental Personnel - Management Intern, $0.86 $0.86 3.00 Program Analyst II, Program Analyst III and O&M to Recycling Fund (1710) from the Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) E - 24

71 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED BUDGET CHANGES AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS FY -17 2015 ($ in millions) FY 2015-17 FY 2016-17 ALL OTHER FUNDS FY 2015-16 FTE On-Going On-Going One-Time Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) (cont'd) Significant Expenditure Changes OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS (cont'd) Reduction in Recycling contract expenses due to new franchise ($6.19) ($6.28) in Recycling Fund (1710) $0.66 $0.65 11.17 Transfer Gardener II, Irrigation Specialist, and Park Attendant PT to Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) from LLAD Fund (2310) Transfer Gardener II, Irrigation Specialist, and Park Attendant ($0.65) ($0.66) (11.17) PT to Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) from LLAD Fund (2310) (7.20) Transfer of Transportation Engineers and O&M from ($1.68) ($1.69) Multipurpose Reserve Fund (1750) to Measure BB Fund (2216) 7.20 $1.68 $1.69 Transfer of Transportation Engineers and O&M to Measure BB Fund (2216) from Multipurpose Reserve Fund (1750) Set aside funding for Department of Transportation in Measure $1.00 $0.50 BB Fund (2216) Transfer of O&M and personnel costs to Multipurpose Reserve 0.38 $1.60 $1.60 Fund (1750) from Central District Bond Funds (5611 and 5613) due to the transfer of ORA garages to the City Transfer of O&M and personnel costs from Central District bond (0.38) ($1.60) ($1.60) Funds (5611 and 5613) to Multipurpose Reserve Fund (1750) due to the transfer of ORA garages to the City $0.31 2.33 $0.31 Transfer of personnel to Measure F Fund (2215) from State Gas Tax: Prop 42 Replacement Fund (2231) due to the reduction in gas tax revenues (1.00) ($0.09) ($0.09) Transfer Administrative Assistant I from Sewer Service Fund (3100) to Measure F Fund (2215) Transfer of personnel and O&M to Measure F Fund (2215) from $1.64 $1.64 6.00 State Gas Tax Fund (2230), State Gas Tax: Prop 42 Replacement Fund (2231) and Administrative Assistant I from Sewer Service Fund (3100) Transfer of personnel to Measure BB Fund (2216) from State 16.60 $0.00 $1.96 Gas Tax Fund (2230) due to the reduction in gas tax revenues Transfer of personnel from State Gas Tax Fund (2230) to ($1.96) $0.00 (16.60) Measure BB Fund (2216) due to the reduction in gas tax revenues Transfer of personnel to State Gas Tax Fund (2230) from State $0.00 $1.73 14.93 Gas Tax: Prop 42 Replacement Fund (2231) due to the reduction in gas tax revenues E - 25

72 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BUDGET CHANGES SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ADOPTED AND REVENUE ENHANCEMENTS FY 2015 -17 ($ in millions) FY 2016-17 FY 2015-17 FTE FY 2015-16 ALL OTHER FUNDS On-Going One-Time On-Going Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Incr / (Reduc) Significant Expenditure Changes (cont'd) OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS (cont'd) Transfer of personnel from State Gas Tax: Prop 42 Replacement ($2.27) ($2.04) (18.93) Fund (2231) to State Gas Tax Fund (2230), Measure F Fund (2215) and Measure BB Fund (2216) due to the reduction in gas tax revenues in State Gas Tax: Prop 42 Replacement Fund (2231) Revolving Funds for Private Property Side Walk Repair in $0.40 Development Services Fund (2415) City Hall Fire Alarm System in Facilities Fund (4400) (transfer $0.55 from the GPF) Transfer Civil Engineer to Public Works from Department of $0.18 1.00 $0.17 Planning and Building in Development Services Fund (2415) $0.40 Transfer Ball Fields crew from Oakland Parks & Recreation to 6.29 $0.39 Oakland Public Works NON-DEPARTMENTAL Transfer Insurance Premium Payment to Fund 1100 from $1.75 $1.75 General Purpose Fund (1010) E - 26

73 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS Source of Funds Uses of Funds Fund Description Fund General Purpose Fund Revenues from most of the City's Discretion of the City Council Most City 1010 departments receive General Purpose taxes, fees and service charges Fund support Self-Insurance Liability Self-insurance liability claims and 1100 Transfer of funds from the General settlements, outside legal services and Purpose Fund, Sewer Fund, and court costs other miscellaneous funds City payroll deductions for 1150 Workers' Compensation Workers' Compensation Insurance Workers' Compensation Insurance Insurance Claims claims and administration 1200 Pension Override Tax Revenue Property tax override Payment to the Police and Fire Retirement System Oakland Redevelopment Redevelopment Property Tax 1610 City staff and other costs related to Trust Fund ("RPTTF") Oakland Redevelopment Successor Successor Agency (ORSA) Agency projects Assessments on delinquent refuse Collection of delinquent refuse collection 1700 Mandatory Refuse Collection collection customers bills 1710 Recycling Program Special surcharge on refuse City's recycling program and related activities collection bills Comprehensive Clean-Up Special surcharge on refuse Illegal dumping enforcement; street 1720 collection bills sweeping, custodial services and other clean-up related activities Henry J Kaiser Convention Center Transfers from General Purpose Reduce negative fund balance, in 1730 Fund, in accordance with accordance with repayment plan repayment plan Hazardous Materials Inspection Program Fees from inspections by Hazardous Materials Inspection 1740 Emergency Service Hazardous Materials Unit 1750 Multi-Purpose Reserve Fees from City-owned off-street Off-street parking facilities revenue is parking facilities, other revenues at restricted by Council policy to parking Council discretion facility construction and operation; All other revenue may be spent at Council discretion 1760 Telecommunications Reserve Cable television franchise fees Operation of the City's cable television station (KTOP) and other telecommunications-related operations E - 27

74 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS ’ D ) ( CONT Fund Description Fund Uses of Funds Source of Funds Telecommunications Land Use 1770 Telecommunication projects Fee revenue generated from use of public property for telecommunications equipment Kids First Oakland Children's Fund Transfer from the General Purpose Programs for children and youth 1780 Fund (equal to 3.0% of unrestricted revenues) Contract Administration Fee Transfers from General Purpose 1791 Reduce negative fund balance, in accordance with repayment plan Fund, in accordance with repayment plan Office of Parks and Recreation Fees for recreation-related program Supporting parks and recreation programs 1820 Cultural Advisory (OPRCA) Self- Sustaining Revolving Fund Central District Project Area Loans Loan repayments Redevelopment projects within Central 1830 District Project Area Central City East Project Area Loans Loan repayments Redevelopment projects within Central City 1831 East Project Area 1832 Coliseum Project Area Loans Loan repayments Redevelopment projects within Coliseum Project Area Penalties for blight authorized by To Increase, improve, and preserve the 1870 Affordable Housing Trust Fund Ordinance No. 13139 & 25% of supply of affordable housing in the City, residual RPTTF with priority given to housing for very low income households. Low and Moderate Income Housing Loan repayments 1880 Low and Moderate Income Housing Asset Fund (LMIHF) Operating cost Asset Fund (LMIHF) Operation Multi Service Center/Rent Rental income Building maintenance for the Multi Service 1882 Center 2000 Subordinated Housing Set- Proceeds from 2000 Subordinated 1883 Development of Low and Moderate Income aside bonds Housing Set-aside Bonds Housing projects 1884 Proceeds from 2006 Subordinated Development of Low and Moderate Income 2006 Housing Set-aside Bond Housing projects Proceeds Housing Set-aside Bonds 2011 Subordinated Housing Set- Proceeds from 2011 Subordinated 1885 Development of Low and Moderate Income aside Bonds Housing Set-aside Bonds Housing projects 2102 Department of Agriculture U.S. Department of Agriculture Year-round lunch program for school children offered through City's Department of Human Services E - 28

75 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ( ’ D ) FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS CONT Fund Description Uses of Funds Fund Source of Funds Fee revenue generated from use of 1770 Telecommunications Land Use Telecommunication projects public property for telecommunications equipment Kids First Oakland Children's Transfer from the General Purpose Programs for children and youth 1780 Fu nd Fund (equal to 3.0% of unrestricted revenues) Transfers from General Purpose Reduce negative fund balance, in Contract Administration Fee 1791 Fund, in accordance with accordance with repayment plan repayment plan 1820 Fees for recreation-related Supporting parks and recreation Office of Parks and Recreation Cultural Advisory (OPRCA) Self- program programs Sustaining Revolving Fund Central District Project Area 1830 Loan repayments Redevelopment projects within Central District Project Area Loans 1831 Central City East Project Area Loan repayments Redevelopment projects within Central Loans City East Project Area 1832 Coliseum Project Area Loans Loan repayments Redevelopment projects within Coliseum Project Area 1870 Penalties for blight authorized by Affordable Housing Trust Fund To Increase, improve, and preserve the Ordinance No. 13139 & 25% of supply of affordable housing in the City, residual RPTTF with priority given to housing for very low income households Low and Moderate Income Loan repayments Low and Moderate Income Housing 1880 Asset Fu nd ( LMIHF) Operating cost Hou sing Asset Fu nd ( LMIHF) Operation 1882 Multi Service Center/Rent Rental income Building maintenance for the Multi Service Center 1883 2000 Subordinated Housing Set- Development of Low and Moderate Proceeds from 2000 Subordinated Housing Set-aside Bonds aside bonds Income Housing projects 2006 Housing Set-aside Bond Development of Low and Moderate Proceeds from 2006 Subordinated 1884 Housing Set-aside Bonds Income Housing projects Proceeds 1885 2011 Subordinated Housing Set- Proceeds from 2011 Subordinated Development of Low and Moderate Housing Set-aside Bonds aside Bonds Income Housing projects 2102 Department of Agriculture U.S. Department of Agriculture Year-round lunch program for school children offered through City's Department of Human Services E - 29

76 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES CONT ’ D ) FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS ( Fund Description Fund S ource of Funds Uses of Funds Offset city's costs of supporting the 2123 US Department of Homeland Urban Area Security Initiative newly established Homeland Security (UASI) Grants Security p rogram 2124 Federal disaster relieve fund Disaster recovery activities Federal Emergency Management Agency 2125 E nvironmental Protection Agency Environmental projects Environmental Protection Agency 2127 Dept of Transportation-TIGER II Department of Transportation Oakland Army Base projects Grant Department of Health and Various social services programs for low- Federal funds administered by 2128 income residents such as headstart California Department of Economic Human Services (DHHS) O pportunity 2129 Trade Corridor Improvement To finance the improvements of highway State of California, California Fund (TCIF) State Grant Transportation Commission (CTC) capacity, freight rail system, port c apacity, truck corridor, airport ground access of the previous Oakland Army Base area known as the Trade Corridor Investment Fund (TCIF) Grants from California Department Health and social case management California Department of Aging 2132 services for frail elderly residents of Aging State of California Capital projects related to park and 2134 California Parks and Recreation recreation acquisition and development California Water Resource Board State of California Water Resource 2136 Improvement on water quality Board Library programs 2138 State of California grants from California Department of Department of Education Education 2139 California Department of State of California grants from To provide funding for energy efficiency Conservation Department of Conservation and conservation programs California Department of State of California grants from Capital projects related to transportation 2140 Department of Transportation Transportation 2144 California Dept. of Housing and Provide grants for Emergency Housing California Housing and Community Development Community Development grants Program and Winter Relief Program 2146 California State Emergency Pay for emergency-related services such State of California Service as seismic retrofitting of buildings 2148 California Library Services State Public Library Commission Library operations and Foundation E - 30

77 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ( CONT ’ D ) FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS Fund Description Uses of Funds Fund Source of Funds 2150 California Department of Fish and California Department of Fish To provide funding for programs related Games to preservation of wildlife and Games 2152 California Board of Corrections California Board of Corrections Research/evaluate the effectiveness of narcotics enforcement activities California Integrated Waste California Integrated Waste 2154 To provide funding for used motor oil Management Board Management Board recycling and public education programs State COPS grants Law enforcement activities 2158 5th Year State COPS Grant, AB 1913, Statutes of 2000 State of California Other State of California Miscellaneous programs 2159 Street improvements within the City of County of Alameda 2160 County of Alameda Grants Oakland 2162 Metropolitan Transportation To provide funding for transportation Metro Transportation Com: TDA Commission programs Metropolitan Transportation 2163 Projects that benefit pedestrians and Metropolitan Transportation Commission - Transportation Commission bicyclists Program Grant Congestion Mitigation & Air Streetscape improvement projects County of Alameda 2164 Quality (CMAQ) 2165 Prop 1B Nov 2006 CA Trans State of California - Prop. 1B Local street and road repairs Bond To provide funding for Broadway 2166 US Department of Commerce Bay Area Air Quality Management Shuttle programs Economic Development District Administration 2172 Alameda County Abandoned Vehicle registration surcharge Removal of abandoned vehicles from Vehicle Abatement Authority private or public property 2175 Alameda County: Source County of Alameda To provide funding for recycling programs Reduction & Recycling 2185 Oakland Redevelopment Agency Loans to qualified businesses within the Oakland Redevelopment Agency Grants Central District Project Area 2190 Private Grants Corporations and private Restricted to specific programs individuals 2195 Workforce Investment Act US Department of Labor Employment and training services for Oakland residents; overseen by Oakland Workforce Investment Board and the Mayor E - 31

78 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES AND DESCRIPTIONS CONT ’ D ) ( FUND Source of Funds Uses of Funds Fund Fund Description Alameda County Transportation Measure B - ACTIA 2211 Traffic and transportation projects, Imp rovement Au th ority ( ACTIA) - including street and signal construction, maintenance and repair 1/2 percent Alameda County sales tax re-authorized by Measure B in 2002 Measure B - Bicycle/Pedestrian 2212 Alameda County Transportation Bicycle and pedestrian projects Imp rovement Au th ority ( ACTIA) - Pass-Thru Funds 1/2 percent Alameda County sales tax re-authorized by Measure B in 2002 Measure B - Paratransit - ACTIA Alameda County Transportation Paratransit projects 2213 Imp rovement Au th ority ( ACTIA) - 1/2 percent Alameda County sales tax re-authorized by Measure B in 2002 2214 ACTIA Reimbursable Grants Alameda County Transportation Transportation projects Imp rovement Au th ority ( ACTIA) 2215 Measure F - Vehicle Registration Local transportation projects defined by Vehicle registration fee Fee Measure F Measure BB - Alameda County Alameda County Transportation 2216 Traffic and transportation projects, Imp rovement Au th ority ( ACTIA) - Transportation Commission Sales including street and signal construction, Tax 1/2 percent Alameda County sales Bicycle and pedestrian, paratransit, maintenance and repair tax re-authorized by Measure BB in 2014 State Gas Tax State of California - allocation of 2230 Uses related to local streets and gasoline tax revenues highways Includes acquisition of real property, construction, improvement, repairs and maintenance of streets and lighting 2231 State Gas Tax-Prop 42 For Local street and road rehabilitation State Proposition 42 Replacement Funds Measure Q - Library Services Voter-approved special parcel tax Maintenance of library operations 2241 Retention-Enhancement authorized by Measure Q 2242 Measure Q Reserve - Library Required reserve Required Reserve from Measure Q Services Retention-Enhancement 2250 Measure N Fund Voter-approved special parcel tax To provide paramedic services on fire authorized by Measure N trucks E - 32

79 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ( ’ D ) FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS CONT Fund Description Uses of Funds Fund Source of Funds 2251 Special parcel and parking tax Public Safety Act / 2004 Measure Violence prevention through social- services intervention, long-term crime- Y prevention programs, police services, fire- safety and paramedic support 2252 Special parcel and parking tax Measure Z - Violence Prevention Violence prevention through social- services intervention, long-term crime- and Public Safety Act of 2014 prevention programs, police services, fire- safety and paramedic support Measure WW: East Bay Regional 2008 Measure WW bond proceeds 2260 Parks and open space renovation Parks District Local Grant projects through East Bay Regional Parks District Landscaping & Lighting Landscape & Lighting Assessments 2310 Operation, construction, maintenance, Assessment District (assessed on property tax bills) repair of street lighting, landscaping, and related activities 2320 Fire Suppression Assessment Fire suppression programs Special voter-approved tax District 2321 Wildland Fire Prevention Special voter-approved tax Vegetation management services Assessment District Fund 2330 Special tax from parcels in a Vegetation management services in that Werner Court Vegetation Management District subdivision located in the Oakland area Hills Wood Street Community Facilities Special tax on Wood Street Wood street community facilities 2331 District Community maintenance 2410 Link Handipark Surcharge on handicap parking Programs for the elderly offenses False Alarm Reduction Program Alarm Permit Revenue For the False Alarm Reduction Program 2411 2412 Alameda County Emergency Emergency-related programs Voter-approved special parcel tax Dispatch Service Supplemental authorized by Measure M Assessment 2413 Rent Adjustment Program Fund Rent program service fee The fees are dedicated for the payment of services and costs of the Rent Adjustment Program E - 33

80 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ( CONT ’ D ) FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS Fund Description Uses of Funds Fund Source of Funds Licenses, fees, and permits from 2415 Development Service Fund Planning and zoning services; construction inspections, construction housing and commercial planning permit approvals; building code and construction-related activities enforcement; plan checks, engineering services Traffic Safety Fund Fines and forfeitures of bail for Traffic safety projects including 2416 construction and improvement of violations of the State Vehicle Code streets, signs and signals 2417 Excess Litter Fee Assessment fees from business Litter and trash clean-up resulting from businesses Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) To provide funding to the Oakland 2419 Three (3) % Surcharge to the Convention and Visitors Bureau (OCVB), Surcharge City's Transient Occupancy Tax the Oakland Zoo, Oakland Museum of (Hotel Tax) California, Chabot Space & Science Center and the Cultural Arts Programs and Fesitivals Workforce Investment Act To provide funding for the Youth Federal stimulus funds 2601 administered through the ( ARRA) Employment programs Workforce Investment Act 2603 HUD-ESG/SHP/HOPWA ( ARRA) Federal stimulus funds To provide funding for the Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re- administered through HUD Housing Program 2605 Dept of Health & Human Services Federal stimulus funds To provide funding for the Head Start ( ARRA) Program administered through the Department of Health and Human Services Metro Transportation Federal stimulus funds 2606 To provide funding for street Commission ( ARRA) resurfacing, curb ramp installation and administered through Metro Transportation Commission sidewalk repair 2607 Department of Justice-COPS Hiring and/or preserving police officers Federal stimulus funds administered through the Hiring Recovery Program (ARRA) Department of Justice 2608 Environmental Protection Agency Federal stimulus funds To provide funding for assessment of ( ARRA) administered through the hazardous substances in soil and Environmental Protection Agency groundwater in west Oakland 2609 Dept of Energy-EECBG Program Federal stimulus funds To provide funding for energy efficiency ( ARRA) administered through the and conservation programs Department of Energy E - 34

81 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS ’ D ) ( CONT Fund Description Uses of Funds Fund Source of Funds 2610 Federal stimulus funds State Water Control Board- To provide funding for removal of stormwater pollutants at Lake Merritt CWSRF Program ( ARRA) administered through the State Water Control Board and Oakland Estuary HUD-CDBG ( ARRA) Federal stimulus funds To provide funding for the community 2611 administered through HUD development block grant program California Department of 2612 Federal stimulus funds To provide funding for weatherization administered through The services to low-income residents Community Services - Weatherization Assistance Department of Community Service and Development Program ( ARRA) Port Security Grant Program 2613 Federal stimulus funds Port Security Programs administered Pass-through grant ( ARRA) from Port of Oakland 2826 Mortgage Revenue Proceeds from revenue bonds and Multi-Lending mortgage purchase repayment of mortgage loans programs 2910 Federal Asset Forfeiture - Uses related to law enforcement Federal government 15% Set-Aside 2912 Federal Asset Forfeiture City Federal government Uses related to law enforcement Share 2914 State of California Uses related to law enforcement State Asset Forfeiture Public Works Grants Various State and Federal grants Public Works projects 2990 Parks and Recreation Grants Proceeds of b onds authorized b y 2992 Park and open space acquisition, capital improvement projects and programs; Measure A and other grants Year-Round Lunch Program 2993 Library Grants Library Grants For Library related projects 2994 Social Services Grants Grant from City of Berkeley Temporary winter shelter at Oakland Army Base Miscellaneous grants or contracts Police Grants Various reimbursable police activities 2995 from other government entities 2996 Parks and Recreation Grants Parks & Recreation grants. Track Parks & Recreation grants for 2001 2001 separately from Fund 2992, which tracked prior year grant activities. 2999 Miscellaneous Grants Various State, Federal and Restricted to specific activities approved miscellaneous grants by the granting source E - 35

82 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ( FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS D ) CONT ’ ource of Funds Uses of Funds S Fund Fund Description Sewer service charges (charged on 3100 Sewer Service Fund Acq uisition, construction, reconstruction, EBMUD bills) relocation, maintenance, operation and r epair of sewer facilities Required reserve ransfer from sewer service fund 3150 Sewer Rate Stabilization Fund T 3200 Golf Course City golf course fees and City golf course operations, maintenance and capital improvements concession charges Equipment rental charges to Maintenance and replacement of City Equipment Rental 4100 operating departments vehicles and other motorized equipment 4200 Rad io Fu nd Maintenance and replacement of City Radio rental charges to operating radios and other communications departments eq uipment Maintenance and replacement of City 4210 Telephone Equipment & Telephone and software charges to oftware operating departments telephones and computer software S 4300 Reproduction Maintenance and replacement of City Reproduction equipment rental reproduction equipment and services charges to operating d epartments City Facilities Operation and maintenance of City 4400 City facility rental charges to operating departments facilities, including custodial services 4450 City Facilities Energy California Energy Commission Implement energy conservation capital projects in city facilities Conservation Loan 4500 Central Stores Reimbursements from Supplies, materials and equipment for City operations departments Purchasing charges to operating Staffing, operations and maintenance for 4550 Purchasing Fund departments Purchasing unit of the Controllers' Office 4600 Information Technology Information Technology charges to Operation and maintenance of City operating departments information Technology systems Piedmont Pines Underground Bond proceeds from Piedmont 5055 Piedmont Pines area underground Assessment District projects Pines Underground Assessment D istrict Revenue Bonds 5057 2012 Reassessment Project Fund Special property tax assessment To refund the 1999 Reassessment from Reassessment District No 99- Bonds, including the forms of Fiscal 1 A gent, Escrow Agreement Deposit and Trust Agreement, and Bond Purchase Agreement E - 36

83 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ( ’ D ) FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS CONT Fund Description Uses of Funds Fund Source of Funds Improvements to the Rockridge Library Special property tax assessment 5130 Rockridge Library Assessment District Proceeds from JPA Series 2005 5200 JPFA Capital Projects: Series 2005 Seismic retrofit; infrastructure projects, b onds deferred maintenance and improvements to public facilities 5311 Measure G: 2006 Zoo, Museum Capital Projects: Oakland Zoo, Museum Bond proceeds from Measure G: and Chabot Space & Science Center Series 2006 improvements 5320 Measure DD: 2003A Clean Water, Proceeds from General Obligation Capital projects to improve water bonds authorized by Measure DD quality; provide educational and Safe Parks & Open Space Trust in 2003A recreational facilities for children; clean Fund for Oakland up Lake Merritt; restore Oakland's creeks, waterfront, and Estuary; and renovate parks and open space 5321 Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water, Capital projects to improve water Proceeds from General Obligation bonds authorized by Measure DD Safe Parks & Open Space Trust quality; provide educational and Fund for Oakland recreational facilities for children; clean in 2009B up Lake Merritt; restore Oakland's creeks, waterfront, and Estuary; and renovate parks and open space Municipal Capital Improvement Bond proceeds Construction, purchase, lease, or 5500 improvements of City capital assets 5501 Revenue proceeds from 1989 Construction, purchase, lease, or Municipal Capital Improvement - 1989 Local Government Funding LGFA Ref u nd improvements of City capital assets Agency ( LGFA) Ref u nd 5504 Parking Garage Access Garage access improvement project Proceeds from lease Improvement Municipal Improvement Capital- 1.5% assessment on eligible City's Use for Public Art activities 5505 Pu b lic Art capital projects 5510 Capital Reserves One-time revenues, mainly from Capital projects bond refinancing / restructuring and financing deals 5610 Central District Projects Funding Agreement with the To provide funding for Central District Former Oakland Redevelopment redevelopment projects Agency E - 37

84 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS ’ D ) ( CONT Fund Description ource of Funds Uses of Funds Fund S 5611 Central District: TA Bonds Series To provide funding for Central District Bond proceeds from the Central District Tax Allocation Bond: Series redevelopment projects 2003 2 003 Central District: TA Bonds Series To provide funding for Central District Bond proceeds from the Central 5612 redevelopment projects District Tax Allocation Bond: Series 2005 2 005 5613 Bond proceeds from the Central To provide funding for Central District Central District: TA Bonds Series 2009T District Tax Allocation Bond: Series redevelopment projects 2 009 One-time revenues, mainly from 5630 Broadway/MacArthur/San Pablo To provide funding for bond refinancing / restructuring Projects Broadway/MacArthur/San Pablo area an r d financing deals edevelopment projects Central City East Projects Funding Agreement with the 5640 To provide funding for Central City East Area redevelopment projects Former Oakland Redevelopment Ag ency 5642 Central City East TA Bonds Series Bond proceeds from the Central To provide funding for Central City East 2006A-TE (Tax Exempt) City East Tax Allocation Bond: Area redevelopment projects S eries 2006A-TE Bond proceeds from the Central 5643 To provide funding for Central City East Central City East TA Bonds Series 2006A-T (Taxable) City East Tax Allocation Bond: Area redevelopment projects S eries 2006A-T Coliseum Projects 5650 To provide funding for Coliseum Area Funding Agreement with the Former Oakland Redevelopment redevelopment projects Ag ency 5653 Bond proceeds from the Coliseum To provide funding for Coliseum Area Coliseum: TA Bonds Series 2003 Tax Allocation Bond: Series 2003 redevelopment projects 5655 Coliseum: TA Bonds Series 2006B- To provide funding for Coliseum Area Bond proceeds from Coliseum Tax Allocation Bond: Series 2006B-TE TE (Tax Exempt) redevelopment projects Coliseum: TA Bonds Series 2006B- To provide funding for Coliseum Area Bond proceeds from Coliseum Tax 5656 Allocation Bond: Series 2006B-T redevelopment projects T (Taxable) 5660 West Oakland Projects Funding Agreement with the To provide funding for West Oakland Area redevelopment projects Former Oakland Redevelopment Ag ency 5670 Oakland Base Reuse Authority Transfer from the former Oakland Capital projects Redevelopment Agency E - 38

85 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS FUND CONT ’ D ) ( Fund Description Uses of Funds Fund Source of Funds Lease revenue 5671 OBRA: Leasing & Utility Building maintenance for the Oakland Army Base Joint Army Base Infrastructure Transfer from the former Oakland Oakland Army Base environmental 5672 Redevelopment Agency remediation cost OBRA: Environmental Oakland Army Base environmental Transfer from the former Oakland 5673 Remediation Redevelopment Agency remediation cost Oakland Army Base Joint Oakland Army Base environmental Transfer from the former Oakland 5674 remediation cost Remediation Redevelopment Agency Funds Transfer from LLAD (2310) Debt service payment for the LED 2013 LED Streetlight Acquisition 6013 Streetlight lease Lease Financing Bank and bond expenditure for both 6014 CSCD Authority 1992 Fund transfer from Municipal principal and interest Improvement Capital Fund 6015 Certificates of Participation- Bank and bond expenditure for both COP - Oakland Museum 2002 Series A Oakland Museum 2002 Series A principal and interest 6027 JPFA Capital Projects: Series 2005 Proceeds from Revenue Bonds Payment of debt service and bond 2005 Series administration costs of Capital Improvement projects 6029 Property tax revenue for pension Bank and bond expenditure for both Taxable Pension Obligation Bonds: 2012 Series-PFRS override principal and interest for POBs Taxable Pension Obligation Bank and bond expenditure for both Property tax revenue for pension 6032 Bonds 2001 Series principal and interest for POBs override 6036 JPFA Refunding Revenue Bonds: Proceeds from Revenue Bonds Refunding JPFA Revenue Bonds: 2005 2008 Series A-1 (Tax-Exempt) 2008 Series A (tax exempt) Series 6037 JPFA Refunding Revenue Bonds: Refunding JPFA Revenue Bonds: 2005 Proceeds from Revenue Bonds 2008 Series A-2 (taxable) Series 2008 Series A-2 (Taxable) 6063 General Obligation Bond: Series Proceeds from Revenue Bonds JPFA-related debt service payments 2005 2005 Series 6311 Measure G: 2006 Zoo, Museum Voter-approved Measure G Educational facilities at the Oakland assessments Museum of CA; the Oakland Zoo and the Chabot Space and Science center 6312 General Obligation Bond (GOB): Voter-approved Measure DD and Debt Service payments of interest and 2012 Series Measure G assessments principal for GOB 2012 E - 39

86 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ( FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS D ) CONT ’ Source of Funds Fund Description Fund Uses of Funds 6320 Measure DD 2003A Debt Srv- Voter-approved Measure DD Principal and interest on long-term debt Clean Water, Safe Parks & Open assessments Space Trust Fund for Oakland Measure DD 2009 Debt Srv- Voter-approved Measure DD Principal and interest on long-term debt 6321 Clean Water, Safe Parks & Open assessments Space Trust Fund for Oakland Fire Area - Redemption Special Assessments for fire area 6520 Pay for fire prevention-related services utility underground 6530 Special Assessments for Rockridge Rockridge Area Water District - Pay for street light undergrounding liability Redemption district Skyline Sewer District - Repayment agreement with Pay for street light undergrounding 6540 homeowners liability Redemption Piedmont Pines 2010 Utility Special Assessments from Debt service payments 6555 Underground Phase I Piedmont Pines district Principal and interest Other special assessment districts 6570 1996 JPFA Pooled Assessment Revenue Bonds - Assessment Fu nd 1997 JPFA Pooled Assessment Other special assessment districts Principal and interest 6580 Revenue Bonds - Revenue Fund 6585 1999 JPFA Reassessment District Other special assessment districts Principal and interest Debt Service 2012 Refunding Reassessment 6587 Special property tax assessment Bank and bond expenditure for both from Reassessment District No 99- principal and interest Bonds-Debt Service 1 6612 JPFA Lease Revenue Refunding Proceeds from lease revenue Construction of City Administration bonds and other funding sources Bonds (Admin Building) Building 6999 Revenue from sale of season Debt service on the Coliseum and Miscellaneous Debt Services tickets. renovation Lease Revenue Bonds. 7100 Police and Fire Retirement City Police and Fire Retirement City administrative costs related to the System contributions System Police and Fire Retirement System 7120 City Municipal Employees City administrative costs related to the Oakland Municipal Employees Retirement System contributions Retirement System (OMERS) Oakland Municipal Employees Retirement System E - 40

87 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ( ’ D ) FUND SOURCES AND DESCRIPTIONS CONT Fund Description Fund Uses of Funds Source of Funds 7130 Employee Deferred Employee deferred compensation Account for employees' deferred Compensation compensation contributions and contrib utions disbursements 7320 Pension Annuity receipts Transfer to General Purpose Fund to Pension Annuity Fund support accrued pension liability payments State Asset Trust 7420 Confiscated funds held in the Dispensed by order of criminal court course of Police activities Unclaimed Cash Funds from Police asset forfeitures- Transfer to General Fund after holding 7440 redistributed from State period to fund city services 7540 Oakland Public Library Trust Donations, endowments and Library Programs contributions from individuals and private corporations Donations and proceeds from fund- Museum programs and improvements Oakland Public Museum Trust 7640 raising activities Kerrison Trust for Police Private, individual donation Uses related to police service 7690 enhancements Enhancement Grant Clearing 7760 Recoveries of departmental Administrative costs in departments that burden charges to other are largely supported by grant and subordinate programs within other restricted funding sources departments Personnel costs that are directly Capital project funding for personnel expenditures supported by capital projects 7999 Miscellaneous Trusts Donations and endowments Miscellaneous programs and services E - 41

88 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NOTES E - 42

89 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES 2015 -16 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY ADOPTED FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Unaudited Adopted Adopted Fund Description Ending Fund Revenues Positions Expenditures (FTE) Balance ** 534,378,786 534,378,786 2,284.86 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) * 110,052,475 2,535,425 Mayor 9.60 4,436,312 28.02 City Council City Administrator 1,655,673 15,926,614 88.35 City Attorney 5,308,541 29.40 22,000 1,903,677 10.00 City Auditor City Clerk 8.36 1,842,217 Public Ethics Commission 6.00 858,779 487,617,011 110.24 Finance 22,594,813 30.38 237,651 Human Resources Management 4,740,469 2,308,801 10,209,508 50.05 Information Technology 304,075 2.00 Race & Equity 6,398,068 211,713,264 1,123.85 Police 11,072,744 123,604,555 556.85 Fire 165,542 6,465,571 Human Services 30.94 Oakland Parks & Recreation 248,299 15,765,804 108.97 Oakland Public Library 732,908 11,129,415 65.61 Economic & Workforce Development 1,343,122 5,058,763 18.24 41,466 Planning & Building Oakland Public Works 8.00 2,863,827 85,823,691 Non-Departmental 22,576,967 1,252,000 Capital Improvement Projects 2,024,752 954,863 954,863 1020 - Vital Services Stabilization Fund * Non-Departmental 954,863 954,863 (15,302,775) 23.72 25,283,891 25,283,891 1100 - Self Insurance Liability * 5,033,950 City Attorney 23.72 Police 5,798,011 Fire 936,010 Oakland Parks & Recreation 414,922 Oakland Public Works 3,774,814 4,845,746 21,509,077 8,255,252 Non-Departmental - - 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 16.04 City Attorney 488,822 1.91 Finance 31,210 0.25 Human Resources Management 1,662,352 10.18 Police 2.00 365,094 Fire 29,054 0.20 Oakland Public Works 271,443 1.50 Non-Departmental (2,847,975) * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 43

90 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES 2015 -16 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND (C ONT ’ D ) FY ADOPTED FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Unaudited Adopted Adopted Fund Description Expenditures Positions Revenues Ending Fund (FTE) Balance ** 71,851,789 71,851,789 1200 - Pens ion Over r ide Tax Revenue * 74,655,178 200,000 Finance Non-Departmental 71,651,789 71,851,789 1610 - Succes s or Redevelopment Agency Reimbur s ement Fund 7,191,655 7,191,655 101,497 34.37 City Administrator 751,649 1.98 1,924,445 1,036,563 City Attorney 4.00 67,499 0.40 City Clerk 3.75 Finance 851,411 0.30 49,038 Human Resources Management 3,682,756 2,851,041 15.27 Economic & Workforce Development 1,584,454 Housing & Community Development 1,584,454 8.67 (3,852,540) 2,074,695 2,074,695 1700 - Mandatory Refuse Program * 8.43 2,074,695 2,074,695 8.43 Finance 1710 - Recycling Program * 2,722,052 4,483,106 4,483,106 18.93 City Attorney 333,913 1.50 50,230 Fire 1.10 Economic & Workforce Development 257,048 Oakland Public Works 3,841,915 16.33 4,483,106 7,199,724 22,229,224 22,229,224 138.03 1720 - Compr ehens ive Clean-up * Fire 94,239 0.15 60,000 Human Services Economic & Workforce Development 15,553 0.10 257,604 Planning & Building 2.00 Oakland Public Works 22,229,224 21,801,828 135.78 1730 - Henr y J Kais er Convention Center * (1,758,880) 1,758,880 1,758,880 Non-Departmental 1,758,880 1,758,880 (4,867,100) 1.66 10,207,366 10,207,366 1750 - Multipur pos e Res er ve * 52,494 City Administrator 0.34 Finance (25,000) 2,612,345 0.32 Economic & Workforce Development 10,100 398,350 Oakland Public Works 1,944,177 1.00 7,022,266 Non-Departmental 3,200,000 5,200,000 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount. E - 44

91 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES 2015 -16 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND (C ONT ’ D ) FY ADOPTED FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Adopted Unaudited Fund Description Revenues Ending Fund Positions Expenditures (FTE) Balance ** 1,698,105 613,093 9.73 1760 - Telecommunications Res er ve 1,698,105 8.74 1,698,105 City Clerk 1,515,507 40,436 Finance 0.25 Information Technology 142,162 0.74 808,179 1770 - Telecommunications Land Use * 723,495 723,495 3.14 City Administrator 50,000 723,495 3.14 Economic & Workforce Development 673,495 5,152,963 14,049,327 6.05 1780 - Kid's First Oakland Children's Fund 14,049,327 14,049,327 14,049,327 6.05 Human Services 1791 - Contr act Adminis tr ation Fee * (1,209,689) 1,209,689 1,209,689 1,209,689 1,209,689 Non-Departmental 2,130,676 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 6,808,045 6,808,045 117.72 Oakland Parks & Recreation 6,808,045 6,795,616 117.62 Economic & Workforce Development 12,429 0.10 1,520,960 5,100,000 2.53 1870 - Affordable Housing Trust Fund 5,100,000 2.53 5,100,000 Housing & Community Development 5,100,000 (248,457) 1,247,769 6.50 2102 - Department of Agriculture 1,247,769 1,247,769 Human Services 1,247,769 6.50 2103 - HUD-ESG/SHP/HOPWA * 5,966,711 5,966,711 1.17 (4,491,994) Human Services 5,966,711 1.17 5,966,711 2105 - HUD-EDI Grants 150,200 3.00 Housing & Community Development 3.00 2107 - HUD-108 (3,242,669) 666,000 666,000 666,000 666,000 Housing & Community Development (153,165) 8,210,190 2108 - HUD-CDBG * 8,210,190 29.92 City Attorney 29,881 0.19 Finance 138,989 1.00 Human Services 767,023 3.73 250,217 Economic & Workforce Development 219,288 1.75 Housing & Community Development 7,959,973 7,055,009 23.25 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount. E - 45

92 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES 2015 -16 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND (C ONT ’ D ) FY ADOPTED FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Adopted Unaudited Fund Description Ending Fund Expenditures Positions Revenues (FTE) Balance ** 2109 - HUD-Home 2,061,879 2,061,879 3.64 2,665,002 2,061,879 3.64 2,061,879 Housing & Community Development 89,645 59,549 59,549 2.00 2112 - Department of Justice 59,549 Police 59,549 2.00 (215,771) 197,114 14.35 2113 - Department of Justice - COPS Hiring 197,114 197,114 14.35 Police 197,114 (242,278) 1,857,267 1,857,267 46.06 2114 - Department of Labor 1,857,267 Human Services 1,857,267 46.06 (20,556) 398,199 398,199 2120 - Federal Action Agency 1.01 398,199 398,199 1.01 Human Services 2123 - US Dept of Homeland Security 280,008 11.10 Fire 11.10 2124 - Feder al Emer gency Management Agency (FEMA) 944,958 944,958 3.50 (847,080) 944,958 3.50 944,958 Fire (2,985,783) 25,581,965 25,581,965 2128 - Depar tment of Health and Human Ser vices 186.30 Human Services 25,581,965 186.30 25,581,965 2129 - Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF) State Gr ant - 2.00 (1,124,417) Economic & Workforce Development 2.00 (125,000) Oakland Public Works 125,000 2138 - Califor nia Depar tment of Educ ation 49,551 945,921 945,921 Human Services 945,921 945,921 86,853 64,042 64,042 2148 - Califor nia Libr ar y Ser vices 1.08 64,042 64,042 1.08 Oakland Public Library 2152 - California Board of Corrections 409,376 13,215 13,215 1.00 Human Services 13,215 1.00 13,215 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount. E - 46

93 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -16 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2015 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Unaudited Adopted Fund Description Ending Fund Positions Revenues Expenditures (FTE) Balance ** 543,177 543,177 2159 - State of California Other (566,980) 4.54 114,123 114,123 1.00 Police 366,905 1.54 Human Services 366,905 62,149 255,818 1.00 Economic & Workforce Development Housing & Community Development 1.00 (193,669) 2160 - County of Alameda: Grants 1,465,481 1,465,481 2.09 2,184,507 1,018,066 1.00 Fire 1,019,524 447,415 445,957 1.09 Human Services (319,125) 72,719 72,719 0.27 2163 - Metro Transportation Com: Program Grant Oakland Public Library 72,719 72,719 0.27 2172 - Alameda County: Vehicle Abatement Author ity 408,960 408,960 500,209 2.00 Police 408,960 408,960 2.00 2190 - Private Grants (523,013) 25,000 25,000 0.20 Fire 25,000 25,000 0.20 693,309 4,897,390 7.96 2195 - W or kfor ce Inves tment Act * 4,897,390 81,412 Finance 0.58 Human Services 68,956 179,956 1.08 4,828,434 4,636,022 6.30 Economic & Workforce Development 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA * 9,320,600 11,715,992 11,715,992 9.48 30,209 0.13 City Attorney 10,920 39,309 Finance 0.25 Oakland Public Works 11,705,072 3,064,908 9.10 Capital Improvement Projects 8,581,566 2212 - Meas ur e B: Bicycle/Pedes tr ian Pas s -Thr u Funds * 1,451,270 1.70 1,486,195 1,451,270 1,451,270 522,454 1.70 Oakland Public Works 928,816 Capital Improvement Projects 315,190 2213 - Meas ur e B: Par atr ans it - ACTIA 1,243,514 3.50 1,243,514 Human Services 1,243,514 1,243,514 3.50 2215 - Meas ur e F - Vehicle Regis tr ation Fee * 2,105,164 2,105,164 8.33 3,022,593 Oakland Public Works 2,105,164 2,105,164 8.33 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 47

94 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -16 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2015 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Unaudited Adopted Adopted Fund Description Expenditures Revenues Ending Fund Positions (FTE) Balance ** 2216 - Meas ur e BB - Alameda County Tr ans por tation Commis s ion Sales Tax * 2,343,116 13.11 14,632,854 14,632,854 1.00 210,420 Mayor 1,123,918 1,123,917 Human Services 0.91 Oakland Public Works 2,871,599 11.20 13,508,936 10,426,918 Capital Improvement Projects 9,352,355 2230 - State Gas Tax * 9,352,355 46.66 3,895,216 9,352,355 9,202,355 46.66 Oakland Public Works 150,000 Capital Improvement Projects 2,756,989 11.59 1,950,733 1,950,733 2231 - State Gas Tax-Prop 42 Replacement Funds * Oakland Public Works 1,950,733 11.59 1,950,733 2241 - Meas ur e Q-Libr ar y Ser vices Retention & Enhancement * 373,410 16,809,791 16,809,791 150.73 City Administrator 17,657 243,954 Information Technology 2.00 148.73 16,809,791 Oakland Public Library 16,548,180 2242 - Meas ur e Q Res er ve- Libr ar y Ser vices Retention & Enhancement * 733,580 733,580 713,341 733,580 Oakland Public Library 733,580 2250 - Measure N: Fund * 1,641,291 1,641,291 6.85 520,378 City Administrator 9,492 Fire 1,641,291 1,631,799 6.85 2252 - Meas ur e Z - Violence Pr evention and Public Safety Act of 2014 4,639,115 24,658,021 81.69 24,658,021 83,313 0.40 Mayor 659,647 City Administrator 0.80 Finance 24,658,021 23,320 Police 13,150,968 66.00 Fire 2,000,000 Human Services 8,740,773 14.49 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 48

95 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -16 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2015 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Unaudited Adopted Fund Description Ending Fund Positions Revenues Expenditures (FTE) Balance ** 20,109,200 20,109,200 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 73.16 (289,890) 25,973 City Administrator 0.20 19,300,000 27,700 Finance Oakland Parks & Recreation 1.00 2,627,942 (760) Economic & Workforce Development 224,200 15,508,850 71.96 Oakland Public Works 585,000 Non-Departmental 1,734,495 185,000 Capital Improvement Projects 1.00 1,891,979 2321 - W ildland Fir e Pr evention As s es s Dis tr ict * 2,378,210 1,891,979 1,891,979 1.00 Fire 1,891,979 27,864 3,200 3,200 2330 - W er ner Cour t Vegetation Mgmt Dis tr ict Fire 3,200 3,200 1,030,283 1,611,245 1,611,245 8.50 2411 - False Alarm Reduction Program * 233,476 Information Technology 1.00 Police 1,611,245 1,377,769 7.50 2412 - Meas ur e M - Alameda County: Emer gency Dis patch Ser vice Supplemental As s es s ment * 981,585 2,461,384 2,461,384 11.10 City Administrator 9,453 2,461,384 11.10 Fire 2,451,931 2,949,086 20.41 2,154,724 2,949,086 2413 - Rent Adjustment Program Fund * City Attorney 3.90 122,898 743,249 449,861 4.10 Finance 2,826,188 Housing & Community Development 1,755,976 12.41 2415 - Development Ser vice Fund * 34,650,524 34,650,524 171.71 9,655,383 314,682 1.58 City Administrator 1,100,101 City Attorney 5.50 Finance 127,251 1.00 Information Technology 214,518 1.03 Housing & Community Development 2,342 28,890,069 26,944,980 138.50 Planning & Building 5,589,175 Oakland Public Works 24.10 5,775,370 Capital Improvement Projects 171,280 171,280 2416 - Traffic Safety Fund * 1,846,971 2,926,764 2,926,764 23.88 Police 2,365,935 22.00 1,400,000 Oakland Public Works 1,526,764 560,829 1.88 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 49

96 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -16 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2015 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 Adopted Adopted Adopted Unaudited Fund Description Revenues Positions Expenditures Ending Fund (FTE) Balance ** 477,928 477,928 2417 - Exces s Litter Fee Fund 1,084,387 433,163 City Administrator 477,928 Finance 44,765 2419 - Meas ur e C: Tr ans ient Oc c upanc y Tax (TOT) Surcharge 4,728,407 4,728,407 288,541 0.75 Economic & Workforce Development 576,135 0.75 576,135 4,152,272 Non-Departmental 4,152,272 263,020 89,492 2826 - Mor tgage Revenue 89,492 89,492 89,492 Housing & Community Development (706,980) 280,000 2990 - Public Works Grants 280,000 1.37 280,000 280,000 Oakland Public Works 1.37 2995 - Police Grants 20,000 20,000 3,568 Police 20,000 20,000 2996 - Parks and Recreation Grants 2001 25,624 16,847 16,847 16,847 Oakland Parks & Recreation 16,847 4,728,840 2999 - Miscellaneous Grants 1.80 City Administrator 1.00 Oakland Public Works 0.80 (Cash Balance) * 45,292,286 61,918,415 61,918,415 3100 - Sew er Ser vice Fund 130.99 City Attorney 3.80 746,643 100,000 0.35 2,332,011 Finance 229,913 Information Technology 1.10 Fire 287,374 2.00 Oakland Public Works 61,818,415 32,157,394 123.74 Non-Departmental 8,292,080 17,873,000 Capital Improvement Projects 2,009,832 500,000 3150 - Sewer Rate Stabilization Fund * 500,000 Oakland Public Works 500,000 500,000 3200 - Golf Course 3,239,022 659,571 659,571 1.75 Oakland Parks & Recreation 651,121 1.75 659,571 Economic & Workforce Development 8,450 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 50

97 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -16 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2015 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Unaudited Adopted Adopted Adopted Fund Description Positions Ending Fund Expenditures Revenues (FTE) Balance ** * 264,636 23,464,248 23,464,248 55.00 4100 - Equipment (Cash Balance) 5,521 Human Resources Management Oakland Public Works 23,464,248 23,458,727 55.00 (Cash Balance) 4200 - Radio / Telecommunications 7,313,407 7,313,407 10.71 4,446,567 City Administrator 0.20 35,955 43,124 0.33 Finance Information Technology 7,313,407 7,234,328 10.18 2,316,359 308,530 308,530 4210 - Telephone Equipment and Softw ar e 308,530 308,530 Information Technology (1,769,897) 1,320,007 1,320,007 4300 - Reproduction 5.00 1,320,007 1,320,007 5.00 Information Technology 4400 - City Facilities (Cash Balance) * (17,537,264) 35,376,429 35,376,429 109.43 Finance (75,000) 2,400 Economic & Workforce Development 109.43 Oakland Public Works 28,582,429 31,449,029 6,294,000 Non-Departmental 4,000,000 500,000 Capital Improvement Projects 4450 - City Facilities Ener gy Cons er vation Pr ojects 2,746,985 1.00 1.00 Oakland Public Works (3,848,306) 4500 - Central Stores * 516,419 516,419 2.50 516,419 516,419 Finance 2.50 (109,723) 4550 - Purchasing 898,580 898,580 8.00 Finance 898,580 898,580 8.00 4600 - Information Technology * 2,975,527 2,975,527 2,975,527 2,975,527 Information Technology 663,476 5130 - Rockridge: Library Assessment District * 134,420 134,420 City Administrator 3,320 Finance 134,420 131,100 5321 - Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water,Safe Parks & Open Space Trust Fund for Oakland 10,768,873 4.40 Economic & Workforce Development 0.50 Oakland Public Works 3.90 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 51

98 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -16 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2015 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Adopted Unaudited Fund Description Revenues Ending Fund Positions Expenditures (FTE) Balance ** 5505 - Municipal Capital Improvement: Public Arts 0.75 385,854 0.75 Economic & Workforce Development 5610 - Centr al Dis tr ict Pr ojects 350,000 350,000 16,383,165 350,000 350,000 Economic & Workforce Development 18,339,365 5611 - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2003 * 1,311,000 1,311,000 Non-Departmental 1,311,000 1,311,000 9,640,581 1,887,000 5613 - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2009T * 1,887,000 1,887,000 1,887,000 Non-Departmental 5643 - Central City East TA Bonds Series 2006A-T (Taxable) * 412,000 40,053,323 2.50 412,000 Economic & Workforce Development 412,000 2.50 412,000 5650 - Coliseum Projects 100,000 100,000 5,274,006 Economic & Workforce Development 100,000 100,000 5670 - Oakland Bas e Reus e Author ity * 1,349,070 565,118 565,118 565,118 Economic & Workforce Development 565,118 52,436,538 1,550,020 2.00 5671 - OBRA: Leasing & Utility 1,550,020 161,151 1.00 City Administrator 1,550,020 1,388,869 Economic & Workforce Development 1.00 6013 - 2013 LED Streetlight Acquisition Lease Financing 1,734,495 1,734,495 356,433 1,734,495 1,734,495 Non-Departmental 6029 - Taxable Pension Obligation Bonds: 2012 Ser ies -PFRS 1,605 8,966,222 8,966,222 Non-Departmental 8,966,222 8,966,222 25,508 43,290,000 43,290,000 6032 - Taxable Pension Obligation: Series 2001 Non-Departmental 43,290,000 43,290,000 6036 - JPFA Refunding Revenue Bonds: 2008 Ser ies A-1 (Tax-Exempt Bonds ) 15,521,249 17,511,159 17,511,159 Non-Departmental 17,511,159 17,511,159 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 52

99 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -16 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2015 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Adopted Unaudited Fund Description Ending Fund Expenditures Positions Revenues (FTE) Balance ** 5,632,522 5,632,522 21,517 6064 - GO Refunding Bonds, Series 2015A * 5,632,522 5,632,522 Non-Departmental 2,947,205 6,661,227 6312 - GOB Series 2012-Refunding Bonds 6,661,227 Non-Departmental 6,661,227 6,661,227 40,025 32,448 6540 - Skyline Sew er Dis tr ict - Redemption * 32,448 32,448 32,448 Non-Departmental 6555 - Piedmont Pines 2010 Utility Underground Phas e I - Debt Ser vice * 236,169 164,782 236,169 Non-Departmental 236,169 236,169 6570 - JPFA Pooled Assessment: 1996 Revenue Bonds - Assessment 24,400 24,400 (94,734) Non-Departmental 24,400 24,400 6587 - 2012 Refunding Reassessment Bonds-Debt Ser vice * 441,123 441,123 0.40 663,870 63,352 0.40 Finance Non-Departmental 441,123 377,771 6612 - JPFA Leas e Revenue Refunding Bonds (Admin Building): 2008 Series B 9,066,350 (1,196) 9,066,350 Non-Departmental 9,066,350 9,066,350 - 21,500,000 6999 - Mis cellaneous Debt Ser vice 21,500,000 21,500,000 21,500,000 Non-Departmental 7100 - Police and Fir e Retir ement Sys tem * 419,253,888 3,061,924 3,061,924 5.15 City Attorney 128,594 0.50 3,061,924 Finance 4.65 2,933,330 7120 - Oakland Municipal Employees ' Retir ement System OMERS * 4,506,378 62,136 62,136 0.40 Finance 62,136 0.40 62,136 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 53

100 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -16 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2015 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Adopted Unaudited Fund Description Expenditures Revenues Positions Ending Fund (FTE) Balance ** (2,502) 244,589 244,589 1.14 7130 - Employee Defer r ed Compens ation 244,589 Human Resources Management 244,589 1.14 7320 - Police and Fir e Retir ement Sys tem Refinancing Annuity Trust * 18,580,952 18,580,952 87,506,894 18,580,952 18,580,952 Non-Departmental 1,285,403 7540 - Oakland Public Library Trust 110,879 110,879 110,879 110,879 Oakland Public Library 7640 - Oakland Public Museum Trust 797,839 32,610 32,610 Non-Departmental 32,610 32,610 626,731 - 143.55 7760 - Grant Clearing City Administrator 25,000 134,786 City Attorney 0.45 Information Technology 155,412 1.90 Oakland Public Works (315,198) 141.20 7999 - Miscellaneous Trusts 692,089 69,270 69,270 Oakland Parks & Recreation 69,270 69,270 1,202,960,209 1,202,960,209 Gr and Total 4,126.89 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 54

101 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Estimated Adopted Adopted Fund Description Revenues Expenditures Ending Fund Positions Balance ** (FTE) 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) * 2,285.16 90,753,055 530,689,270 530,689,270 9.60 (5,103,326) 2,567,901 Mayor 28.02 City Council 4,491,097 (8,927,409) 1,655,673 15,267,590 88.55 (27,882,858) City Administrator 29.40 (10,642,666) 22,000 City Attorney 5,378,125 (3,730,219) 1,826,542 City Auditor 10.00 1,860,152 8.36 (3,702,369) City Clerk 870,223 Public Ethics Commission 6.00 Finance 21,887,977 110.34 937,048,897 493,914,676 237,651 30.38 (8,862,355) Human Resources Management 4,597,188 2,308,801 50.05 (15,927,557) 10,335,651 Information Technology 2.00 312,566 Race & Equity 6,570,146 218,529,408 1,123.85 (417,274,458) Police 8,226,347 128,688,435 Fire 556.85 (232,993,899) 165,542 5,978,003 30.94 (12,112,490) Human Services 248,299 15,547,529 Oakland Parks & Recreation (30,816,735) 108.97 Oakland Public Library 732,908 11,746,848 65.61 (21,410,447) Economic & Workforce Development 1,577,877 4,814,541 18.24 (6,952,305) Planning & Building 41,648 (83,114) 2,897,432 (5,761,259) Oakland Public Works 8.00 (121,015,788) 15,029,350 72,798,414 Non-Departmental (1,504,000) Capital Improvement Projects 252,000 400,786 400,786 3,380,401 1020 - Vital Services Stabilization Fund * 400,786 400,786 - Non-Departmental 1100 - Self Insurance Liability * 25,309,345 23.72 (12,652,942) 25,309,345 5,068,835 23.72 (10,102,785) City Attorney 5,798,011 (11,596,022) Police 936,010 (1,872,020) Fire Oakland Parks & Recreation 414,922 (829,844) Oakland Public Works 3,774,814 4,845,746 (2,141,864) Non-Departmental 21,534,531 8,245,821 26,542,535 - - 16.04 - 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 492,136 1.91 City Attorney (980,958) Finance 0.25 (62,577) 31,367 Human Resources Management 1,671,835 10.18 (3,334,187) Police 366,766 2.00 (731,860) Fire 0.20 (58,463) 29,409 Oakland Public Works 272,940 1.50 (544,383) Non-Departmental 5,712,428 (2,864,453) * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 55

102 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED ARY BY FUND (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMM FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Estimated Adopted Adopted Fund Description Revenues Ending Fund Positions Expenditures Balance ** (FTE) 73,974,413 97,330,650 1200 - Pens ion Over r ide Tax Revenue * 73,974,413 200,000 Finance 400,000 (400,000) 73,774,413 Non-Departmental 73,974,413 - 1610 - Succes s or Redevelopment Agency Reimbur s ement Fund 7,204,765 34.27 101,497 7,204,765 1,930,779 753,105 1.98 City Administrator 2,350,470 City Attorney 4.00 (2,076,965) 1,040,402 67,965 (135,464) City Clerk 0.40 (1,705,826) 854,415 Finance 3.65 49,369 0.30 (98,407) Human Resources Management 3,686,492 2,852,015 15.27 1,666,192 Economic & Workforce Development 1,587,494 1,587,494 8.67 - Housing & Community Development - 2,074,695 2,074,695 8.43 (2,266,092) 1700 - Mandatory Refuse Program * Finance 2,074,695 8.43 - 2,074,695 - 1710 - Recycling Program * 4,367,200 4,367,200 18.93 2,506,294 City Attorney 336,217 1.50 (670,130) 50,230 Fire (100,460) (515,192) 258,144 1.10 Economic & Workforce Development 3,722,609 Oakland Public Works 16.33 1,285,782 4,367,200 - 22,298,405 22,298,405 138.03 1720 - Compr ehens ive Clean-up * 2,210,405 Fire 0.15 (188,938) 94,699 60,000 (120,000) Human Services 15,640 0.10 Economic & Workforce Development (31,193) Planning & Building 260,866 2.00 (518,470) Oakland Public Works 22,298,405 21,867,200 135.78 858,601 - - 1730 - Henr y J Kais er Convention Center * Non-Departmental - - 7,007,366 7,007,366 1750 - Multipur pos e Res er ve * 1.66 (4,416,188) City Administrator 52,938 0.34 (105,432) Finance (25,000) 2,609,119 0.32 (5,271,464) Economic & Workforce Development 10,100 398,350 (776,500) Oakland Public Works 1,946,959 1.00 10,153,396 7,022,266 Non-Departmental 2,000,000 (4,000,000) * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 56

103 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Adopted Estimated Adopted Fund Description Expenditures Ending Fund Revenues Positions Balance ** (FTE) 1,718,162 9.73 613,093 1760 - Telecommunications Res er ve 1,718,162 1,534,458 City Clerk 366,302 1,718,162 8.74 40,707 0.25 (81,143) Finance (285,159) 142,997 Information Technology 0.74 - 723,042 723,042 3.14 445,642 1770 - Telecommunications Land Use * City Administrator (100,000) 50,000 Economic & Workforce Development 673,042 3.14 100,000 723,042 - 14,471,923 6.05 5,152,963 1780 - Kid's First Oakland Children's Fund 14,471,923 14,471,923 14,471,923 6.05 - Human Services - - 1791 - Contr act Adminis tr ation Fee * - Non-Departmental - 6,808,045 6,808,045 117.72 2,130,676 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 6,808,045 6,795,532 Oakland Parks & Recreation 24,942 117.62 Economic & Workforce Development 12,513 0.10 (24,942) - 1870 - Affordable Housing Trust Fund 4,650,000 4,650,000 2.53 1,520,960 Housing & Community Development 4,650,000 4,650,000 2.53 - - 1,248,851 6.50 (248,457) 2102 - Department of Agriculture 1,248,851 1,248,851 1,248,851 6.50 - Human Services - 5,966,711 5,966,711 2103 - HUD-ESG/SHP/HOPWA * (4,466,889) 1.17 Human Services 5,966,711 1.17 - 5,966,711 - 3.00 150,200 2105 - HUD-EDI Grants Housing & Community Development - 3.00 - 2107 - HUD-108 2,119,000 2,119,000 (3,242,669) Housing & Community Development 2,119,000 2,119,000 - - 8,160,435 8,160,435 29.92 (203,165) 2108 - HUD-CDBG * 50,510 0.19 (80,391) City Attorney Finance 1.00 (320,097) 181,108 Human Services 200,462 1,018,782 3.73 (1,335,126) Economic & Workforce Development 1.75 (532,892) 313,604 Housing & Community Development 7,959,973 6,596,431 23.25 2,268,506 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 57

104 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Estimated Adopted Adopted Fund Description Expenditures Ending Fund Revenues Positions Balance ** (FTE) 2,061,879 3.64 2,665,002 2109 - HUD-Home 2,061,879 2,061,879 2,061,879 3.64 - Housing & Community Development - 89,645 2112 - Department of Justice Police - - 79,116 79,116 4.35 (215,771) 2113 - Department of Justice - COPS Hiring Police 79,116 4.35 - 79,116 - 1,908,637 46.06 (242,278) 2114 - Department of Labor 1,908,637 1,908,637 1,908,637 46.06 - Human Services - 399,986 399,986 2120 - Federal Action Agency (20,556) 1.01 Human Services 399,986 1.01 - 399,986 - 11.10 280,008 2123 - US Dept of Homeland Security Fire - 11.10 - 2124 - Feder al Emer gency Management Agency (FEMA) 944,958 944,958 3.50 (847,080) 944,958 3.50 - Fire 944,958 - 2128 - Depar tment of Health and Human Ser vices 25,748,213 186.30 (2,985,783) 25,748,213 25,748,213 25,748,213 186.30 - Human Services - 2129 - Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF) State Gr ant 2.00 (1,124,417) - (125,000) 2.00 Economic & Workforce Development 250,000 Oakland Public Works 125,000 (250,000) - 2138 - Califor nia Depar tment of Educ ation 945,921 945,921 49,551 Human Services 945,921 945,921 - - 64,042 64,042 1.08 86,853 2148 - Califor nia Libr ar y Ser vices Oakland Public Library 64,042 1.08 - 64,042 - 2152 - California Board of Corrections 13,215 13,215 1.00 409,376 Human Services 13,215 1.00 - 13,215 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 58

105 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Adopted Estimated Adopted Fund Description Revenues Positions Ending Fund Expenditures Balance ** (FTE) 526,196 3.12 (566,980) 2159 - State of California Other 526,196 114,123 1.00 - Police 114,123 1.54 - 370,677 370,677 Human Services 150,121 Economic & Workforce Development 0.58 (302,394) 41,396 (108,725) 302,394 Housing & Community Development - 1,465,466 2160 - County of Alameda: Grants 1,465,466 2.09 2,184,507 1,018,051 1.00 (2,860) Fire 1,019,453 447,415 1.09 2,860 Human Services 446,013 - 72,719 72,719 0.27 (319,125) 2163 - Metro Transportation Com: Program Grant 72,719 72,719 0.27 - Oakland Public Library - 2172 - Alameda County: Vehicle Abatement Author ity 413,477 2.00 500,209 413,477 413,477 413,477 2.00 - Police - 2190 - Private Grants 25,000 25,000 0.20 (523,013) Fire 25,000 25,000 0.20 - - 4,899,192 7.96 169,537 2195 - W or kfor ce Inves tment Act * 4,899,192 (163,095) 81,683 Finance 0.58 69,478 1.08 (222,000) Human Services 180,478 4,829,714 4,637,031 Economic & Workforce Development 385,095 6.30 - 10,443,920 10,443,920 9.48 7,977,142 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA * 30,405 0.13 City Attorney (60,614) Finance 10,920 39,527 0.25 (56,996) Oakland Public Works 10,433,000 3,124,133 9.10 15,949,031 Capital Improvement Projects 7,249,855 (15,831,421) - 2212 - Meas ur e B: Bicycle/Pedes tr ian Pas s -Thr u Funds * 1,324,511 1.70 1,177,800 1,324,511 1,324,511 525,589 1.70 1,727,738 Oakland Public Works Capital Improvement Projects 798,922 (1,727,738) - 2213 - Meas ur e B: Par atr ans it - ACTIA 1,243,514 3.50 315,190 1,243,514 Human Services 1,243,514 1,243,514 3.50 - * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 59

106 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED BY FUND (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Adopted Estimated Adopted Fund Description Revenues Positions Ending Fund Expenditures Balance ** (FTE) 2,109,322 8.33 2,084,107 2215 - Meas ur e F - Vehicle Regis tr ation Fee * 2,109,322 2,109,322 8.33 - Oakland Public Works 2,109,322 - 2216 - Meas ur e BB - Alameda County Tr ans por tation Commis s ion Sales Tax * 12,440,584 29.71 (181,464) 12,440,584 213,372 1.00 (423,792) Mayor 1,154,158 Human Services 0.91 1 1,154,158 Oakland Public Works 5,588,988 27.80 16,334,775 11,286,426 5,484,066 Capital Improvement Projects (15,910,984) - 2230 - State Gas Tax * 7,222,038 7,222,038 31.89 1,901,304 7,222,038 7,072,038 31.89 300,000 Oakland Public Works 150,000 (300,000) Capital Improvement Projects - 1,582,985 1,582,985 9.59 2,769,237 2231 - State Gas Tax-Prop 42 Replacement Funds * Oakland Public Works 1,582,985 9.59 - 1,582,985 - 2241 - Meas ur e Q-Libr ar y Ser vices Retention & Enhancement * 17,693,988 17,693,988 150.73 (254,351) 17,657 City Administrator (35,314) (491,400) 247,446 2.00 Information Technology 17,428,885 Oakland Public Library 148.73 526,714 17,693,988 - 2242 - Meas ur e Q Res er ve- Libr ar y Ser vices Retention & Enhancement * 754,121 1,127 754,121 754,121 754,121 - Oakland Public Library - 1,657,366 2250 - Measure N: Fund * 6.85 486,509 1,657,366 City Administrator 9,492 (18,984) Fire 1,657,366 1,647,874 6.85 18,984 - 2252 - Meas ur e Z - Violence Pr evention and Public Safety Act of 2014 25,207,875 81.69 4,639,115 25,207,875 84,506 Mayor 0.40 (167,819) City Administrator 675,329 0.80 (1,334,976) Finance 25,207,875 23,320 49,819,256 Police 13,470,983 66.00 (26,621,951) 2,000,000 (4,000,000) Fire Human Services 8,953,737 14.49 (17,694,510) * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 60

107 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Adopted Estimated Adopted Fund Description Ending Fund Revenues Expenditures Positions (FTE) Balance ** 73.16 (289,890) 19,939,200 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 19,939,200 (51,946) City Administrator 25,973 19,300,000 0.20 38,544,424 Finance 27,876 (5,253,661) 2,625,719 1.00 Oakland Parks & Recreation 1,523 Economic & Workforce Development (763) 15,544,496 71.96 (30,604,946) 224,200 Oakland Public Works 415,000 1,700,899 Non-Departmental (2,435,394) Capital Improvement Projects (200,000) 15,000 1,393,582 1.00 (407,352) 2321 - W ildland Fir e Pr evention As s es s Dis tr ict * 1,393,582 - 1.00 1,393,582 Fire 1,393,582 - 3,200 3,200 27,864 2330 - W er ner Cour t Vegetation Mgmt Dis tr ict 3,200 3,200 - Fire - 1,614,128 1,614,128 8.50 604,910 2411 - False Alarm Reduction Program * 234,847 1.00 (468,323) Information Technology 1,614,128 1,379,281 7.50 468,323 Police - 2412 - Meas ur e M - Alameda County: Emer gency Dis patch Ser vice Supplemental As s es s ment * 2,380,370 2,380,370 11.10 608,846 City Administrator 9,453 (18,906) 2,380,370 11.10 18,906 Fire 2,370,917 - 2413 - Rent Adjustment Program Fund * 2,756,708 19.41 648,930 2,756,708 530,615 2.90 (1,026,309) City Attorney 124,657 452,884 4.10 (902,745) Finance 2,632,051 Housing & Community Development 1,773,209 12.41 1,929,054 - 34,064,640 34,064,640 171.71 10,654,449 2415 - Development Ser vice Fund * 316,571 1.58 (631,253) City Administrator City Attorney 5.50 (2,210,485) 1,110,384 Finance 128,095 1.00 (255,346) Information Technology 215,777 1.03 (430,295) 1,722 (4,064) Housing & Community Development 28,659,498 26,694,031 138.50 3,910,556 Planning & Building Oakland Public Works 5,398,060 24.10 (179,113) 5,405,142 Capital Improvement Projects 200,000 (200,000) 2416 - Traffic Safety Fund * 2,926,764 2,926,764 23.88 1,446,971 Police 2,363,927 22.00 (1,929,862) 1,400,000 Oakland Public Works 1,526,764 562,837 1.88 1,929,862 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 61

108 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Adopted Estimated Adopted Fund Description Revenues Positions Ending Fund Expenditures Balance ** (FTE) 477,928 1,084,387 2417 - Exces s Litter Fee Fund 477,928 433,163 City Administrator (866,326) 866,326 477,928 Finance 44,765 - 2419 - Meas ur e C: Tr ans ient Oc c upanc y Tax (TOT) Surcharge 4,907,317 0.75 288,541 4,907,317 598,500 598,500 0.75 Economic & Workforce Development - Non-Departmental 4,308,817 - 4,308,817 - 89,492 263,020 2826 - Mor tgage Revenue 89,492 89,492 89,492 - Housing & Community Development - 280,000 280,000 1.37 (706,980) 2990 - Public Works Grants Oakland Public Works 280,000 280,000 1.37 - - 20,000 20,000 3,568 2995 - Police Grants Police 20,000 - 20,000 - 2996 - Parks and Recreation Grants 2001 16,847 16,847 25,624 Oakland Parks & Recreation 16,847 16,847 - - 4,728,840 2999 - Miscellaneous Grants 1.80 - 1.00 City Administrator 0.80 - Oakland Public Works - (Cash Balance) * 62,144,806 62,144,806 131.16 36,748,945 3100 - Sew er Ser vice Fund City Attorney 751,784 3.80 (1,498,427) 100,000 2,332,370 0.35 (4,464,381) Finance 231,265 Information Technology (461,178) 1.10 Fire 290,537 2.00 (577,911) Oakland Public Works 62,044,806 32,244,370 123.91 59,461,457 Non-Departmental 8,293,480 (16,585,560) 18,001,000 (35,874,000) Capital Improvement Projects - 500,000 500,000 3150 - Sewer Rate Stabilization Fund * 3,009,832 Oakland Public Works 500,000 500,000 - - 3200 - Golf Course 659,532 659,532 1.75 3,239,022 Oakland Parks & Recreation 651,082 1.75 16,900 659,532 Economic & Workforce Development 8,450 (16,900) * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 62

109 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Adopted Estimated Adopted Fund Description Revenues Positions Ending Fund Expenditures Balance ** (FTE) * 23,429,176 23,429,176 55.00 371,848 4100 - Equipment (Cash Balance) 5,521 Human Resources Management (11,042) 55.00 11,042 23,429,176 Oakland Public Works 23,423,655 - (Cash Balance) 7,290,901 7,290,901 10.51 3,969,280 4200 - Radio / Telecommunications (35,955) City Administrator Finance 0.33 (86,865) 43,741 7,290,901 10.18 122,820 Information Technology 7,247,160 - 4210 - Telephone Equipment and Softw ar e 308,530 2,316,359 308,530 308,530 - Information Technology 308,530 - 1,320,007 1,320,007 5.00 (1,769,897) 4300 - Reproduction 1,320,007 1,320,007 5.00 - Information Technology - (Cash Balance) * 30,964,132 4400 - City Facilities 109.43 (8,449,264) 30,964,132 Finance (75,000) (150,000) Economic & Workforce Development 2,400 4,800 31,036,732 109.43 5,733,200 Oakland Public Works 28,170,132 2,794,000 Non-Departmental (5,088,000) Capital Improvement Projects 2,746,985 1.00 4450 - City Facilities Ener gy Cons er vation Pr ojects Oakland Public Works 1.00 - - 516,419 516,419 2.50 (3,538,000) 4500 - Central Stores * 516,419 - 516,419 2.50 Finance - 910,229 910,229 8.00 (109,723) 4550 - Purchasing Finance 910,229 910,229 8.00 - - 2,500,000 (64,473) 4600 - Information Technology * 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 - Information Technology - 5130 - Rockridge: Library Assessment District * 134,420 925,676 134,420 City Administrator 3,320 (6,640) Finance 134,420 131,100 6,640 - 5321 - Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water,Safe Parks & Open Space Trust Fund for Oakland 4.40 10,768,873 Economic & Workforce Development 0.50 - Oakland Public Works 3.90 - * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 63

110 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Estimated Adopted Adopted Fund Description Revenues Ending Fund Positions Expenditures Balance ** (FTE) 385,854 5505 - Municipal Capital Improvement: Public Arts 0.75 0.75 - Economic & Workforce Development - 5610 - Centr al Dis tr ict Pr ojects 350,000 16,383,165 350,000 350,000 - Economic & Workforce Development 350,000 - 5611 - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2003 * 17,028,365 - Non-Departmental 5613 - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2009T * 7,753,581 - Non-Departmental - 5643 - Central City East TA Bonds Series 2006A-T (Taxable) * 39,641,323 2.50 Economic & Workforce Development 2.50 - - 5650 - Coliseum Projects 100,000 100,000 5,274,006 100,000 - 100,000 Economic & Workforce Development - 560,547 560,547 223,405 5670 - Oakland Bas e Reus e Author ity * Economic & Workforce Development 560,547 560,547 - - 1,836,893 2.42 52,436,538 5671 - OBRA: Leasing & Utility 1,836,893 1.00 (323,366) City Administrator 162,215 1,836,893 1,674,678 1.42 323,366 Economic & Workforce Development - 6013 - 2013 LED Streetlight Acquisition Lease Financing 1,700,899 356,433 1,700,899 1,700,899 Non-Departmental 1,700,899 - - 6029 - Taxable Pension Obligation Bonds: 2012 Ser ies -PFRS 8,966,222 8,966,222 1,605 Non-Departmental 8,966,222 8,966,222 - - 44,595,002 44,595,002 25,508 6032 - Taxable Pension Obligation: Series 2001 44,595,002 44,595,002 - Non-Departmental - 6036 - JPFA Refunding Revenue Bonds: 2008 Ser ies A-1 (Tax-Exempt Bonds ) 17,142,673 17,142,673 15,521,249 Non-Departmental 17,142,673 17,142,673 - * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 64

111 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Estimated Adopted Adopted Adopted Fund Description Positions Ending Fund Revenues Expenditures Balance ** (FTE) 14,736,725 6064 - GO Refunding Bonds, Series 2015A * 14,736,725 21,517 14,736,725 14,736,725 - Non-Departmental - 6,667,977 6,667,977 2,947,205 6312 - GOB Series 2012-Refunding Bonds 6,667,977 6,667,977 - Non-Departmental - 35,619 44,638 6540 - Skyline Sew er Dis tr ict - Redemption * 35,619 - 35,619 Non-Departmental 35,619 - 6555 - Piedmont Pines 2010 Utility Underground Phas e I - Debt Ser vice * 236,169 236,169 174,855 236,169 Non-Departmental 236,169 - - 6570 - JPFA Pooled Assessment: 1996 Revenue Bonds - Assessment 28,000 (94,734) 28,000 Non-Departmental 28,000 - 28,000 - 6587 - 2012 Refunding Reassessment Bonds-Debt Ser vice * 445,380 445,380 0.40 658,933 64,259 (127,611) Finance 0.40 445,380 127,611 381,121 Non-Departmental - 6612 - JPFA Leas e Revenue Refunding Bonds (Admin Building): 2008 Series B 9,065,650 (1,196) 9,065,650 Non-Departmental 9,065,650 9,065,650 - - 21,500,000 21,500,000 - 6999 - Mis cellaneous Debt Ser vice 21,500,000 21,500,000 - Non-Departmental - 7100 - Police and Fir e Retir ement Sys tem * 3,196,295 3,196,295 5.15 412,995,669 130,423 0.50 (259,017) City Attorney 3,196,295 3,065,872 Finance 4.65 259,017 - 7120 - Oakland Municipal Employees ' Retir ement System OMERS * 62,955 62,955 0.40 4,381,287 Finance 62,955 0.40 - 62,955 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 65

112 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES -17 ADOPTED (C ONT ’ D ) FY 2016 BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2016-17 Adopted Adopted Estimated Adopted Fund Description Ending Fund Expenditures Revenues Positions (FTE) Balance ** 246,452 246,452 1.14 (2,502) 7130 - Employee Defer r ed Compens ation 246,452 246,452 Human Resources Management - 1.14 - 7320 - Police and Fir e Retir ement Sys tem Refinancing Annuity Trust * 8,462,481 77,783,009 8,462,481 8,462,481 - Non-Departmental 8,462,481 - 110,879 7540 - Oakland Public Library Trust 110,879 1,285,403 110,879 Oakland Public Library 110,879 - - 7640 - Oakland Public Museum Trust 32,610 32,610 797,839 Non-Departmental 32,610 32,610 - - 143.55 626,731 - 7760 - Grant Clearing (50,000) 25,000 City Administrator 135,752 0.45 City Attorney (270,538) Information Technology 1.90 (311,825) 156,413 Oakland Public Works 141.20 632,363 (317,165) - 7999 - Miscellaneous Trusts 69,270 69,270 692,089 Oakland Parks & Recreation 69,270 69,270 - - 1,182,137,681 1,182,137,681 Gr and Total 4,112.89 25,840,140 * Includes transfer to or from balance. ** Fund balances shown are gross amounts and therefore may not reflect the available net amount . E - 66

113 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES REVENUE TABLES E - 67

114 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NOTES E - 68

115 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ALL FUNDS REVENUE FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2015-16 Adopted Unaudited Adopted Actuals Revenue Type Budget Budget Actuals $159,447,714 $169,193,090 $177,407,009 Property Tax $142,919,431 61,717,027 66,657,994 80,071,583 79,572,070 Sales Tax 176,490 - - Vehicle License Fee - 7,962,708 7,506,955 7,060,938 7,060,938 Gasoline Tax Business License Tax 62,905,126 66,849,456 70,047,500 71,721,300 50,422,336 50,593,847 50,000,000 50,000,000 Util ity Consumption Tax Real Estate Transfer Tax 59,059,973 62,706,096 61,176,000 63,182,900 Transient O ccupancy Tax 18,208,285 21,458,241 21,628,407 22,463,317 16,660,703 18,397,843 18,890,857 19,410,356 Parking Tax 137,644,119 146,394,692 137,575,840 149,632,568 Local Tax 16,742,146 22,507,950 17,865,955 17,762,137 Licenses & Permits Fines & Penalties 27,408,792 26,220,072 29,089,860 28,712,651 Interest Income 9,105,921 8,846,548 932,012 1,044,012 Service Charges 162,756,638 177,967,243 169,621,711 171,561,624 Internal Service Funds 53,904,498 55,201,614 70,413,167 65,475,965 166,742,909 198,444,046 57,843,901 57,802,421 Grants & Subsidies Miscellaneous 116,397,031 213,331,577 41,901,771 38,263,033 Interfund Transfers 232,429,586 215,128,455 153,187,423 133,614,994 $1,342,987,228 $1,517,836,834 $1,156,500,015 $1,154,687,295 Subtotal Revenue - - 46,460,194 27,450,386 Transfers from Fund Balance $1,342,987,228 $1,517,836,834 $1,202,960,209 $1,182,137,681 Grand Total E - 69

116 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BREAKDOWN OF FY 2015-17 ALL FUNDS REVENUE BY TYPE Interest Income Fines & Penalties Service Charges 0.08% 2.42% 14.30% Internal Service Licenses & Permits Funds 1.49% 5.70% Local Tax 12.04% Grants & Subsidies 4.85% Parking Tax 1.61% Miscellaneous Transient 3.36% Occupancy Tax 1.85% Real Estate Transfer Interfund Transfers Tax 12.02% 5.21% Transfers from Fund Utility Consumption Balance Tax 3.10% 4.19% Business Gasoline Tax License Tax Sales Tax Property Tax 0.59% 5.28% 6.69% 14.53% HISTORICAL CHANGES IN ALL FUNDS REVENUE $1,700 $1,500 $1,300 $1,100 $900 Millions $700 $500 FY 201 3- 14 FY 201 4- 15 FY 201 6- 17 FY 201 5- 16 U na udit ed Ad opt ed Ad opt ed Act ua ls Bu dge t Act ua ls Bu dge t E - 70

117 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES GENERAL PURPOSE FUND REVENUE FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Unaudited Actuals Adopted Revenue Type Budget Actuals Budget Property Tax $142,823,340 $159,364,299 $164,907,424 $172,469,311 Sales Tax 49,761,088 51,824,207 55,425,093 54,433,806 - - - Vehicle License Fee 176,490 62,905,126 66,849,456 70,047,500 71,721,300 Business License Tax Util ity Consumption Tax 50,422,336 50,593,836 50,000,000 50,000,000 59,059,973 62,706,096 61,176,000 63,182,900 Real Estate Transfer Tax Transient O ccupancy Tax 14,318,512 16,787,423 16,900,000 17,556,000 Parking Tax 8,443,638 9,337,111 10,211,274 10,492,084 1,388,448 1,570,907 2,335,747 2,335,747 Licenses & Permits 22,195,164 23,035,039 23,937,797 23,967,499 Fines & Penalties 793,095 924,905 740,482 740,482 Interest Income Service Charges 43,392,862 49,786,173 48,180,068 48,090,899 Internal Service Funds 62,040 50 - - Grants & Subsidies 1,007,508 3,598,933 119,435 119,435 3,616,549 2,291,123 5,149,320 749,320 Miscellaneous Interfund Transfers - 342,082 14,922,885 2,206,667 $460,189,679 $499,188,129 $524,053,025 $518,065,450 Subtotal Revenue - - 10,325,761 12,623,820 Transfers from Fund Balance $460,189,679 $499,188,129 $534,378,786 $530,689,270 Grand Total E - 71

118 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BREAKDOWN OF FY 2015-17 GPF REVENUE BY TYPE Utility Consumption Business License Tax Tax 9.39% Real Estate Transfer 13.31% Tax 11.68% Transient Sales Tax Occupancy Tax 10.31% 3.24% Parking Tax 1.94% Licenses & Permits 0.44% Fines & Penalties 4.50% Interest Income Property Tax 0.14% 31.68% Service Charges 9.04% Transfers from Fund Balance Interfund Transfers Grants & Subsidies Miscellaneous 2.15% 1.61% 0.02% 0.55% HISTORICAL CHANGES IN GPF REVENUE $60 0 $55 0 $50 0 $45 0 $40 0 $35 0 Millions $30 0 $25 0 $20 0 FY 201 4- 15 FY 201 3- 14 FY 201 6- 17 FY 201 5- 16 Ad opt ed U na udit ed Ad opt ed Act ua ls Act ua ls Bu dge t Bu dge t E - 72

119 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES SUMMARY OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE FUND REVENUES eneral Fund (GPF) revenue s. For Purpose Below is a detailed discussion of the individual categories that comprise G each category, a brief description is provided, followed by historical data, relevant analysis , key forecast assumptions and then the forecast itself. Property Tax Property tax is the largest single source of revenu e for the GPF. The property tax is ad valorem, which means that the However , Prop osition 13, which passed in 1978, tax paid on a property is proportional to the property’s value. percent of a property’s assessed value, introduced two significant caveats: 1) the annual tax owed is a maximum of 1 hanges, in which case and 2) the assessed value can only increase a maximum 2 percent each year, unless ownership c the prevailing market value assessment is used as the basis for taxation. percent assessment is collected by the County and is distributed to various public entities in accordance with The one The County’s computation results in the City receiving about 26 percent of total collections. a complex formula. , year -over -year , at a steady pace of 7.6 Over the last 10 years, property tax revenue has grown on average percent, due primarily to robust increases in local housing values. The growth for that period was accelerated by a rapid run - up of housing demand, new construction, and developments that began in FY 2004 -05. The rise in FY 2004 -05 property tax revenues was also due to a V ehicle F) “backfill” payment from the State (the difference License Fee (VL of 2 percent percent ) in the form of property tax. The value of rising property between the old VLF and new fee of 0.65 tax, which increased more quickly than VLF revenues, brought Oakland additional revenues. Furthermore, in FY 2011 - , with the dissolution of the Redevelopment Agency, unallocated redevelopment property tax increment is flowing 12 back to the City in the form of additional property tax revenues. Beginning in FY 2004 -05, property assessments rose quickly, propelled by hig h volume of home sales and rising home prices. Driven by economic growth and aggressive lending practices , the housing market accelerated and finally peaked in 2007 when the median single -family home price reached $580,000. After this peak, housing demand and prices eventually declined due to an economic downturn, lack of affordability, tightened credit, and increased foreclosures. In the beginning of the Great Recession, the median house price fell to $315,000 in 2008 and further fell The local real estate market bottomed out in FY 2010 -11. Starting in FY 2011- 12, the City began to $192,000 in 2009. to see a rebound in housing prices. Currently the median single -family home price is around $500,000, only $80,000 from the 2007 peak. The figure below shows p roperty tax revenues since FY 2001 -02. Of note, since 2012, the City receives a portion of the R idual Property Tax Trust Fund (RPTTF) as the result of dissolution of the Redevelopment es Agency, which is regulated by State law. RPTTF is the portion of property tax increment that would have gone to redevelopment agencies if they had not been dissolved less the funding required to wind- down the obligations of the redevelopment agency. Of particular note is FY 2012 -13, which realized a one -time spike in RPTTF resulting from the E - 73

120 FINANCIAL SUM MARIES distribution of all unobligated tax increment revenue held in reserve by the former Redevelopment Agency. The RPTTF should not be viewed as growth of property tax, but rather as a shift of local resources after losing funding. General Purpose Fund property taxes, inclusive of RPTTF, are expected to grow from redevelopment agency -15 to $172.5 million in FY 2016 -17. a budgeted $148.8 million in FY 2014 Property Tax Millions Adopted $200.0 Historical Budget Values Actuals $180.0 Unaudited $172.5 $164.9 $159.4 $160.0 $154.1 $142.8 $138.8 $140.0 $134.5 $131.8 $131.7 $126.7 $116.5 $120.0 $105.3 $100.0 $90.7 $80.0 $70.1 $67.3 $60.6 $60.0 $40.0 $20.0 $0.0 E - 74

121 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Sales & Use Tax ble personal property.” The recent passage of Proposition 30 Sales and use t ax applies to the retail sale or use of “tangi ax percentage in the City of Oakland to 9.5 .5 , tax paid is 9 sales t brings the total percent; meaning on a $1 purchase The City receives percent of the total tax, meaning the City receiv es 1 cent on a $1 purchase . cents. 1 below details the general allocation of s The table ax on purchases in the City of Oakland. Some of the tax ales and use t revenue receive by the State of California is redistributed to counties to provide h ublic safe ty services. ealth and p Rate Receiving Agency 6.5% The State of California 1.0% The City of Oakland 0.5% The Bay Area Rapid Transit District Alameda County Transportation Improvement Authority 1.0% Alameda County Essential Health Care Services 0.5% 9.5% Total Sales Tax ax revenue is fairly volatile, varying to a large extent with the overall strength of the local and national Sales t Recently s ales previous recession, s ales tax revenue declined significantly. economy. During the tax revenues have increased to the economic recovery. Increases are also attributable to high gasoline and jet fuel prices. Tax base is its diversity; it comes from seven major business groups. No ales One of the strengths of the Oakland S single group accounts for more than 25 percent of the total . See the chart below . - Sales Tax FY 2014 15 Unaudited Consumer Goods Restaurants 13% & Hotels 17% Food and Drugs 9% Business & Building & Industry Construction 15% 10% Autos/ Fuel Transport 17% 19% E - 75

122 FINANCIAL SUM MARIES is projected to be 11.4 percent higher than its FY 20 5-16 -14 level, d ue to the economic Sales Tax revenue in FY 201 13 and an antic ipated one -time increase due to the end of the “Triple -Flip” . The Triple Flip refers to a funding recovery -05 unde shift beginning in FY 2004 of the local 1 percent portion of sales tax to r which the State withheld 0.25 percent ery Bond pay debt service on $15.0 billion in bonds authorized under the Proposition 57, California Economic Recov was backfilled with an equivalent amount of property tax revenue that would have Act. The withheld 0.25 percent otherwise been given to schools. According to the California Department Finance, it is anticipated that the bonds will be retired in FY 2015 hen the bonds are retired, the City will receive a one- time true -up sales tax remittance of -16. W $3 million. These are one -time revenues and are not assumed to continue. Sales Tax Millions $70.0 Historical Adopted Values Budget Actuals $60.0 Unaudited $55.4 $54.4 $53.1 $51.8 $49.8 $48.8 $50.0 $46.7 $46.1 $44.9 $44.7 $41.7 $41.2 $38.4 $38.2 $40.0 $36.5 $35.9 $30.0 $20.0 $10.0 $0.0 E - 76

123 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Business License Tax The B usiness License T ax (BLT) is charged annually to Oakland businesses and is composed of three primary components; normal business gross receipts; gross receipts from construction activity; and business tax from the rental of residential and commercial property. The rate on gross receipts varies by type of business, ranging from a low of sixty cents per $1,000 of receipts for grocers to six dollars per $1,000 of receipts for public utilities. The rate on rental income is $13.95 per $1,000. Business License Tax has been a relatively steady and reliable revenue source as shown in the chart below. However, BLT is impacted by the condition of the economy . The City expects to see a benefit from an increase in the rental real estate market. Office space in the downtown realized a drop in the vacancy rate to 8.4 percent at the end of calendar 2014. This is down more than a percentage point since 2013. Continuing growth activity is largely centered in the BART served business districts, particularly Lake Merritt and Oakland City Center areas. Recovery of the local economy and the implementation of a new business discovery program are expected to help increase revenues in future year s. Over the two -year budget business license tax revenue is expected to increase by roughly 3 percent annually. E - 77

124 FINANCIAL SUM MARIES Business License Tax Millions $90.0 Adopted Historical Budget Values $80.0 Actuals Unaudited $71.7 $70.0 $70.0 $66.8 $62.9 $60.8 $58.7 $60.0 $54.3 $54.1 $53.1 $52.5 $50.3 $50.0 $44.2 $43.9 $43.8 $42.1 $42.0 $40.0 $30.0 $20.0 $10.0 $0.0 E - 78

125 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Utility Consumption Tax The Utility Consumption Tax (UCT) is imposed on the use of utilities, primarily electricity, natural gas, cable television, The UCT applies to both residential and commercial users. It is collected by utility companies and and telephone. remitted to the City each month. The tax rate in Oakland has been 7.5 percent since 1993, although there are two significant exceptions: annual payments by manufacturers are capped at $350,000, and low -income residents pay just 5.5 percent on energy use (gas and electricity). -15 UCT revenue totaled $ 50. The FY 2014 million and i ts composition is shown below . The graph illustrates that in 59 FY -15 , energy and telecommunications accounted for a major portion of UCT, at 58 percent and 32 2014 percent, respectively. Cable television accounted for the remaining 10 percent. 15 - UCT Revenues in FY 2014 Unaudited Telecom 32% Energy 58% Cable TV 10% Historical growth in UCT revenue has been due in large part to increases in the tax rate and the prices of energy and due to industry restructuring, services billed to customers. This tax is unpredictable technological change, weather, dynamics of energy markets, price volatility, consumption p atterns and energy conservation. Energy consumption is impacted by the recession, energy efficiency programs, and by local con ser vation efforts. Telecommunications accounts for 32 of UCT revenues down from 4 0 percent in FY 2009 -10 . This is due to percent innovations in technology that have begun to erode the tax base. Services like pre -paid cell phones and voice over internet protocol, combined with decreasing data costs and industry price wars , are placing downward pressure on the consumption of taxable telecommunications services. UCT is forecasted to remain at the current level. Increases in cable and energy usage are offset by energy efficient projects and “green” building. E - 79

126 FINANCIAL SUM MARIES Utility Consumption Tax Millions $70.0 Historical Adopted Values Budget $60.0 Actuals Unaudited $53.4 $52.7 $52.5 $51.4 $51.4 $51.1 $50.8 $50.6 $50.4 $50.0 $50.0 $49.8 $49.5 $48.8 $50.0 $48.1 $46.6 $40.0 $30.0 $20.0 $10.0 $0.0 E - 80

127 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Real Estate Transfer Tax RETT) rate is 1 .61 percent charged to real estate transactions . Oakland’s share is 1.5 The Real Estate Transfer Tax ( gets the remaining . The tax is triggered by the transfer of property ownership - Alameda County percent 0.11 percent and both the buyer and seller are responsible for ensuring the tax is paid. Up until 2006, RETT revenue had been one of the fastest growing major revenue categories, following significant real estate market growth. As the real estate market cooled in 2007, sales volume significantly declined, and home prices . This resulted from the economic downturn, rising new and existing home inventories, and escalating home decreased foreclosures due to falling home prices and growing number of adjustable rate mortgages and subprime loan defaults. Additionally, new and more stringent lending standards plus reluctance on the part of lenders applied further housing market. downward pressure on the As demand for housing and sales transactions plummeted, RETT revenue took a major hit. In FY 20 12 -13 the local housing market began to experi ence a substantial recovery in the average -over sale price of homes. The City has seen double digit year These price increases have -year growth in home prices. resulted in strong increases in RETT revenues. Furthermore, the recent growth in RETT has largely been due to the sale of large commercial properties as post- recession commercial real estate, once again, becomes an attractive investment. RETT is often subject to major non -recurring revenues. When certain high value properties are sold they can res ult in the sale of the downtown City Center complex resulted in nearly $10 anomalously high revenue. In past years, million projected in revenue. These very large transactions cannot be . easily Real Estate Transfer Tax Millions $90.0 Adopted Historical $79.5 Budget Values $77.7 $80.0 Actuals Unaudited $70.0 $63.2 $62.7 $61.5 $61.2 $59.1 $60.0 $55.7 $50.0 $47.3 $42.1 $40.0 $37.3 $37.0 $36.2 $34.3 $31.6 $30.7 $30.0 $20.0 $10.0 $0.0 E - 81

128 FINANCIAL SUM MARIES Transient Occupancy Tax ) rate is 14 The Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT percent and is paid by lodgers at the City’s hotels who stay thirty days to 1 4 percent in FY 2008 - or less; the tax is collected and remitted by hotel operators. The rate was increased from 11 Measure C su pports various cultural institutions and is booked in a separate 09 due to the Measure C tax surcharge. fund. revenue declined by 17 percent in FY 2008 TOT -10 due to the recession’s adverse affects on tourism -09 and FY 2009 th terrorist attacks and economic and travel. e September 11 This is consistent with the prior recessions. Following th . In FY 2005 slowdown, TOT revenues declined sharply and remained flat for the next four years -06, TOT rebounded 9.7 percent, and continued positive growth two years afterward. In FY 2008 -09 the City experi enced significant by decline in TOT due to the Great Recession. TOT revenues have since recovered culminating in a record high of $14.3 million in FY 2013 -14 . TOT is expected to grow steadily over the two -year budget, reaching $17.56 millio n in FY 2016- 17. The recovery in TOT revenues has been principally driven by high average daily hotel room rates and increased occupancy rates. Transient Occupancy Tax Millions $25.0 Adopted Historical Budget Values $22.5 Actuals Unaudited $20.0 $17.6 $16.9 $17.5 $16.8 $14.3 $15.0 $12.3 $12.2 $11.8 $12.5 $11.3 $10.7 $10.7 $10.6 $10.5 $10.3 $10.3 $9.5 $10.0 $8.5 $7.5 $5.0 $2.5 $0.0 E - 82

129 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Parking Tax The tax rate is 18.5 percent (8.5 The Parking Tax is a tax imposed on the occupant of an off -street parking space. pe rcent supports Measure Z and is booked in a separate fund), and is collected by parking operators. activities Approximately half of the City’s Parking Tax revenue is generated from parking at the Oakland International Airport. venues are strongly correlated with passenger volume at the Oakland The Parking Tax re Airport. International Parking 08 -09 , due to aggressive price competition, the economic downturn, and revenue declined sharply in FY 20 . reduced airline travel Parking Tax revenue is expected to surpass levels reached during its pre- recession peak during the FY 2015 -16 and FY 2016 -17 budgets. Parking Tax Millions Adopted Historical Budget Values $12.0 Actuals Unaudited $10.5 $10.2 $10.0 $9.3 $8.9 $8.7 $8.6 $8.5 $8.5 $8.5 $8.4 $8.2 $7.9 $7.7 $8.0 $7.5 $7.5 $7.0 $6.0 $4.0 $2.0 $0.0 E - 83

130 FINANCIAL SUM MARIES Licenses & Permits Police and Fire permits, traffic, medical cannabis, bingo Licenses and Permit s revenue primarily includes special permits, animal licenses. residential parking permits, and -07, 93 percent of License & Permit revenue related to development and building code enforcement In FY 2006 activities were taken out of the General Purpose Fund (GPF) and moved to the new Development Services Fund (2415 ). Those revenues were specifically associated with a variety of development and enforcement activities, such as land use, permit, and inspection and abatement services. This separation was intended to allow clearer monitoring of these revenues and their related expenditures, as required by state law. -07 dropped to a new baseline of only 7 As a result of the separation, Licenses and Permits revenue after FY 2006 percent of the previous amounts. -16 over FY Proposed increases to the City’s Master Fee Schedule is responsible for the growth forecasted in FY 2015 2014 -17 revenues are projected to remain flat. -15. In FY 2016 Licenses & Permits Millions $20.0 Adopted Historical $19.0 Budget Values $18.0 Actuals Unaudited $15.6 $16.0 $14.0 $13.0 $12.5 $12.0 $11.3 $10.0 $8.0 $6.0 $4.0 $2.3 $2.3 $1.6 $1.6 $2.0 $1.4 $1.4 $1.3 $1.2 $1.1 $0.9 $0.7 $0.0 E - 84

131 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Fines & Penalties roughly 90 percent of the tota l), penalties , and Fines & Penalties consist primarily of parking enforcement fines ( late property interest on tax payments. Parking c itation revenues are expected to remain constant over the two- year budget period . This is primarily due to parking citation issuance arising from the implementation of several parking friendl y policies , includin g the decreased -minute grace period . five and the park mobile program Fines & Penalties Millions $35.0 Adopted Historical Budget Values Actuals $30.0 Unaudited $28.0 $27.4 $26.0 $25.8 $25.6 $24.7 $24.3 $24.2 $25.0 $24.0 $23.9 $23.0 $22.2 $21.9 $21.3 $20.0 $16.9 $16.2 $15.0 $10.0 $5.0 $0.0 E - 85

132 FINANCIAL SUM MARIES Interest Income This revenue category nets interest income from investments against the cost of advances made from the City’s General Purpose Fund to o ther funds. Interest income is estimated at Interest income is volatile, fluctuating along with short- term interest rate movements. to be received 15- and FY 201 6-17. The amount reflects the interest income projected 16 $0.7 million in each of FY 20 . from pooled investments Interest Income Millions Adopted Historical $5.0 Budget Values $4.5 $4.5 Actuals Unaudited $4.0 $3.6 $3.5 $3.2 $3.0 $2.5 $2.0 $1.9 $2.0 $1.8 $1.7 $1.5 $1.1 $1.0 $0.9 $1.0 $0.8 $0.8 $0.7 $0.7 $0.7 $0.5 $0.0 E - 86

133 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Service Charges service provided by the City. T ) may recover all or part he charge ( Service charges are imposed on the user of a or fee 07, the composition of this revenue changed significantly, explaining In FY 2006- of the cost of providing the service. A major change in that year saw $ 11 million in revenues related to building and the steep drop in revenue that year. (2415) . construction being permanently moved into the Development Service s Fund Budgeted Service Charges by Category in FY 2015 - 16 Franchise Port Revenue Fees 16% 31% Other Fees 9% Rental Income Parking 5% Meter Other Service Revenue Charges 28% 11% the components of service charges is provided below: Background information concerning • Port Revenue consists of payments for general services, Fire, and other services the City provides to the Port. The City invoices semi- Port revenue is expected to remain annually, based on actual costs of services. constant over the two- year budget. • Franchise Fees apply to four utilities for the use of City rights of way: PG&E for gas and electric; Waste Management of Alameda County for garbage collection; East Bay Municipal Utility for water; and District year budget. Comcast for cable television. Franchise fee revenue is expected to remain constant over the two- Parking Meter Revenue consists of charges for parking in metered street stalls. Parking reven ue is expected • to grow between 1 and 2 annually over the two -year budget . percent Other Service Charges is revenue from other fees charged including parks and recreation fees, public works • fees, fire inspection fees, and charges for personnel service to provide public safety at events . Thes e revenue s are remain constant annually over the two -year budget . expected to • Rental Income is rental fees for the City’s facilities and lands, as well as concessions at various locations. percent These are expected to grow between 1 a nd 2 revenues annual ly over the two -year budget . E - 87

134 FINANCIAL SUM MARIES Service Charges Millions $70.0 Historical Adopted Values Budget Actuals $60.6 Unaudited $60.0 $56.7 $49.8 $48.2 $48.1 $50.0 $45.9 $45.4 $45.0 $44.6 $44.1 $43.9 $43.4 $43.1 $41.5 $39.0 $40.0 $34.4 $30.0 $20.0 $10.0 $0.0 E - 88

135 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Miscellaneous -time items that do not fit well into other categories , such as The Miscellaneous category consists largely of one . The Miscellaneous category has experienc ed substantial billboard revenue agreements and land/property sales -time and unpredictable nature. The pea ks in FY 2002- 03, FY 2003 -04, FY , due to its one variation from year to year -07 and FY 2008 -09 occurred as a result of a large number of land and facility sales in those years. The large peak 2006 -12 is also a result of land sales otably the Henry J. Kaiser Convention Center. in FY 2011 , n Miscellaneous Millions Adopted $35.0 Historical Budget Values $32.1 Actuals Unaudited $30.0 $25.0 $19.2 $20.0 $15.4 $15.0 $12.2 $11.4 $10.0 $8.0 $6.5 $5.7 $5.1 $4.3 $4.0 $5.0 $3.6 $2.8 $2.3 $1.8 $0.7 $0.0 E - 89

136 FINANCIAL SUM MARIES Interfund Transfers e transfers into the GPF from other f s. They can be made for a variety of reasons and have und Interfund Transfers ar -time payments or scheduled payments for a limited time. various objectives. The se transfers are usually one For example , the Sewer Service Fund (3100) has been making fund transfers into GPF to cover the cost of the office ity Administration C space taken up by Sewer Service employees in the C omplex. 2015 -17 the GPF is expected to receive approximately $14.9 million and $2. 2 million , respectively In FY -16 and 2016 Interfund Transfer revenue . These consist of one in lion in deferred pension credit and $3 -time transfers of $9.72 mil million as a result of the transfer of garages and the on -going $2.2 million associated revenues . Interfund Transfers Millions $45.0 Historical Adopted Values Budget $40.0 $38.7 Actuals Unaudited $35.0 $29.3 $30.0 $25.7 $25.0 $21.9 $20.1 $18.9 $20.0 $17.1 $14.9 $14.4 $15.0 $10.6 $10.0 $6.7 $5.0 $2.9 $2.2 $1.7 $0.3 $0.0 $0.0 E - 90

137 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES EXPENDITURE TABLES E - 91

138 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NOTES E - 92

139 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES ALL FUNDS EXPENDITURES FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Unaudited Adopted Adopted Actuals Agency / Department Actuals Budget Budget Mayor $2,865,779 $2,179,774 $2,217,223 $2,829,158 3,599,300 3,775,596 4,436,312 4,491,097 City Council 1 12,553,205 17,367,577 18,476,250 17,801,806 City Administrator 15,460,538 14,233,941 15,115,252 15,055,588 City Attorney 1,653,631 1,630,123 1,903,677 1,826,542 City Auditor 2 1,807,630 2,372,962 3,425,223 3,462,575 City Clerk 3 858,779 870,223 - - Public Ethics Commission 27,683,445 31,564,673 36,117,569 35,604,483 Finance Human Resources Management 5,112,346 6,092,519 6,701,969 6,570,365 Information Technology 14,871,881 16,240,771 23,267,335 22,940,093 - - 304,075 312,566 Race & Equi ty 224,945,156 241,854,595 235,570,787 242,535,092 Police 116,573,817 131,252,435 134,969,853 139,494,304 Fire Human Services 67,363,180 68,948,185 69,453,990 70,108,819 O akland Parks & Recreation 24,891,073 26,786,234 26,341,522 26,120,901 O akland Public Library 25,711,282 26,239,314 28,658,815 30,177,494 Economic & Workforce Development 25,784,866 19,320,826 17,652,619 17,291,413 Housing & Community Development 36,298,721 48,761,096 18,121,483 18,770,502 25,163,443 23,420,746 27,244,050 26,996,545 Planning, & Building O akland Public Works 185,026,087 178,922,759 161,919,550 161,487,326 Non-Departmental 293,558,131 494,534,558 329,523,361 305,203,325 $1,110,237,505 $1,355,536,133 $1,162,891,629 $1,149,986,838 Subtotal Expenditures 107,369,825 Capital Improvement Projects 32,150,843 139,387,120 40,068,580 $1,494,923,253 $1,217,607,330 $1,182,137,681 Grand Total $1,202,960,209 5 During FY 6458-59, the Anim al Shelter div is ion was trans f erred f rom the P olice Departm ent to a Departm ent within the City Administrator's Of f ice called Oakland Animal Serv ices. 6 Com m unications / KTOP trans f erred f rom the City Adm inis trator's Of f ice to the City Clerk's Of f ice per Council direction. 7 P ublic Ethics was res tructured as a s tand alone departm ent per v oter approv al of M eas ure CC. E - 93

140 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BREAKDOWN OF FY 2015-17 ALL FUNDS EXPENDITURE BY DEPARTMENT Capital Improvement Planning, & Building Projects Housing & Community 2.27% Mayor 3.03% Development 0.24% 1.55% City Council 0.37% Economic & Workforce City Administrator Development Departmental Non - 1.52% 1.47% 26.61% City Attorney 1.26% O akland Public City Auditor Works 0.16% 13.37% City Clerk 0.29% O akland Public Library Fire 2.47% Public Ethics 11.51% Commission Finance Police 0.07% O akland Parks & 3.01% 20.05% Recreation Human Resources 2.20% Management 0.56% Human Services Information Technology 5.85% Race & Equi ty 1.94% 0.03% HISTORICAL CHANGES IN ALL FUNDS $1,5 00 $1,3 00 $1,1 00 $90 0 $70 0 Millions $50 0 $30 0 $10 0 FY 2016-17 FY 2013-14 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 A dop t ed A ctu al s A dop t ed Unaudited Bu dge t A ctu al s Bu dge t E - 94

141 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES GENERAL PURPOSE FUND EXPENDITURES FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Unaudited Actuals Agency / Department Actuals Budget Budget Mayor $2,567,901 $1,903,648 $2,001,862 $2,535,425 3,599,300 3,775,596 4,436,312 4,491,097 City Council 1 8,836,967 13,766,855 15,926,614 15,267,590 City Administrator 7,962,648 5,561,912 5,308,541 5,378,125 City Attorney 1,653,631 1,630,123 1,903,677 1,826,542 City Auditor City Clerk 1,728,194 2,309,361 1,842,217 1,860,152 2 858,779 870,223 - Public Ethics Commission 15,322,172 19,806,945 22,594,813 21,887,977 Finance Human Resources Management 3,577,193 4,409,783 4,740,469 4,597,188 Information Technology 8,516,462 9,779,785 10,209,508 10,335,651 - 304,075 312,566 Race & Equi ty 189,381,809 213,291,610 211,713,264 218,529,408 Police 96,363,195 112,430,904 123,604,555 128,688,435 Fire Human Services 6,926,163 5,887,394 6,465,571 5,978,003 O akland Parks & Recreation 13,429,565 14,086,210 15,765,804 15,547,529 O akland Public Library 9,075,365 9,110,565 11,129,415 11,746,848 Economic & Workforce Development 2,458,025 2,989,798 5,058,763 4,814,541 Housing & Community Development - 612 200,000 - 97,030 518,139 41,466 41,648 Planning, & Building O akland Public Works 4,662,593 3,732,290 2,863,827 2,897,432 68,663,906 73,435,370 85,823,691 72,798,414 Non-Departmental $444,158,478 $533,126,786 $530,437,270 $498,724,502 Subtotal Expenditures Capital Improvement Projects 522,586 1,109,180 1,252,000 252,000 $444,681,063 $499,833,682 $534,378,786 $530,689,270 Grand Total 5 During FY 6458-59, the Anim al Shelter div is ion was trans f erred f rom the P olice Departm ent to a Departm ent within the City Administrator's Of f ice called Oakland Animal Serv ices. 6 P ublic Ethics was res tructured as a s tand alone departm ent per v oter approv al of M eas ure CC. E - 95

142 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES BREAKDOWN OF FY 2015-17 GENERAL PURPOSE FUND EXPENDITURE BY DEPARTMENT Mayor Fire City Council Non - Departmental 0.48% 23.72% 0.84% 14.91% O aklandPublic Works City Administrator 0.54% 2.93% City Attorney Planning, & Building 1.00% 0.01% City Auditor 0.35% Economic & Workforce City Clerk Development 0.35% 0.93% Public Ethics Commission 0.16% Human Services 1.17% Finance O akland Parks & 4.18% Human Resources Recreation Management 2.94% 0.88% O akland Public Library Information Technology 2.15% 1.93% Race & Equi ty Police 0.06% 40.45% HISTORICAL CHANGES IN ALL FUNDS $60 0 $50 0 $40 0 Millions $30 0 $20 0 $10 0 FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Unaudited A dop t ed A ctu al s A dop t ed Bu dge t Bu dge t A ctu al s E - 96

143 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES SUMMARY OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE FUND EXPENDITURES Below is a detailed discussion of the individual categories that comprise G eneral Purpose Fund (GPF) expenditures . relevant analysis, and key forecast assumptions. For each category, a brief descr iption is provided, followed by GPF Budgeted Expenditures 16 - by Category in FY 2015 Debt Service, O&M Transfers & 17.3% Overhead 11.4% Sworn Retirement 9.0% Civilian Civilian Salaries Retirement 15.6% 4.2% Sworn Fringe 8.8% Civilian Fringe Sworn Salaries 5.0% 28.6% E - 97

144 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Salaries budget includes assumptions related to salaries for sworn and civilian personnel that are consistent with the The City’s memoranda of understanding with its bargaining units. The budget includes Cost of Living Adjustments for sworn firefighter personnel that were agreed to in the Memorandum of Understanding reached with Local 55, International Association of Firefighters on July 1, 2014. As agreements covering the two year budget cycle have not City’s other bargaining units no COLAs are assumed, although funds have been set aside for been reached with the , and available for negotiations. The budget does assume increases in salaries for employee compensation classifications that will be impacted by the newly enacted Measure FF minimum wage law. GPF Salaries Millions Including Overtime, Allowances, & Premiums $200.0 Unaudited Adopted Historical Actual Budget Values $180.0 $163 $157 $160.0 $153 $140 $140 $135 $140.0 $132 $128 $120.0 $100.0 $87 $84 $76 $74 $80.0 $70 $70 $64 $61 $60.0 $40.0 $20.0 $0.0 FY10-11 FY11-12 FY12-13 FY13-14 FY14-15 FY15-16 FY16-17 FY09-10 Sworn salaries Civilian salaries E - 98

145 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Fringe Benefits Civilian and sworn fringe benefit expenditures are comprised of many components, including health insurance, workers’ compensation, dental and vision insurance, disability insurance, unemployment insurance, and others. Cost sharing between employer and employee on fringe benefits is also a bar gained arrangement. The budget assume s that Kaiser health the arrangement currently in place would continue (e.g., the City fully pays the equivalent of the s). insurance premium GPF Fringe Benefits Millions $60.0 Unaudited Adopted Historical Actual Budget Values $49 $50.0 $47 $42 $39 $40.0 $36 $36 $33 $32 $30.0 $27 $27 $25 $23 $23 $22 $19 $20.0 $18 $10.0 $0.0 FY10-11 FY14-15 FY16-17 FY09-10 FY13-14 FY12-13 FY11-12 FY15-16 Sworn fringe Civilian fringe E - 99

146 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Retirement civilian and sworn employees would Staff assumed that the City’s employer contribution retirement expenditures for grow at the rate projected by CalPERS, the City’s retirement program administrator. Based on the most current is expected that the civilian employee rate will increase by 2.74% in FY 2015 -16 and 2.46% in information available, it increase for sworn employees is expected to be 2.59% in FY 2015 -16 and 2.71% in FY 2016 -17 . FY 2016 -17. The rate Although CalPERS identifies an “employer contribution” and “employee contribution” for retirement deposits, the actual cost sharing between the City and employees is a bargained arrangement codified in Memoranda of The budget assume s that the arrangement currently in Understanding (MOUs) between the City and employee unions. place would continue. GPF Retirement Millions Unaudited Adopted Historical $60.0 Actual Budget Values $54 $50.0 $48 $39 $39 $40.0 $36 $31 $30 $30 $30.0 $24 $22 $19 $20.0 $16 $12 $12 $12 $11 $10.0 $0.0 FY10-11 FY12-13 FY13-14 FY14-15 FY09-10 FY11-12 FY15-16 FY16-17 Sworn retirement Civilian retirement E - 100

147 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Other Expenditures Operations and Maintenance operations and maintenance (O&M) expenditures would remain in future years at FY 2014 -15 levels, Budgeted policy consistent with budgeting practices and the City’s actual experience with these expenditures, unless specific interventions occur. Historically, operations and maintenance expenditures, which are composed of services and supplies and contracts, have grown very slightly, and therefore is assumed . no growth Debt Service, Overhead, and Operating Transfers Th e City’s Treasury Division estimated the future debt service expenditures based on the repayment schedule of the City’s current debt. Debt service includes principal and interest expenses on bonds and other loans. Staff forecasted ng transfers would remain constant at FY 2014 -15 levels. The FY 201 5-17 adopted budget that overhead and operati contains some updates to overhead cost recovery rates relative to past years. GPF Other Expenditures Millions Historical Historical Unaudited Unaudited Adopted Adopted Values Values Actual Actual Budget Budget $100.0 $92 $92 $83 $80.0 $71 $71 $65 $62 $61 $61 $60.0 $55 $55 $54 $53 $50 $49 $44 $40.0 $20.0 $0.0 FY09-10 FY11-12 FY15-16 FY13-14 FY10-11 FY12-13 FY16-17 FY14-15 O&M Debt Service, Transfers & Overhead E - 101

148 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NOTES E - 102

149 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES OTHER BUDGET INFORMATION E - 103

150 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NOTES E - 104

151 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NEGATIVE FUNDS Many non- GPF City funds have negative balances . The poor financial standing of the funds is a result of historical overspending and/or under- recovery , as well as operational shortfalls (cost increases outpacing revenue growth). negatives include: Self -Insurance Liability Fund ($ 15.3 million projected by the end of FY 201 4- Funds with significant 15 ), Mandatory Refuse Program ($ 3.9 million), Municipal Capital Improvement ($5 .4 million ), Kaiser Convention Center Fund ($ and Facilities Fund ($ 17 .5 million). These negative balances harm the overall health of the 1. 8 million), City’s assets by borrowing from the available positive funds, such as the General Purpose Fund, internal pension assets, deferred leave balances, etc. Except for the GPF, these other positive funds are mostly restricted, and funds borrowed from them will require repayment. E - 105

152 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NEGATIVE FUNDS Ending Ending Unaudited Ending Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Assigned Agency (as of 6/30/12) Fund (as of 6/30/15) Explanation of negative fund balance (as of 6/30/13) Fund Description (as of 6/30/14) / Dept Negative Funds with Repayment Schedules: (21,016,159) (22,474,395) (15,302,775) On repayment plan through 2022. Self Insurance Budget Office (22,980,339) 1100 Liability (5,839,314) (5,881,460) (5,063,421) 1700 (3,852,540) Mandatory Refuse Rising lien receivables due to non-payments of Finance Program garbage fees, and previous multiple transfer to GPF. Negative Funds should be eliminated over time as liens are collected through sale of properties. Additionally the recent increase of surcharge rate will leave a positive effect on this fund balance. (2,907,559) Henry J Kaiser (2,338,469) Budget Office (1,758,880) Proposed to be paid off in FY 2016-17. (3,490,580) 1730 Convention Ce (4,766,712) (4,557,584) 1750 (4,867,100) Negative was created due to two $2.1 million Multipurpose Reserve O PW (5,206,844) transfer to the GPF and in FY 2005-06 an additional $800K was transferred to GPF. Garage rate increases and expenditure reductions were adopted for FY 2009-11. In FY 2016-17, transportation staff are proposed to be moved to other eligible sources. 1760 Telecommunications The fund was previously on a re-payment plan, (197,957) CAO Reserve but was compl etel y paid down. CAO (2,942,764) (2,360,355) (1,789,294) (1,209,689) 1791 Proposed to be paid off in FY 2016-17. Contract Administration Fee (289,890) (1,416,293) O PW Issuance of new debt - Capital lease. 2310 Lighting and Landscape Assessment District (1,584,849) (4,265,613) O PW Paid off in FY 2014-15. Equi pment 4100 (7,339,685) ITD (815,669) (1,220,643) (1,530,670) (1,769,897) Repayment factored into internal service fund 4300 Reproduction rate in FY 2015-17. City Facilities (21,494,517) (18,329,573) (17,537,264) On repayment plan through 2019. 4400 O PW (23,611,188) (4,146,005) (3,922,045) (3,820,440) (3,848,306) To reduce the cost of the fund, Central Store 4500 Finance Central Stores section was eliminated in the FY 2011-12 budget. Agencies/departments will now manage their supplies on a just-in-time basis. (525,975) (300,431) 4550 (140,664) (109,723) To be paid off in FY 2015-16. Purchasing Finance (67,926,367) (62,278,619) (50,546,064) Total (78,072,482) Reimbursable Negative Funds: EWD (498,834) (710) (712) Central City East Negative should be cover by loan repayments. 1831 Project EWD (327,240) Current fund balance is positive. Coliseum Project Area 1832 Loans (128,007) (410,231) Reimbursed by ORSA. 1883 2000 Subordinated EWD Housing Se EWD (1,451,335) (1,152,559) Current fund balance is positive. 2011A-T Subordinated 1885 Housing O PW (223,546) 2061 (198,501) (174,446) (32,151) The City is waiting for FEMA to issue the final 2006 FEMA: 1628 Winter Storm close out report of the disaster, send final reimbursement and release retention payment. O PW (547,108) (271,331) (271,683) 2062 (271,643) The City is waiting for FEMA to issue the final 2006 FEMA: 1646 close out report of the disaster, send final Spring Storm reimbursement and release retention payment. E - 106

153 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES (CONT’D) NEGATIVE FUNDS Ending Unaudited Ending Ending Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Assigned Agency (as of 6/30/13) (as of 6/30/15) Fund Fund Description (as of 6/30/14) Explanation of negative fund balance (as of 6/30/12) / Dept Reimbursable Negative Funds: (248,457) (161,917) (137,459) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time HSD (107,446) Department of 2102 between spending grant funds and receiving Agriculture reimbursement from the grantor. (3,324,975) (4,738,988) 2103 (4,445,304) HUD- Historical negative balance (pre FY 1999-00) HSD (4,491,994) ESG/SHP/HO PWA requires one-time offset of $3.9M. A portion of this uncol l ectibl e amount (approximatel y $1.2M) is due to HUD's modified cost reimbursement methodology. (1,586,671) (202,353) (3,242,669) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time 2107 HCD HUD-108 (3,613,637) between spending grant funds and receiving loan payments. (153,165) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time HCD 2108 HUD-CDBG between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. O PD (71,552) (78,606) (80,269) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time 2000 Local Law 2111 Enforcement B between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. Department of Justice O PD (87,332) Paid off in FY 2014-15. 2112 HSD (1,262,927) (270,750) 2113 Current negative fund balance is due to lag time Department of Justice- (215,771) CO PS between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. (38,325) (39,995) (108,390) (242,278) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time 2114 Department of Labor HSD between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. Department of 2116 (1,301,865) (205,489) (109,220) Current fund balance is positive. O PW Transportation HSD Federal Action Agency (18,231) (36,949) (20,556) Historical negative balance is due to (18,118) 2120 accumulated negative interest of $17K. Timing of drawdown and/or reimbursement. - (909,388) Fire Current fund balance is positive. US Dept of Homeland 2123 (764,364) Security Fire 2124 (872,254) (1,249,486) Federal Emergency Current negative fund balance is due to lag time (898,403) (847,080) Management between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. 2127 Department of (1,960,603) OBRA (15,091) (1,775,518) Current fund balance is positive. Transportation-Tiger HSD (642,069) (1,239,783) 2128 (1,553,583) (2,985,783) Historical negative balance (pre FY1999-2000) Dept. of Heal th and relates to $255K in accumulated negative Human Services interest and also timing of drawdowns and/or reimbursements. The fund requires one-time revenue offset. (274,718) Trade Corridor OBRA/ONI Current negative fund balance is due to lag time 2129 (1,124,417) between spending grant funds and receiving Improvement F reimbursement from the grantor. O PW (381,120) (1,069,058) (1,445,219) (2,888,600) 2134 Historical negative balance (pre FY 1999-00) California Parks and Recreation requires one-time offset. $107K is related to SB174 Park Grant Activities, and $109K is related to non-project related charges. Current negative fund balance is due to lag time between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. (123,555) HSD (41,662) 2138 Current fund balance is positive. California Department of Education E - 107

154 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NEGATIVE FUNDS (CONT’D) Ending Unaudited Ending Ending Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Assigned Agency Fund Description (as of 6/30/15) Explanation of negative fund balance Fund (as of 6/30/13) (as of 6/30/12) (as of 6/30/14) / Dept Reimbursable Negative Funds: (379,037) (321,583) California Housing and (182,670) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time (1,518,506) HCD/HSD 2144 between spending grant funds and receiving Community Development reimbursement from the grantor. Library/O PW (563,451) (561,841) (564,621) Current fund balance is positive. 2148 California Library Services O PD (28,846) Current fund balance is positive. California Board of 2152 Corrections 2154 California Integrated (73,475) (72,533) (72,790) (70,823) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time O PW Waste Management between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. Board O PW (2,708,265) (566,980) (1,377,809) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time 2159 State of California between spending grant funds and receiving O ther reimbursement from the grantor. O PW (171,800) (52,614) (10,870) 2162 (47,709) Metro Transportation Current negative fund balance is due to lag time Com: TD between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. (319,125) O PW (624,988) 2163 (556,387) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time Metro Transportation (537,224) Com: Program Grant between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. O PW (91,804) (91,556) (91,717) (91,703) 2164 Congestion Mitigation Current negative fund balance is due to lag time & Air between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. O PW Fund closed in FY 2014-15. 2165 (23,462) Prop 1B Nov 2006 CA Trans Bo - Bay Area Air Q uality (59,557) Current fund balance is positive. O PW 2166 (8,441) Management District (382,939) (546,559) (540,691) (523,013) Historical negative balance due to 2190 Private Grants Various Neighborhood law project (City Attorney's Office). This project requires a one-time revenue offset. The remaining deficit balance is from several (265,410) (217,606) (1,167,347) ACTIA Reimbursable 2214 O PW streetscape projects Staff is continuing to Grants review the ability to receive reimbursement for these projects. 2260 Measure WW: East Current negative fund balance is due to lag time (1,653,960) (2,052,029) (951,249) (879,096) O PW between spending grant funds and receiving Bay Regional Parks District Local Grant reimbursement from the grantor and retention amount. (2,827,714) (2,037,216) Current fund balance is positive. Development Service PBD 2415 Fund HUD- HCD (171) Current fund balance is positive. 2603 ESG/SHP/HO PWA (ARRA) 2605 HSD (139) (141) (138) (135) Current negative fund balance is due to lag time Dept of Heal th & between spending grant funds and receiving Human Services reimbursement from the grantor. E - 108

155 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES (CONT’D) NEGATIVE FUNDS Ending Unaudited Ending Ending Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Assigned Agency (as of 6/30/12) (as of 6/30/13) (as of 6/30/15) Fund Description Explanation of negative fund balance (as of 6/30/14) Fund / Dept Reimbursable Negative Funds: 2606 (283,138) Fund will be closed in FY 2014-15 O PW Metro Transportation Commission 2607 Department of Justice- Fund will be closed in FY 2015-16. (1,168,627) O PD CO PS H Environmental 2608 (21,438) Fund will be closed in FY 2014-15. HCD Protection Agency D ept of Energy -EECBG 2609 (212,957) Current fund balance is positive. O PW (187,077) Program State Water Control (175,264) (11,379) Fund will be closed in FY 2014-15. O PW 2610 Board-CW (5,525) (69,694) Current fund balance is positive. 2611 HCD HUD-CDBG (ARRA) Fire 2613 (83,480) (51,094) Port Security Grant Current negative fund balance is due to lag time (15,126) (51,094) Program between spending grant funds and receiving reimbursement from the grantor. 2912 Federal Asset O PD Current fund balance is positive. (37,333) Forfeiture O PW (651,723) (859,049) (879,048) (706,980) PWA staff wil l be continuing efforts to 2990 Public Works Grants coordinate with responsibl e departments to move ineligible grant charges to other matching fund sources. The $886K estimate of unrecoverable costs is made up of historical expenditures ($856K) and accumulated negative interest of $32K. Emergency Response: 5008 PWA staff will coordinate with responsible O PW (156,821) (155,732) (155,911) (156,342) GOB Series 1992 departments to move ineligible charges to other funds. (1,152,559) (1,244,494) Loan repayment through RO PS. West O akl and Projects EWD (1,026,591) 5660 EWD (754,244) Current fund balance is positive. Joint Arm Base 5672 Infrastructure 5673 (59,787) Current fund balance is positive. EWD OBRA: Environmental Remediation (144,305) (143,909) JPFA Pooled (143,744) Non-Departmental (94,734) Fund balance to be recovered by assessment. 6570 Assessment: 1996 Revenue Bonds (1,196) 6612 (4,206) (2,353) Fund balance to be recovered by assessment. Non-Departmental JPFA Lease Revenue Refunding (31,603,437) (22,871,116) (23,273,837) Total (18,689,743) E - 109

156 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NEGATIVE FUNDS (CONT’D) Ending Unaudited Ending Ending Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Fund Balance Assigned Agency (as of 6/30/12) (as of 6/30/13) (as of 6/30/15) Explanation of negative fund balance Fund Fund Description (as of 6/30/14) / Dept Non-Reimbursable Negative Funds without Repayment Plan: (971,381) (964,635) Underground District (968,269) O PW Fund is no longer being used. This fund was (965,744) 1600 originally set up as a pass thru for Revolving Fund undergrounding projects. Very little recovery took place in FY 1999-00 and FY 2000-01. The fund has accumulated negative interest of $721K and all remaining charges are considered un-collectable. This fund requires a one-time revenue off-set. 2992 (2,590,719) (2,583,736) (2,588,260) (2,587,880) Historical negative balance (FY 1993-94) O PR Parks and Recreation Grants requires one-time offset. $161K is related to accumulated negative interest. OPR has confirmed current activity will be reimbursed on a quarterly basis. O PW (1,614,742) (1,612,887) JPFA Admin Building: (1,624,167) Historical negative balance (FY 2001-02) is 5012 (1,619,201) related Admin building projects (Civic Center Series 1996 Complex/City Hall) that are uncollectable. This fund requires a one-time revenue offset. (5,414,975) Municipal Capital (4,900,385) (5,007,783) Historical negative balance caused by 5500 Budget Office (5,471,106) expenditures exceeding revenues. This fund Improvement requires a one-time revenue offset. (3,336,084) (3,389,318) (3,385,425) Miscellaneous Capital Budget Historical negative balance related to $1.3 (3,317,981) 5999 Projects million in negative interest and $2.1 million in O ffice/O PW various project expenditures (e.g. Y2K conversion). This fund requires one-time revenue offset. (13,447,067) (13,519,597) (13,916,383) Total (14,031,629) Total Negative Funds (98,669,332) (87,736,284) (110,793,854) (112,976,871) E - 110

157 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES TEN- YEAR REPAYMENT PLAN FOR FUNDS WITH NEGATIVE BALANCES Certain funds with negative balances, such as the Kaiser Convention Center Fund and Contract Compliance Fund were -07. The plan involves the GPF amortizing the negative balance put on 10 -year repayment schedules during FY 2005 -year period. in these funds and making annual transfers over a 10 TEN-YEAR NEGATIVE FUND REPAY MENT SCHEDULES S ELF- INS URANCE FUND (1 1 0 0 ) FINANCIAL PRO JECTIO N Amount of T r ansfer Beginning Fund Deficit I ncr ease Change in T otal GPF Non- G PF Change in T otal Year - End $ (15,302,775) T r ansfer in Subsidy Rev enues Expenditur es Fund Balance Fund Balance Portion Portion 23,954,259 1,329,632 (13,973,143) 21,509,077 3,774,814 2,154,533 9% 2015-16 25,283,891 2016-17 25,309,345 23,989,144 1,320,201 (12,652,942) 21,534,531 3,774,814 25,454 0% 4% 1,138,921 3,967,240 22,481,026 (10,913,494) 1,739,447 24,708,818 26,448,266 2017-18 4% 2018-19 27,638,437 25,450,083 2,188,355 (8,725,140) 23,492,672 4,145,766 1,190,172 4% 2,668,582 2019-20 28,882,167 26,213,585 (6,056,558) 24,549,842 4,332,325 1,243,730 4% 1,299,698 4,527,280 25,654,585 (2,874,686) 3,181,872 26,999,993 30,181,865 2020-21 4,602,702 30,684,679 2% 27,809,993 26,081,977 0 2021-22 2,874,686 502,814 KAIS ER CO NVENTIO N CENTER FUND (1 7 3 0 ) FINANCIAL PRO JECTIO N Beginning Fund Def icit Total Total Change in Year- End Change in Amount of Increase (1,758,880) $ Revenues Expenditures* Subsidy Fund Balance Fund Balance in Subsidy Subsidy 1,758,880 - 1,758,880 0 0 - 0% 2015-16 NIS TRATIO N FUND (1 7 9 1 ) FINANCIAL PRO JECTIO N MI CO NTRACT AD Beginning Fund Deficit T otal T otal Change in Year - End Amount of Change in I ncr ease $ (1,209,689) in Subsidy Subsidy Subsidy Rev enues Expenditur es* Fund Balance Fund Balance 1,209,689 - 0 0 1,209,689 0% 2015-16 - FACILITIES FUND (4400) FINANCIAL PROJECTION Beginning Cash Deficit Change in Fund Balance I SF non-ISF T otal T otal Year - End I mpact Rate $ (17,537,264) Inc. on GPF Fund Balance TOTAL GPF Non G PF Rev enue Expenditur es Rev enue Rev enues (11,243,264) 16,310,197 11% 6,294,000 5,927,860 366,140 28,532,429 34,826,429 658,345 2015-16* 34,168,084 28,170,132 866,140 1,927,860 2,794,000 (8,449,264) 17,778,114 0% 2016-17 30,305,787 658,345 30,964,132 (4,833,550) 19,911,488 2017-18 31,972,605 658,345 32,630,950 29,015,236 433,886 3,181,829 3,615,714 5% 29,885,693 22,300,867 7% 658,345 34,719,243 34,060,898 580,026 4,253,524 4,833,550 0 2018-19 *ISF Revenues include one-time $8.4 mil from GPF E - 111

158 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES NOTES E - 112

159 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES LONG -TERM LIABILITIES Overview of Long -Term Liabilities The City has four defined benefit retirement plans: Oakland Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS), Oakland Municipal Employees’ Retirement System (OMERS), and the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (PERS) Public Safety Retirement Plan and Miscellaneous Retirement Plan. PFRS and OMERS are closed plans that cover employees hired prior to July 1976 and September 1970, respectively. The City also has programs in place to partially pay health insurance premiums for certain classes of retirees f rom City employment. City retirees are eligible for retiree health benefits if they meet certain requirements relating to age and service. The retiree health benefits are described in the labor agreements between the City and Local utions. Unions and in City resol The table below shows a summary of the long -term liabilities for the City : Unfunded Descriptions Amount 1 California Public Employees Retirement System (Cal PERS) unfunded balance as of $1,135M $478M unfunded liability and 67.9% June 30, 2013. The Public Safety Plan has a - sworn) Plan has a $657M unfunded liability and funded ratio; the Miscellaneous (non - 14 – $98.6 million. 69.5% funded ratio. The City annual pension cost for FY 2013 2 $ 463M Other Post - Employment Benefits (OPEB) has the unfunded actuarial accrued liability (UAAL) of $463M as of July 1, 2013. The City contributed $20.6 million for FY 2013 - 14. 3 $ Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS), closed retirement system, unfunded balance 215M e in FY 2017 18, estimated at $25M. 100% as of July 1, 2013 payments will resum - Funding required by 2026. A separate tax override funding stream exists until 2026. 98.7M Negative Funds – $ $62.3 million of the negative funds have a repayment plan, $22.9 million are reimbursement funds and $13.5 million are funds with no repayment plan. $40.3M Accrued Leaves are approximately $40.3M unfunded as of June 30, 2014. 1 T he City annual pension cost is funded per CalPERS annual required contribution (ARC). 2 The City is on a p ay -you go funding progress. As of June 30, 2014, the City begun to partially pre -fund the ARC to California Employer’s Retiree -as Benefit Trust (“CERBT”) per resolution no. 85016. The UAAL is defined as the difference between the present value of projected future benefits earned by employees to date and the actuarial value of assets accumulated to finance those benefits. 3 Tax override funding stream exists until 2026. On July 1, 2012, the City issued $210 million in additional Pension Obligation Bonds (Series 2012). As a result of a funding agreement was entered into between the PFRS Board and the City and therefore, no annual contributions until July 1, 2017. Unfunded Pension Liability for CalPERS – Active Retirement Plan The City has active defined benefit retirement plans for safety and miscellaneous employees with CalPERS. Although the funded ratios of the safety and miscellaneous (civilian) plan with CalPERS are below 100%, the City will continue to maintain these funded ratios through increases in CalPERS’ required contributions from the City , which are already accounted for in the cost escalation of current employees’ retirement contribution. E - 113

160 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Unfunded Pension Liability for PFRS and OMERS – Closed Retirement Plans defined benefit retirement plans: the Oakland Police and Regarding unfunded pension liability, the City has two close ployees’ Retirement System (OMERS) . The OMERS system was Fire Retirement System (PFRS), Oakland Municipal Em recently annuitized by the City through the passage of Measure EE by the voters in November of 2014 and thus does not present an ongoing financial challenge to the City. Based upon the most recent report the PFRS' Unfunded Actuarial Accrued Liability (UAAL) was $ 215.7M as of July 1, 2013. On July 30, 2012, the City issued Taxable Pension Obligation Bonds, Series 2012 (“2012 POBs”) of approximately $212.5 million. The proceeds of the bonds were deposited into the closed Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS) to fund the Unfunded Actuarial Accrued Liability (UAAL) or beneficiary retirement benefits. As a result, the City will not be required to make any further periodic payments to the Retirement Sys tem through June 30, 2017, thereby providing temporary relief to the City’s general fund. Most importantly, the bonds are secured and payable s from any legally available source of funds of the City as well as and including the pledge of Tax Override Revenue 0.1575 percent tax on property within the City of Oakland. (TOR) received by the City from a levy of a Other Post Employment Benefits (OPEB) Like many municipalities, the City has accrued significant unfunded long post -term liabilities, including for other employment benefits (OPEB) for police, fire, and miscellaneous employees. Public administration and financial management best practices dictate that the City must begin to make deposits to build assets in order to offset these liabilities. In addition, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) now requires that municipalities report these liabilities in their CAFR and other appropriate financial reports. -as -you -go basis, The City is currently paying for OPEB benefits for its retirees on a pay through which it pays as much each year as is require d for just that year’s expenses. According to the most recent report from the City’s actuary, Aon -as -you -go pay Hewitt, the estimated required pay -16 are $7 million for police, $5.5 mil lion for Fire, ments for FY 2015 and $7.7 million for Civilians totaling $20.6 million annually. As of July 1, 2013, the Actuarial Accrued Liability (which is equal to that portion of the Actuarial Present Value of ,944, a decrease from the OPEB Benefits that have been earned to date), was $463,850 previous year ($553,530,074). The reduction was due to a City contribution into California Employer’s Retirement Benefit Trust (CERBT), an agent multiple -employer defined benefit post- employment healthcare plan administered by CalPERS. After the dissolution of the former Redevelopment Agency, the City has requested payments for OPEB through the Recognized Obligation Payment Schedule (“ROPS”). To date, the City has received approximately $2,364,688 and has begun investing those fund s in the CERBT. The City will receive approximately $665,000 annually until June 30, 2022, thus over this period the City has secured approximately $14 million to pay unfunded OPEB liabilities. By partially pre- funding the annual required contribution (ARC ) to CERBT, the City has established asset for future liabilities and is able to use a higher discount rate. As a component of the FY 2015 -17 Budget , the administration recommended that $ 16 million ($ 14.9 million one -time contribute to the CERBT and $ on -going) be used to million , which will lead to reductions in the City’s future 1.1 Actuarial Accrued Liability . Compensated Absences – Accrued Vacation, Sick Leave, and Compensatory Time The City’s policy and its agreements with employee groups permit employees but unused to accumulate earned, vested vacation, sick leave and other compensatory time. All earned compensatory time is accrued when incurred in the government -wide financial statements and the proprietary fund financial statements. A liability for these amounts The estimated current liability is $40 .3 million. is reported in the governmental funds only if they are due and payable. E - 114

161 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CITY OF OAKLAND ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY F - 1

162 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY SUMMARY OF POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT 10 2009- THROUGH FY 2016-17 FY (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2012-13 FY 2010-11 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2009-10 FY 2011-12 Midcycle Adopted Midcycle Adopted Adopted Amended Adopted Midcycle Department Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE FTE FTE FTE FTE FTE 10.00 9.00 9.00 13.50 10.00 11.00 11.00 Mayor 9.00 35.50 26.46 26.46 26.46 26.46 28.02 28.02 City Council 26.46 1 66.60 61.50 64.30 187.15 115.65 City Administrator 75.75 95.25 95.25 City Attorney 67.00 61.00 62.00 65.00 68.00 75.00 74.00 74.00 10.00 City Auditor 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 1 17.50 11.50 9.00 9.00 9.00 17.50 11.00 City Clerk 10.00 1 6.00 6.00 Public Ethics 2 23.50 Contracting & Purchasing 22.50 3 Administrative Services 164.50 4 222.30 215.70 Finance & Management 229.30 4 Finance Department Administration 2.00 2.00 36.00 36.00 38.00 Controller's O ffice 38.00 Revenue 74.00 80.00 80.00 75.00 Treasury 27.00 27.00 27.00 27.00 4 42.00 42.00 42.00 41.00 37.50 38.70 43.00 Human Resources Mgmt 3 68.00 64.00 69.00 75.00 73.00 80.00 Information Technology 73.00 2.00 2.00 Race & Equi ty 1 1,159.13 1,084.13 961.65 1,001.85 1,138.85 Police Department 1,240.70 1,228.70 1,215.35 593.95 586.45 589.95 589.95 595.95 596.95 593.95 588.05 Fire Department 5 44.95 44.95 Museum 3 506.69 Community Services 1 Neighborhood Services 4.00 276.75 273.09 Human Services 303.49 301.37 305.37 305.37 266.06 O akland Parks & Recreation 220.99 218.49 232.13 240.58 236.44 229.34 229.34 215.69 O akland Public Library 215.04 217.01 215.01 215.79 214.89 211.00 215.69 Economic & Workforce 54.50 54.00 54.50 1 Development Housing & Community 48.75 46.25 55.50 54.50 53.50 6 Development 6 118.75 116.50 140.50 140.50 Planning & Building 127.75 257.00 Community & Economic 451.60 263.50 6 Development Agency 587.35 723.05 732.83 O akland Public Works 753.58 764.47 785.57 785.57 722.58 TOTAL FTE 4,124.12 3,950.06 3,754.59 3,680.69 3,898.05 4,009.68 4,126.89 4,112.89 5 City Administrator assumed the Revenue Division and Parking Revenue Collection from Finance and Management. City Administrator assumed Employee Relations from HRM. City Administrator assumed Office of Economic and Workforce Development and Office of Neighborhood Investment responsibilities from Community and Economic Development Agency with dissolution of the Oakland Redevelopment Agency (ORA) in FY 6455-56. In FY 6457-58 the Revenue Division moved back to the Finance Department and Economic & Workforce Development became it's own department, which includes Project Implementation. During FY 6458-59, the Animal Shelter division was transferred from the Oakland Police Department to a Department within the City Administrator's Office called Oakland Animal Services. In FY 6459-56, Neighborhood Services Division was absorbed by other departments, KTOP transferred to the City Clerk's office per Council direction and Public Ethic was restructured as a stand-alone department per voter approval of Measure CC. 6 The Department of Contracting and Purchasing and Information Technology were divisions of the Finance and Management Agency through FY 6446-47. The Department of Contracting and Purchasing functions were absorbed by other departments in FY 6455-56. 7 Administrative Services is created, composed of Information Technology, Finance and Management, and Human Resources Management and Community Services is created composed of Human Services and Parks and Recreation in FY 6456-57. In FY 6457-58 Administrative Services was dissolved. 8 Finance and Management transferred Parking Revenue Collection to City Administrator, Parking Enforcement to Police Department, and Repair Operations to Public Works as part of the restructuring due to the dissolution of the ORA in FY 6455-56. In FY 6457-58 Administrative Services was dissolved creating individual departments, Human Resources, Information Technology and the Finance Department, which includes the Controller, Treasury and Revenue Management Bureaus. 9 City ceased operating the Oakland Museum of California in FY 6455-56. 6 With the dissolution of the ORA in FY 6455-56, the Community and Economic Development Agency was dissolved and new departments, the Planning & Building Department and the Housing & Community Development Department, are created. F - 2

163 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLA SSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE City Administrator * (cont'd) 75.75 95.25 95.25 Administration 26.75 24.75 24.75 1.00 1.00 Admin Asst to the City Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Analyst I 1.00 1.00 Administrative Assistant II (CONF) 1.00 4.00 5.00 5.00 Assist to the City Administrator 3.00 2.00 2.00 Assistant City Administrator City Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 5.00 City Administrator Analyst 5.00 2.00 1.00 Deputy City Administrator 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Exec Assist to Asst City Administrator 1.00 1.00 Exec Assist to the City Administrator 1.00 Manager, Agency Administrative 0.75 0.75 0.75 2.00 2.00 Mayor's PSE 14 2.00 Performance Audit Manager 1.00 - - Performance Auditor 2.00 - - Public Information Officer II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Budget 5.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 Accountant III 1.00 2.00 2.00 Assist to the City Administrator 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Budget Director 1.00 1.00 City Administrator Analyst 1.00 Citizens' Police Review Board 9.00 11.00 11.00 Complaint Investigator II 5.00 5.00 6.00 1.00 CPRB Executive Director 1.00 1.00 Intake Technician - 3.00 3.00 Office Assistant II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Policy Analyst 1.00 1.00 1.00 Communications / KTOP 8.00 - - Cable Operations Technician 4.00 - - 1.00 - - Cable TV Operations Chief Engineer 1.00 - - Cable TV Production Assistant Cable TV Production Assistant, PPT 2.00 - - * D uring FY 6458 5 9 , the Animal Shelter division was transferred from the Oakland Police Department to a Department within the City - , Neighborhood Services Division was absorbed by other 6 459 - 5 6 Administrator's Office called Oakland Animal Services. In FY departments, KTOP transferred to the City Cler k's office per Council direction and Public Ethic was restructured as a stand -alone department per voter approval of Measure CC. F - 3

164 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 Adopted Adopted Midcycle Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE 75.75 95.25 95.25 (cont'd) City Administrator * Contract Compliance 14.00 14.00 14.00 2.00 2.00 Administrative Analyst II 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Services Manager I 1.00 1.00 Contract Compliance Field Tech 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 Contract Compliance Office Assistant 2.00 3.00 Contract Compliance Officer 3.00 Contract Compliance Officer, Sr. 1.00 1.00 1.00 Director of Contracts & Purchasing - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Employment Services Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Job Developer 1.00 Manager, Contact & Employ Svcs - - Receptionist 1.00 1.00 1.00 Employee Relations 5.00 5.00 5.00 - 2.00 2.00 Emp & Labor Relations Analyst, Senior 2.00 1.00 1.00 Employee Relations Analyst Prin Employee Relations Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 Human Resource Analyst, Senior 1.00 - - Human Resource Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 Equal Opportunity 2.00 2.00 2.00 Equal Emp Opportunities Officer 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 Equal Opportunity Specialist 1.00 1.00 Human Resource Analyst, Principal - - Neighborhood Services - - 4.00 1.00 - - Assist to the City Administrator - - Program Analyst I 2.00 - - 1.00 Program Analyst III - 33.50 33.50 Oakland Animal Services Administrative Assistant I 1.00 1.00 - Animal Care Attendant - 7.00 7.00 Animal Care Attendant, PT - 3.00 3.00 - 1.00 Animal Control & Shelter Manager 1.00 - 10.00 Animal Control Officer 10.00 Animal Control Officer, PPT - 1.00 1.00 Animal Control Supervisor - 2.00 2.00 * D - 5 , uring FY 6458 9 the Animal Shelter division was transferred from the Oakland Police Department to a Department within the City 6 6 5 - 459 , Neighborhood Services Division was absorbed by other Administrator's Office called Oakland Animal Services. In FY departments, KTOP transferred to the City Clerk's office per Council direction and Public Ethic was restructured as a stand -alone department per voter approval of Measure CC. F - 4

165 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE City Administrator * (cont'd) 75.75 95.25 95.25 - (cont'd) Oakland Animal Services 33.50 33.50 Director of Animal Services - 1.00 1.00 1.00 Exec Asst to the Director 1.00 - - 0.50 Public Service Rep, PPT 0.50 2.00 2.00 - Public Service Representative 1.00 1.00 Veterinarian - - 2.00 2.00 Veterinary Technician Volunteer Program Specialist II 1.00 1.00 - Public Ethics - - 2.00 1.00 Exec Dir to Public Ethics Comm - - 1.00 - - Program Analyst I City Attorney (cont'd) 68.00 75.00 74.00 1.00 Accountant II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Analyst I 1.00 City Attorney 1.00 1.00 City Attorney, Assistant 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 Claims Investigator III 1.00 Deputy City Attorney II 4.00 4.00 4.00 Deputy City Attorney III 7.00 10.00 9.00 Deputy City Attorney IV 11.00 11.00 11.00 7.00 7.00 Deputy City Attorney V 7.00 2.00 2.00 Exec Assist to Asst City Attorney 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Exec Assist to the City Attorney 1.00 1.00 Information System Administrator 1.00 Legal Administrative Assistant 9.00 9.00 9.00 1.00 1.00 Legal Secretary, Supervising 1.00 Legal Support Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 Manager, Agency Administrative 1.00 1.00 1.00 Manager, Legal Admin Services 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Microcomputer Systems Specialist II 3.00 5.00 Neighborhood Law Corps Attorney 5.00 Office Assistant I 1.00 1.00 1.00 Open Government Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 * During FY 6458 - 5 9 , the Animal Shelter division was transferred from the Oakland Police Department to a Department within the City Administrator's Office called Oakland Animal Services. In FY 6 459 - 5 6 , Neighborhood Services Division was absorbed by other departments, KTOP transferred to the City Clerk's office per Council direction and Public Ethic was restructured as a stand -alone department per voter approval of Measure CC. F - 5

166 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE City Attorney (cont'd) 68.00 75.00 74.00 8.00 8.00 6.00 Paralegal 2.00 Public Service Representative 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Special Counsel City Auditor 10.00 10.00 10.00 City Auditor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 City Auditor, Assistant 1.00 1.00 Exec Assist to the City Auditor 1.00 1.00 Performance Auditor 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Performance Auditor, Sr. 2.00 2.00 2.00 Permformance Audit Manager 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Receptionist to the City Auditor 9.00 17.50 17.50 City Clerk (cont'd) Administrative Analyst I 1.00 1.00 1.00 Cable Operations Technician - 5.00 5.00 - 1.00 Cable TV Operations Chief Engineer 1.00 Cable TV Production Assistant - 2.00 2.00 Cable TV Stage Manager, PT - 0.50 0.50 City Clerk 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 City Clerk, Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 Citywide Records Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Exec Asst to Agency Director 3.00 3.00 Legislative Recorder 3.00 Management Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 City Council 26.46 28.02 28.02 4.50 4.50 4.50 City Council Admin Assistant 12.96 14.52 14.52 City Councilmember's Assistant Council Member 8.00 8.00 8.00 Exec Assistant to the City Council 1.00 1.00 1.00 (cont'd) Economic & Workforce Development 54.00 54.50 54.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 Account Clerk III Administrative Analyst II 3.00 2.00 2.00 Administrative Assistant I 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Services Manager II 2.00 1.00 1.00 City Administrator Analyst 1.00 1.00 1.00 Development/Redevelopment Pgrm Mgr 3.00 3.00 3.00 Director of Econ & Workfrce Dev 1.00 1.00 1.00 F - 6

167 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Economic & Workforce Development (cont'd) 54.00 54.50 54.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 Employment Services Supervisor 1.00 1.00 Graphic Design Specialist 1.00 Manager, Marketing Program 1.00 1.00 - Office Assistant II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Program Analyst I 1.00 - - 0.50 Program Analyst I, PPT 0.50 - 5.00 5.00 5.00 Program Analyst II 0.50 Program Analyst II, PPT 0.50 0.50 Program Analyst III 3.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 Project Manager 1.00 3.00 3.00 Project Manager III 3.00 Project Manager III, PPT 1.00 1.00 - 3.00 4.00 4.00 Real Estate Agent Real Estate Services Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Special Events Coordinator 0.50 2.50 Student Trainee, PT 2.50 Urban Economic Analyst I 1.00 2.00 2.00 Urban Economic Analyst II 7.00 5.00 5.00 Urban Economic Analyst III 5.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 Urban Economic Analyst IV, Projects 5.00 3.00 3.00 Urban Economic Coordinator 3.00 137.00 147.00 147.00 Finance - Administration 2.00 2.00 Agency Director, Finance & Mgmt - 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 Exec Asst to the Director Controller 38.00 38.00 36.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Account Clerk III 1.00 1.00 Accountant II 1.00 Accountant III 8.00 8.00 8.00 Accounting Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 Accounting Technician 4.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Analyst I 2.00 2.00 2.00 Budget & Operations Analyst III 1.00 1.00 1.00 Business Analyst IV 6.00 6.00 Buyer 5.00 2.00 2.00 City Administrator Analyst 2.00 1.00 1.00 Controller 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Controller, Assistant F - 7

168 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATIO N SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Finance (cont'd) 137.00 147.00 147.00 38.00 38.00 (cont'd) Controller 36.00 2.00 2.00 Financial Analyst 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Office Assistant II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Purchasing Supervisor 1.00 Storekeeper II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Storekeeper III 1.00 1.00 Systems Accountant III 1.00 Revenue Management (cont'd) 74.00 80.00 80.00 1.00 Account Clerk III - - 2.00 1.00 2.00 Accountant II 1.00 1.00 Cashier 1.00 Collections Officer 6.00 6.00 6.00 1.00 Manager, Revenue - - - 1.00 Office Manager 1.00 Parking Meter Collector 8.00 8.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Parking Meter Collector Supervisor 13.00 13.00 Public Service Representative 13.00 Revenue & Tax Administrator - 1.00 1.00 Revenue Analyst 1.00 1.00 1.00 Revenue Analyst, Principal 2.00 2.00 2.00 9.00 11.00 Revenue Assistant 11.00 5.00 5.00 Revenue Operations Supervisor 5.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 Tax Auditor II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Tax Auditor III 15.00 18.00 18.00 Tax Enforcement Officer II 3.00 2.00 2.00 Tax Representative II Treasury 27.00 27.00 27.00 1.00 Accountant III 1.00 1.00 Administrative Assistant II 2.00 2.00 2.00 Benefits Representative 2.00 2.00 2.00 Cashier 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Controller, Assistant 1.00 1.00 Financial Analyst 1.00 Financial Analyst, Principal 2.00 2.00 2.00 Human Res Operations Tech, Senior 3.00 3.00 3.00 Human Res Operations Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 Human Res Systems Analyst, Senior 2.00 2.00 2.00 Human Res Systems Analyst, Supv 1.00 1.00 1.00 Human Resource Oper Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 F - 8

169 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Finance (cont'd) 137.00 147.00 147.00 Treasury (cont'd) 27.00 27.00 27.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Investment Officer 1.00 Manager, Treasury 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Payroll Personnel Clerk II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Payroll Personnel Clerk III 1.00 Retirement Systems Accountant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Treasury Analyst I 1.00 Treasury Analyst II 1.00 1.00 Treasury Analyst III 1.00 1.00 1.00 Fire (cont'd) 593.95 593.95 596.95 1.00 1.00 - Account Clerk II 2.00 2.00 2.00 Accountant II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Accountant III Administrative Analyst II 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 Administrative Assistant I 3.00 3.00 Administrative Assistant II 3.00 Administrative Services Manager II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Agency Director, Fire Services 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assistant Chief of Fire Department 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assistant Fire Marshal-Non Sworn 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assistant to the Director 12.00 Battalion Chief 12.00 12.00 56.00 56.00 56.00 Captain of Fire Department 2.00 2.00 Deputy Chief of Fire Department 2.00 Emer Medical Srvcs Coordinator 4.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Emer Serv Manager, Assistant 1.00 1.00 Emergency Medical Srvcs Instructor, PT 1.00 Emergency Planning Coordinator 3.00 3.00 3.00 Emergency Planning Coordinator, Sr 4.00 4.00 4.00 Engineer of Fire Department 84.00 84.00 84.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Exec Assistant to Agency Director 18.00 18.00 Fire Communications Dispatcher 18.00 Fire Communications Dispatcher, Sr 4.00 4.00 4.00 Fire Communications Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 Fire Division Manager 3.00 2.00 2.00 Fire Equipment Technician 2.00 2.00 2.00 Fire Fighter 188.00 188.00 188.00 Fire Fighter Paramedic 93.00 93.00 93.00 F - 9

170 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE 593.95 593.95 Fire (cont'd) 596.95 3.00 3.00 3.00 Fire Investigator Fire Marshal (Non-Sworn) 1.00 - 1.00 Fire Marshall, Assistant - - 1.00 1.00 Fire Personnel Operations Spec 1.00 1.00 Fire Prevent Bureau Inspect, Civil 8.00 7.00 8.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 Fire Protection Engineer 1.00 Fire Safety Education Coordinator 1.00 1.00 Fire Suppression District Inspector 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.50 1.50 Fire Suppression District Inspector, PT 1.50 1.00 Hazardous Materials Inspect, Senior - - Hazardous Materials Inspector II 1.00 2.00 1.00 67.00 67.00 67.00 Lieutenant of Fire Department 1.00 1.00 1.00 Management Assistant 1.75 1.75 1.75 Management Intern, PT 1.00 1.00 Manager, Emergency Services 1.00 Office Assistant II 4.00 3.00 3.00 Office Manager 2.00 2.00 2.00 Payroll Personnel Clerk III 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Program Analyst I 1.00 1.00 1.00 Program Analyst II 1.00 Student Trainee, PT 2.00 - - 1.70 1.70 1.70 Temp Contract Svcs Employee, PT 1.00 1.00 1.00 Vegetation Management Supervisor Housing & Community Development (cont'd) 55.50 54.50 53.50 1.00 - - Account Clerk I Account Clerk II - 1.00 1.00 1.00 Accountant II 2.00 2.00 Administrative Analyst I 3.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Analyst II 1.00 - - Administrative Assistant I 5.00 5.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Administrative Assistant II 1.00 1.00 Administrative Services Manager I 1.00 Budget & Grants Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 Community Dev Prgm Coordinator 6.00 4.00 3.00 Development/Redevelopment Pgrm MGR 3.00 3.00 3.00 Director of Housing & Comm Dev 1.00 1.00 1.00 Exec Asst to the Director - 1.00 1.00 Hearing Officer 2.00 3.00 3.00 F - 10

171 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Housing & Community Development (cont'd) 55.50 54.50 53.50 2.00 Home Management Counselor II - 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Home Management Counselor III Housing Development Coordinator III 2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Housing Development Coordinator IV 2.00 1.00 2.00 Loan Servicing Administrator 2.00 Loan Servicing Specialist 2.00 3.00 1.00 Management Assistant - - 2.00 Mortgage Advisor 2.00 2.00 Office Assistant II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Program Analyst I 1.00 3.00 2.00 Program Analyst II 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Program Analyst III 2.00 1.00 1.00 Project Manager II Project Manager III 1.00 - - 3.00 3.00 3.00 Rehabilitation Advisor III 1.00 1.00 Rehabilitation Supervisor I 1.00 Senior Hearing Officer 1.00 1.00 1.00 Student Trainee, PT 0.50 0.50 0.50 Human Resources Management (cont'd) 42.00 42.00 43.00 2.00 2.00 Administrative Analyst II 2.00 1.00 1.00 Benefits Analyst 1.00 1.00 1.00 Benefits Representative 1.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 Benefits Technician Claims & Risk Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 Director of Personnel Res Mgmt 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Disability Benefits Coordinator 1.00 1.00 Employee Fleet & Safety Coordinator 1.00 Exec Asst to the Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 Human Resource Analyst (CONF) 6.00 6.00 6.00 Human Resource Analyst, Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Human Resource Analyst, Principal 3.00 3.00 Human Resource Analyst, Senior 3.00 Human Resource Clerk 4.00 3.00 3.00 Human Resource Oper Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 Human Resource Technician 6.00 6.00 6.00 Human Resources Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 Management Assistant 2.00 1.00 1.00 Office Assistant II 2.00 1.00 1.00 F - 11

172 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Human Resources Management (cont'd) 42.00 43.00 42.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Program Analyst I Program Analyst III 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Safety & Loss Control Specialist Training Coordinator 1.00 1.00 - Human Services (cont'd) 301.37 305.37 305.37 2.00 2.00 2.00 Accountant I 3.00 3.00 3.00 Accountant II 1.00 Accountant III 1.00 1.00 6.00 6.00 Administrative Assistant I 6.00 4.00 5.00 4.00 Administrative Assistant II 1.00 Administrative Services Manager II 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assistant to the Director 4.00 4.00 Case Manager I 4.00 Case Manager II 5.00 5.00 3.00 1.80 1.80 1.80 Case Manager, Supervising 1.00 1.00 Child Education Coordinator 1.00 Community Housing Services Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 Cook III 1.00 1.00 1.00 Custodian 5.00 4.00 4.00 Custodian Supervisor - 1.00 1.00 1.49 1.49 1.49 Custodian, PT 2.00 Data Entry Operator 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Data Entry Operator, Senior 1.00 1.00 Director of Human Services 1.00 Early Childhhood Center Director 19.55 19.55 19.55 79.10 79.10 79.10 Early Childhood Instructor 6.13 6.13 Early Childhood Instructor, PT 6.13 Exec Asst to the Director - 1.00 1.00 Family Advocate 16.00 16.00 16.00 Food Program Coordinator, PPT 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.50 0.50 Food Program Driver, PT 5.00 5.00 Food Program Monitor, PT 5.00 Food Service Worker 6.89 6.89 6.89 Head Start Driver Courier 4.00 4.00 4.00 Head Start Facilities Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 Head Start Nutrition Coordinator 2.00 2.00 2.00 Head Start Supervisor 2.00 3.00 3.00 Headstart Program Coordinator 11.00 11.00 11.00 F - 12

173 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Human Services (cont'd) 301.37 305.37 305.37 8.00 Health & Human Svcs Prgm Planner 9.00 9.00 0.60 0.60 Housing Development Coordinator III 0.60 Maintenance Mechanic, PPT 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Maintenance Mechanic, PT 3.00 Manager, Human Services 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Manager, Youth Services 1.80 1.80 1.80 Nurse Case Manager Office Assistant I, PPT 0.60 0.60 0.60 4.00 3.00 Office Assistant II 3.00 1.80 1.80 Outreach Developer 1.80 1.06 1.06 1.06 Outreach Worker, PT 1.00 1.00 1.00 Payroll Personnel Clerk III 4.00 7.00 Program Analyst I 7.00 7.00 9.00 9.00 Program Analyst II 3.50 1.50 1.50 Program Analyst II, PPT Program Analyst III 1.00 1.00 1.00 Public Service Employee 14, PT 1.00 - - Senior Aide, PT 48.32 47.32 47.32 Senior Center Director 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 Senior Services Prgm Assistant 3.00 0.53 0.53 Senior Services Prgm Assistant, PPT 0.53 4.00 4.00 4.00 Senior Services Supervisor 3.70 3.70 3.70 Student Trainee, PT Information Technology (cont'd) 75.00 73.00 73.00 Accountant II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Analyst I 1.00 1.00 - Administrative Analyst II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Services Manager II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Database Administrator 4.00 3.00 3.00 Database Analyst III 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Director of Info Technology 5.00 4.00 Electronics Technician 4.00 Exec Asst to the Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 Information System Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 Information Systems Supervisor 4.00 4.00 4.00 Manager, Information Systems 3.00 3.00 3.00 Manager, Oracle Operations 2.00 2.00 2.00 Microcomputer Systems Spec III 6.00 6.00 6.00 F - 13

174 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Midcycle Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Information Technology (cont'd) 75.00 73.00 73.00 12.00 12.00 14.00 Microcomputer Systems Specialist II 2.00 Network Architect 2.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Operations Support Specialist 2.00 Project Manager - - 3.00 3.00 Project Manager II - 1.00 1.00 - Project Manager III 1.00 1.00 1.00 Reproduction Assistant Reproduction Offset Operator 3.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 Reprograhpic Shop Supervisor 1.00 4.00 4.00 Spatial Data Analyst III 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Systems Programmer II 7.00 7.00 7.00 Systems Programmer III Telecommunication Systems Engineer 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Telecommunications Electrician, Sr 3.00 2.00 Telephone Services Specialist 2.00 Mayor 10.00 11.00 11.00 Exempt Limited Duration Employee - 1.00 1.00 Mayor 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 Special Assistant to the Mayor I 3.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Special Assistant to the Mayor II 2.00 Special Assistant to the Mayor III 2.00 2.00 (cont'd) 236.44 229.34 229.34 Oakland Parks & Recreation 1.00 1.00 1.00 Account Clerk II Account Clerk III 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Accountant III 1.00 1.00 Administrative Assistant I 1.00 Administrative Services Manager II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assist Director, Parks & Rec 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assistant to the Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Exec Asst to the Director 1.98 1.98 Facility Security Assistant 1.98 Facility Security Assistant, PPT 0.75 0.75 0.75 Facility Security Assistant, PT 1.50 3.50 3.50 Gardener Crew Leader 1.00 - - Lifeguard, PT 17.12 17.12 17.12 Management Intern 1.00 1.00 1.00 Naturalist, Supervising 1.00 1.00 1.00 F - 14

175 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equi valents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Adopted Midcycle Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Oakland Parks & Recreation (cont'd) 236.44 229.34 229.34 1.00 Office Manager 1.00 1.00 Park Attendant, PPT 3.71 - - Park Attendant, PT 3.39 - - 1.00 1.00 1.00 Payroll Personnel Clerk II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Payroll Personnel Clerk III 3.25 Pool Manager, PT 3.25 3.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 Program Analyst II 1.00 1.00 Public Service Rep, PPT 1.00 Public Service Rep, Sr 1.00 - 1.00 Public Service Representative 3.00 3.00 3.00 Public Service Representative PT 2.00 - 2.00 Recreation Aide, PT 8.37 8.37 8.37 8.81 8.81 8.81 Recreation Attendant I, PT 1.00 Recreation Attendant II, PPT 1.00 1.00 Recreation Attendant II, PT 1.68 1.68 1.68 14.00 15.00 15.00 Recreation Center Director 1.00 1.00 Recreation General Supervisor 1.00 Recreation Leader I, PT 29.87 29.87 29.87 Recreation Leader II, PPT 35.00 29.25 29.25 Recreation Leader II, PT 11.20 11.20 11.20 11.50 12.00 Recreation Program Director 12.00 1.23 1.23 1.23 Recreation Specialist I, PPT 11.49 Recreation Specialist I, PT 11.99 11.49 7.90 8.65 8.65 Recreation Specialist II, PPT 2.60 2.60 Recreation Specialist II, PT 2.60 Recreation Supervisor 9.00 9.00 9.00 2.56 2.56 2.56 Sports Official, PT 0.60 0.60 Stagehand, PT 0.60 Student Trainee, PT 1.48 1.48 1.48 Temp Contract Svcs Employee, PT 6.18 6.18 6.18 Temp Rec Aide, PT 2.91 2.91 2.91 4.08 4.08 4.08 Temporary Recreation Leader I, PT 0.59 0.59 Temporary Recreation Leader II, PT 0.59 Temporary Recreation Spec I, Sr, PT 0.40 0.40 0.40 Temporary Recreation Spec II, Sr, PT 0.35 0.35 0.35 Temporary Recreation Specialist, PT 0.52 0.52 0.52 Van Driver, PT 3.00 3.00 3.00 Water Safety Instructor, PT 5.92 5.92 5.92 Youth Sports Program Coordinator 2.00 2.00 2.00 F - 15

176 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE 215.69 215.69 Oakland Public Library (cont'd) 214.89 2.00 2.00 2.00 Account Clerk II 2.00 Account Clerk III 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Accountant II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Services Manager II 1.00 Archivist 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Associate Director, Library Services 1.00 1.00 Curator of History, Chief 1.00 Development Specialist III 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Director of Library Services 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Exec Asst to the Director 21.00 Librarian I 21.00 21.00 0.04 0.04 0.04 Librarian I, PPT 4.13 4.13 Librarian I, PT 4.13 Librarian II 32.00 32.00 32.00 0.60 0.60 0.60 Librarian II, PPT 0.70 0.70 Librarian II, PT 0.70 Librarian, Administrative 1.00 1.00 1.00 Librarian, Senior 11.00 11.00 11.00 Librarian, Senior, PT 0.38 0.38 0.38 6.00 6.00 Librarian, Supervising 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Library Aide 9.20 Library Aide, PPT 9.20 9.20 40.75 40.75 40.75 Library Aide, PT 27.00 27.00 Library Assistant 27.00 Library Assistant, PT 10.71 10.71 10.71 10.00 10.00 10.00 Library Assistant, Senior 4.70 5.50 Library Asst, PPT 5.50 Library Automation Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 Literacy Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 Literacy Assistant, PT 0.50 0.50 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 Literacy Assistant, Senior 1.00 1.00 Management Assistant 1.00 Museum Guard 2.00 2.00 2.00 Museum Guard, PT 1.88 1.88 1.88 Museum Project Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 Office Assistant I 3.00 3.00 3.00 Office Assistant II 3.00 3.00 3.00 Office Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 F - 16

177 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Oakland Public Library (cont'd) 215.69 214.89 215.69 0.70 0.70 0.70 Program Analyst I, PT Student Trainee, PT 0.60 0.60 0.60 Oakland Public Works (cont'd) 764.47 785.57 785.57 Account Clerk II 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 Account Clerk III 4.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Accountant I 2.00 2.00 2.00 Accountant II Accountant III 3.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 ADA Projects Coordinator 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Administrative Analyst II 5.00 Administrative Assistant I 5.00 5.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 Administrative Assistant II 1.00 1.00 Administrative Assistant II (CONF) 1.00 Administrative Services Manager I 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Services Manager II 1.00 1.00 Agency Director, Public Works 1.00 Arboricultural Inspector 3.00 3.00 3.00 Architectural Assistant (Office) 1.00 1.00 1.00 Architectural Associate (Field) 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 Assist Director, Pub Works Agency 3.00 11.00 11.00 Auto Equipment Mechanic 11.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Auto Equipment Service Worker 1.00 1.00 1.00 Blacksmith Welder Budget & Grants Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Budget & Operations Analyst III 8.00 7.00 Capital Improvement Project Coor 7.00 Carpenter 5.00 5.00 5.00 Chief of Party 1.00 1.00 1.00 City Land Surveyor 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Concrete Finisher 7.00 7.00 Construction & Maintenance Mechanic 7.00 Construction & Maintenance Supv I 2.00 2.00 2.00 Construction Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 Construction Inspection Supv (Field) 3.00 3.00 3.00 15.00 Construction Inspector (Field) 16.00 16.00 Construction Inspector (Office) 1.00 - - Construction Inspector, Sr (Field) 3.00 3.00 2.00 Construction Inspector, Sr (Office) 2.00 1.00 1.00 F - 17

178 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Oakland Public Works (cont'd) 764.47 785.57 785.57 1.00 1.00 1.00 Construction Inspector, Sup II 3.00 3.00 Custodial Services Supervisor I 3.00 Custodian 44.40 46.40 44.40 1.00 1.00 1.00 Custodian Supervisor 5.89 Custodian, PPT 5.89 5.89 14.79 14.79 14.79 Custodian, PT 2.00 2.00 2.00 Drafting/Design Technician, Sr 2.00 Drafting Technician, Int (Office) 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Electrical Const & Maint Planner 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Electrical Engineer II 2.00 Electrical Engineer III 2.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Electrical Painter 2.00 2.00 Electrical Supervisor 2.00 Electrician 12.00 12.00 13.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Electrician Helper 3.00 3.00 Electrician Leader 3.00 Electro-Mechanical Machinist 1.00 1.00 1.00 Employee Fleet & Safety Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 Energy Engineer III 1.00 1.00 1.00 24.00 28.00 Engineer, Assistant II (Office) 28.00 17.00 14.00 17.00 Engineer, Civil (Office) 3.00 Engineer, Civil Field 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Engineer, Civil Principal 1.00 1.00 Engineer, Civil Supervising (Field) 1.00 Engineer, Civil Supv (Office) 5.00 5.00 5.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Engineer, Transportation 3.00 3.00 Engineer, Transportation Assistant 3.00 Engineer, Transportation Supv 2.00 2.00 2.00 Engineering Intern, PT 4.00 4.00 4.00 Engineering Technician II (Office) 4.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Environmental Program Specialist 1.00 1.00 1.00 Environmental Program Supervisor Environmental Services Intern 1.00 1.00 1.00 Equipment Body Repair Worker 3.00 3.00 3.00 Equipment Parts Technician 3.00 3.00 3.00 Equipment Services Superintendent 1.00 1.00 1.00 Equipment Supervisor 3.00 3.00 3.00 Exec Assistant to Agency Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 Facilities Complex Manager 2.00 2.00 2.00 F - 18

179 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In F ull Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Adopted Midcycle Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Oakland Public Works 764.47 785.57 785.57 (cont'd) 0.50 0.50 0.50 Facility Security Assistant, PT 1.00 1.00 Fleet Specialist 1.00 20.00 21.00 21.00 Gardener Crew Leader 10.00 7.00 10.00 Gardener II 14.00 Heavy Equipment Mechanic 14.00 14.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 Heavy Equipment Operator 7.00 7.00 Heavy Equipment Service Worker 7.00 Heavy Equipment Supervisor 2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 Irrigation Repair Specialist 4.00 12.00 11.00 Maintenance Mechanic 12.00 Maintenance Mechanic, PT 0.50 - - 2.00 2.00 2.00 Management Assistant 5.00 5.00 5.00 Management Intern Management Intern, PT 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Manager, Agency Administrative 2.00 1.00 Manager, Building Services 1.00 Manager, Capital Improvement Pgrm 1.00 2.00 2.00 Manager, Electrical Services 1.00 1.00 1.00 Manager, Environmental Services 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Manager, Equipment Services 1.00 Manager, Park Services 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 Manager, Support Services 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Manager, Sustainability Pgm 1.00 1.00 Manager, Technology Pgm 1.00 Office Assistant II 2.00 2.00 2.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 Painter Park Attendant 2.00 2.00 - 1.00 Park Attendant, PPT 2.71 2.71 Park Attendant, PT 33.84 37.73 37.73 Park Equipment Operator 5.00 5.00 5.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Park Supervisor I 1.00 1.00 1.00 Park Supervisor II Parking Meter Repair Worker 7.00 7.00 7.00 Payroll Personnel Clerk III 4.00 4.00 4.00 Plumber 3.00 3.00 3.00 Pool Technician 2.00 2.00 2.00 Pool Technician, PPT 1.00 1.00 1.00 Program Analyst I 3.00 3.00 3.00 Program Analyst II 4.00 4.00 4.00 F - 19

180 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Oakland Public Works (cont'd) 764.47 785.57 785.57 11.00 11.00 Program Analyst III 8.00 Project Manager 1.00 - - 3.00 Project Manager II 3.00 3.00 5.00 6.00 6.00 Public Service Representative 68.00 65.00 68.00 Public Works Maintenance Worker 3.00 Public Works Operations Manager 3.00 3.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 Public Works Supervisor I 7.00 Public Works Supervisor II 7.00 7.00 Recycling Specialist 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 Recycling Specialist, Senior 2.00 23.00 23.00 Sewer Maintenance Leader 23.00 32.00 32.00 32.00 Sewer Maintenance Worker 7.00 7.00 7.00 Sign Maintenance Worker Solid Waste/Recycling Prg Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Spatial Data Analyst III 10.00 9.00 Stationary Engineer 9.00 Stationary Engineer, Chief 3.00 3.00 3.00 Street Maintenance Leader 34.00 35.00 35.00 Street Sweeper Operator 20.00 20.00 20.00 5.55 5.55 Student Trainee, PT 5.55 3.00 3.00 Support Services Supervisor 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Surveying Technician (Field) 2.00 2.00 2.00 Surveying Technician, Sr (Field) Traffic Engineering Tech, Senior (O) 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Traffic Painter 2.00 2.00 Traffic Sign Maker 2.00 Training & Public Svcs Admin 1.00 1.00 1.00 Transportation Planner, Senior 2.00 2.00 2.00 Tree High Climber 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Tree Supervisor I 1.00 1.00 Tree Supervisor II 1.00 Tree Trimmer 8.00 8.00 8.00 Watershed Program Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 Planning & Building (cont'd) 116.50 140.50 140.50 Account Clerk II 2.00 3.00 3.00 Account Clerk III 2.00 2.00 2.00 Administrative Analyst II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Assistant I 1.00 1.00 1.00 F - 20

181 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Planning & Building (cont'd) 116.50 140.50 140.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Assistant II 1.00 1.00 Administrative Services Manager I 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 Business Analyst II Business Analyst IV 1.00 1.00 - 2.00 2.00 Construction Inspector, Sr (Office) 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Deputy Director/Building Official 1.00 1.00 1.00 Deputy Director/City Planner Director of Building & Planning 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 Engineer, Assistant II (Office) 2.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Engineer, Civil (Office) 2.00 Engineer, Civil Principal 2.00 2.00 Engineer, Civil Supv (Office) - 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 Exec Asst to the Director 1.00 Graphic Delineator 1.00 1.00 1.00 Inspection Services Manager - 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 Management Assistant 1.00 Manager, Zoning 1.00 1.00 1.00 Office Assistant II 2.00 7.00 7.00 Office Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 Permit Technician I - 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Permit Technician II 2.00 Planner I 2.00 2.00 9.00 10.00 10.00 Planner II 1.00 1.00 Planner II, Design Review 1.00 Planner III 11.00 11.00 10.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Planner III, Historic Preservation 1.00 1.00 Planner III, PPT 1.00 Planner IV 2.00 4.00 4.00 Planner V 2.00 2.00 2.00 Planning Intern, PT 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Principal Inspection Supv 1.00 3.00 Process Coordinator II 3.00 Process Coordinator III 1.00 2.00 2.00 Program Analyst I 1.00 1.00 1.00 Program Analyst III - 1.00 1.00 Public Service Rep, PPT 0.50 0.50 0.50 Public Service Rep, Sr 1.00 1.00 1.00 Public Service Representative 10.00 11.00 11.00 F - 21

182 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Midcycle Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Planning & Building (cont'd) 116.50 140.50 140.50 5.00 5.00 4.00 Specialty Combination Insp, Senior 36.00 Specialty Combination Inspector 34.00 36.00 (cont'd) Police 1,215.35 1,240.70 1,228.70 1.00 1.00 1.00 Account Clerk I 4.00 Account Clerk II 4.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Account Clerk III 2.00 2.00 2.00 Accountant II Accountant III 1.00 1.00 1.00 15.00 17.00 Administrative Analyst II 17.00 3.00 3.00 Administrative Assistant I 3.00 10.00 Animal Care Attendant, PT - - - - Animal Control Officer 11.00 1.00 - - Animal Control Officer, PPT 1.00 - - Animal Control Supervisor 10.00 9.00 9.00 Captain of Police (PERS) 1.00 1.00 1.00 Chief of Police 1.00 Chief of Police, Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Criminalist I - Criminalist II 17.00 15.00 15.00 Criminalist III 5.00 5.00 5.00 2.00 2.00 Crossing Guard, PPT 2.00 17.00 12.65 Crossing Guard, PT 17.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 Deputy Chief of Police (PERS) 1.00 Director of Animal Services - - Exec Assistant to Agency Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Forensic Technician - 1.00 1.00 Grants Coordinator 1.00 Intake Technician 5.00 4.00 4.00 Internal Auditor III 1.00 3.00 3.00 Latent Print Examiner II 5.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Latent Print Examiner III 27.00 27.00 Lieutenant of Police (PERS) 27.00 Management Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 Manager, Crime Laboratory 1.00 1.00 1.00 Neighborhood Services Coordinator 10.00 10.00 10.00 Office Assistant II 1.00 1.00 1.00 Parking Control Technician 26.00 26.00 26.00 Parking Control Technician, PPT 6.95 6.95 6.95 F - 22

183 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPA RTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Police (cont'd) 1,215.35 1,240.70 1,228.70 26.75 26.75 26.75 Parking Control Technician, PT Parking Enforcement Supervisor I 4.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Payroll Personnel Clerk II 3.00 3.00 Payroll Personnel Clerk III 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Performance Audit Manager 9.00 Police Cadet, PT 9.00 9.00 Police Communications Dispatcher 67.00 67.00 67.00 7.00 7.00 Police Communications Operator 7.00 4.00 4.00 Police Communications Supervisor 4.00 18.00 20.00 20.00 Police Evidence Technician 561.00 556.00 Police Officer (PERS) 591.00 Police Officer Trainee 100.00 50.00 50.00 1.00 1.00 Police Personnel Oper Specialist 1.00 Police Pgrm & Performance Auditor 2.00 2.00 2.00 Police Property Specialist 5.00 5.00 5.00 Police Property Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 54.00 53.00 Police Records Specialist 53.00 5.00 5.00 Police Records Supervisor 5.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Police Services Manager I 61.00 61.00 61.00 Police Services Technician II Program Analyst III 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Project Manager II 1.00 2.00 Project Manager III 2.00 Public Service Representative 1.00 1.00 1.00 Reproduction Offset Operator 1.00 1.00 1.00 Sergeant Of Police 1.00 - - Sergeant of Police (PERS) 124.00 129.00 123.00 1.00 1.00 Storekeeper II 1.00 Support Services Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 Technical Communication Specialist 1.00 1.00 1.00 Veterinarian 1.00 - - Veterinarian Technician 1.00 - - Veterinary Technician 1.00 - - Volunteer Program Specialist II 2.00 1.00 1.00 F - 23

184 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY CLASSIFICATION SUMMARY BY DEPARTMENT (In Full Time Equivalents) FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE 6.00 6.00 - Public Ethics Commission - 1.00 1.00 Administrative Assistant II - 1.00 Administrative Services Manager I 1.00 Exec Dir to Public Ethics Comm 1.00 1.00 - - 1.00 Internal Auditor III 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 Program Analyst I Program Analyst III - 1.00 1.00 Race & Equity - 2.00 2.00 Program Analyst II - 1.00 1.00 Race & Equity Executive Director - 1.00 1.00 4,009.68 4,126.89 4,112.89 Grand Total FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Midcycle Adopted Adopted Citywide Budget Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Civilian 2,744.68 2,797.89 2,793.89 Fire Sworn 508.00 507.00 507.00 Police Sworn 722.00 762.00 707.00 Police Officer Trainee 50.00 100.00 50.00 Grand Total 4,009.68 4,126.89 4,112.89 F - 24

185 MAYOR MAYOR SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Actuals Adopted Unaudited Adopted Expenditures by Fund R UTIES AND ESPONSIBILITIES D Actuals Budget Budget 1010 $1,903,648 $2,001,862 $2,535,425 $2,567,901 General Purpose Fund (GPF) The Mayor’s Office supports the Telecommunications Reserve 72,444 - - 1760 - Mayor in carrying out her duties as - - 213,372 Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation 210,420 2216 specifically outlined in the City 2251 36,346 - 44,809 - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 Charter: - 83,313 84,506 Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety Act 2252 - 4400 13,489 - - 14,715 City Facilities • The Mayor shall be responsible for - 42,887 46,786 City Facilities Energy Conservation Projects 4450 - the submission of an annual - - 12,000 Mayor's International Committee 7530 - budget to the Council that shall be - 122,639 85,371 Miscellaneous Trusts 7999 - prepared by the City $2,179,774 TOTAL $2,217,223 $2,829,158 $2,865,779 Administrator under the direction GPF Percent to Total Department 89.6% 89.6% 90.3% 87.3% of the Mayor and Council. The Mayor shall, at the time of the 0.4% 0.5% 0.4% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures 0.5% submission of the budget, submit a al statement of the gener conditions of the affairs of the City, the goals of the administration and AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM recommendations of such FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 measures as she may deem Midcycle Adopted Adopted expedient and proper to Program Authorized Budget Budget accomplish such goals. FTE FTE FTE The Mayor shall recommend to the • Mayor's Support 10.00 11.00 11.00 Council measures and legislation 9.60 9.60 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 9.60 as she deems necessary and to - 1.00 1.00 2216 - Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation make such other - - 2251 - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 0.40 recommendations to the Council 2252 - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety 0.40 0.40 - concerning the affairs of the City as 11.00 10.00 TOTAL 11.00 she finds desirable. The Mayor shall encourage • programs for the physical, economic, social and cultural SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM development of the City. • The Mayor s hall actively promote Revenue economic development to broaden FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 and strengthen the commercial Adopted Adopted Midcycle Program and employment base of the City. Budget Budget Budget • The Mayor shall appoint the City Mayor's Support $0 $0 $0 Administrator, subject to $0 $0 $0 TOTAL confirmation by the City Council, remove the City Administrator and Expenditure on to the City give directi FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 Administrat or. The Mayor shall Adopted Midcycle Adopted ouncil before advise the C Program Budget Budget Budget removing the City Administrator. Mayor's Support $2,045,594 $2,829,158 $2,865,779 • The Mayor shall serve as $2,829,158 TOTAL $2,865,779 $2,045,594 ceremonial head of the City. • The Mayor shall represent the City -governmental relations as in inter directed by the Council. SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE • The Mayor shall provide FTE FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 community leadership. General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes None G - 1

186 MAYOR P RIORITIES ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM To achieve her vision, the Mayor seeks to position Oakland as a vibrant, equitable city that is growing . responsibly The Mayor has four priorities for revenue sources growing those responsibly : Improve public safety using a 1. holistic approach, including more police officers, better community policing, violence intervention and prevention programs, as well as addressing the root causes Create more housing and jobs, but do 3. of crime, starting with better jobs and are cleaned and neighborhood so in an equitable way that keeps corrected quickly and police and education. Oakland affordable for residents at firefighters are there when we need 2. Improve the City’s physical every income level and provides ment them. This will show that govern infrastructure, starting with roads, so employment opportunities for is trustworthy and transparent and they look and work better, cost less to ith a variety of skills and Oaklanders w make the city look attractive, so maintain and create more vibrant, people feel good about living and education. attractive and healthy neighborhoods working in Oakland. – making Oakland a great place to 4. Be more responsive to requests for come live, play and bring your city services so problems in every business. G - 2

187 CITY COUNCIL CITY COUNCIL SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 Actuals Adopted Unaudited Adopted Expenditures by Fund Vested with all powers of legislation Actuals Budget Budget in municipal affairs, the City Council $3,775,596 $4,491,097 $4,436,312 $3,599,300 General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1010 is the governing body that exercises $3,599,300 $4,491,097 $4,436,312 $3,775,596 TOTAL the corporate powers of the City of authorities Oakland under the 100.0% GPF Percent to Total Department 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% granted by the Oakland City Charter 0.8% 0.8% 0.8% 0.8% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures and the State of California Constitution. The Council is comprised of eight Councilmembers, with seven elected from geographic districts and one AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM citywide (At -Large). All Councilmembers are elected to a FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 term of four years. Adopted Adopted Midcycle Program Budget Authorized Budget FTE FTE FTE ESPONSIBILITIES R UTIES AND D 26.46 28.02 28.02 Policy Analysis 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 26.46 28.02 28.02 In accordance with the Charter, the 28.02 TOTAL 26.46 28.02 City Council : • sets the goals and priorities for the City, adopts the City budget, • adopts the city’s laws by ordinance • and resolution, SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM • appoints members to various City Revenue and Port of Oakland boards and FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 commissions. Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program Budget Budget Budget USINESS OALS G B $0 $0 Policy Analysis $0 TOTAL $0 $0 $0 Ensure a good quality of life for all  . Oakland residents Expenditure Grow revenues through economic  growth and improved government FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Adopted Midcycle Adopted . efficiency Program Budget Budget Budget  Reduce crime and ensure public Policy Analysis $3,848,098 $4,491,097 $4,436,312 safety for every Oakland TOTAL $4,436,312 $3,848,098 $4,491,097 . neighborhood  Expand economic development and reduce unemployment.  Expand public -private partnerships .  Improve efficiency and SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE responsiveness to our residents and stakeholders . FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes Improve the infrastructure,  $167,312 1.12 Increase each council district by 0.14 FTE $169,704 . transportation and housing Develo p a sustainable city.  $65,731 0.44 $66,672 Increase Council President by 0.44 FTE, City Councilmember's Assistant Ensure that all Oakland children  through seniors have an $60,732 $58,458 Increase City Council Adminstration O&M opportunity to be successful. G - 3

188 CITY COUNCIL ESCRIPTIONS P ROGRAM D ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY DIVISION NALYSIS OLICY P A CITY COUNCIL This program analyzes new public 28.02 FTE policy initiatives and ensures that City of Oakland policy objectives are being met. It also, addresses constituent concerns and handles Council Administration legislative follow -up unique to 1.94 FTE Councilmembers and/or Council priorities. District One District Two 3.26 FTE 3.26 FTE District Three District Four 3.26 FTE 3.26 FTE District Five District Six 3.26 FTE 3.26 FTE District At - Large District Seven 3.26 FTE 3.26 FTE G - 4

189 CITY ADMINISTRATOR SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND CITY FY 2013-14 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 Actuals Adopted Unaudited Adopted Expenditures by Fund ADMINISTRATOR Budget Budget Actuals $13,766,855 $8,836,967 General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1010 $15,267,590 $15,926,614 753,105 1,086,166 781,880 751,649 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 1610 1720 7,632 - Comprehensive Clean-up - - M ISSION S TATEMENT Multipurpose Reserve 1750 17,979 36,923 52,494 52,938 1760 1,342,927 1,379,818 Telecommunications Reserve - - The Office of the City Administrator - 1770 Telecommunications Land Use - 50,000 50,000 provides strategic leadership that 2241 Measure Q-Library Services Retention & Enhancement 18,763 14,959 17,657 17,657 supports the Mayor and City Council 9,492 10,255 8,234 Measure N: Fund 2250 9,492 and motivates and challenges the Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 694,420 642,662 2251 - - organization to deliver efficient and 2252 Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety Act 675,329 - - 659,647 effective services to the community. 2310 Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 26,516 25,973 25,973 15,128 9,453 9,453 2412 Alameda County: Emergency Dispatch Service 10,257 8,121 2413 (17,867) 191,203 Rent Adjustment Program Fund - - 316,571 Development Service Fund 186,873 225,989 2415 314,682 USINESS B OALS G Excess Litter Fee Fund 7,737 10,103 2417 433,163 433,163 (43) Dept of Energy-EECBG Program (ARRA) 2609 - - - Administer the affairs of the City in  2999 Miscellaneous Grants - 203,944 - - an efficient and effective manner. 4200 Radio / Telecommunications - - - 35,955  Conduct necessary reviews of City 5130 Rockridge: Library Assessment District 4,131 3,320 3,320 3,457 Municipal Capital Improvement: Public Arts 5505 - - 229 229 operations to improve efficiency 131,515 - - 5650 Coliseum Projects - and accountability of City 162,215 161,151 143,837 5671 O BRA: Leasing & Util ity 122,904 government. 79 - - - 7100 Police and Fire Retirement System  Manage and coordinate citywide 25,000 - Grant Clearing 7760 25,000 - service delivery. $17,801,806 TOTAL $12,553,205 $17,367,577 $18,476,250 Enforce all applicable laws,  86.2% 79.3% 70.4% GPF Percent to Total Department 85.8% ordinances and policies of the City. 3.0% 2.8% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures 2.0% 2.9%  Advance the City’s vision and goals and build organizational capacity. SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY DEPARTMENT/DIVISION Provide professional expertise and Revenue support to the May or and City Council in the formulation, FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Department/Division interpretation, and application of Budget Budget Budget public policy. $3,104,208 $10,737,265 $3,097,874 Administration / Operations  Advance the Mayor’s and City 3 - - 1,581,944 Communications / KTO P Council’s priorities. 139,002 139,002 139,002 Contracts & Compl iance 1 - 343,242 343,242 O akland Animal Services TOTAL $3,586,452 $3,580,118 $12,458,211 IVISION D ESCRIPTIONS D Expenditure PERATIONS O A / DMINISTRATION FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 This program directs and Midcycle Adopted Adopted Department/Division coordinates all City agencies and Budget Budget Budget departments to ensure the goals and $8,225,926 $7,598,953 $8,525,930 Administration / Operations policy directives of the City Council 1,142,530 1,023,977 1,126,672 Budget and Mayor are implemented and 1,456,016 1,622,083 1,643,235 Citizens' Police Review Board/ Complaint Intake 3 services are delivered to the - 1,214,546 - Communications / KTO P community in an efficient and cost 2,115,833 2,446,874 2,323,403 Contracts & Compl iance effective manner. The 987,259 921,435 932,942 Employee Relations Administration Division also includes 302,573 432,397 336,920 Equal O pportunity 2 Agenda Management, 392,761 - - Neighborhood Services 1 cations, Measure Z Communi - 3,803,558 3,839,681 O akland Animal Services 4 evaluation, Nuisance Abatement, - 362,966 - Public Ethics Special Activity Permits, and the TOTAL $16,500,414 $18,476,250 $17,801,806 Oaklanders’ Assistance Center. 1 During FY 2014-15, the Anim al Shelter div is ion was trans f erred f rom the P olice Departm ent to a Departm ent within the City Administrator's Of f ice called Oakland Animal Serv ices. 2 Neighborhood Services Division was absorbed by other Departments in FY 2015-17. 3 KTOP trans f erred to City Clerk's Of f ice per Council direction. 4 P ublic Ethics was res tructured as a s tand alone departm ent per v oter approv al of M eas ure CC. G - 5

190 CITY ADMINISTRATOR (CONT'D) AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT/DIVISION ESCRIPTIONS IVISION D D FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 B UDGET Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program Authorized Budget Budget Develops a balanced and fiscally FTE FTE FTE responsible budget that meets Administration / Operations 26.75 24.75 24.75 community priorities; provides 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 21.39 19.25 19.25 consultative services to ensure City 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 2.34 1.78 1.78 programs are efficient and effective; Fund provides thorough legislative 0.34 0.34 0.34 1750 - Multipurpose Reserve analysis to the City Administrator 1760 - Telecommunications Reserve 0.30 - - and elected officials to ensure the 0.80 - - 2251 - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 in its City remains proactive 2252 - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety - 0.80 0.80 legislative agenda. Act of 2014 2415 - Development Service Fund 1.58 1.58 1.58 OLICE OARD B EVIEW R P ITIZENS C / 1.00 1.00 2999 - Miscellaneous Grants - NTAKE OMPLAINT C I Budget 5.00 5.00 5.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 4.34 4.60 4.80 This program , the civilian police 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 0.66 0.20 0.20 oversight department for the City of Fund Oakland, was established to review 4200 - Radio / Telecommunications - 0.20 - complaints of conduct by police 9.00 11.00 11.00 Citizens' Police Review Board / Complaint Intake officers, conduct fact -finding 9.00 11.00 11.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) investigations of these complaints, 3 8.00 - - Communications / KTOP eports and thereafter make advisory r - - 0.20 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement to the City Administrator. Fund 7.80 1760 - Telecommunications Reserve - - C ONTRACTS & C OMPLIANCE Contracts & Compliance 14.00 14.00 14.00 Supports and oversees citywide 13.00 13.00 13.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) decentralized contracting for 1.00 1.00 1.00 5671 - OBRA: Leasing & Utility professional services all the way Employee Relations 5.00 5.00 5.00 through to contract execution. 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 5.00 5.00 5.00 Contracts and Compliance also 2.00 2.00 2.00 Equal Opportunity provides quality control reviews and 2.00 2.00 2.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 2 -offs on construction contracts. sign - - 4.00 Neighborhood Services In addition, this division monitors, 2.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) - - and enforces social equity policies 2251 - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 - - 2.00 1 such as the federally required - 33.50 33.50 Oakland Animal Services Disadvantaged Business Enterprise - 33.50 33.50 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) (DBE) Program and the locally 4 2.00 - - Public Ethics required living wage policy, - - 2.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) prevailing wage policy, minimum 75.75 TOTAL 95.25 95.25 wage policy, 50 percent local 1 During FY 2014-15, the Anim al Shelter div is ion was trans f erred f rom the P olice Departm ent to a Departm ent within the City employment policy, 15 percent Administrator's Of f ice called Oakland Animal Serv ices. Oakland apprenticeship, prompt 2 Neighborhood Services Division was absorbed by other Departments in FY 2015-17. payment policy, eq benefits policy, ual 3 KTOP trans f erred to City Clerk's Of f ice per Council direction. local business and the 50 percent 4 P ublic Ethics was res tructured as a s tand alone departm ent per v oter approv al of M eas ure CC. participation policy. G - 6

191 CITY ADMINISTRATOR IVISION D D ESCRIPTIONS ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY DIVISION ELATIONS R MPLOYEE E Represents the City and provides CITY ADMINISTRATOR support to City staff on matters 95.25 FTE concerning employees represented by labor unions; negotiates on behalf of the City to set wages, hours, and other conditions of employment; Budget Administration / Operations assists City management staff in the 5.00 FTE 24.75 FTE of labor contracts; and interpretation investigates and resolves grievances. Citizens’ Police Review Board Contracts & Compliance QUAL O PPORTUNITY E 11.00 FTE 14.00 FTE Equal Opportunity is mandated by federal, state, and local laws and regulations, performs the following functions: investigates Equal Equal Opportunity Employee Relations 5.00 FTE 2.00 FTE Employment Opportunity (EEO) claims of discrimination and harassment and retaliation via a neutral fact finding process; receives Oakland Animal Services and responds to informal EEO 33.50 FTE mediation and dispute resolution requests from employees; oversees and enforces the mandated Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)/Fair Employment and welfare, OAS is responsible for Housing Act (FEHA) workplace O AKLAND A NIMAL S ERVICES (OAS) -related calls for responding to animal for City accommodations process This program is dedicated to service including helping stray, employees and job applicants; improving the relationship between injured, abandoned, neglected, and develops and submits mandated EEO the residents of Oakland and its mistreated animals as w ell as for the statistical reports; conducts sexual animals through the delivery of enforcement of all state and local harassment education and EEO effective, courte ous, and responsive Animal Welfare laws within the City. monitors hiring training programs; animal care and control services. practices for EEO compliance and Ensuring both public safety and animal conducts community outreach. G - 7

192 CITY ADMINISTRATOR SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes Eliminate a Performance Audit Manager and two Performance ($383,377) (3.00) ($388,864) Auditor positions resulting from no longer civilianizing Internal Affairs within the City Administrator's Office CPRB: Add Intake Technician; transfer an Intake Technician from $219,362 2.00 $216,972 OPD; downgrade Investigator to an Intake Technician; Increase O&M 2.00 $304,077 $312,566 Establish a Dept of Race, Human Rights & Equity (add 1.00 Director, 1.00 Program Analyst II and O &M ) Reclassify Employee Relations (ER) positions from Principal ER ($33,276) ($32,866) Analyst and Senior HR Analyst to Employee & Labor Relations Analyst, Senior $197,416 $194,630 Animal Shelter: Add 2.00 Public Service Rep and 0.50 Public 2.50 Service Rep, PPT positions $150,000 $90,000 One-time funding for community engagement services related to future budget priorities and the devel opment of potential bal l ot measures to improve public health & safety and City infrastructure Provide one-time funds for Contracts & Compliance to support $0 $150,000 and assess the workload associated with monitoring and compliance of the voter-approved local minimum wage law provisions (Measure FF) Add one-time funding for the Equal O pportunity Program to $100,000 $0 assist with investigation of complaints and increase training for City staff Set aside one-time funds for the implementation of a $0 $250,000 Comprehensive Public Safety Strategy $300,000 $0 Add one-time funding for l egal support grant to assist unaccompanied minors $64,330 $65,233 0.30 Transferred 0.30 FTE of Asst to the City Administrator from Fund 1760 to Fund 1010 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE ALL Other Funds Changes Changes Add funding for website content writers, editors, designers, $100,000 $100,000 programming, and continual testing - 50% from the Telecommunications Land-Use Fund (1770), 25% from the Development Services Fund (2415) and 25% from the Public Works Clearing Fund (7760) ($1,511,697) (8.50) KTO P O perations - Personnel and O &M was transferred to the ($1,530,645) Office of the City Clerk per Council direction (1760) Transferred 0.30 FTE of Asst to the City Administrator from ($64,330) (0.30) ($65,233) Fund 1760 to Fund 1010 Increase O&M for Measure Z evaluation and support in Measure $26,541 $26,922 Z Fund (2252) FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE Organizational Changes Changes Changes Transfer the Animal Shelter from the Police Department and 31.00 $3,419,849 $3,451,205 create the Oakland Animal Services Department within the City Administrator's Office Publ ic Ethics was restructured as a stand al one department per ($358,275) ($354,057) (2.00) voter approval of Measure CC. Positions and O &M Transferred from the City Administrator's O ffice Transfer expenditures associated with Neighborhood Services to ($407,357) ($402,432) (3.00) other Departments, including one position to Police (GPF) and two positions to Human Services (Measure Z) KTO P O perations - Personnel and O &M was transferred to the (8.50) ($1,511,697) ($1,530,645) Office of the City Clerk G - 8

193 CITY ATTORNEY SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND CITY ATTORNEY FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Unaudited Actuals Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund Actuals Budget Budget $5,308,541 $5,561,912 $7,962,648 General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1010 $5,378,125 TATEMENT S M ISSION 4,417,830 3,343,352 Self Insurance Liability 5,068,835 5,033,950 1100 488,822 482,124 408,098 Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 492,136 1150 The Office of the City Attorney is 1,361,343 1,040,402 1,036,563 1,527,876 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 1610 committed to providing the highest 1710 333,913 336,217 Recycling Program 301,705 304,636 quality legal services to the City of 49,637 29,881 50,510 2108 HUD-CDBG 22,785 Oakland, its City Council, employees, 33,298 30,209 2211 28,434 Measure B: ACTIA 30,405 officers, agencies, departments, boards 125,685 State Gas Tax-Prop 42 Replacement Funds - - 104,457 2231 and commissions; to promoting open 346,719 Rent Adjustment Program Fund 2413 549,561 743,249 530,615 and , transparency government 2415 Development Service Fund 613,906 598,508 1,100,101 1,110,384 accountability to the residents of 3100 633,935 746,643 648,147 751,784 Sewer Service Fund Oakland in accordance with the letter 104,050 7100 110,668 128,594 130,423 Police and Fire Retirement System and spirit of the law; and to apply the - 28,965 24,202 Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System 7120 - 7760 - - Grant Clearing 134,786 135,752 - law in an innovative and community TOTAL $15,460,538 $14,233,941 $15,115,252 $15,055,588 orie nted manner to improve the quality of life in all Oakland neighborhoods. 51.5% 35.1% 35.7% 39.1% GPF Percent to Total Department GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures 1.0% 1.0% 1.1% 1.8% G & T OALS OP P RIORITIES AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY DIVISION The top priorities of the OCA are to: FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Midcycle Adopted Adopted  Continue to provide highest quality Division Authorized Budget Budget legal services to City Officials, FTE FTE FTE departments and boards and 25.00 28.00 27.00 Advisory commissions. 6.23 9.04 9.04 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF)  Aggressively defend and advocate for 7.32 7.32 7.32 1100 - Self Insurance Liability Oakland’s interests and resources in 0.92 0.92 0.92 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims court and initiate legal action and 5.31 3.50 3.50 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement other initiatives to protect the rights 1710 - Recycling Program 1.00 1.00 1.00 and interests and enhance the 2108 - HUD-CDBG 0.19 0.19 0.19 of our residents and quality of life 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA 0.13 0.13 0.13 community. 2231 - State Gas Tax-Prop 42 Replacement Funds 0.25 - - Explore and identify ways to provide  2413 - Rent Adjustment Program Fund 0.90 1.90 0.90 the highest quality professional legal 1.15 2.15 2.15 2415 - Development Service Fund services in the most efficient and 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 1.10 1.10 1.10 0.40 0.50 0.50 7100 - Police and Fire Retirement System -effective manner possible. cost 0.10 7120 - Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System - -  Restore and maintain a staff of well - 0.25 0.25 - 7760 - Grant Clearing qualified attorneys and support staff 27.00 29.00 29.00 City Attorney: Administration with extensive knowledge of the City 1010 - General Fund: General Purpose 14.39 14.86 14.86 of Oakland, making it possible for 7.07 6.60 6.60 1100 - Self Insurance Liability them to meet demands more 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 0.50 0.50 0.50 efficiently and effectively. 1710 - Recycling Program 0.50 0.50 0.50 2413 - Rent Adjustment Program Fund 1.00 2.00 2.00 2415 - Development Service Fund 1.60 2.60 2.60 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 1.94 1.94 1.94 Litigation 16.00 18.00 18.00 1010 - General Fund: General Purpose 3.50 5.50 5.50 1100 - Self Insurance Liability 9.80 9.80 9.80 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 0.99 0.99 0.99 2231 - State Gas Tax-Prop 42 Replacement Funds 0.20 - - 2415 - Development Service Fund 0.75 0.75 0.75 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 0.76 0.76 0.76 7760 - Grant Clearing - 0.20 0.20 TOTAL 68.00 75.00 74.00 G - 9

194 CITY ATTORNEY SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY DIVISION IVISION D ESCRIPTIONS D Revenue S ERVICES A DVISORY FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 Provide legal services covering a wide Midcycle Adopted Adopted Division spectrum of municipal affairs, including Budget Budget Budget but not limited to legal advice and $0 $300,000 Advisory $0 and reviewing and counsel, drafting - 122,898 124,657 City Attorney: Administration negotiating contracts, and preparing 22,000 22,000 22,000 Litigation legislation. $322,000 $146,657 TOTAL $144,898 UPPORT EGAL L & O PERATIONS S Manage the budget, personnel and Expenditure support services of the City Attorney’s FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 Office, including but not limited to Adopted Midcycle Adopted Division payroll, information technology, and Budget Budget Budget assistant services. legal Advisory $6,144,982 $6,633,719 $6,523,692 City Attorney: Administration 4,725,913 5,078,555 5,081,813 ITIGATION L S ERVICES Litigation 3,274,299 3,402,978 3,450,083 Advocate the City's interest in claims TOTAL $15,055,588 $14,145,194 $15,115,252 and lawsuits filed against and on behalf of the City, its officers, employees and agencies. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY DIVISION OFFICE OF THE CITY ATTORNEY 75.00 FTE Advisory City Attorney: Administration 29.00 FTE 28.00 FTE Litigation 18.00 FTE SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes Add Deputy City Attorney III (NSA Compliance) 1.00 $235,507 $238,462 $470,608 $463,968 Add Deputy City Attorney III, Paralegal and 2.0 Neighborhood Law 4.00 Corps Attorney positions $40,400 $40,400 Add O &M for Enterprise Agreement with Microsoft - Transfer Deputy City Attorney III to the Development Services (1.00) ($233,433) ($236,751) Fund (2415) $425,288 Transfer Deputy City Attorney IV from the Successor $419,412 1.81 Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610), PRFS Fund (7100) and OMERS Fund (7120) ALL Other Funds 1.00 $122,898 $124,657 Add Paral egal to the Rent Adjustment Fund (2413) Transfer Deputy City Attorney IV from Funds 1610, 7100 and 7120 ($425,289) (1.81) ($419,411) to the GPF 1.00 $233,433 $236,751 Transfer Deputy City Attorney III to Fund 2415 from the GPF Transfer Paralegal to Fund 2415 from the Self Insurance Liability $58,228 0.47 $57,402 Fund (1100) Transfer Paralegal from Fund 1100 to Fund 2415 (0.47) ($57,402) ($58,228) G - 10

195 CITY AUDITOR SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND CITY AUDITOR FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Adopted Unaudited Adopted Actuals Expenditures by Fund Actuals Budget Budget TATEMENT S ISSION M 1010 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $1,653,631 $1,630,123 $1,903,677 $1,826,542 TOTAL $1,826,542 $1,903,677 $1,630,123 $1,653,631 The mission of the Office of the City Auditor is to conduct pe rformance 100.0% GPF Percent to Total Department 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% audits that return in- depth and 0.3% 0.4% 0.3% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures 0.4% meaningful results to the citizens of -based Oakland by utilizing a risk audit approach to identify and audit AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM the areas of government most , vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 and mismanagement. Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program Budget Budget Authorized FTE FTE FTE OALS B USINESS G Auditing 10.00 10.00 10.00 of monetary benefit for $4 Identify  1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 10.00 10.00 10.00 every $1 in audit cost. 10.00 10.00 10.00 TOTAL Conduct performance audits to  improve the economy, efficiency, SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM , and accountability of effectiveness City Government. Revenue Conduct mandated audits of City  FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 expenditures. Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program an effective  Maintain Budget Budget Budget to combat whistleblower program $0 Auditing $0 $0 fraud, waste, and abuse. TOTAL $0 $0 $0 -up on audit  Follow recommendations in accordance Expenditure with the City Charter. FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Provide a professional, supportive,  Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program and effective environment for staff Budget Budget Budget to excel. $1,826,542 Auditing $1,903,677 $1,561,450 $1,903,677 $1,561,450 $1,826,542 TOTAL D ROGRAM P ESCRIPTIONS UDITING A SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE This program conducts audits of all FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE departments and agencies of the City General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes in accordance with applicable $100,000 Add O &M to expand capacity of audit function $0 government auditing standards and in conformity with Section 403 of the Oakland City Charter. Audit services ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM will identify ways to increase the economy, efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability of City government. OFFICE OF THE CITY AUDITOR 10.00 FTE Auditing 10.00 FTE G - 11

196 CITY AUDITOR NOTES G - 12

197 CITY CLERK SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND CITY CLERK FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2013-14 Adopted Unaudited Actuals Adopted Expenditures by Fund Budget Budget Actuals M ISSION S TATEMENT $2,309,361 $1,728,194 $1,860,152 1010 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $1,842,217 1610 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 67,965 79,435 63,601 67,499 1,515,507 1,534,458 - Telecommunications Reserve - 1760 The mission of the Office of the City $3,425,223 $3,462,575 $2,372,962 TOTAL $1,807,630 Clerk is to deliver high quality, professional services to the citizens of 95.6% 97.3% 53.8% 53.7% GPF Percent to Total Department the City of Oakland, elected officials, GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures 0.4% 0.5% 0.4% 0.3% and the internal organization that facilitates their needs and seamless access to information to fully participate in the decision making processes affecting the quality of life for AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM everyone in the City of Oakland. FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Program B G OALS USINESS Budget Authorized Budget FTE FTE FTE  Support the Mayor, City C ouncil, City 4.40 4.00 4.00 Agenda Management Administrator, and Department 3.60 3.46 3.46 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) Directors in achieving their goals for 0.80 0.30 0.30 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement the City through accurate recording 0.24 0.24 1760 - Telecommunications Reserve - of legislative activities and retention 1.00 1.00 1.00 Customer Services & Public Relations / retrieval of City records. 1.00 1.00 1.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1.20 2.00 2.00 Elections & Political Compliance  Enhancement of City -Wide Records 1.00 1.90 1.90 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) Management program to promote 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 0.20 0.10 0.10 sibility, retention, and timely acces 1 - 8.50 8.50 KTOP Operations destruction. 8.50 8.50 1760 - Telecommunications Reserve -  Continue outreach to encourage Records Management 2.40 2.00 2.00 citizen participation in government 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 2.00 2.00 2.00 affairs and increase voter 0.40 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement - - participation. TOTAL 17.50 17.50 9.00 1 KTOP Operations transferred from City Administrator's Office per Council direction. P ROGRAM D ESCRIPTIONS GENDA M ANAGEMENT A SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM Manages and performs processes to prepare and issue City Council Revenue legislative agendas and materials in FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 advance to the public, members of the Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program Council, and executive staff; facilitate Budget Budget Budget opportunities for public comment 1 $1,718,162 $0 $1,698,105 KTO P O perations during the meeting; record official $1,698,105 TOTAL $0 $1,718,162 actions taken by the Council, the Oakland Redevelopment Successor Expenditure Agency, JPA, and certain other governing bodies (Legally Mandated). FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Program Budget Budget Budget S USTOMER C UBLIC ERVICE AND P Agenda Management $1,011,115 $1,010,768 $1,001,013 R ELATIONS Customer Services & Public Relations 147,325 178,401 180,629 Manage general operations for the 399,304 422,392 425,725 Elections & Political Compliance finance, b udget, payroll, department: 1 1,450,934 1,468,975 - KTO P O perations personnel, workers comp; process Records Management 405,669 372,483 376,478 Domestic Partnership Registration $3,462,575 $3,425,223 $1,963,413 TOTAL facilities Applications; ’ coordinate 1 KTOP Operations transferred from City Administrator's Office per Council direction. . needs; and Equal Access G - 13

198 CITY CLERK SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE ESCRIPTIONS ROGRAM D P FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE OLITICAL P C LECTIONS OMPLIANCE & E General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes Administer and Coordinate election Transferred 0.24 FTE of City Clerk to the Telecommunications (0.24) ($64,573) ($65,483) services for the selection of City and Fund (1760) OUSD officers, approval of Initiatives, FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE ALL Other Funds Changes Changes City Measures, Referendums, and Recalls; Serve as Filing Officer and Transferred 0.24 FTE of City Clerk to the Telecommunications $65,483 $64,573 0.24 Fund (1760) from the GPF (1010) Filing Official for the issuance, filing, review, and audit of required Fair FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE Organizational Changes Changes Changes ) FPPC Political Practices Commission ( KTO P O perations - Personnel and O &M was transferred from the 8.50 $1,515,507 $1,534,458 n Political Reports, i.e. Campaig City Administrator's Office Disclosure Statements and Statements of Economic Interest (Form 700) (Legally Mandated). PERATIONS O KTOP KTOP is the City’s government access ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM KTOP provides cable television station. coverage of City Council, Council department Committee, and other City meetings, and broadcasting original OFFI CE OF THE CI TY CLE RK and acquired programming that 17.50 FTE connects and engages viewers with their city government, fellow citizens and the world at large. Customer Service Agenda Management & Public Relations M ECORDS ANAGEMENT R 4.00 FTE 1.00 FTE Maintain minutes, ordinances, resolutions, motions, and contracts adopted and approved by the City Elections & Political Compliance KTOP Operations 8.50 FTE 2.00 FTE Council; provide ready access to records city -wide; set policy and establi sh procedures to guide the care, preservation, retention, and disposition Records Management 2.00 FTE of all city records and information; manage access to and contract for offs ite storage facility; coordinate records requests; manages records’ disposition processes; processes discovery requests for litigation requests. G - 14

199 PUBLIC ETHICS COMMISION SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND PUBLIC ETHICS FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 Actuals Adopted Adopted Unaudited COMMISION Expenditures by Fund Budget Budget Actuals $0 1010 $870,223 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $0 $858,779 $0 TOTAL $858,779 $870,223 $0 M S ISSION TATEMENT 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0% GPF Percent to Total Department The Public Ethics Commission (PEC) GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures 0.0% 0.0% 0.2% 0.2% ensures compliance with Prior to FY 2015-16, Public Ethics was a division of the City Administrator's Office. government ethics, campaign finance, transparency, and lobbyist registration laws that aim to promote fairness, openness, honesty, and AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM integrity in City government. FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 Adopted Adopted Midcycle Program Budget Authorized Budget OALS G B USINESS FTE FTE FTE Educate/Engage  Provide – 6.00 6.00 Public Ethics - education, advice, technical - 6.00 6.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) assistance, and formal legal TOTAL 6.00 6.00 - in consultation with the opinions In FY 2014-15, Public Ethics was a division within the City Administrator's Office. City Attorney’s office to ensure that all public servants, candidates for office, lobbyists, City contractors, and interested SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM membe rs of the public are aware of and understand the campaign Revenue finance, ethics, and transparency FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 laws that apply to them. Adopted Adopted Midcycle Program Budget Budget Budget  Disclose/Illuminate – Facilitate ctive and accessible accurate, effe $0 $0 $0 Public Ethics disclosure of government integrity $0 $0 TOTAL $0 data such as campaign finance reporting, conflicts of Expenditure interest/gifts reports, and lobbyist FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 activities, all of which help the Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program public and PEC staff monitor Budget Budget Budget , view information, and filings Public Ethics $870,223 $858,779 $0 detect inconsis tencies or $870,223 TOTAL $0 $858,779 noncompliance. In FY 2014-15, Public Ethics was a division within the City Administrator's Office.  – Conduct Detect/Deter investigations and audits to compliance with the laws monitor within the Commission’s ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM jurisdiction.  – Impose Prosecute administrative penalties and fines for violations of the laws within PUBLIC ETHICS COMMISSION sdiction. the PEC’s juri 6.00 FTE Public Ethics 6.00 FTE G - 15

200 PUBLIC ETHICS COMMISION ROGRAM D ESCRIPTION P SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) C B OARD I NDEPENDENT ITH ITIZEN W Changes Changes UTHORITY A EGAL L 4.00 $504,722 Add positions for Public Ethics resulting from the successful $511,948 voter initiative, Measure CC, to augment the responsibilities, The Public Ethics Commission is structure and staffing for the Publ ic Ethics Commission a seven -member board of Oakland FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE residents who provide policy Organizational Changes Changes Changes direction to Commission staff and Publ ic Ethics was restructured as a stand al one department per $354,057 $358,275 2.00 -judicial board that serve as a quasi voter approval of Measure CC. Positions and O &M Transferred evaluates allegations of legal from the City Administrator's O ffice violations. The Commission was created by City Charter in 1996 202) and (Section amended in November 2014 to strengthen the ’s independence and Commission The PEC staffing (Section 603). compliance with the oversees following laws and policies: • Oakland Government Ethics Act • Oakland's Campaign Reform Act (OCRA) Limited Public Financing Act • • Sunshine Ordinance Lobbyist Registration Act • • Oakland's False Endorsement in Campaign Literature Act G - 16

201 FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND FINANCE FY 2015-16 FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 DEPARTMENT Unaudited Actuals Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund Budget Budget Actuals 1010 $21,887,977 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $22,594,813 $19,806,945 $15,322,172 76,327 31,210 31,367 Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 1150 54,111 The Finance Department provides 1,050,414 1,191,445 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 1610 854,415 851,411 comprehensive financial services for 1700 2,074,695 2,074,695 1,032,149 1,345,381 Mandatory Refuse Program the City; provides timely and accurate - (525) 525 Comprehensive Clean-up 1720 - financial reports; maintains integrity of 1750 1,099,167 2,020,778 Multipurpose Reserve 2,609,119 2,612,345 information in the City's financial 40,707 40,436 1760 39,949 - Telecommunications Reserve systems and monitors internal 2105 HUD-EDI Grants - - - 2,846 controls; processes payments; 151,439 139,073 HUD-CDBG 2108 138,989 181,108 2195 Workforce Investment Act 150,369 57,765 81,412 81,683 processes payroll and maintains 34,489 42,460 39,527 39,309 Measure B: ACTIA 2211 inventory of critical supplies - 268,087 Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 2251 - 274,494 (warehousing); collects deposits and 2252 23,320 23,320 Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety Act - - records City revenues; procures 2310 27,700 28,414 45,742 Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 27,876 materials, supplies and services for City 2413 498,203 449,861 452,884 299,238 Rent Adjustment Program Fund departments; manages the City's 128,982 127,251 128,095 2415 Development Service Fund 125,562 investments; issues and restructures 44,765 - - Excess Litter Fee Fund 2417 44,765 City's and Successor Redevelopment 2,332,370 2,332,011 1,670,625 1,532,208 Sewer Service Fund 3100 Agency bond issues and debt; plans, 43,741 43,124 Radio / Telecommunications 4200 10,835 $43,071 directs and administers all risk Central Stores 4500 516,419 516,419 491,304 369,774 718,115 Purchasing 615,408 4550 910,229 898,580 management, insurance and safety 131,100 2,262 2,565 Rockridge: Library Assessment District 5130 131,100 activities. - 15,402 - - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2003 5611 The Finance Department includes the 301,248 2,321,322 5613 Central District: TA Bonds Series 2009T - - - 6520 Fire Area - Redemption (22,663) - - : following Bureaus 68,399 2012 Refunding Reassessment Bonds-Debt Service 87,729 6587 63,352 64,259  Controller Police and Fire Retirement System 2,621,891 2,440,325 7100 3,065,872 2,933,330  Revenue Management 210,933 Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System 62,955 7120 62,136 265,947 Treasury  7130 - - 286 Employee Deferred Compensation - 471 501 7200 - - Health Insurance Premium Trust: Unrepresented The goal is to establish a single 7220 285 - Health Insurance Premium Trust: Local 790 Retirees - 538 Administrati ve Unit to ensure uniform - - 20 34 Health Insurance Premium Trust: Western Council of 7260 processes, procedures, training, and 7280 4 Health Insurance Premium Trust: I.B.E.W. - - 7 7300 Health Insurance Premium Trust: Local 21 Retirees 954 1,472 - - standard protocols for administrative - - 2,277 Grant Clearing 7760 - tasks within the department. - 188,569 - Oakland Redevelopment Agency Projects (ORA) 7780 - TOTAL $35,604,483 $36,117,569 $31,564,673 $27,683,445 ESCRIPTIONS D IVISION D 61.5% 55.3% 62.8% 62.6% GPF Percent to Total Department 3.4% 4.0% 4.2% 4.1% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures A DMINISTRATION This division provides administrative support, oversight and leadership to the five divisions in Administrative Services . The Division’s primary responsibility is managing the department’s general operations to ensure efficient and effective service AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY BUREAU/DIVISION delivery. FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 Adopted Midcycle Adopted C ONTROLLER Bureau/Division Budget Authorized Budget bureau This is responsible for financial FTE FTE FTE reporting. This includes timely and 2.00 2.00 Administration - accurate financial information and 38.00 Controller 36.00 38.00 reports to the City Administrator, the 74.00 Revenue Management 80.00 80.00 Mayor and Council, agencies and the Treasury 27.00 27.00 27.00 public; maintaining the integrity of 147.00 137.00 147.00 TOTAL information in the City’s financial management systems; and the designing and monitoring of internal G - 17

202 FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY BUREAU/DIVISION ESCRIPTIONS D D IVISION Revenue CONT ) ( C ’ D ONTROLLER FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 controls that safeguards the assets of Adopted Adopted Midcycle Bureau/Division . In addition, the City the bureau Budget Budget Budget provides inter departmental and $6,562,898 Administration $117,200 $115,546 United States mail service. outgoing Controller 1,244,886 1,414,999 1,426,648 handles the processing of The bureau 3,719,595 Revenue Management 2,393,456 3,719,595 payment requests, issues and 533,813,635 477,145,582 540,794,690 Treasury bureau distributes vendor checks. The $546,058,133 $539,063,775 $487,346,822 TOTAL also manages a centralized billing and receivable system that keep track of all Expenditure accounts receivables. The Budget, Analysis and Operations section FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 produces accura te and timely analysis Adopted Adopted Midcycle Bureau/Division Budget Budget Budget of program revenues and expenditures; provides consultative services to $1,130,166 $1,139,185 Administration $1,178,508 ensure programs are efficient and 6,346,171 6,448,095 Controller 6,439,939 develops a fiscally effective; 20,811,832 20,570,445 Revenue Management 21,092,129 . responsible budget Treasury 7,829,400 7,473,839 6,925,074 $35,662,731 TOTAL $35,604,483 $36,117,569 EVENUE ANAGEMENT M R collects records and This bureau reports on City revenues; deposits City- SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE (CONT'D) wide collections; enforces and monitors FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE compliance with the provisions of the General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes City ordinances and complies with the 1.00 Add Finance Director $316,058 $320,522 State of California reporting requirements, pertaining to the Business License, following taxes: Consumption, Parking Tax, Utility maintains and upgrades HR/payroll Operation Section, Payroll Section and Real Estate Transfer, Consumption, systems, includ ing implementing changes Retirement Section. The Bureau is Transient Occupancy Tax, Sales Tax as compliance to labor contracts, responsible for Cash Management (for the and Mandatory Garbage; identifies legislative and other system y, Successor Agency and Port of Cit and brings into compliance non requirements; and maintains database for Oakland) i.e. manage day to day registered and delinquent tax historical data for various reporting. In investments for safety, liquidity and yield; accounts; acts as the collection agent addition, this Bureau administer all three Debt Management for City of Oakland and for all City Agencies and departments of City’s retirement systems (CalPERS, Successor Agency, including issuing new the City in Small and represents ERS, and PFRS) including timely OM debt, maintaining and restructuring debt, Claims Court; manages and collects pension payments, facilitate all retiree e and compliance with disclosur all revenues derived from the City’s medical, and administering the various regulations, and preserve strong credit parking meters; and collects pension boards and committees, and ratings and investor relations ; Cash revenues derived from parking oversight responsibility of a wide range related services including, cash collection, citations. of pension investment portfolios held in banking services, asset management and trust. petty cash management. Also, this Bureau REASURY T timely process citywide payroll and This Bureau has five sections: Investment payments, including benefits and taxes; Section, Debt Issuance Section, Cash and G - 18

203 FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND CONTROLLER’S FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 Adopted Adopted Unaudited Actuals BUREAU Expenditures by Fund Budget Actuals Budget $2,452,276 General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1010 $4,046,816 $3,981,318 $3,304,807 30,012 29,862 1150 Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 32,405 9,903 M TATEMENT S ISSION 416,214 435,615 1610 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 669,530 579,400 1750 Multipurpose Reserve - - - (334,057) Bureau The mission of the Controller’s 151,439 137,147 HUD-CDBG 2108 181,108 138,989 81,412 150,369 57,765 Workforce Investment Act 81,683 2195 is to provide timely and accurate 2211 Measure B: ACTIA 34,489 39,527 42,460 39,309 financial information that support and - 22,810 - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 22,145 2251 enhances the effective, responsive and Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety Act 2252 23,320 23,320 - - courteous delivery of services to the of 2014 citizens and residents of Oakland, 2310 Lighting and Landscape Assessment District - - 265 76 businesses, the Mayor, City 2415 Development Service Fund 78,397 78,468 73,669 73,799 Administrator, City Departments. The 42,167 36,687 39,875 36,857 3100 Sewer Service Fund 369,774 491,304 516,419 516,419 Central Stores 4500 Burea u maintains strong internal 718,115 909,479 897,830 615,408 Purchasing 4550 controls, ensuring transparency, - 302 - Rockridge: Library Assessment District 5130 - adhering to established financial 7100 Police and Fire Retirement System 55,251 92,785 91,476 - policies and procedures and complying 7120 Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System 23,641 - - - with legal fiscal reporting O M ERS requirements. Services include: 7780 188,569 - Oakland Redevelopment Agency Projects (ORA) - - financial reporting, budget $4,324,450 $6,346,171 $6,448,095 TOTAL $5,709,709 development, implementation and 57.9% 62.8% 56.7% 62.7% GPF Percent to Total Department erational analysis, procurement of op 0.6% 0.7% 0.7% 0.8% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures goods and services, accounts payable processing, centralized billing and accounts receivable tracking, inter- departmental and outgoing United States mail and parcel service. AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY UNIT (CONT'D) B OALS G USINESS FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted  To safeguard the City’s financial and Unit Authorized Budget Budget material assets by maintaining FTE FTE FTE strong internal controls, ensuring 4.50 6.50 6.50 Accounts Payable equity and transparency in 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 4.50 6.50 6.50 Department processes, adhering to 6.00 7.00 7.00 Budget Analysis & Operations established financial policies and 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 4.85 6.15 6.25 procedures, and complying with all 0.90 0.60 0.50 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement legal fiscal reporting requirements. 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA 0.25 0.25 0.25 16.00 14.00 14.00 General Ledger / Accounts Receivable To implement GASB 68 for required  10.38 9.07 9.07 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) . financial reporting 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 0.25 0.25 0.25  -12 system To implement Oracle R 1.92 1.65 1.65 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement upgrade for the City’s financial 1.00 1.00 1.00 2108 - HUD-CDBG system . 2195 - Workforce Investment Act 0.83 0.58 0.58  To develop more efficient and 2415 - Development Service Fund 0.50 0.50 0.50 effective internal controls for the 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 0.25 0.25 0.25 City . 0.61 0.70 0.70 7100 - Police and Fire Retirement System 7120 - Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System 0.26 - -  To improve and streamline the City 2.50 2.50 2.50 Mailroom year -end audit process . 4500 - Central Stores 2.50 2.50 2.50  To select and implement a new and 7.00 8.00 8.00 Purchasing improved budgeting system. 4550 - Purchasing 7.00 8.00 8.00  To improve and streamline the City 38.00 38.00 TOTAL 36.00 procurement process . G - 19

204 FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY UNIT NIT D ESCRIPTIONS U Revenue AYABLE A CCOUNTS P FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 processes the City Unit This Adopted Midcycle Adopted Unit (over 70,000 departments’ payables Budget Budget Budget invoices, grant payments, travel $425,838 Mailroom $516,419 $516,419 requests, reimbursements, and refunds 898,580 819,048 Purchasing 910,229 annually) , thereby ensuring that $1,426,648 $1,244,886 TOTAL $1,414,999 vendors are paid timely and departments are able to procure Expenditure supplies and services needed to continue the operations, services, and FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Adopted Midcycle Adopted s benefiting the citizens of program Unit Budget Budget Budget Oakland. The Section handles the sales tax reporting to the State Board of Accounts Payable $527,047 $734,717 $745,174 Budget Anal ysis & O perations 1,463,273 1,236,750 1,220,669 Equalization and 1099 Miscellaneous 2,985,139 3,042,974 General Ledger / Accounts Receivable 3,205,413 reporting for City vendors to the 516,419 Mailroom 425,838 516,419 Internal Revenue Service. Purchasing 818,368 889,227 906,778 $6,346,171 $6,439,939 TOTAL $6,448,095 B PERATIONS O & NALYSIS A , UDGET fiscally This Unit develops a responsible budget; develops a budget (CONT'D) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE that meets council priorities and FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE community needs; produces timely and General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes accurate analysis of program revenues $101,269 Add Accounting Technician 1.00 $99,840 and expenditures; provides (1.00) Freeze Accounting Supervisor ($150,733) ($148,605) consultative services to ensure programs are efficient and effective. 0.25 $31,801 Transfer Accountant II from the WIA Fund (2195) $31,353 piles and produces the Biennial Com FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE Proposed Budget and prepares the ALL Other Funds Changes Changes Adopted Policy Budget. Add Buyer to Purchasing Fund (4550) $118,146 1.00 $116,478 Transfer Accountant II from Fund 2195 to the GPF ($31,801) (0.25) ($31,353) ENERAL EDGER A / G L CCOUNTS R ECEIVABLE This provides accounting, fiscal Unit ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY UNIT monitoring, and financial and specialized reporting for all City departments, thereby allowing them to perform timely grant draw downs, and CONTROLLER’S OFFICE securing new grants. Plans and 38.00 FTE coordinates the year -end audit process and prepares the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR), the Single Audit Report and completes Budget, Analysis & Operations Accounts Payable 7.00 FTE 6.50 FTE s several legislative mandated measure year -end audits. It completes the State - Mandated Cost Claim Report, the State Controller’s Report, and the Oakland General Ledger / Mailroom Accounts Receivable Redevelopment Successor Agency 2.50 FTE 14.00 FTE Audit. This Section also reconciles and interfaces payroll and back accounts to the General Ledger, manages the City’s Purchasing fixed assets, debt services payments, 8.00 FTE manages the City’s overall financial system (Oracle), and conducts fiscal -recipients. monitoring of grant sub G - 20

205 FINANCE DEPARTMENT AILROOM M P URCHASING U ESCRIPTIONS D NIT This Section supports the procurement operates the City’s central Unit This of materials, equipment and services , which shipping and receiving functions ENERAL EDGER / G L A CCOUNTS provides more efficient and economical essential to providing governmental R ECEIVABLE (cont’d) mail services for all City departments, services for the citizens of Oakland. The This Section provides centralized billing promotes the most effective use Section which is over 800,000 pieces of and collection support to City of City funds in the acquisition of incoming mail and 400,000 pieces of departments, enabling the departments . This se outgoing mail annually ction also commodities, procurement of supplies to realize revenues and enabling them handles the metered postage billing and and services for City departments. The to maintain a balanced budget. Section prepares specifications and reconciliation process. requests for formal bids and request for ty proposals in collaboration with Ci departments. G - 21

206 FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND REVENUE FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2013-14 FY 2015-16 MANAGEMENT Actuals Unaudited Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund Budget Budget Actuals BUREAU General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1010 $13,274,457 $11,513,983 $12,847,844 $13,554,148 Mandatory Refuse Program 1,107,455 781,482 2,074,695 2,074,695 1700 1750 Multipurpose Reserve 1,418,178 2,005,733 2,612,345 2,609,119 TATEMENT S ISSION M - Telecommunications Reserve 1760 39,949 40,436 40,707 2310 Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 45,742 28,414 26,308 26,667 The Revenue Management Bureau is 299,018 497,983 449,861 452,884 2413 Rent Adjustment Program Fund committed to the delivery of quality, 70 70 - - Development Service Fund 2415 courteous and responsive services, - 2417 Excess Litter Fee Fund - 44,765 44,765 treating all citizens with fairness, dignity 1,490,833 1,626,958 2,288,145 2,288,324 3100 Sewer Service Fund and respect. We seek to achieve an 4550 Purchasing - - 750 750 optimal level of effectiveness and 5611 - - 15,402 - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2003 compliance in the administration and - - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2009T 5613 2,321,322 301,248 collection of local taxes, fines, and fees, 2,277 - - - 7760 Grant Clearing to ensure equity and transparency in the $18,145,013 $20,811,832 $21,092,129 $18,198,808 TOTAL application of applicable laws and 70.8% GPF Percent to Total Department 64.3% 63.8% 63.3% policies. 2.6% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% G USINESS OALS B  General operations to ensure efficient and effective service delivery .  Safeguard the City’s financial and material assets by maintaining strong (CONT'D) AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY UNIT internal controls, ensuring equity and transparency in division’s processes. FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Enforces provisions of the California  Adopted Adopted Midcycle Unit State Vehicle and Oakland Municipal Authorized Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Codes. Administration 6.00 6.00 6.00 4.62 4.80 4.80 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) NIT ESCRIPTIONS D U 1700 - Mandatory Refuse Program 0.43 0.43 0.43 1750 - Multipurpose Reserve 0.50 0.32 0.32 DMINISTRATION A 1760 - Telecommunications Reserve 0.25 0.25 0.25 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 0.10 0.10 - The Unit’s primary responsibility is 0.10 - - 2413 - Rent Adjustment Program Fund collection of local taxes, fines and 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 0.10 0.10 0.10 managing the department’s general 17.00 20.00 20.00 Audit / Compliance operations to ensure efficient and 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 14.80 17.80 17.80 effective service delivery. It also 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 0.20 0.20 0.20 preserves the City’s financial and 2413 - Rent Adjustment Program Fund 2.00 2.00 2.00 material assets by maintaining strong Business Tax 14.00 13.00 13.00 internal controls, ensuring equity and 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 12.00 11.00 11.00 transparency in division’s processes. 2.00 2.00 2.00 2413 - Rent Adjustment Program Fund Also, it adheres to established financial Mandatory Garbage / Collections 14.00 17.00 17.00 policies and procedures complying with 7.50 9.00 9.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) fiscal reporting requirements. all legal 6.50 8.00 8.00 1700 - Mandatory Refuse Program Furthermore, this division supports is 15.00 15.00 15.00 Parking Citation Assistance Center inting & mailing of responsible for pr 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 15.00 15.00 15.00 business tax renewals and certificates Parking Meter Collections 8.00 9.00 9.00 and also handles and processes lockbox 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 8.00 9.00 9.00 transient occupancy tax , utility user tax 74.00 80.00 80.00 TOTAL and parking tax. Additionally, it directs and enforces provisions of the California Mun State Vehicle and Oakland icipal G - 22

207 FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY UNIT ESCRIPTIONS U NIT D Revenue CONT ) DMINISTRATION D ’ ( A FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 Municipal Codes, and is responsible for Adopted Adopted Midcycle Unit revenue forecasting and reconciliation. Budget Budget Budget The division’s sections/units include: $235,892 $235,892 $221,517 Administration Business Tax (BT), Audit, 2,594,623 2,594,623 1,856,075 Audit / Compliance Collections/Compliance, Mandatory Business Tax 512,031 512,031 16,400 Garbage, Parking Citation Assistance 342,176 342,176 264,591 Mandatory Garbage / Collections Center (PCAC) and Parking Meter 34,873 34,873 Parking Citation Assistance Center 34,873 collections. TOTAL $3,719,595 $3,719,595 $2,393,456 OMPLIANCE A UDIT /C Expenditure audits and The Revenue Audit Unit FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 ws all the revenue sources such as: revie Adopted Midcycle Adopted Unit  Business Tax Budget Budget Budget  Transient Occupancy Tax $4,679,423 $3,798,786 Administration $4,681,910  Parking Tax 3,085,093 2,777,188 Audit / Compliance 3,286,751 Utility Consumption Tax  Business Tax 1,578,291 1,556,198 1,663,790  Real Property Transfer Tax 2,014,757 Mandatory Garbage / Collections 1,668,457 1,988,363 Sales Tax  Parking Citation Assistance Center 5,416,835 5,161,421 5,181,609 The primary function and goal of the Parking Meter Collections 4,348,811 4,341,334 5,245,389 Revenue Audit Section is to confirm the TOTAL $20,570,445 $20,811,832 $21,092,129 taxpayer's accurate filing of tax information and payment of taxes due while ensuring the proper application of respective revenue ordinances by both ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY UNIT staff and taxpayers. ensures that all liance unit The Comp businesses conducting business in REVENUE Oakland are in compliance with the rules 80.00 FTE and regulations set forth in Oakland Municipal Code and have current business tax certificates for conducting This Unit issues business in the City. ice of Determinations (NODs) and Not Audit / Compliance Administration processes business tax liens for both 6.00 FTE 20.00 FTE residential and commercial rental accounts are also handled by this section. Mandatory Garbage Business Tax /Collections 13.00 FTE AX B USINESS T 17.00 FTE Reviews of tax and fee ordinances to ensure equitable and fair application of Parking Citation taxes and fees paid to the City by the Parking Meter Collection Assistance Center 9.00 FTE residential and commercial community. 15.00 FTE This section collects, records and reports on all City revenues; enforces and monitors the provisions of the City's ordinances; Complies with the State of  Excess Liter Fee (ELF) City in Small Claims Court, collects California reporting requirements  Business Improvement District delinquent business tax and code pertaining to the following taxes & Fees: ) (BID enforcement, and bring into compliance Business Tax delinquents businesses which have not  Utility Users’ Tax registered according to the provisions of Real Estate Transfer,  M /C ARBAGE G ANDATORY OLLECTIONS the Business Tax Ordinance.  Parking Tax Transient The Collections unit acts as the  Occupancy Tax The primary responsibilities of the collection agent for all City departments,  Rental Adjustment Program (RAP) Mandatory Garbage unit is to collect bureaus, and divisions; represents the G - 23

208 FINANCE DEPARTMENT SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE D ESCRIPTIONS U NIT FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) /C M ANDATORY ARBAGE G OLLECTIONS Changes Changes CONT ( ) D ’ $87,000 Add Revenue Assistant $88,100 1.00 delinquent garbage invoices and issue Add Tax Enforcement Officers (FY 2015-16 for 6 months only) 3.00 $345,000 $170,000 Notifications of Property Assessment on Transfer Revenue Assistant to fund 1700 (1.00) ($96,244) ($97,622) behalf of the City’s Mandatory Garbage $83,506 Transfer Revenue O perations Supervisor from Mandatory 0.50 $82,327 program. Refuse Program Fund (1700) 1.00 $119,178 $120,884 Transfer Tax Enforcement O fficer II from Fund 1700 C SSISTANCE ENTER A P ARKING C ITATION FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE ALL Other Funds The Parking Citation Assistance Center Changes Changes (PCAC) processes all parking violation 1.00 $105,648 $107,161 Add Office Manager to Fund 1700 citations, and posts various citation 1.00 Add Revenue Assistant to Fund 1700 $86,860 $88,104 payments. The citation payments are Transfer Revenue Assistant to Fund 1700 from the GPF $96,244 $97,622 1.00 handled either by direct cashier services or through the mail. PCAC staff also Transfer Tax Enforcement O fficer II to the GPF from Fund 1700 (1.00) ($119,178) ($120,884) provides direct in- son or telephone per assistance to citizens regarding various parking related issues including the Residential Permit Parking. C ETER M ARKING P OLLECTIONS Parking Meter Collections is responsible for collecting parking meter revenue from the on and off parking -street meters. They also perform counting, sorting, bagging of the coins for different coin denominations and Brink’s pick up. G - 24

209 FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND TREASURY BUREAU FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 Unaudited Actuals Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund Actuals Budget Budget ISSION TATEMENT M S 1010 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $680,815 $2,940,389 $4,247,401 $3,186,537 - 1150 Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 286 30 30 is The mission of the Treasury Bureau 1610 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 521,915 471,014 387,280 409,553 to promote the conditions for fiscal 1700 Mandatory Refuse Program - - - 284 and prosperity and stability in Oakland 1720 - - (525) 525 Comprehensive Clean-up provide support services to all City - - - 2105 2,846 HUD-EDI Grants . Treasury Bureau departments - - 1,926 2108 HUD-CDBG - services include: financial management - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 245,112 250,854 2251 - and maintenance of the City ’s financial Development Service Fund 2415 48,812 48,123 50,514 47,164 and manage portfolio payroll systems 5,000 3100 Sewer Service Fund 1,500 1,500 5,000 for City, Port and Successor Agency; 43,124 4200 Radio / Telecommunications 43,071 10,835 43,741 debt management for City and Rockridge: Library Assessment District 2,262 2,263 5130 131,100 131,100 Successor Agency; and administer the - - (22,663) - 6520 Fire Area - Redemption . Ci ty’s retirement systems 87,729 68,399 63,352 64,259 2012 Refunding Reassessment Bonds-Debt Service 6587 2,385,074 Police and Fire Retirement System 7100 2,973,087 2,841,854 2,621,891 187,292 Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System 7120 62,955 62,136 265,947 B OALS G USINESS 7130 Employee Deferred Compensation 286 - - - Health Insurance Premium Trust: Unrepresented 471 7200 - - 501 provide oversight for all City  To 7220 - 285 538 Health Insurance Premium Trust: Local 790 Retirees - financial interests as Treasurer of the - 20 - 34 Health Insurance Premium Trust: Western Council of 7260 City and the Successor Agency . 7280 7 Health Insurance Premium Trust: I.B.E.W. 4 - -  To safeguard the City and 954 Health Insurance Premium Trust: Local 21 Retirees 7300 - - 1,472 $6,925,074 $7,829,400 $6,685,362 $4,187,428 TOTAL Successor’s investments by maintaining strong internal controls, 16.3% 44.0% 46.0% 54.2% GPF Percent to Total Department , ensuring equity and transparency 0.6% 0.8% 0.6% 0.2% adhering to established financial GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures policies and procedures . (investments and debt policy)  To ensure the stability of City financial resources through effective debt financing, maintenance of the AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY UNIT (CONT'D) City’s bond ratings that reflect a deep, sta ble, and diversified FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 economic base with management Adopted Adopted Midcycle Unit practices that are considered strong Authorized Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE by rating agencies; and effective debt management. 1.60 1.60 1.60 Administration 1.50 1.50 1.50 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF)  To maintain investor’s relation and 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 0.10 0.10 0.10 attract potential investors by Cash & Operations 1.00 1.00 1.00 strong financial demonstrating 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1.00 1.00 1.00 management and c ondition in order Debt Issuance & Investment 6.00 6.00 6.00 to promote City’s financings to 4.95 4.95 4.95 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) ensure lowest interest costs to the 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 0.65 0.65 0.65 . City 0.40 0.40 0.40 6587 - 2012 Refunding Reassessment Bonds-Debt Service audits  To administer and oversee 13.00 13.00 13.00 Payroll ensures and retirement benefits; 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 11.17 11.42 11.42 protect and ensure compliance ; and 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 1.00 0.75 0.75 t investing of the pension pruden 2415 - Development Service Fund 0.50 0.50 0.50 ( PFRS) for the benefit of the fund 4200 - Radio / Telecommunications 0.33 0.33 0.33 retirees and beneficiaries. 5.40 5.40 5.40 Retirement 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 0.90 1.05 1.05 7100 - Police and Fire Retirement System 3.80 3.95 3.95 7120 - Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System 0.70 0.40 0.40 TOTAL 27.00 27.00 27.00 G - 25

210 FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY UNIT NIT D ESCRIPTIONS U Revenue O PERATIONS C ASH & FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 receive and deposit timely of This unit Adopted Adopted Midcycle Unit City, Successor and Port’s entire Budget Budget Budget revenue stream; account for, verify and $476,181,055 Debt Issuance & Investment $537,535,440 $530,689,575 allocate recovered monies to 3,259,250 3,124,060 964,527 Retirement appropriate funds and accounts for all $477,145,582 $540,794,690 $533,813,635 TOTAL city departments and programs; perform general banking and depository services and safekeeping. Expenditure FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 NVESTMENT I EBT D SSUANCE & I Adopted Adopted Midcycle Unit deals with all of the City’s and This unit Budget Budget Budget Successor Agency’s debt expectations $415,936 $393,541 Administration $460,163 and needs including issuing new debt Cash & O perations 64,139 72,449 73,486 maintaining and restructuring debt; 1,628,155 2,601,186 Debt Issuance & Investment 1,515,221 and managing day to day investment Payroll 1,742,301 1,766,906 1,655,626 portfolios. 3,153,525 Retirement 3,665,756 3,019,923 TOTAL $7,473,839 $7,829,400 $6,925,074 P AYROLL processes and distributes bi This unit - weekly payroll in a timely efficient way SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE (CONT'D) including benefits and taxes, maintains FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) and upgrades payroll systems, and Changes Changes processes year -end reports and Decrease expenditures (recoveries) ($100,000) ($100,000) production of W -2’s and 1099R’s . ($1,100,000) One-time transfer out in FY15-16 of 25% of the 12th Street $0 Remainder Revenue to the Affordable Housing Trust Fund ETIREMENT R (1870) This unit administers all three of the 0.15 $22,619 $22,300 Transfer Retirement Systems Accountant from the O MERS Fund retirement systems (CalPERS, City’s (7120) It oversees the and PFRS). FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE administration of audits and retirement ALL Other Funds Changes Changes benefits and ensures compliance for Reduce O&M in the PFRS Fund (7100) and OMERS Fund (7120) ($543,716) ($666,676) OMERS). two closed systems (PFRS and ($22,300) ($22,619) (0.15) Transfer Retirement Systems Accountant from Fund 7120 to the The Retirement staff ensures accurate GPF and timely pension payments, facilitating all Retiree medical, administering the various Pension ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY UNIT Boards and Committees, and oversight responsibility of a wide range sion i nvestment portfolios held of pen in trust accounts . TREASURY 27.00 FTE Administration Cash & Operations 1.00 FTE 1.60 FTE Debt Issuance & Investment Payroll 6.00 FTE 13.00 FTE Retirement 5.40 FTE G - 26

211 HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND HUMAN RESOURCES FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 MANAGEMENT Adopted Actuals Unaudited Adopted Expenditures by Fund Actuals Budget Budget General Purpose Fund (GPF) $3,577,193 $4,597,188 $4,409,783 1010 $4,740,469 1150 Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 1,288,235 1,407,003 1,662,352 1,671,835 TATEMENT S ISSION M 1610 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement Fund 69,953 68,625 49,038 49,369 4100 61,635 26,052 5,521 5,521 Equi pment The mission of the Human Resources 4400 City Facilities 10,000 27,708 - - Management Department is to manage - - 1,348 1,260 Police and Fire Retirement System 7100 a comprehensive personnel system 7120 Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System 1,162 1,162 - - based on merit and to provide City 102,820 150,926 244,589 246,452 7130 Employee Deferred Compensation agencies and departments with a $5,112,346 $6,092,519 $6,701,969 $6,570,365 TOTAL competitive workforce through GPF Percent to Total Department 70.0% 70.7% 72.4% 70.0% training, active outreach, recruitment, GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures 0.8% 0.9% 0.9% 0.9% hiring, and the promotion of qualified candidates, particularly Oakland residents ; and to support employee satisfaction and retention through a comprehensive risk and benefits management program. AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY DIVISION FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 USINESS B G OALS Adopted Midcycle Adopted Division Budget Budget Authorized FTE FTE FTE To provide City agencies and departments with a high quality, Administration 4.00 4.00 4.00 skilled, diverse workforce through 3.73 3.67 3.67 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) active outreach, recruitment, hiring, 0.23 0.23 0.23 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 7130 - Employee Deferred Compensation 0.04 0.10 0.10 and promotion of qualified candidates; Recruitment & Classification 26.00 25.00 25.00 to maintain a comprehensive 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 25.90 24.90 24.90 classification plan; to administer the 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 0.10 0.10 0.10 Equal Access Program; to administer Risk & Benefits 13.00 13.00 13.00 the City’s employee benefits plans; and 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 2.00 1.81 1.81 to oversee the Risk Management 9.90 9.95 9.95 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims Program for the City. 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 0.20 0.20 0.20 7130 - Employee Deferred Compensation 0.90 1.04 1.04 IVISION D ESCRIPTIONS D 42.00 42.00 TOTAL 43.00 A DMINISTRATION Provides direction and support to all of the Human Resources Management units; advises the Mayor, Council, and SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY DIVISION City Administrator on Human Resources issues; develops and Revenue facilitates the implementation of action FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 plans to address current and future City Midcycle Adopted Adopted human resources needs. Department Division Budget Budget Budget director is the Secretary to the Civil Administration $484,103 $485,108 $482,240 Service Board. $482,240 $484,103 $485,108 TOTAL ISK & B ENEFITS R Expenditure Administers all risk management and FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 employee benefits programs. Midcycle Adopted Adopted Division Functional units include Employee Budget Budget Budget Integrated Disability Benefits, Administration $804,332 $1,233,767 $1,244,068 Management and Risk & Safety. 3,648,148 3,482,856 Recruitment & Classification 3,363,303 Provides staff support to the Deferred 1,820,054 1,799,496 Risk & Benefits 1,843,441 Compensation Committee and Safety TOTAL $5,967,131 $6,701,969 $6,570,365 Disability Retirement Board. Manages G - 27

212 HUMAN RESOURCES SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE (CONT'D) D D IVISION ESCRIPTIONS FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) ) ( ’ CONT B & ENEFITS ISK R D Changes Changes One-time funding for public safety personnel recruitment $0 $200,000 employee benefits programs all contract including medical, dental, vision, life, flexible spending accounts, tax - deferred savings accounts, employee assistance program and more. Ensure compliance with the Affordable Care Administer Act (ACA). s the City ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY DIVISION Integrated Disability Program that consolidates all mandated disability related programs including protected (CFRA, FMLA, and administration leave HUMAN RESOURCES , Federal Employment and PDL) 42.00 FTE Housing Act (FEHA) compliance and Workers’ Compensation claims Administer administration. s Employee Health and Safety Programs including Administration Recruitment & Classification CalOSHA compliance, safety/loss 25.00 FTE 4.00 FTE control services, employee medical surveillance testing, employee medical examinations and drug/alcohol testing. Manage the Commercial Insurance and Risk & Benefits 13.00 FTE Self - Insurance portfolios and represent City on insurance pool boards and committees. Monitor vendor contracts for Compliance with Risk Management related requirements. Extend other Risk Management and/or employment liability services to departments as needed. C LASSIFICATION R ECRUITMENT & Responsible for all aspects of recruiting and for retaining the most qualified candidates for employment. Maintains a competitive classification and compensation system; recruits local, statewide and national candidates who reflect the City’ s diversity objectives. Provides staff support to the Civil Service Board. This division also houses the Equal Access Program which seeks to ensure resident access to City services in accordance with the Equal Access to Services Ordinance (Ordinance No.123 24 C.M.S.). G - 28

213 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND INFORMATION FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2013-14 FY 2015-16 TECHNOLOGY Actuals Unaudited Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund Actuals Budget Budget 1010 $10,209,508 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $8,516,462 $9,779,785 $10,335,651 - 5,443 - 1610 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement TATEMENT S ISSION M 1760 Telecommunications Reserve 45,846 142,997 142,162 20,433 278,229 293,518 Measure Q-Library Services Retention & Enhancement 243,954 247,446 2241 Information Technology The 2411 False Alarm Reduction Program - 233,476 234,847 Department is committed to 181,004 284,468 Development Service Fund 2415 215,777 214,518 providing the timely delivery of 352,382 2999 Miscellaneous Grants 223,930 - - effective strategic, responsive, cost- 176,331 229,913 199,600 Sewer Service Fund 3100 231,265 technology solutions and quality 7,234,328 3,083,327 Radio / Telecommunications 7,247,160 4200 2,912,542 services to meet the goals defined by 308,530 790,033 Telephone Equipment and Software 4210 521,807 308,530 the Mayor, City Council and Reproduction 1,483,565 1,569,036 1,320,007 4300 1,320,007 Oakland's citizens. We are dedicated 4600 Information Technology 2,500,000 - 2,975,527 Health Insurance Premium Trust: Unrepresented 22 - - 7200 to maintaining the highest standards 7760 239,878 155,011 Grant Clearing 155,412 156,413 of excellence in our technical skills TOTAL $14,871,881 $16,240,771 $23,267,335 $22,940,093 by providing total quality workmanship and expertise; by 60.2% 57.3% 43.9% 45.1% GPF Percent to Total Department understanding the needs of the 2.3% 1.9% 2.3% 2.2% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures customer to facilitate the accomplishment of common objectives; and by always treating customers and staff with respect and dignity. B OALS G USINESS Improve customer service for  AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY DIVISION internal clients, businesses and the FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 communi ty by providing an Adopted Midcycle Adopted overall Information Technology Division Budget Budget Authorized (IT) vision and strategic plan that FTE FTE FTE includes the re -engineering and Administration & Customer Services 13.00 18.00 18.00 architecting of the City's re- 6.60 11.00 11.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) existing IT environment and 4200 - Radio / Telecommunications 1.40 2.00 2.00 associated services. 4300 - Reproduction 5.00 5.00 5.00 Install, mainta  in and support the Enterprise Application Services 12.00 9.00 9.00 mission critical public safety 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 11.00 8.00 8.00 applications and infrastructure. 4200 - Radio / Telecommunications 1.00 1.00 1.00 Provide technical resources for Enterprise Network & Computing Services 23.00 20.00 20.00 business needs analysis, 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 19.75 16.75 16.75 technology acquisition, solution 2241 - Measure Q-Library Services Retention & 2.00 2.00 2.00 designing, contract negotiations, 4200 - Radio / Telecommunications 0.25 0.25 0.25 project management, and support 7760 - Grant Clearing 1.00 1.00 1.00 services. Public Safety Systems Services 27.00 26.00 26.00 -active, stable and Provide a pro  15.40 14.30 14.30 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) ntra/internet highly reliable i 1760 - Telecommunications Reserve 0.74 0.74 0.74 environment that supports and 2411 - False Alarm Reduction Program 1.00 1.00 1.00 -Oakland, -Commerce, E enhances E 2415 - Development Service Fund 1.03 1.03 1.03 Geographical Citywide 1.10 1.10 1.10 3100 - Sewer Service Fund GIS ), Crime Information System ( 4200 - Radio / Telecommunications 6.83 6.93 6.93 Watch and migration of City 0.90 0.90 0.90 7760 - Grant Clearing applications to the Web. 75.00 73.00 TOTAL 73.00  Enable and publish City Data for the use of City Agencies and Departments and provide access to this resource to Residents and Businesses. Provide national G - 29

214 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY DIVISION ) OALS ONT ’ USINESS (C B G D standards based Interoperable Revenue communications infrastructure to FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 the City’s Public Safety Agencies Adopted Adopted Midcycle Division and to surrounding justifications. Budget Budget Budget Administration & Customer Services $3,750,017 $6,604,335 $6,128,808 Improve the availability, reliability  Enterprise Application Services 4,750 - - and speed of the City’s fixed and 7,621,937 3,954,267 Enterprise Network & Computing Services 7,599,431 . wireless network connectivity $7,709,034 $13,728,239 TOTAL $14,226,272 Expenditure ESCRIPTIONS D IVISION D FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 Adopted Adopted Midcycle Division C USTOMER A & DMINISTRATION Budget Budget Budget S ERVICES $7,419,212 $3,247,113 Administration & Customer Services $6,959,803 This division provides general Enterprise Application Services 2,662,533 2,152,525 2,177,997 administrative support, oversight, 9,096,188 6,280,056 9,050,999 Enterprise Network & Computing Services the Information and leadership to Public Safety Systems Services 4,391,502 4,644,599 4,706,105 Technology Department. The TOTAL $16,581,204 $23,267,335 $22,940,093 division’s responsibility includes human resources management, budget, fiscal, accounting, worker’s comp, accounts payable and SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE receivable, telephone and radio , billing, cable television complaints FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE es. and printing/duplicating servic General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes (0.50) ($125,526) Transfer Manager, Information Systems to fund 4200 ($123,784) E A PPLICATION S ERVICES NTERPRISE ($115,750) ($114,117) (0.60) Transfer Information Systems Supervisor to fund 4200 This division maintains and supports enterprise applications and FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE ALL Other Funds Changes Changes such as Oracle’s databases, Enterprise Resource Planning $0 Reprogram IT project funds (4600) one time ($3,844,475) Financials, system , which includes Transfer Manager, Information Systems from 1010 to 4200 0.50 $123,783 $125,525 Human Resources, Benefits, Payroll, $114,117 $115,750 Transfer Information Systems Supervisor from 1010 to 4200 0.60 Contract Management, Public Sector Budgeting (PSB), Internet cruitment, Internet Procurement, Re Internet Supplier, and Internet . This division Sourcing designs, ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY DIVISION develops and implements program solutions for enterprise applications; provides support for performance monitoring of enterprise resources INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY acity planning and performance cap 73.00 FTE and supports interagency enterprise applications such as Accela, a land based management system for Building and Planning Services. Administration & Customer Enterprise Application Services Services 9.00 FTE It also provides GIS information to 18.00 FTE users; researches GIS database accuracy and completeness; develops pplications to access various web a Enterprise Network & Computing Public Safety resources; maintains intranet Services Systems Services applications including web content 26.00 FTE 20.00 FTE management; performance capacity planning. It also provides GIS information to users; researches GIS database accuracy and completeness; G - 30

215 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY s, R ecords Aided Dispatch (CAD) system support, including email, file servers IVISION D ESCRIPTIONS D Management System (RMS), Servers, and general business applications. Backup and Storage, Desktop A ERVICES E NTERPRISE PPLICATION S The Network and Telecommunications Computers, Laptop Computers, (CONT’D) group supports the City’s wide area Emergency operation Center computing develops web applications to access network infrastructure providing voice infrastructure, Dispatch Center various resources; maintains intranet and data communications to all agencies computing and infrastructure. Also applications including web content and department throughout the City. responsible for the mobile applications, management. fire station alerting systems and public ERVICES S YSTEMS S S UBLIC P AFETY safety end- users equipment in the police C OMPUTING NTERPRISE & ETWORK N E This division is primarily dedicated to and fire vehicles. ERVICES S and needs IT the Public Safety cater The Business Applications/GIS Services This division supports and provides a maintain mission critical systems, as group develops and maintains custom range of enterprise technology services well as provide citywide business business applications including OPD including IT Helpdesk, Desktop and elligence reporting and business int Internal Personnel Assessment System Server Support, and Network . The collaboration platform solutions ) ) and Personn (IPAS el Database (PDB Infrastructure Support services. It public safety services and business applications; develop, maintain and prepares short and long range network, applications division includes three platform; develops GIS support citywide server and desktop client strategies, and sections, Computing Services, Business web applications to access various is responsible for the development of Application/GIS Services, and Wireless resources; maintains intranet the City’s desktop, server and network . This Division is responsible for Services applications including web content access security policies, standards, and developing, deploying, maintaining and management. This group also includes technical specifications. supporting the business applications as -going maintenance and support the on well as mission critical infrastructure The IT Helpdesk typically serves as the -party , as well as , in- of various third including P25 Radio system, microwave initial point of contact for technology house developed applications. backbone, dispatch centers, broadband incident reporting, first level problem The Wireless Services a.k.a . Radio Shop body -worn camera system wireless, s, resolution and answering general IT is a 24/7 group which maintains the applications, databases, and Next questions. P25 mission critical voice Generation 911 data systems around the The Desktop and Server group supports communication radio system, handheld clock. and provides assistance with issues and mobile radios, Microwave Backbone The Computing Services group provide ranging from desktop software, cable television infrastructure, network, support for all public safety computer workstation and mobile and closed circuit television video applications and infrastructure device troubleshooting and deployment, systems. 911 Computer -critical including mission to backend enterprise technology G - 31

216 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY NOTES G - 32

217 RACE & EQUITY SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND & EQUITY RACE FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Unaudited Actuals Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund S ISSION M TATEMENT Actuals Budget Budget $0 1010 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $0 $304,075 $312,566 To assist the City Administrator and TOTAL $0 $0 $304,075 $312,566 City Departments in the application of equity and social justice GPF Percent to Total Department 0.0% 100.0% 100.0% 0.0% foundational practices with regard to 0.0% 0.1% 0.1% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures 0.0% actions. To endeavor to integrate City these practices into: the City's strategic, operational and business plans; management and reporting systems for accountability & AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM performance; and budgets in order to eliminate inequities and create FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 opportunities for all p eople and Adopted Midcycle Adopted Program Budget Authorized Budget communities. FTE FTE FTE Race & Equity 2.00 2.00 - USINESS B OALS G 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 2.00 2.00 - 2.00 TOTAL - 2.00 Assist the City in the development and implementation of equity and social justice foundational practices that enable Oakland government to: Raise and sustain the visibility of 1. SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM the citywide vision of a fair and jus t principle that the city serves Revenue all residents by promoting fairness FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 and opportunity and eliminating Adopted Midcycle Adopted Program inequities, and other equity and Budget Budget Budget social justice values, policies and $0 $0 $0 Race & Equi ty foundational practices. $0 $0 TOTAL $0 2. Increase focus on the determinants of equity in order to make Expenditure progress in the elimination of the FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 root cause of inequities. The Adopted Adopted Midcycle determinants of equity are the Program Budget Budget Budget social, economic, geographic, political and physical environment Race & Equi ty $0 $304,075 $312,566 conditions in which people in $312,566 $304,075 $0 TOTAL Oakland are born, grow, live, work and age in a way that lead to the creation of a fair and just society and include: ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM  Community economic development that supports local ownership of assets, including homes and businesses, and RACE & EQUITY assures fair access for all to FTE 2.00 business development and business retention opportunities;  Community and public safety Race & Equity that includes services such as FTE 2.00 fire, police, emergency medical services and code enforcement that are responsive to all residents so that everyone feels G - 33

218 RACE & EQUITY opportunity for all people, support: jobs, housing, amenities G OALS ’ D ) ( B USINESS CONT particularly for people of color, low - and services; trees and forest safe to live, work and play in any income communities and people with canopy; and clean air, water, soil neighborhood in Oakland; limited English proficiency or, when and sediment; A law and justice system that  decisions that have a negative impact Housing for all people that is safe,  provides equitable access and fair on fairness and opportunity are affordable, high quality and treatment for all; unavoidable, steps are implemented healthy;  Early childhood development that that mitigate the negative impacts;  Job, training and jobs that provide supports nurturing relationships, residents with the knowledge and 4. Foster an organizational culture that high quality affordable child care skills to compete in a diverse promotes fairness and opportunity and early learning opportunities workforce with the ability to make with collaboration across that promote optimal early sufficient income for the purchase departments and other organizations; childhood development and school of basic necessities to support them readiness for all children; and their families; 5. Build capacity to engage all Education that is high quality and  Neighborhoods that support all  communities in a manner that: culturally appropriate and allows communities and individuals promotes and foster trust among each student to reach his or her through strong social networks, c, race, class people across geographi maximum learning an d career trust among neighbors and the and gender lines; results in more potential; ability to work together to achieve effective policies, processes and Equity in city practices that  common goals that improve the services; and supports communities' eliminates all forms of quality of life for everyone in the efforts to develop solutions. discrimination in city activities in neighborhood; order to provide fair treatment for Parks and natural resources that  all employees, contractors, clients, ESCRIPTION P ROGRAM D provide access for all people to safe, community partners, residents and clean and quality outdoor spaces, QUITY E & ACE R others who interact with the City; facilities and activities that appeal  d systems that support local Foo to the interests of all communities; In the Department of Race and Equity food production and provide access and following divisions & there shall be the to affordable, healthy, and  Transportation that provides programs: Race and Equity, Equitable culturally appropriate foods for all everyone with safe, efficient, City, Equity Training, Equitable people; affordable, convenient and reliable Community engagement, and Project  Health and human services that are mobility options including public Implementation. The specific functions high quality, affordable and transit, walking, car pooling, biking, of each division/program shall be culturally appropriate and support and quality streets and sidewalks. developed during the Fiscal Year upon the optimal well- being of all people; the hiring of Department of Race and 3. Consider equity and social justice  Healthy built and natural Equity staff. making so that impacts in all decision- environments for all people that decisions increase fairness and include mixes of land use that G - 34

219 POLICE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND POLICE FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Actuals Adopted Unaudited Adopted DEPARTMENT Expenditures by Fund Actuals Budget Budget $213,291,610 $189,381,809 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $218,529,408 1010 $211,713,264 3,467,701 1100 Self Insurance Liability 8,106,522 5,798,011 5,798,011 S TATEMENT ISSION M Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 365,094 1150 - - 366,766 - - - 1610 313 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement The Oakland Police Department is 1720 - Comprehensive Clean-up (236) - 236 committed to reducing crime and (522) - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 1820 - - 59,549 2112 1,112,714 3,802,602 - Department of Justice serving the community through fair, Department of Justice - CO PS Hiring 3,158,008 3,588,769 197,114 79,116 2113 quality policing. 2,851 - - - Department of Transportation 2116 Department of Treasury 2117 - - 409,823 - - - 2152 California Board of Corrections 1,029,014 177,083 OALS B USINESS G 155,339 483,738 5th Year State COPS Grant, AB 1913, Statutes of 2000 2158 - - 114,123 615,840 248,924 State of Cal ifornia O ther 2159 114,123  Provide effective leadership and 160,000 408,960 County of Alameda: Grants 413,477 2160 - administrative support by - - 281,948 149,178 Al ameda County: Vehicl e Abatement Authority 2172 providing comprehensive oversight 2251 12,984,613 - - 13,853,037 Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 of internal operations, maintaining 13,150,968 2252 - - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety Act 13,470,983 sound fiscal practices, 2411 1,415,335 2,961,665 1,377,769 1,379,281 False Alarm Reduction Program implementing and utilizing up -to- 2,365,935 2,363,927 2416 910,456 1,749,980 Traffic Safety Fund date technology, and providing - - (3,012) - Department of Justice-CO PS Hiring Recovery Program 2607 effective supervision and training. 2910 - - Federal Asset Forfeiture: 15% Set-aside 70,000 63,400 2912 Federal Asset Forfeiture: City Share 85 187,854 - - Pr  omote public trust and 2914 46,284 State Asset Forfeiture 209,035 - - confidence through the efficient and 2916 Vice Crimes Protection - Court O rdered to Police - - - 39,927 effective investigation of complaints 20,000 20,000 151,270 133,081 Police Grants 2995 involving violations of law or policy - 1,254,140 860,115 2999 - Miscellaneous Grants against police personnel and the 1,114 - - 1,215 4100 Equi pment practice of procedural justice as a - - - - Municipal Capital Improvement 5500 - - 5510 Capital Reserves - - means of constitutional policing . - - 7350 - - Police and Fire Facility Trust and efficient Provide effective  7420 State Asset Trust 51,359 202,931 - - criminal investigation of adult and 3,693 Unclaimed Cash 5,236 7440 - - juvenile crimes through consistent 5,221 Kerrison Trust for Police Enhancement 7690 - - 18,456 training, intelligent analysis of TOTAL $224,945,156 $241,854,595 $235,570,787 $242,535,092 crime data, the identification of 89.9% 84.2% 88.2% 90.1% GPF Percent to Total Department career criminals, and prosecution of 41.2% 42.8% 39.6% 42.6% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures offenders. -art Provide timely state -of-the  Department to establish a process to Planning. The Public Information Office forensic analytical services and place juvenile offenders into a handles media inquiries and responds to analysis of physical evidence from Program or Juvenile Hall and to questions and comments from the public. crimes, while making full, systematic develop system to monitor all referrals The Internal Affairs Division investigates use of forensic science databases and and outcomes for juvenile offenders. all allegations of misconduct against contemporary technologies to solve Departmental personnel. The Office of crimes and apprehend perpetrators. Reduce violence caused by career  Inspector General performs audit criminals and maintain involvement in Effectively address crime and public  functions and coordinates youth development. safety issues by increasing police implementation of the Negotiated personnel's capacity to provide a Improve traffic safety and community  Settlement Agreement. The Assistant higher quality of service to the safety through enforcement of traffic Chief is responsible for all operational - community through basic and in codes, public education, and the and many support functions. Fiscal service training to improve skills and removal of traffic hazards and Services provides accounting, accounts abilities. abandoned vehicles from City streets. payable, accounts receivable, audits,  Provide targeted i nvestigation of budget, contracting and purchasing, prostitution activity with a priority on financial reporting, the false alarm IVISION /D UREAU ESCRIPTIONS D B intervention with minors and the reduction, and grant services. The prosecution of adults involved in OLICE P HIEF OF FFICE OF THE O C Intelligence Unit disseminates critical human trafficking. Collaborate with The Office of the Chief of Police includes: information concerning the safety of the the Department of Human Services, The Chief's Immediate Office; Public Oakland community. Research and Alameda County judges, the Alameda Information; Internal Affairs; Inspector Pl anning manages the Department’s County District Attorney's Office, and General; the Assistant Chief; Fiscal legislative, policy, and short- - and long the Alameda County Probation Services; Intelligence; and Research and term planning functions. G - 35

220 POLICE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY BUREAU/DIVISION UREAU /D IVISION D ESCRIPTIONS B Revenue IELD PERATIONS F 1 AND B UREAU OF O IELD O PERATIONS 2 UREAU OF B F FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 Midcycle Adopted Adopted Bureau/Division The Bureau of Field Operations 1 is Budget Budget Budget responsible for all patrol and specialized Office of the Chief of Police $1,684,741 $1,650,352 $1,687,624 resource functions for the western 56,069 4,592,626 Bureau of Field Operations 1 56,069 portion of the City of Oakland. Included Bureau of Field Operations 2 6,443,609 8,005,392 8,063,989 in BFO 1 are Neighborhood Services Bureau of Risk Management 33,912 - - Section 1; BFO Administration; and 252,485 Bureau of Services 1,891,190 252,485 Patrol Areas 1, 2, and 3. The Bureau of Bureau of Investigations 154,565 210,372 150,823 all Field Operations 2 is responsible for $14,766,254 TOTAL $10,210,990 $10,209,059 patrol and specialized resource functions for the eastern portion of the Expenditure City of Oakland. Included in BFO 2 are Neighborhood Services Section 2; Patrol FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Adopted Adopted Midcycle Areas 4 and 5; and Support Operations. Bureau/Division Budget Budget Budget The Support Operations Division $40,191,265 $34,245,710 Office of the Chief of Police $41,737,388 encompasses the Special Op erations 98,540,930 Bureau of Field Operations 1 64,095,518 71,577,609 Section and the Traffic Operations Bureau of Field Operations 2 59,108,991 57,457,109 25,925,430 Section. Neighborhood Services provide - Bureau of Risk Management 19,546,182 - a link between OPD and the Oakland Bureau of Services 33,944,995 38,086,088 20,700,220 community through serving as Bureau of Investigations 35,055,479 35,471,041 30,377,451 organizers and liaisons with community 685,328 695,068 - Ceasefire groups including Neighborhood Crime $242,535,092 $235,570,787 TOTAL $229,335,923 Prevention Councils. Police patr ol provides general investigation, community policing, and crime prevention. The Special Operations Section includes Air Support; Marine Support; Special Events; Tactical Operations; Alcoholic Beverage Action Team; the Canine Program; and the ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY BUREAU/DIVISION Reserve Prog ram. The Traffic Operations Section promotes traffic safety; investigates traffic complaints; and provides traffic and parking POLICE DEPARTMENT enforcement. 1240.70 FTE ERVICES S UREAU OF B The Bureau of Services is made up of four functional areas: Records; Office of the Chief of Police Bureau of Field Operations 1 358.00 FTE 72.00 FTE Communications; Technology and Evidence/Property; and Personnel and Training. The Records Section - -traffic police crime maintains all non Bureau of Field Operations 2 Bureau of Services 346.70 FTE 284.00 FTE related reports and records, answers public record requests, manages the City’s tow contract, performs warrant verification, and inpu ts data into the Bureau of Investigations Ceasefire Department’s public safety records 4.00 FTE 176.00 FTE management software. The Communications Division manages the emergency 911 call system and all calls for service and dispatches appropriate emergency response personnel. The Technology and Evidence/Property Section is responsible for providing technology support and receiving, tracking, and storing property and evidence. The Personnel and Training G - 36

221 POLICE DEPARTMENT AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY BUREAU/DIVISION UREAU IVISION /D B ESCRIPTIONS D FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Bureau/Division ERVICES CONT ’ D ) UREAU OF S ( B Authorized Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Division includes the Personnel 19.00 72.00 72.00 Office of the Chief of Police Section; Training Section; and PAS 18.00 69.50 69.50 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) Administration Unit. The Personnel - - 0.65 2159 - State of California Other Section is responsible for daily 2411 - False Alarm Reduction Program - 2.50 2.50 -related processing of all personnel - - 0.35 2251 - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 matters and maintains individual Bureau of Field Operations 1 563.00 358.00 398.00 personnel files for everyone who 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 488.00 310.84 359.84 works for OPD. It is divided into 2113 - Department of Justice - COPS Hiring 10.00 10.16 1.16 Personnel Administration and the 62.00 2251 - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 - - Medical, Payroll, and Recruiting and - 37.00 37.00 2252 - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety Background Units. The Training Act of 2014 2411 - False Alarm Reduction Program 1.00 - - Section is responsible for providing 2416 - Traffic Safety Fund 2.00 - - basic and in -service training for all Bureau of Field Operations 2 180.35 346.70 346.70 sworn and select civilian personnel. 161.70 307.67 308.67 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) The PAS Administration Unit 3.03 2.03 - 2113 - Department of Justice - COPS Hiring administers the Department’s 2.00 2.00 2.00 2172 - Alameda Co unty: Vehi cle Abatement Autho ri ty Personnel Assessment System. 1.00 2251 - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 - - 13.00 13.00 - 2252 - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety B UREAU OF I NVESTIGATIONS Act of 2014 2416 - Traffic Safety Fund 15.65 21.00 21.00 The Bureau of Investigations (BOI) - - Bureau of Risk Management 129.00 investigates criminal activity, 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) - - 129.00 analyzes evidence and develops Bureau of Services 144.00 284.00 234.00 cases for prosecution. Included in 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 134.50 277.00 227.00 BOI are the Criminalistics Section; 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 2.00 2.00 2.00 Criminal Investigations Division; 2112 - Department of Justice 1.00 - - Special Victims Section; Robbery and 2159 - State of California Other - - - Burglary Sectio n; Felony 1.00 1.00 2252 - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety - Assault/Gangs Section; Misdemeanor Act of 2014 2411 - False Alarm Reduction Program 6.50 4.00 4.00 Crimes and Task Forces Section; 180.00 176.00 174.00 Bureau of Investigations Youth and School Services Section; 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 164.62 157.84 157.84 and Homicide Section. 2112 - Department of Justice - 2.00 2.00 2113 - Department of Justice - COPS Hiring 12.38 1.16 1.16 C EASEFIRE 1.00 1.00 1.00 2159 - State of California Other Ceasefire provides Police resources 13.00 13.00 2252 - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety - Act of 2014 in working with other community 2411 - False Alarm Reduction Program 1.00 1.00 - resources to reduce shootings and 4.00 4.00 - Ceasefire homicide s; decrease recidivism and 1010 - General Fund: General Purpose 1.00 1.00 - incarceration rates; and strengthen 2.00 2.00 - 2252 - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety police -community relations. Act of 2014 - 2416 - Traffic Safety Fund 1.00 1.00 1,228.70 1,240.70 TOTAL 1,215.35 G - 37

222 POLICE DEPARTMENT SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes Add Police O fficer Trainee 50.00 - $2,039,629 Add O&M - 175TH POLICE ACADEMY $1,556,899 - $5,235,648 35.00 - Add Police O fficer (PERS) Add Sergeant of Police (PERS) $1,035,670 - 5.00 Add ongoing O&M cost for additional officers - $420,000 $273,492 2.00 Add Internal Auditor III positions $269,632 Add Project Manager III Internal Affairs - NSA Compliance 1.00 $250,970 $254,562 $400,000 - Add O&M Police Helicopter (one-time) Add O &M for Predictive Policing Software (PredPol) $83,400 $75,000 Add one-time funding for Grow Cadet Pilot Program $450,000 - Add Crime Analyst (Administrative Analyst II) 2.00 $236,296 $232,956 Add Police Evidence Technicians 2.00 $206,666 $209,534 Reduce OPD Overtime due to increased staffing ($500,000) ($500,000) Add Special Investigation to reduce gun violence & illegal gun $500,000 $500,000 dealing $85,000 - Restore funding for NCPC Community Engagement and Outreach and West Oakland Biz Alert (one-time) Shotspotter (Phase I - ongoing) $84,000 $84,000 Shotspotter (Phases II and III - one-time) $820,000 - Upgrade Captain to Deputy Chief for NSA Sustainabil ity $50,466 $50,466 Freeze Criminalist II positions in Crime lab ($287,196) (2.00) ($283,142) Reduce Compliance Director CF Balance - ($1,180,241) Transfer Grants Coordinator from the Department of Justice $166,248 1.00 $163,901 Fund (2112) Transfer an Intake Technician to CPRB (1.00) ($100,596) ($102,036) FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE ALL Other Funds Changes Changes - 2.00 - Add positions (Project Manager II and Volunteer Specialist) offset with reductions in miscellaneous personal expenditures in Measure Z Fund (2252) 4.35 $20,000 $20,000 Fund Crossing Guards at schools with most significant pedestrian safety and traffic, safety probl ems within the Traffic Safety Fund (2416) Reduce O&M for Red Light Camera Enforcement fund 2416 ($268,327) ($266,732) Transfer Grants Coordinator from Fund 2112 to the GPF ($163,901) ($166,248) (1.00) FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE Organizational Changes Changes Changes Transfer Program Analyst III from CAO to O PD 1.00 $149,386 $151,525 G - 38

223 FIRE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND DEPARTMENT FIRE FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 Unaudited Actuals Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund Budget Budget Actuals $112,430,904 $128,688,435 1010 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $96,363,195 $123,604,555 S ISSION M TATEMENT 328,019 1100 605,994 Self Insurance Liability 936,010 936,010 29,054 29,409 11,365 34,317 Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 1150 The proud men and women of the 1710 34,843 52,869 Recycling Program 50,230 50,230 Oakland Fire Department are 94,699 94,239 72,398 Comprehensive Clean-up 1720 198,108 committed to providing the highest 959,167 1,012,432 1740 Hazardous Materials Inspections - - quality and highest level of courteous 2123 US Dept of Homeland Security 3,426,269 2,046,973 - - 6,254,315 2,957,065 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 2124 944,958 944,958 and responsive services to the 2128 - - - 6,346 Department of Health and Human Services citizens of Oakland. 660 - 2,050 - 2150 California Department of Fish and Games This is accomplished by - - 79,530 State of Cal ifornia O ther 2159 276,697 implementing comprehensive 3,141,570 401,723 County of Alameda: Grants 1,019,453 2160 1,019,524 strategies and training in fire 25,000 8,402 24,928 Private Grants 2190 25,000 2250 1,647,874 1,631,799 1,613,487 1,892,957 Measure N: Fund prevention, fire suppression, - - 4,000,000 4,266,947 Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 2251 emergency medical services, and all - 697,840 2,000,000 2252 2,000,000 Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety Act risk mitigation, including: human- of 2014 caused and natural disasters, 2321 Wildland Fire Prevention Assess District - 1,393,582 598,311 1,891,979 gency preparedness, 9-1- 1 emer Werner Court Vegetation Mgmt District (3,645) 2330 57 3,200 3,200 based fire services and community- 1,703,428 Alameda County: Emergency Dispatch Service 1,697,894 2412 2,370,917 2,451,931 Supplemental Assessment services. 2613 - - 561 Port Security Grant Program (ARRA) - 2999 35,439 Miscellaneous Grants - - - 287,374 290,537 297,191 295,565 Sewer Service Fund 3100 USINESS OALS G B - - 7120 Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System - 81 O M ERS  Provide leadership to all aspects of TOTAL $116,573,817 $131,252,435 $134,969,853 $139,494,304 the Department's operation, 92.3% 91.6% 85.7% 82.7% GPF Percent to Total Department especially strategic planning, fiscal 21.7% 22.6% 23.1% 24.2% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures management, personnel management and labor relations.  Deliver high quality services when responding to emergency calls within 7 minutes, 90% of the time SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY BUREAU/DIVISION - from when dispatch first receives the call to arrival on the scene. Revenue  Create 9-1- 1 incidents in the FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Dispatch system within 90 seconds Bureau/Division Budget Budget Budget for the annual volume of 60,000 emergency calls; maintain $23,947 $12,000 $12,000 Fire Chief's Office Computer Aided Dispatch/Records 6,158,072 9,035,281 5,144,325 Field Operations Bureau Management System (CAD/RMS ) 4,583,279 4,115,694 4,871,914 Fire Prevention & Support Services Bureau and the Center of Excellence 70,084 70,084 1,419,862 Emergency Management Services Division accreditation, which will enable 5,170,734 5,293,024 5,357,978 Medical Services, Communication & IT Services Division the Oakland Fire Department to TOTAL $16,630,782 $19,058,622 $15,648,874 compete for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) dispatch contracts. Expenditure  Provide Communities of Oakland FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Respond to Emergencies (CORE) Adopted Adopted Midcycle Bureau/Division training and public education; Budget Budget Budget continue to implement the Fire Chief's Office $2,271,468 $2,084,199 $2,068,051 National Incident Management Fiscal &Administration Services Division 567,704 615,067 620,101 System (NIMS) and National Field Operations Bureau 105,986,496 112,174,813 117,095,922 Response Plan (NRP); provide 10,951,059 11,323,815 12,052,478 Fire Prevention & Support Services Bureau basic and advanced training to 674,844 Emergency Management Services Division 2,119,951 668,164 elected officials, man agement, and 8,068,179 7,421,312 8,119,943 Medical Services, Communication & IT Services Division key staff to ensure an effective $139,494,304 TOTAL $130,419,409 $134,969,853 Emergency Operations Center (EOC). G - 39

224 FIRE DEPARTMENT (CONT'D) AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY BUREAU/DIVISION OALS D ) CONT ’ B USINESS ( G FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 Review 98-  100% of all plans, Adopted Midcycle Adopted sprinkler, fire alarm, evacuation, Bureau/Division Budget Budget Authorized hood and duct (Tenant FTE FTE FTE Improvements (TI), and Tenant 9.00 8.90 8.90 Fire Chief's Office Parcel Maps (TPMs) within fifteen 8.50 8.70 8.70 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) business days; ensure public (15) - - 0.10 1740 - Hazardous Materials Inspections and private buildings are in - - 2123 - US Dept of Homeland Security 0.10 compliance with the California 0.10 2124 - Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - - Fire Code; d evelop and implement 2250 - Measure N: Fund 0.10 0.10 0.10 online permitting with an online 2412 - Alameda County: Emergency Dispatch Service 0.10 0.10 0.10 payment option; develop and Fiscal &Administration Services Division 3.00 3.00 3.00 implement new inspection and 2.80 2.80 2.80 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) billing database. 0.20 0.20 0.20 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims  Continue to maintain an effective Field Operations Bureau 500.45 500.45 500.45 and efficient Fiscal and 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 498.00 498.00 498.00 Administration Services Division 2124 - Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 2.25 2.25 2.25 to ensure minimal vacancies with 2190 - Private Grants 0.20 0.20 0.20 effective recruitment and exam Fire Prevention & Support Services Bureau 36.50 35.50 35.50 processes. In addition, ensure 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 28.25 32.60 32.60 employee safety and health, which 1720 - Comprehensive Clean-up 0.15 0.15 0.15 will result in increased - - 1740 - Hazardous Materials Inspections 5.35 productivity and reduced workers’ 2250 - Measure N: Fund 0.75 0.75 0.75 compensation claims. Partner with 1.00 1.00 1.00 2321 - Wildland Fire Prevention Assess District to provide Oakland Public Works 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 1.00 1.00 1.00 logistical support to the Oakland 17.00 15.10 15.10 Emergency Management Services Division Fi re Department’ s facilities, 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 2.75 2.75 2.75 apparatus, and equipment, 13.00 11.10 11.10 2123 - US Dept of Homeland Security including developing and - 0.25 0.25 2124 - Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) instituting reasonable - - 0.25 2146 - California State Emergency Services maintenance schedule s to ensure 1.00 1.00 1.00 2160 - County of Alameda: Grants CAL -OSHA compliance. Medical Services, Communication & IT Services 31.00 31.00 31.00  Continue to explore revenue 12.00 12.00 12.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) opportunities, such as grant funds 1.00 1.00 1.00 2124 - Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and cost -recovery fees; streamline 2250 - Measure N: Fund 6.00 6.00 6.00 billing process to maximize the 2412 - Alameda County: Emergency Dispatch Service 11.00 11.00 11.00 revenue collection. 1.00 1.00 1.00 3100 - Sewer Service Fund  Continue to meet all mandated 596.95 TOTAL 593.95 593.95 training, exercise and drill requirements needed to respond and practices to supervisory and to emergency incidents related to UREAU /D IVISION B level staff; administers executive- airport, water rescue, confined space D ESCRIPTIONS contracts and grants. heavy rescue, rescue and hazardous material response, natural and C HIEF & FFICE O IRE F -made disasters and Urban human F IELD O PERATIONS B UREAU ISCAL F /A DMINISTRATION ERVICES S Search and Rescue. Responsible for emergency medical Responsible for providing effective  Improve the entire Oakland Fire response , fire suppression, mitigation of leadership the Department’s operations Department training curriculum with disasters and rescue activities . Large st through strategic planning, financial -specific established, OFD division employs 1 0 Battalion Chiefs reporting, performance measures, performa nce standards. Continue to and over 430 suppression personnel. payroll and benefits, staff developme nt assess the feasibility of the Joint andles The Field Operations Bureau h and training; serves as the liaison to the Oakland Fire and Police Department , over 60,000 emergency incidents a year citizens, department staff, city Regional Training Center. Enhance which includes fire, rescue, medi cal aid management, the Mayor and City training capacity and efficiency of and other calls for service. Manages all Council. Manages entry level and meeting mandated training major disaster responses and staffs 25 promotional recruitment, exams, - requirements by utilizing online, web (including the engine companies testing, worker’s compensation, based training. and seven truck companies. airport) grievances, disciplines and labor ides training in labor law relations; prov G - 40

225 FIRE DEPARTMENT SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE IVISION /D ESCRIPTIONS UREAU D B FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes D ) PERATIONS O IELD UREAU F B ( CONT ’ $129,584 $127,755 1.00 Add Fire Protection Engineer In addition to emergency response, Charge GPF Fire Fighters to the SAFER Grant within the FEMA ($3,077,209) $0 non permitted firefighters conduct Fund (2124) -residential facilities commercial, multi Freeze Fire Marshall, Assistant ($279,613) ($267,227) (1.00) and vegetation management inspections Wildfire Prevention Funding (one-time) - $500,000 The Special Operation on an annual basis. under the direction of operates Division 1.00 $66,022 $65,090 Transfer Account Clerk II from the Hazardous Materials Inspection Fund (1740) eau and is the Field Operations Bur $12,720 $12,541 0.10 Transfer Accountant II from Fund 1740 comprised of four highly trained, specialized response teams; Aircraft 1.00 Transfer Assistant Fire Marshal-Non Sworn from Fund 1740 $210,226 $213,235 Rescue and Firefighting (ARFF) Response $78,063 $79,181 Transfer Fire Marshal (Non-Sworn) from Fund 1740 0.35 Team, Hazardous Materials Response FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE Team, Technical Rescue Team and the ALL Other Funds Changes Changes Water Rescue Response Team. Each t eam Extension of SAFER Grant within the FEMA Fund (2124) $0 $3,077,209 is required to undergo ex tensive ($213,235) (1.00) ($210,226) Transfer Assistant Fire Marshal-Non Sworn from Fund 1740 to preparatory training and annual refresher the GPF training in order to remain certified in Transfer Accountant II from Fund 1740 to the GPF ($12,720) ($12,541) (0.10) their respective specialties. ($79,181) (0.35) Transfer Fire Marshal (Non-Sworn) from Fund 1740 to the GPF ($78,063) Transfer Account Clerk II from Fund 1740 to the GPF (1.00) ($65,090) ($66,022) ERVICES IRE REVENTION & P F S UPPORT S Transfer Emergency Services Manager from the CA State of ($64,177) (0.25) ($65,092) B UREAU Emergency Services Fund (2146) to Fund 2124 Fire Prevention m anages and directs all 0.25 Transfer Emergency Services Manager to Fund 2124 from Fund $64,177 $65,092 fire prevention functions to benefit the 2146 overall health & safety of the Oakland $365,534 $265,841 Increase O&M within the Alameda County: Emergency Dispatch Community through public education, Service Fund (2412) inspection and enforcement of the ($350,664) Remove O&M from Fund 1740 due to CUPA Program close-out ($350,232) California Fire Code. Fire Prevention (1.00) ($86,269) Eliminate Administrative Assistant I from Fund 1740 ($87,504) supports business and building ($135,153) (1.00) Eliminate Senior Hazardous Materials Inspector from Fund 1740 ($137,088) development through fire engineering Eliminate Hazardous Materials Inspector II from Fund 1740 (1.00) ($136,830) ($138,755) plan check and engineering services, and Investigation Services. The Fire ($722,000) ($722,000) Reduce O&M within the Wildfire Prevention Assessment District Fund (2321) Commercial Inspection Program, Reduce O&M within Fund 2124 ($135,526) ($154,235) managed by fire prevention is an annual -permitted fire code inspection of non ($352,177) Reduce O&M within Measure N Fund (2250) ($344,709) -unit residential commercial and multi occupancies conducted by sworn personnel. The Vegetation Management ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY BUREAU/DIVISION Program is an annual fire code inspection both of private public properties and , located within the Fire open space , conducted by both sworn and District FIRE DEPARTMENT Fire Suppression District . personnel 593.95 FTE Support Services manages the timely and -effective purchase, acquisitio n, cost coordination, maintenance and/or repair Fiscal & Fire Chief Office of Fire Department facilities, fire Administration Services 8.90 FTE apparatus, personal protective safety 3.00 FTE gear, tool and equipment, and the FEMA sponsored CA -TF4, Type 1 Urban Search Fire Prevention & Support and Rescue team, while the training Field Operations Bureau Services Bureau 500.45 FTE division coordinates mandated training 35.50 FTE existing and recruit personnel . for Emergency Management Medical Services, Services Communications & IT Services 15.10 FTE 31.00 FTE G - 41

226 FIRE DEPARTMENT ) Program. CORE Emergencies ( guidelines; maintains inventory of IVISION UREAU B /D Maintains and manages the City's equipment for Basic/Advanced Life ESCRIPTIONS D Emergency Operations Center (EOC); Support and tracks and manages all provides training for City staff to ensure licenses and certifications for all E MERGENCY M ANAGEMENT S ERVICES compliance with SEMS, NIMS and to paramedics and EMTs; develops D IVISION ensure management and staff ve health programs for the preventi emergencies; respond for the readiness community; provides EMT and Implements and strengthens the City's to respond during major emergencies; -related classes, such as CPR, Paramedic emergency prevention, mitigation, responsible for the City's Homeland First Aid and Automatic Emergency preparedness, response and recovery Security Program. Defibrillation for citizens and efforts in alignment with state and businesses. Dispatch Communication federal emergency management Center provides dispatch service legislation, including California's EDICAL S ERVICES , AND M and support for emergency calls Standardized Emergency Management C OMMUNICATION I NFORMATION & maintains all Fire Department System (SEMS), the federal National IVISION D TECHNOLOGY communications equipment; Incident Management System (NIMS) Provides voter -mandated emergency coordinates with the Department of and the National Response Framework medical services to the citizens, Information Technology and Oakland ; develops and or (NRFP) NPF) Plan ( businesses and visitors of Oakland; Police Department to implement and provides community disaster 1 -1- manages programs related to all 9 maintain the City’s Integr ated Public preparedness training and planning, ing medical emergencies, includ Safety System (IPSS). which includes public education and the continuous paramedic training in Communities of Oakland Respond to accordance with local, state and federal G - 42

227 HUMAN SERVICES SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND HUMAN SERVICES FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 Actuals Adopted Adopted Unaudited Expenditures by Fund Budget Actuals Budget M ISSION S TATEMENT $6,926,163 $5,978,003 1010 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $6,465,571 $5,887,394 1720 Comprehensive Clean-up 56,600 60,000 60,000 60,000 builds The Human Services Department 1780 11,940,556 11,977,894 14,049,327 14,471,923 Kid's First Oakland Children's Fund strong communities by enriching the 1880 Low Mod Operations 129,566 - - - quality of life for individuals and Multi Service Center/Rent - 141,672 108,780 - 1882 families in Oakland . 2102 Department of Agricul ture 980,926 757,823 1,247,769 1,248,851 HUD-ESG/SHP/HO PWA 8,393,567 8,596,541 5,966,711 5,966,711 2103 2108 HUD-CDBG 1,189,849 1,303,554 767,023 1,018,782 G USINESS B OALS Department of Justice 2112 - - 1,018,473 361,471 2114 909,159 1,222,319 1,857,267 1,908,637 Department of Labor Provide high quality, effective  2120 Federal Action Agency 335,160 319,923 398,199 399,986 programs for children, youth, 2128 Department of Health and Human Services 22,944,429 23,719,579 25,581,965 25,748,213 families, seniors and other adults 870,192 971,105 945,921 945,921 California Department of Education 2138 - 1,514,138 13,215 13,215 2152 California Board of Corrections through direct services, grant - 5th Year State COPS Grant, AB 1913, Statutes of 2000 602 - 2158 - making, and close collaboration and 3,000,458 3,408,838 366,905 370,677 State of Cal ifornia O ther 2159 coordination with other public and County of Alameda: Grants 2160 383,963 370,767 445,957 446,013 community based agencies. 135,787 171,529 179,956 180,478 Workforce Investment Act 2195  Develop new resources and leve rage 2213 Measure B: Paratransit - ACTIA 1,250,047 1,175,980 1,243,514 1,243,514 existing resources to maintain and 1,123,917 1,154,158 2216 Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation - - expand programs that promote Commission Sales Tax social equity for Oakland residents. - - 6,328,769 6,786,400 Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 2251 8,740,773 8,953,737 - - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety Act 2252 Develop and support collaborations  of 2014 that improve community health and 2826 Mortgage Revenue - - 1,424 584 safety with an emphasis on violence - 2994 Social Serv ices Grants 201,112 84,717 - prevention and community building. - - - 11,344 Miscellaneous Grants 2999 - - 152,797 103,394 Oakland Senior Center: Downtown 7901 , plan and recommend  Identify 7902 O akland Senior Center: North 31,720 18,649 - - proactive policy and programmatic - - 22,956 13,987 Oakland Senior Center: West 7903 responses to community needs and - - 5,888 12,820 O akland Senior Center: East 7904 social issues that impact the health TOTAL $67,363,180 $68,948,185 $69,453,990 $70,108,819 -being of Oakland residents. and well 10.3% 9.3% 8.5% 8.5% GPF Percent to Total Department  Create opportunities for community 1.6% 1.2% 1.2% 1.1% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures engagement and education through volunteerism and involvem ent with Boards, Commissions and SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM community groups.  Sustain the Department’s efficient Revenue fiscal and program operations and FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 improve and enhance service Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program accountability through expanded Budget Budget Budget performance monitoring, evaluation $6,806,284 $4,713,063 Empowering Seniors & People with Disabilities $6,840,203 and continuous quality Fostering Safe & Healthy Communities 8,032,683 8,036,700 8,469,527 improvement. 15,009,725 Oakland Fund for Children & Youth 14,471,923 14,049,327  Foster staff development and 24,838,547 23,810,843 Strengthening Children, Youth & Their Families 25,005,877 acknowledgement. TOTAL $54,354,703 $53,726,841 $52,003,158 ESCRIPTIONS D ROGRAM P Expenditure FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 EOPLE E MPOWERING S ENIORS AND P Adopted Adopted Midcycle Program Budget Budget Budget ISABILITIES D WITH $9,823,676 $7,815,645 $9,701,552 Empowering Seniors & People with Disabilities Provide a comprehensive and Fostering Safe & Healthy Communities 11,207,110 11,105,689 11,265,508 coordinated network of support 8,752,213 Measure Y/Measure Z - Violence Prevention 6,775,040 9,057,198 services, information and referrals, Oakland Fund for Children & Youth 12,350,760 14,335,565 14,699,045 activities for seniors and persons and Strengthening Children, Youth & Their Families 24,254,495 25,436,847 25,385,516 with disabilities. Programs include: TOTAL $62,403,050 $69,453,990 $70,108,819 urpose the Multip Senior Services G - 43

228 HUMAN SERVICES AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM IVISION D ESCRIPTIONS D FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 E EOPLE ENIORS AND S P MPOWERING Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program CONT ( ISABILITIES ’ ) D D WITH Authorized Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE Program (MSSP) which supports frail Empowering Seniors & People with Disabilities 84.44 84.14 85.04 seniors and persons with disabilities to 20.17 20.27 18.75 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) remain independent; Senior 46.06 46.06 46.83 2114 - Department of Labor Companion and Foster Grandparent 1.01 1.01 2120 - Federal Action Agency 1.01 (SC/FG) Programs which offer 2128 - Department of Health and Human Services 10.31 9.31 10.31 volunteer opportunities for seniors to 0.94 2159 - State of California Other 1.19 0.94 work with frail- -risk elderly and at 2160 - County of Alameda: Grants 1.06 1.06 1.06 children; and the ASSETS program 2195 - Workforce Investment Act 0.88 1.08 1.08 w income seniors which provides lo 3.50 3.50 2213 - Measure B: Paratransit - ACTIA 4.41 with employment training services and 2216 - Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation - 0.91 0.91 job placement. Oakland Paratransit for Fostering Safe & Healthy Communities 19.76 17.55 17.04 the Elderly and Disabled (OPED) 6.51 7.02 9.23 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) provides paratransit services which 1.17 1.17 1.17 2103 - HUD-ESG/SHP/HOPWA augment the County’s paratransit 3.73 2108 - HUD-CDBG 3.73 3.73 - 0.25 2112 - Department of Justice - OPED is funded by Alameda program. 2128 - Department of Health and Human Services 4.00 4.00 4.00 County Measure B Transportation 1.00 2152 - California Board of Corrections - 1.00 Initiative and shortly will be 2159 - State of California Other 0.60 0.60 1.35 augmented by Measure BB. 0.03 0.03 2160 - County of Alameda: Grants 0.03 -sponsored Senior Additionally City 8.40 14.49 15.10 Measure Y/Measure Z - Violence Prevention Centers offer culturally appropriate - 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 0.61 - and accessible social, nutrition, 8.40 - 2251 - Measure Y: Public Safety Act 2004 - education and wellness programming 2252 - Measure Z - Violence Prevention and Public Safety 14.49 - 14.49 for seniors throughout the City. Rental Act of 2014 of -owned senior facilities City 8.25 Oakland Fund for Children & Youth 7.21 8.25 generates revenue to support senior 2.20 1.31 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 2.20 activities. The Mayor’s Commission on 6.05 1780 - Kid's First Oakland Children's Fund 5.90 6.05 Aging provides advocacy and policy 179.94 Strengthening Children, Youth & Their Families 181.56 180.94 direction on senior issues. 1.45 1.45 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1.64 6.50 6.50 6.50 2102 - Department of Agriculture AFE AND S OSTERING H EALTHY F - 0.38 2114 - Department of Labor - C OMMUNITIES 171.99 172.99 2128 - Department of Health and Human Services 172.99 0.05 - 2195 - Workforce Investment Act - HS Encompasses D services specifically 305.37 TOTAL 305.37 301.37 designed to make residents safer and to support individuals and families in key areas such as housing and income program provides on -job work -the such as domestic violence, commercially supports that contribute to the overall experience for high school students. sexually exploited minors; 3) reentry -being of the Oakland community. well programs for youth and young adults Included is the Youth Commission including employment; 4) young children opportunity to gives which youth the M EASURE Y/M EASURE Z-V IOLENCE exposed to trauma. The Measure Z build leadership skills and p articipate P REVENTION Oversight Committee will approve a in civic activities; Community Housing Measure Y: the Violence Prevention and recommendation for spending plan serves people in Services which Public Safety Act of 2004 provides services to City Council. The plan will Oakland who are homeless, hungry, approximately $6 million annually for inform a request for proposal to develop HIV/AIDS positive, or living on violence prevention programs to programming under the and implement extremely low incomes by providing neighborhoods and youth and young new initiative. food and hot meal programs, housing -- adults most at risk for committing or , and , transitional emergency being victims of violence. As Measure Y permanent supportive --and support F D AKLAN O UND FOR C HILDREN AND sunsets, Measure Z passed in 2014 will be services. The Alameda County – OUTH Y implemented. With similar funding Oakland Community Action levels, Measure Z priorities for violence Children & Youth The Oakland Fund for Partnership ( AC -OCAP) provides prevention include: 1) street outreach FCY) fosters the development of (O young funding and staff support to programs and case management to youth and young people ages 0 to 20 by providing grant promote self designed to -sufficiency adults at high risk of involvement in funds for services and programs that nate poverty in the elimi and response, advocacy, and violence: 2) crisis improve outcomes for children and youth. The OUSD Academies community. case management for victims of crime The Planning and Oversight Committee G - 44

229 HUMAN SERVICES IVISION D D ESCRIPTIONS ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM C UND FOR F D AKLAN HILDREN AND O ’ D ) ( OUTH Y CONT HUMAN SERVICES policy recommendations to the provides 305.37 FTE City Council and oversees strategic planning, evaluation and grant -making through a competitive proposal process. Fostering Safe & Healthy E mpowering Seniors & People A City Charter amendment (1996 with Disability Communities Measure K – Kids First! voter initiative) 84.14 FTE 17.55 FTE established OFCY as a mandated set aside of funds calculated at 2.5% of the General Purpose revenues annually “to Measure Y/Measure Z Oakland Fund for Children help young people become healthy, & Youth Violence Prevention productive, and honorable adults”. In 8.25 FTE 14.49 FTE November 2008, Oakland voters passed e Kids First 2 initiative, Measure OO, th effect July 1, 2009. Measure which took Strengthening Children, changed the required funding OO Youth & Their Families 180.94 FTE amount and subsequently Measure D Measure OO, and required a modified 3% percent set -aside of city unrestricted general fund revenues for children's programs . Legislation requires SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE completion of an OFCY Strategic Plan every four years and a comprehensive FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) evaluation of OFCY annually. The Changes Changes competitive process yields over 125 O&M for Kindergarten to College $0 $150,000 grants to public and non -profit agencies 2.00 Funding to reduce chronic absenteeism to strengthen $112,000 $262,000 benefitting youth throughout Oakland, partnership with O USD which an emphasis on vibrant after $0 $350,000 O ne-time matching funds to establ ish City/County Re-entry Job school programming. Corps Pilot Program $200,000 $0 O ne-time funding for Q uality Preschool for all OUTH AND , HILDREN C S TRENGTHENING Y $0 One-time funding for City/County Neighborhood Initiative $50,000 T HEIR F AMILIES Support for Homeless/PATH report high priority areas $260,000 $260,000 These programs provide services that $110,000 Housing Services for Commercial Sexual Exploited Children $110,000 improve the health, development and Reduce Overhead Recovery from Grants $156,960 $0 quality children, youth and of life for - families. Early Head Start (ages 0 their FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE ALL Other Funds 3) and Head Sta rt(ages 3 -5) focus on the Changes Changes child’s social, emotional, cognitive and Add Head Start Supervisor to the Head Start Fund (2128) 1.00 $128,033 $129,866 physical development while allowing Add Health and Human Services Program Planner to the CA $68,374 $67,409 1.00 their families with opportunities to be Board of Corrections Fund (2152) involved in program activities and $1,108,215 $1,537,054 Increase contract O &M in the Kids First! Fund (1780) due to receive advocacy and linkages to increase in revenues (transfer from the GPF) community services which support their $121,969 Increase funding for Paratransit in Measure BB Fund (2216) $153,656 needs and goals. The program(s) serve $0 One-time funding to provide an administrative grant for Meals- $50,000 over 1,700 low income children and on-Wheels within the CDBG Fund (2108) their families throughout Oakland with ($26,922) ($26,541) Add 2.0 Program Analyst II and 2.0 Case Manager I positions, 4.00 an emphasis on school readiness and which is offset with reductions in contract O&M in Measure Z quality classroom experiences. The Fund (2252) Summer Food Service program delivers ($441,318) Decrease in contract O&M due to grant requirements within ($441,318) to low free, healthy nutritious lunches HUD-ESG/SHP/HO PWA Fund (2103) in Oakland -aged children income school FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE during neighborhoods (over 70 sites) Organizational Changes Changes Changes the summer months. 2.00 $206,751 $209,647 Transfer 2.0 Program Analyst I positions from CAO Neighborhood Services in Fund 2252 G - 45

230 HUMAN SERVICES NOTES G - 46

231 OAKLAND PARKS & RECREATION SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND OAKLAND PARKS FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 & RECREATION Actuals Unaudited Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund Budget Actuals Budget 1010 $15,547,529 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $13,429,565 $14,086,210 $15,765,804 414,922 Self Insurance Liability 41,506 1100 414,922 535,768 S ISSION M TATEMENT Kid's First Oakland Children's Fund 1780 439,919 410,307 - - 1820 OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 5,623,035 6,165,574 6,795,616 6,795,532 Oakland Parks & Recreation is 176,491 406,724 HUD-CDBG - - 2108 committed and dedicated to offering 2310 2,625,719 2,627,942 Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 4,329,829 4,123,041 quality services, activities, and 16,847 16,847 108,109 115,188 Parks and Recreation Grants 2001 2996 programs open to all Oakland 957,675 651,082 3200 651,121 708,333 Golf Course residents and visitors. Our goal is to 2,099 350 Equi pment - 4100 - cultivate awareness about the - 5,417 4,583 Capital Reserves 5510 - availability and accessibility of Parks - 7999 Miscellaneous Trusts 7,583 69,270 69,270 and Recreation services. We offer $24,891,073 $26,786,234 $26,120,901 $26,341,522 TOTAL fun activities in a clean, safe, and 54.0% 59.9% 59.5% 52.6% GPF Percent to Total Department healthy environment that provides 3.0% 2.8% 2.9% 2.9% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures opportunities for personal growth and sk ills development. We strive to offer community ownership and launch best practice standards to SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM operate and maintain our facilities, playgrounds, and parks to preserve Revenue the beauty and legacy of the City of FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Oakland. Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program Budget Budget Budget OPR is committed to “Play with a Aquatics $983,997 $983,997 $761,456 . We are serious about our Purpose” 820,254 Art Centers 944,162 944,162 play. There is a purpose and value in 201,451 Central Administration 499,407 201,451 play that embodies character 2,189,853 1,852,720 Citywide Mega Centers 2,189,892 development, health consciousness, 319,660 700,287 700,287 Dance Centers art appreciation, life skills 980,494 980,494 841,634 Elementary Magnet Sites enhancement through sports, civic 146,941 Mega Programs HS/Young Adults/Adults 188,000 188,000 duty, environmental responsibility 314,182 314,182 310,279 Mega Sports Centers and leadership excellence in every Middle School Magnet Centers 38,346 38,346 38,346 program offering. Our children are 103,221 103,221 85,721 Pre-K Empowerment Centers healthier when they play; our 1,055,298 Regional Mega Center 1,158,000 1,158,000 families are unified when they play; TOTAL $6,731,716 $7,802,032 $7,801,993 our communities thrive when they Play With A Purpose. Expenditure B USINESS OALS G FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program Budget Budget Budget Establish a solid foundation that  defines our purpose at every $1,559,542 $1,542,805 $2,244,372 Aquatics n center and ensure all recreatio 1,336,755 Art Centers 1,370,352 1,350,951 programs are equitable citywide Ball Fields * 493,160 - - for children, youth, teens, and Central Administration 4,293,396 11,216,765 10,981,960 adults. Citywide Mega Centers 3,820,388 3,433,071 3,470,989 755,667 Dance Centers 836,216 851,693  Enhance recreation experiences 1,847,332 Elementary Magnet Sites 2,017,233 1,981,141 for Oakland children, youth and 527,728 Mega Programs HS/Young Adults/Adults 465,850 516,114 residents through the introduction Mega Sports Centers 1,792,551 1,975,244 2,019,553 of magnet and mega centers in 172,512 168,768 157,988 Middle School Magnet Centers specialized areas to attract Pre-K Empowerment Centers 528,286 655,454 625,197 participants from the immediate Programs Without Borders 111,626 8,131 110,464 community and citywide. Regional Mega Center 6,938,440 2,554,529 2,412,516 Partner with agencies and  TOTAL $24,682,316 $26,341,522 $26,120,901 organizations that have the * Ball Fields have mov ed f rom Oakland Parks & Recreation to Oakland Public Works. G - 47

232 OAKLAND PARKS & RECREATION AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM G CONT ’ D ) B ( OALS USINESS FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 expertise in addressing traumatic Adopted Adopted Midcycle Program experiences for children and Budget Budget Authorized youth, in addition to skills in FTE FTE FTE training employees whom work in Aquatics 29.61 29.61 29.61 vulnerable communities. 22.88 12.31 12.31 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 6.73 17.30 17.30 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund  Expose, enlighten, and empower 19.22 18.47 18.47 Art Centers all communities to the richness of 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 9.43 9.43 9.43 OPR programs. 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 9.79 9.04 9.04  Provide specialized enrichment Ball Fields * 8.10 - - programs that embody character 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) - - 1.81 development, health 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 6.29 - - consciousness, art appreciation, Central Administration 17.63 16.63 16.63 life skills, civic duty, and 16.63 15.63 15.63 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) environmental responsibility in 1.00 1.00 1.00 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund every program offering. Increase 39.52 45.08 45.08 Citywide Mega Centers OPR’s visibility to be recognized as 9.47 9.03 9.03 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) an essenti al service and 29.30 34.30 34.30 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund community resource through 3200 - Golf Course 0.75 1.75 1.75 citywide events, such as concerts, 11.84 12.59 12.59 Dance Centers creative partnerships, sporting 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 3.50 3.50 3.50 events, and street festivals. 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 8.34 9.09 9.09 Oakland Parks and Recreation Elementary Magnet Sites 30.86 31.61 31.61 aspires to ensure that all citizens 9.95 10.70 10.70 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) have an opportunity to explore the 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 20.91 20.91 20.91 should include: arts. Art forms Mega Programs HS/Young Adults/Adults 7.69 7.69 7.69 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 5.60 5.60 5.60 Drama, Dance, Fine Arts, Crafts, 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 2.09 2.09 2.09 Music, Architecture Drawing, 29.92 30.41 30.41 Mega Sports Centers Painting, and Sculpting. 26.84 26.83 26.83 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF)  OPR intends to reinstitute the Art 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 3.08 3.58 3.58 Exchange program at Malonga to 1.88 1.88 1.88 Middle School Magnet Centers ensure our children and youth at 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1.75 1.75 1.75 the recreation facilities continue to 0.13 0.13 0.13 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund be exposed to the above art forms. Pre-K Empowerment Centers 8.04 8.04 8.04 Expand the adult  programs / 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 5.86 5.86 5.86 services to become fully self - 2.18 2.18 2.18 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund sustaining through the expansion 0.13 1.83 1.83 Programs Without Borders -traditional of leagues and non 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 0.13 1.83 1.83 programs and classes. 32.00 25.50 25.50 Regional Mega Center 13.00 6.50 6.50 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF)  Increase department revenue in 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 18.00 18.00 18.00 self -sustaining programs and 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 1.00 1.00 1.00 services including the enterp rise TOTAL 236.44 229.34 229.34 centers, through the upgrading and renewing of all contracts. * Ball Fields hav e mov ed f rom Oakland Parks & Recreation to Oakland Public Works. Provide ongoing training for OPR ensure employees at all levels to K Empowerment Ce nters -  Expand Pre- leverage services of foundations and we are developing a strong leadership st as OPR Plays with a Purpose, we Corporate Grants. team for the 21 century. recognize that play is a child’s way of  Introduce Program Without Borders- Increase the development skills for our  making sense of his or her abilities and a program that will provide an avenue for Counselors in Training, through onsite freedom. OPR also understands that youth to take safe and super - vised risk assessments, skill/drill training and play is critical to the social, physical, taking activities that will develop active participation. emotional and mental development of a leadership skills by assessing safe risks, Expand and enhance STRIDE (Striving  child. Expanding Pr e- K magnet centers overcoming obstacles, facing fears, and to Redirect Indi viduals in a Difficult that focus on fostering creativity and growing in self -reliance; educate youth in Environment) Job Training program for imagination will set the foundation for sustainability education and yo -21 citywide through uth ages 14 resilient and flexible children heading environmental stewardship. for success. G - 48

233 OAKLAND PARKS & RECREATION SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE ( CONT ’ D ) B USINESS OALS G FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes Enhance our relationship with  Corporate America and introduce $250,000 Add funding for Security Services at Recreation Centers $0 new initiatives and policy to $0 $79,426 Grants and scholarships for low income youth to participate in include: Naming Rights, Gift in O PR Programs Place, Donations and Sponsorships Administrative Grant to O PR Foundation $50,000 $0 to support capital improvements Subsidy to Feather River Camp $0 $40,000 and to augment recreation ($312,437) ($326,482) (5.00) Freeze Recreation Leader II, PPT programming. ($121,476) Reduction in Zoo Subsidy ($121,476) (4.19) ($179,700) ($182,549) Transfer Pools and Boating personnel to the Self Sustaining Fund (1820) P ESCRIPTIONS ROGRAM D FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE ALL Other Funds A QUATICS Changes Changes - Provide recreation Boating 4.19 Transfer Pools and Boating personnel from the GPF to Fund $182,549 $179,700 1820 experiences for Oakland residents Add Senior Public Service Representative to Fund 1820 1.00 $91,246 $92,552 through the exposure of water sports for ages 5 and up from sailing, $103,890 2.00 Add Public Service Representation, PT to Fund 1820 $103,890 kayaking, dragon boating, sailing into $106,143 $106,143 2.00 Add Facil ity Security Assistant, PT to Fund 1820 science education component for 5th $89,630 $90,913 Add Recreation Program Director to the Golf Fund (3200) 1.00 graders and tall ships. FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE - Provide recreation Pools Organizational Changes Changes Changes experiences for Oakland residents ($397,423) ($392,710) (6.29) Transfer Ball Fields crew from O akland Parks & Recreation to through the introd uction of water O akland Public Works sports for ages zero and up in progressive learn -to-swim lessons, swim teams, lifeguard training, and ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM lap swim. RT C ENTERS A Art centers will consist of the various forms of art ranging from painting, digital media, music lessons, folk and modern songs, martial arts, movement, drawing, crafts, videography, photography and festivals. Given the decrease of arts programs in the public schools system, it is with great excitement that OPR offers magnet center as part of its core services. C ENTR AL A DMINISTRATION Serve as the departmental management infrastructure including fiscal oversight, staff training and development that enables OPR to increase visibility to be recognized as an essential service and community resource, with the end result of increasing revenue, public trust and services. ENTERS C ITYWIDE M EGA C The citywide centers/programs represent programs and services which include; the Central - Reservations Unit, Dunsmuir G - 49

234 OAKLAND PARKS & RECREATION non- traditional and traditional -K RE P MPOWERMENT E C ENTERS ESCRIPTIONS P D ROGRAM activities including kickball, bowling, K centers will use the model Pre- softball, bike polo, volleyball, table ENTERS M EGA CONT D ( ’ C C ) ITYWIDE “Sandboxes to Empowerment” The board games skate boarding, radical Sandboxes to Empowerment program Hellman Historic Estate, golf programs, golf. The development of wheels, and has helped OPR in leveraging First Five Rotary Nature Center and San Antonio this mega unit will support OPR’s belief of Alameda funding, enabling OPR to Recreation Center. The services that children and youth model the expand Tiny Tots programs and play provided under this category range behavior of adults. Creating a format groups citywide. As OPR plays with a from venue rentals, to summer camps, that embraces play for adults will pu rpose, we recognize that play is a and unique programs geared to all ages remind the public that, in the words of child’s way of making sense of his or . and all occasions George Bernard Shaw, “We don’t stop her abilities and freedom. OPR also ing because we grow old; we grow play knows that play is critical to the social, ANCE C ENTERS D old because we stop playing”. When we physical, emotional and mental For years, dance has been a foundation say we want you to come out and play development of a child. Creating Pre -K for OPR. As part of OPR’s not too the OPR way; we encourage this magnet centers that focus on fo stering distant history, young people through because we do not want anyone to stop creativity and imagination will set the the nation looked to OPR for guidance playing. foundation for resilient and flexible and expertise. Under the direction of -term impact has the children. The long Ruth Beckford, patrons not only M ENTERS C PORTS S EGA potential to reduce criminal behavior learned tap, ball et, and modern dance and will certainly ensure that children The mega sports facilities will organize all infused with pop and new hip hop, who are participants in our programs ovide sports for all ages from and pr they also gained an understanding of of the 30 million word will be ahead -Wee to seniors, including twilight Pee the history and value of dance, which count gap, as will their parents. basketball and softball leagues to opened the gateway for creativity and midnight basketball leagues. self -expression. Allowing employees to Employees assigned to these facilities ORDERS ROGRAMS W ITHOUT B P focus on specialized areas verses a will be responsible for the recruitment M AGNET S ITE of scattered overlapping variety of participants from nearby schools, This magnet site will encompass and activities will enhance programming other recreation centers and expose children, youth adults and through the City. community based organizations. A full families to a variety of non -traditional spectrum of sports activities both programs and services that will range S M LEMENTARY E ITES AGNET traditional and non- traditional sports from outdoor experiences to urban Elementary Magnet programs have the will be offered six day per week. technology. The team will capture, and potential to promote the development introduce trend setting programs to of a child’s creativity, productivity, M IDDLE S CHOOL C AGNET M ENTERS challenge the minds of the young and - imagination, self -esteem and self Middle School magnet centers will be old, and attract the youth that have felt awareness. It is at this stage that the most challenging yet most left out, while embracing the diversity recreation can add to the learning rewarding centers. This population of of Oakland’s children, youth and process for a child through the young people has been faced with famili es. Program Without Borders participation of activities that are fun, fluctuating social changes and family (PWB) will introduce participants to educational and more importantly values, increases traumatic playful risk taking “aha” moments to allows the child to resolve conflict, seek experiences, uncertain futures, lack of educational empowering moments of balance, negotiate through o bstacles, clear directions and the deprivation of self -worth and accomplishments. PWB and explore and experience nature. and to restore play. To regain the trust will have a huge impact on changing Through a variety of outings and hope in the lives of middle school aged the outlook of hopelessness, while reenacting and repeating events, youth, they will need to experience a adding pers onal value to all children will be able to act out their full range of play in a caring participants. own feelings and fantasies which environment with energetic employees. allowing the child to release his or her Play and recreation can be powerful for EGIONAL M R C ENTER EGA anger, anxiety and aggression w ithout this age because it teaches young Regional mega centers represent attacking others or bringing harm to - people about leadership, self facilities that are broad in themselves. Creating centers with a motivation, independence and programming and services. The users single focus will change the dynamics autonomy. The opportunity to refocus come from the entire Bay Area; the and landscape of the behavior of our energy and commitment to this target population/recruitment is elementary children who are engaged population through the magnet centers intentional by design based on the in our programs and services. will open doors of opportunity for services offered. Majority of the many children and youth in the City of programs offered are leveraged or , M EGA P ROGRAMS FOR H IGH S CHOOL Oakland. -sustaining. Programs considered self Y OUNG DULTS AND A A DULTS range from science to dance, to sports This mega unit will focus on increasing and art, and serves Pre- K to seniors. intramural sports and family leagues of G - 50

235 OAKLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND OAKLAND PUBLIC FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2013-14 FY 2015-16 LIBRARY Adopted Adopted Actuals Unaudited Expenditures by Fund Budget Budget Actuals 1010 $9,075,365 $9,110,565 $11,129,415 $11,746,848 General Purpose Fund (GPF) California Library Services 2148 139,335 64,042 64,042 54,715 TATEMENT M S ISSION - (39,097) County of Alameda: Grants 2160 - - Metro Transportation Com: Program Grant 65,325 72,719 2163 72,719 103,522 The Oakland Public Library delights, 16,717,918 16,548,180 2241 17,428,885 Measure Q-Library Services Retention & Enhancement 16,317,996 inspires and informs our diverse community as a resource for Measure Q Reserve- Library Services Retention & 2242 - 754,121 - 733,580 Enhancement information, knowledge, and artistic 2993 - Library Grants 238,993 - - literary expression providing the and - (238,993) Miscellaneous Grants - - 2999 best in traditional services, new 110,879 7540 O akland Public Library Trust 198,781 206,171 110,879 technologies and innovative $30,177,494 TOTAL $25,711,282 $26,239,314 $28,658,815 programs. 35.3% 34.7% 38.8% 38.9% GPF Percent to Total Department 2.0% 1.8% 2.1% 2.2% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures B USINESS G OALS  To increase the use of all circulating library materials, AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM including books, magazines, e - books, DVDs, tools, toys, FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Midcycle Adopted Adopted ng downloadable/streami music Program Authorized Budget Budget and movies, as well as laptops and FTE FTE FTE computers for use inside the African American Museum & Library at Oakland 4.90 6.78 6.78 . library 1.00 1.00 1.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) s  To increase the library’ 2241 - Measure Q-Library Services Retention & Enhancement 3.90 5.78 5.78 responsiveness to and 97.44 101.07 101.07 Branch Library Services inclusiveness of Oakland’s diverse 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 28.45 29.80 29.80 communities through engaging 2163 - Metro Transportation Com: Program Grant 0.27 0.27 0.27 and creative activities inside and 2241 - Measure Q-Library Services Retention & Enhancement 68.72 71.00 71.00 outside the library walls. Library System Wide Support 64.57 56.18 56.18 To perfect a customer service  27.37 25.42 25.42 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) approach that centers “people 2241 - Measure Q-Library Services Retention & Enhancement 37.20 30.76 30.76 over things” and provides equal 5.08 5.08 5.08 Literacy Programs access to library services through 1.08 1.08 1.08 2148 - California Library Services trained and diverse staff a well- 4.00 4.00 4.00 2241 - Measure Q-Library Services Retention & Enhancement who are visible and vital 42.90 46.58 46.58 Main Library Services participants in the community. 8.79 9.39 9.39 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 34.11 37.19 37.19 2241 - Measure Q-Library Services Retention & Enhancement programs To enhance services and  215.69 TOTAL 214.89 215.69 for children including story times and for preschool children . early literacy promotion of To engage volunteers, Friends groups,  conversation, community building  To offer tee n programming that Commissioners and donors in and learning. expectations of expands youth supporting the Library’s mission libraries through arts, gaming , civic  To archive and provide collections of through outreach and stewardship engagement and volunteer the African American cultural and activities. opportunities that help develop historical experience in Northern leadership skills and workplace California, along with programs, preparedness. lectures, films, and exhibits that speak P D ESCRIPTIONS ROGRAM to the social, historical, and political  To secure funding to return branch conditions of the African American -days per week and library hours to 6 A MERICAN M USEUM & A FRICAN Diaspora. expanding Sunday hours at four select IBRARY AT O L AKLAND (AAMLO) Branches while also enhancing the  To provide a thriving Adult and This program represents the programs, online services that are available ts Family Literacy Program that assis provided at collections and archives 24/7. with lo adults w reading levels to AAMLO on the culture and history of improve life skills. To be widely known as a safe and  African Americans in Northern central place for participation, California and the Bay Area. G - 51

236 OAKLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM ESCRIPTIONS P D ROGRAM D ) CONT ( ’ Revenue FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 IBRARY S RANCH L ERVICES B Adopted Midcycle Adopted Program services This program represents the Budget Budget Budget provided by the 16 Branch Libraries $72,719 Branch Library Services $72,719 $72,719 located throughout Oakland. Library System Wide Support 19,255,672 18,387,158 19,291,896 64,042 64,042 64,042 Literacy Programs S WIDE UPPORT L IBRARY S YSTEM - Main Library Services 84,210 - - This program represents the system- $18,523,919 $19,476,643 $19,428,657 TOTAL wide services provided by the Finance and Administrative Unit, Expenditure Services, Children’s Services, Teen FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 Community Relations, Materials Unit, Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program Computer Services Unit, and the Budget Budget Budget Acquisitions and Cataloging Unit. $918,603 African American Museum & Library at O akland $778,784 $788,116 Branch Library Services 10,355,799 9,749,409 10,935,631 P L ITERACY ROGRAMS 10,672,810 Library System Wide Support 10,490,059 11,328,120 This program represents the Literacy 423,866 428,759 414,640 Literacy Programs services provided by the Second 7,216,697 4,710,215 Main Library Services 7,276,700 Start Adult Literacy Program. $28,658,815 $27,651,899 TOTAL $30,177,494 M N L IBRARY S ERVICES AI SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE This program represents the public services provided at the Main FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes Library. These include General $500,000 Use of one-time Council set-aside reserve to balance - transfer to the $500,000 Reference services, Main Library Measure Q Fund (2241) Administra tion, the Oakland History Expand Library Services to branches serving disadvantaged youth and $500,000 $0 Room, Magazines and Newspapers, geographical dispersed throughout the City - beginning Jul y 2016 Science, Children’s Room, Computer FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE nd Circulation. Lab a ALL Other Funds Changes Changes 0.80 Add Library Assistant, PPT in Fund 2241 $71,258 $72,278 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM OAKLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY 215.69 FTE African American Museum & Branch Library Services Library at Oakland 101.07 FTE 6.78 FTE Literacy Programs Library System Wide Support 56.18 FTE 5.08 FTE Main Library Services 46.58 FTE G - 52

237 ECONOMIC & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND ECONOMIC & FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 WORKFORCE Actuals Unaudited Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund Budget Actuals Budget DEVELOPMENT General Purpose Fund (GPF) $2,458,025 $2,989,798 $5,058,763 $4,814,541 1010 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 3,738,286 3,685,690 2,851,041 2,852,015 1610 1710 258,144 Recycling Program 257,048 208,458 219,646 1720 15,640 15,553 5,000 13,732 Comprehensive Clean-up M ISSION S TATEMENT 398,350 398,350 1750 374,678 Multipurpose Reserve 350,204 673,495 673,042 1770 543,625 408,092 Telecommunications Land Use To increase investment in Oakland in OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 1820 4,056 11,090 12,429 12,513 a way that contributes to the growth HUD-CDBG 2108 345,555 219,288 313,604 477,043 of the City’s economy, fosters fiscal 3,648 - - - 2116 Department of Transportation sustainability, expands job - - - 260,000 Environmental Protection Agency 2125 opportunities for Oakland residents, - - - 2127 Dept of Transportation-TIGER 37,893 provides for a diversity of housing - - 2128 Department of Health and Human Services (980) - 473,449 (125,000) (125,000) 2129 Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF) State Grant 319,763 choices, and enhances the City’s 2134 - - California Parks and Recreation 6,000 49,500 sense of p lace and quality of life. - 123,184 173,954 California Department of Transportation 2140 - 2166 221,327 Bay Area Air Q uality Management District - - 269,195 255,818 150,121 2159 State of Cal ifornia O ther - - 4,637,031 2195 Workforce Investment Act 6,032,453 5,893,663 4,636,022 OALS USINESS G B - 506,544 - ACTIA Reimbursable Grants 2214 - - (760) - (763) Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 2310  ms Enhance existing revenue strea 503,504 576,135 2419 598,500 Measure C: Transient O ccupancy Tax (TO T) 471,733 through economic development - 2999 Miscellaneous Grants 532,630 150,272 - activities that increase investment 6,000 Golf Course 3200 8,450 8,450 - in the City of Oakland. JPFA Capital Projects: Series 2005 - 3,033 5200 - - 55,972 5321 60,735 - Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water,Safe Parks & Open -  Negotiate and implement major Space Trust Fund for O akland development projects including 5505 - - 239,140 266,759 Municipal Capital Improvement: Public Arts Oakland Army Base, Coliseum City, 350,000 350,000 5610 Central District Projects 40,664 42,857 Oak Knoll, 1800 San Pablo, 12 St. - - - 17,416 Central City East Projects 5640 Remainder parcel, City Center 33,197 5643 Central City East TA Bonds Series 2006A-T (Taxable) 33,529 412,000 - 100,000 5650 Coliseum Projects 20,692 621 100,000 Parcels and TOD projects at West - - 250,134 149,542 Coliseum: TA Bonds Series 2006B-T (Taxable) 5656 Macarthur, Downtown, Oakland, - 565,118 - 560,547 5670 O akland Base Reuse Authority Fruitvale and Coliseum BART O BRA: Leasing & Util ity 1,512,909 1,388,869 1,674,678 5671 7,411,380 stations. - - - 2,652 Joint Army Base Infrastructure 5672  Manage the future disposition of 5673 OBRA: Environmental Remediation 968,677 - - - -owned properties for catalytic City 681,874 - - 5674 O akland Army Base Joint Remediation 587,022 development projects such as1911 5999 Miscellaneous Capital Projects - - - 19,700 Telegraph (Parcel 4) and the - - 7999 Miscellaneous Trusts 417,682 422,798 Henry J. Kaiser auditorium. $19,320,826 TOTAL $17,291,413 $25,784,866 $17,652,619 27.8% 28.7% 9.5% 15.5% s,  Provide real estate service GPF Percent to Total Department including developing and 0.6% 0.6% 0.9% 0.9% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures implementing a portfolio management plan for all City properties. newly adopted public art on private Provide comprehensive marketing  e and implement key business Manag  development ordinance. communications effort to create development activities including modern, attractive marketing ining attracting and reta businesses in Prepare an Economic Development  collateral that helps communicate and sectors such as economic key Strategy for the City of Oakland that market Oakland to investors, manufacturing, retail and technology, clearly communicates the City’s developers, new businesses and other managing the CBD/BID program in economic goals to external and stakehold ers. and key commercial corridors, internal stakeholders. running the Oakland Business Administer the City’s cultural funding  Assistance Center to support small -profits, grants to artists and non ESCRIPTIONS D IVISION D businesses. including coordinating outreach, workshops, panels, and professional  Link Oakland residents to training A DMINISTRATION services agreements. opportunities that improve their Directs and coordinates work for the skills and employability through the Implement public art capital projects,  Department, including overseeing fiscal, delivery of workforce development -generated facilitate community budget and personnel management, programs. projects, and provide support to the G - 53

238 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & WORKFORCE D IVISION D ESCRIPTIONS AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY DIVISION (CONT'D) ’ ) CONT DMINISTRATION A ( D FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 and legislative issues, and legal Midcycle Adopted Adopted Division policy and procedure development, Authorized Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE as well as other inter -departmental and inter -division special projects. 4.95 4.95 Administration 2.50 2.90 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1.00 2.90 A ULTURAL C ARKETING M RTS AND 0.75 0.75 2108 - HUD-CDBG 0.75 0.58 1.00 - 2159 - State of California Other This division works to position 0.30 0.30 0.75 2195 - Workforce Investment Act Oakland as a desirable place to live, 5671 - OBRA: Leasing & Utility - 0.42 - work, and invest through the 7.00 7.00 6.50 Cultural Arts and Marketing creation of marketing collateral, 4.70 4.70 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 4.70 advertising, sponsorships and other 0.10 1710 - Recycling Program 0.10 0.10 tools that help convey a clear, 1720 - Comprehensive Clean-up 0.10 0.10 0.10 coordinated message about Oakland. 0.10 0.10 1820 - OPRCA Self Sustaining Revolving Fund 0.10 The division oversees multimedia 2419 - Measure C: Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) 0.75 0.75 - communications, special events, historic walking tours, graphic 0.50 0.50 5321 - Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water,Safe Parks & Open 0.50 design, and film production 0.75 1.00 0.75 5505 - Municipal Capital Improvement: Public Arts coordination. It also produces the Economic Development (Business Development) 10.00 10.00 9.00 City's flagship annual Art & Soul 5.50 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 6.50 6.50 Festival. 1710 - Recycling Program 1.00 1.00 1.00 2108 - HUD-CDBG 1.00 1.00 1.00 The division also provides oversight 1.50 2195 - Workforce Investment Act 1.50 1.50 for the commissioning of temporary Project Implementation (Real Estate Development) 23.00 20.55 20.55 and permanent works of art 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) - 1.50 1.50 throughout Oakland; maintains the 14.05 19.90 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 14.05 City's art collection; disseminates 2.00 2.00 2.60 2129 - Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF) State public information on all projects; facilitates and consults on art 2.50 5643 - Central City East TA Bonds Series 2006A-T - 2.50 projects generated by individual 0.50 0.50 5671 - OBRA: Leasing & Utility 0.50 artists and for the development of 6.00 5.00 6.00 Real Estate Services (Asset Management) -generated art projects; community 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 0.64 1.64 1.64 and reviews proposed gifts of art to 1.22 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 1.22 1.22 the City. It manages the City’s 3.14 1770 - Telecommunications Land Use 3.14 3.14 cultural arts grant program that Workforce Development 8.00 6.00 6.00 -based art and supports Oakland 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1.00 1.00 1.00 cultural activities throughout the 2195 - Workforce Investment Act 4.50 6.00 4.50 y. Cit 0.50 0.50 5671 - OBRA: Leasing & Utility 1.00 54.50 54.50 TOTAL 54.00 (B USINESS E EVELOPMENT D CONOMIC ) EVELOPMENT D include fostering public and private Knoll, 1911 Telegraph, 2100 Telegraph, This division is responsible for partnerships to bolster Oakland’s 1800 San Pablo, 12 St. Remainder developing and implementing competitive advantage and position in parcel, City Center Parcels and Transit- programs and strategies to retain, identifie d several targeted economic Oriented Develo pment (TOD) projects at expand and attract businesses to cluster groups: health/life science; West Oakland, Macarthur, Downtown, s directly Oakland. The division work innovative digital media; clean & green Fruitvale and Coliseum BART stations. business owners and with individual tech; retail; manufacturing, logistics, The division manages the former , and operators, developers and food production. Redevelopment Agency’s streetscape, professional organizations to façade and tenant improvement implement initiatives that create programs and projects, which are expand and attract businesses to (R MPLEMENTATION I EAL ROJECT P nd support designed to reduce blight a s directly Oakland. The division work EVELOPMENT ) E STATE D new and existing businesses. It is also with business individual owners and This division is responsible for responsible for winding down the affairs operators, , and developers tiating and implementing major nego of the Oakland Redevelopment professional organizations to land development and public Successor Agency (ORSA). implement initiatives that create a improvements projects including business-friendly environment and Oakland Army Base, Coliseum City, Oak help businesses succeed. Strategies G - 54

239 ECONOMIC & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY DIVISION D IVISION D ESCRIPTIONS Revenue STATE (A SSET ERVICES S R EAL E FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 M ANAGEMENT ) Midcycle Adopted Adopted Division This unit provides acquisition, disposal, Budget Budget Budget property management, $0 Administration $41,396 $62,149 commercial/residential relocation, and 521,385 598,585 Cul tural Arts and Marketing 620,950 leasing for all City of Oakland and 504,347 282,526 281,246 Economic Development (Business Development) Redevelopment Successor Agency 6,088,962 450,000 Project Implementation (Real Estate Development) 5,676,127 property. It provides real estate Real Estate Services (Asset Management) 1,663,670 2,054,202 2,026,567 conducts real consultation services; Workforce Development 5,641,760 5,148,220 5,578,936 estate appraisals; and acquires, TOTAL $14,316,961 $8,718,338 $14,205,729 manages, and disposes of City and Redevelopment Agency property. In Expenditure addition, this program negotiates and monitors lease agreements with FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Midcycle Adopted Adopted renters of City / Agency -owned Division Budget Budget Budget property, leases property on behalf of the City/Agency, facilitates the Administration $1,262,324 $1,244,137 $526,981 Agency assemblage of parcels for City / Cul tural Arts and Marketing 1,539,022 1,727,920 1,660,896 projects, and advises the City Council Economic Development (Business Development) 1,832,849 1,610,164 1,636,921 4,573,666 4,927,852 3,641,488 Project Implementation (Real Estate Development) and Redevelopment Successor Agency Real Estate Services (Asset Management) 1,530,350 3,003,057 3,008,744 of real estate aspects of major 5,148,862 Workforce Development 5,661,889 5,139,489 development projects. $17,291,413 $17,652,619 $14,732,579 TOTAL EVELOPMENT D ORKFORCE W This division manages Workforce ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY DIVISION Investment Act (WIA) funds, which are intended to induce businesses to participate in the local delivery of ECONOMIC & WORKFORCE workforce development services. The DEVELOPMENT 54.50 FTE program is being transitioned to the new Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA), which emphasizes services to disenfranchised out -of -school youth, the disabled and Cultural Arts and Marketing Administration veterans, as well as incumbent workers 7.00 FTE 4.95 FTE and employers in specified growth sectors through career pathways and apprenticeship strategies, with an Project Implementation Economic Development onal planning with our emphasis on regi 20.55 FTE 10.00 FTE East Bay WIB partners. This division staffs the Oakland Workforce Investment Board (WIB), which is charged with oversight and policy Workforce Development Real Estate Services 6.00 FTE 6.00 FTE development for the grant funds. Workforce also develops city- wide job training initiatives and coordinates the Youth Internship Program and manages the operation of the new West (CONT'D) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE Oakland Job Resource Center. FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes Add Project Manager III, PPT 1.00 $253,548 $257,177 $140,148 1.00 Add Real Estate Agent $138,170 Add two 0.50 FTE Student Trainee, PT 1.00 $39,516 $39,516 One-time investment in Workforce Investment Strategies & $0 $200,000 Programs to leverage additional support G - 55

240 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & WORKFORCE SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE (CONT'D) FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes $100,000 $0 Direct program support for Kiva Zip small business microloan program and to establish a revolving/matching loan fund (one- time) $213,559 $210,548 1.90 Transfer Administrative Assistant I (1.0) Administative Anal yst II (0.30), Account Clerk III (0.30) and Administrative Services Manager II (0.30) from the Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund (1610) and the WIA Fund (2195) 0.50 Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from $108,723 $107,218 Fund 1610 Transfer Urban Economic Analyst III to the CDBG Fund (2108) (1.00) ($142,297) ($144,334) Transfer Urban Economic Analyst IV, Projects from Fund 2108 1.00 $174,595 $177,070 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE ALL Other Funds Changes Changes Add Program Analyst I, PPT to the Measure C - Transient $51,018 0.50 $50,298 Occupancy Tax Surcharge Fund (2419) to support the Cultural Arts grants program $514,000 $514,000 Add O&M to the Army Base Fund (5670) $306,688 $513,355 Increase O&M within the Army Base Leasing Fund (5671) for CCIG leasing activities (revenue supported) Transfer Administrative Services Manager II, Account Clerk III ($63,027) (0.45) ($62,409) and Administrative Anal yst II from Fund 2195 to the GPF ($150,531) Transfer Administrative Services Manager II, Account Clerk III, ($148,408) (1.45) Administrative Anal yst II and Administrative Assistant I from Fund 1610 to the GPF Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from (1.00) ($214,436) ($217,445) Fund 1610 to the GPF and Central City East Capital Bond Fund (5643) $107,218 $108,723 Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager to 0.50 Fund 5643 from Fund 1610 (0.50) ($107,211) ($108,717) Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from Fund 2195 to Fund 2159 Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from ($17,394) (0.50) ($107,211) Fund 5671 to Fund 2159 (partial 0.08 FTE in Y2) Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager to 1.00 $214,422 $126,111 Fund 2159 (partial 0.58 FTE in Y2) from Fund 5671 and Fund 2195 (0.25) Transfer Program Analyst II from the Public Art Capital Fund ($32,728) ($32,267) (5505) to Fund 2419 0.25 $32,267 $32,728 Transfer Program Analyst II to Fund 2419 from Fund 5505 (0.40) ($85,292) ($84,122) Transfer Project Manager from Fund 1610 to the TCIF Grant Fund (2129) Transfer Project Manager to Fund 2129 from Fund 1610 0.40 $84,122 $85,292 ($282,978) Transfer Urban Economic Analyst II and Urban Economic ($278,984) (2.00) Analyst IV from Fund 1610 to Fund 5643 Transfer Urban Economic Analyst II and Urban Economic 2.00 $278,984 $282,978 Analyst IV to Fund 5643 from Fund 1610 Transfer Urban Economic Analyst III to Fund 2108 from the GPF 1.00 $142,297 $144,334 Transfer Urban Economic Analyst IV, Projects from Fund 2108 (1.00) ($174,595) ($177,070) to the GPF (1.00) Eliminate Administrative Analyst II from Fund 2195 ($116,479) ($118,146) Eliminate Urban Economic Analyst III from Fund 1610 and Fund (2.00) ($286,244) ($290,318) 2129 Reduce O&M in WIA Fund (2195) to balance ($650,046) ($653,550) Reduce O&M within the CDBG Grant Fund (2108) based on ($185,295) ($185,295) actual grant award Reduce O&M within the HOME Grant Fund (2109) based on ($259,221) ($259,331) actual grant award G - 56

241 HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND HOUSING & FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 COMMUNITY Actuals Unaudited Adopted Adopted Expenditures by Fund Actuals Budget Budget $200,000 $612 General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1010 $0 $0 DEVELOPMENT 1,584,454 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 1,587,454 1,675,592 1,587,494 1610 1830 544,959 Central District Project Area - - - M ISSION S TATEMENT - (500,000) Central City East Project Area Loans 1831 - - - - (254,359) Coliseum Project Area Loans 1832 - Affordable Housing for All 1833 209,400 - BMSP Project Area Loans - - 4,650,000 Affordable Housing Trust Fund 1870 597,665 5,100,000 519,823 We believe all Oakland residents 1880 969,649 Low Mod Operations - - 110,395 should have decent and affordable 2000 Subordinated Housing Set-aside 18,565 4,582 - 1883 - housing in healthy, sustainable - - 858,640 1,411,471 2006 Housing Bond Proceeds 1884 neighborhoods with full access to 1885 2011A-T Subordinated Housing 9,186,283 23,159,090 - - -enhancing services. life We work on HUD-EDI Grants - - 505,649 2105 527,250 several levels to create and preserve 2,119,000 666,000 1,789,349 2,864,193 HUD-108 2107 8,020,631 7,271,673 6,596,431 2108 7,055,009 HUD-CDBG affordable housing by: 5,318,832 2,061,879 HUD-Home 2,061,879 2109 6,892,772 • Supporting organizations that - 568,470 1,353,083 California Housing and Community Development 2144 - develop and preserve affordable (108,725) (193,669) 632,682 245,998 State of Cal ifornia O ther 2159 rental and owner -occupied 1,957,650 - - 409,500 Oakland Redevelopment Agency Grants 2185 housing . Rent Adjustment Program Fund 2413 1,773,209 1,565,839 1,755,976 1,838,649 2415 1,722 Development Service Fund 1,108 42,340 2,342 - Providing direct assistance to first • 213,069 Mortgage Revenue 2826 89,492 89,492 272,761 time homebuyers and existing - 175,383 - 339,151 Miscellaneous Grants 2999 homeowners . - - 20,274 Affordable Housing 7450 1,933,690 • Administering the City’s programs $36,298,721 $48,761,096 $18,121,483 TOTAL $18,770,502 to stabilize rents and ensure 0.0% 0.4% 0.0% 0.0% GPF Percent to Total Department compliance with the Just Cause for 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures . Eviction Ordinance • Supporting organizations that provide economic development, AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY DIVISION public facilities, infrastructure, and social services for low and FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 moderate income communities. Adopted Midcycle Adopted Program Budget Budget Authorized FTE FTE FTE Administration 10.70 7.00 8.00 OALS G USINESS B 1.30 1.30 1.85 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 3.50 3.50 2.95 2108 - HUD-CDBG  Expansion of the Receivership 1.94 1.79 2109 - HUD-Home 1.79 Program – A program designed to - 1.00 2.20 2159 - State of California Other facilitate the rehabilitation of 2413 - Rent Adjustment Program Fund 0.41 0.41 0.26 vacant and blighted properties - 0.50 2415 - Development Service Fund - using the legal process of 2999 - Miscellaneous Grants 1.00 - - appointing a third party “Receiver” 3.00 Commercial Lending 3.00 3.00 to obtain financing to rehabilitate 3.00 3.00 2105 - HUD-EDI Grants 2.50 the property. The program is - - 0.50 2108 - HUD-CDBG collaboration between Housing Community Development Block Grants 8.00 8.00 8.00 and Community Development 2108 - HUD-CDBG 8.00 8.00 8.00 (HCD), Planning and Building and Home Ownership & Rehabilitation & Residential 14.50 14.50 16.80 the City Attorney’s office. Planning 1.50 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 1.50 1.50 and Building, after recording a 11.75 2108 - HUD-CDBG 13.70 11.75 Decla ration of Substandard, refers 1.25 1.25 1.35 2109 - HUD-Home blighted properties to HCD for a 2415 - Development Service Fund - - 0.25 feasibility rehabilitation/ 9.00 Housing Development 8.00 9.00 development assessment. After 1610 - Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 6.40 5.87 5.87 the feasibility is determined, the 2.53 2.53 - 1870 - Affordable Housing Trust Fund property is forwarded to the City 2108 - HUD-CDBG 1.00 - - Attorney’s office as a potential 2109 - HUD-Home 0.60 0.60 0.60 Receivership Candidate. A 12.00 Residential Rent Adjustment 9.00 12.00 fied Receiver is selected from quali 2413 - Rent Adjustment Program Fund 9.00 12.00 12.00 a pool and recommended to the courts. After the feasibility is TOTAL 55.50 54.50 53.50 G - 57

242 HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY DIVISION D OALS ( CONT USINESS ) B G ’ Revenue determined, the property is forwarded to the City Attorney’s FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted office as a potential Receivership Division Budget Budget Budget Candidate. A qualified Receiver is selected from a pool and $8,746,333 $2,161,467 Administration $8,299,373 recommended to the courts. After Commercial Lending 2,122,000 666,000 2,119,000 court approval, the receiver Community Development Block Grants 7,455,011 7,109,973 7,109,973 obtains private financing to Home Ownership & Rehabilitation & Residential Lending 939,492 939,492 939,492 rehabilitate the property and is 2,826,188 2,632,051 Residential Rent Adjustment 2,200,004 responsible for the disposition of $20,287,986 $14,877,974 $21,099,889 TOTAL the property after rehabilitation. -implementation of the Rental Re  Expenditure Rehabilitation Program – FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Providing construction loans to Adopted Midcycle Adopted Division property owners to rehabilitate Budget Budget Budget blighted properties for rental $1,401,683 $1,320,653 $1,263,306 Administration housing for seniors, persons with 867,812 2,320,812 2,308,523 Commercial Lending disabilities and low income 3,068,782 2,296,868 2,567,453 Community Development Block Grants renters. The program will provide 3,076,715 Home Ownership & Rehabilitation & Residential Lending 3,209,460 3,185,843 a $75,000 maximum, 6.5% percent Housing Development 4,013,213 8,063,118 7,663,453 deferred , matching funds loan. Residential Rent Adjustment 1,391,205 1,688,671 1,672,622 The loan becomes due and payable $14,488,207 $18,770,502 TOTAL $18,121,483 in full in 2 years. Loan proceeds would be deposited in a revolving fund to be used to finance additional loans. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY DIVISION Expansion of the Surplus Property  Development Partnership with Laney College and loc al Non -Profit HOUSING & COMMUNITY Construction Training DEVELOPMENT Organizations – Providing 54.50 FTE construction training to students by building one to four unit residential properties using City Commercial Lending Administration owned surplus and donated 8.00 FTE 3.00 FTE properties. Implement a New Commercial  Loan Program, the Broadway Community Development Home Ownership & Rehabilitation dor Revitalization Project, Corri & Residential Lending Block Grants 8.00 FTE 14.50 FTE jointly developed by OBDC and the City of Oakland, is supported by a major grant from Citibank and focused on accelerating Housing Development Residential Rent Adjustment redevelopment of the City’s urban 9.00 FTE 12.00 FTE core. The mission of this new public private partnership will be to streamline support for local small businesses and create funding for the creation of new needed jobs. It is expected that  The program will target Oakland's enterprises in the market area. 15 new businesses will be 10- Broadway commercial and retail identified and financed through this corridor, the heart of business activity Implement the new ROOT Loan Fund.  in the city. OBDC will assess the program in the first year, resulting in This new loan fu nd program, market area’s small business needs; the creation of at least 250 new jobs, Restoring Ownership Opportunities ntory and assess available inve with more to be added in the second Today, is supported by national and year of the program. In the first three blighted or underutilized properties; local partners, California Housing n months of the program, $1.6 millio recruit qualified entrepreneurs for Finance Agency, and major lenders. identified opportunities; and provide have been invested in 10 businesses, -sets home mortgages to The model re creating and retaining 190 jobs. G - 58

243 HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (CONT'D) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE OALS ( ) G CONT D B ’ USINESS FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE current market values in order to ALL Other Funds Changes Changes provide sustainable loan Add funds for Affordable Housing Development Projects within $4,109,236 $3,552,302 modifications for eligible Oakland the Affordable Housing Trust Fund (1870) residents. The Oakland pilot program Add Accountant II to the CDBG Grant Fund (2108) $114,785 $113,165 1.00 -25 Oakland would serve about 20 $204,072 Add Home Management Counselor II to Fund 2108 to support $201,192 2.00 eligible -25 Oakland about 20 the Housing Assistance Center homeowners and create the 1.00 $193,455 $190,725 Add Hearing O fficer to the Rent Adjustment Program Fund foundation for a regional loan fund (2413); 2-year limited duration program. 1.00 Add Program Analyst II to Fund 2413; 2-year limited duration $118,146 $116,478  Revamp the ImageSource Workflow Add Administrative Assistant I to Fund 2413; 2-year l imited 1.00 $81,196 $82,358 system which provides tracking CDBG duration Grant Agreements electronically to $500,000 $0 Reallocate O &M for DreamCatcher facility within Fund 2108 allow the process to become (0.15) ($16,722) ($16,962) Transfer Administrative Anal yst I from Fund 2108 to the HUD- completely paperless reducing EDI Grants Fund (2105) excessive staff time utilized in the past Transfer Administrative Analyst I to Fund 2105 from Fund 2108 $16,963 $16,724 0.15 CDBG grant administration process. (0.35) ($43,014) Transfer Loan Servicing Specialist from Fund 2108 to Fund 2105 ($43,630) Review and realign  the use of $43,015 Transfer Loan Servicing Specialist to Fund 2105 from Fund 2108 0.35 $43,630 administration costs for all the HUD ($44,950) (0.30) $0 Transfer Community Development Program Coordinator from entitlement grants. The grants Fund 2108 to the State of CA Grant Fund (2159) continue to decrease annually while 0.30 $0 Transfer Community Development Program Coordinator to Fund $44,949 the administration requirements 2159 from Fund 2108 remain the same or increase. $102,263 $103,695 Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager to 0.53  Identify additional/permanent Fund 1870 from the Successor Redevelopment Agency Fund resources to fund affordable housing (1610) developm ent and fund rehab projects (0.53) Transfer Development/Redevelopment Program Manager from ($102,263) ($103,695) to ensure long term viability and Fund 1610 to Fund 1870 capacity to generate residual receipts. ($44,875) ($45,508) Transfer Director of Housing and Community Development (0.15) from Fund 2108 to Fund 2413  Identify strategies to fund Transfer Director of Housing and Community Development to $44,875 $45,508 0.15 administration of affordable housing Fund 2413 from Fund 2108 developments. (0.80) ($88,738) ($90,009) Transfer Executive Assistant to the Director from Fund 2108 to Collaborate with City Attorney’s Office  Fund 1610 e. -write the Relocation Ordinanc to re Transfer Executive Assistant to the Director to Fund 1610 from 0.80 $88,738 $90,009 Fund 2108 ($124,714) ($122,963) (1.00) Transfer Home Management Counselor III from Fund 2108 to D D IVISION ESCRIPTIONS Fund 1870 1.00 Transfer Home Management Counselor III to Fund 1870 from $122,963 $124,714 DMINISTRATION A Fund 2108 Provides the overall management of the $0 Transfer Program Analyst III from the Miscellaneous Grant Fund ($74,693) (1.00) Department of Housing and Community (2999) to Fund 1870 Development including personnel, fiscal, 1.00 $149,386 Transfer Program Analyst III to Fund 1870 from Fund 2999 $151,525 policy and information technology. (extend position to Y2) Manages strategic initiatives in response Eliminate Community Development Program Coordinator from ($150,789) (1.00) ($148,661) to the foreclosure crisis, in partnership Fund 2159 with national, state, and local partners to ($151,959) $0 (1.00) Eliminate Community Development Program Coordinator from prevent and mitigate foreclosures. Fund 2159 and Fund 2108 in Y2 ($112,512) ($110,924) (1.00) Eliminate Loan Servicing Specialist from Fund 2108 Manages the Housing Assistance Center which streamlines City housing services, (1.00) Eliminate Management Assistant from Fund 2108 and Fund ($151,525) ($149,387) 2415 as well as provide a central portal to meet the housing needs of Oakland $0 Eliminate Program Analyst III from Fund 2159 (1.00) ($106,741) residents. Eliminate Administrative Analyst I from Fund 1610 and Fund ($111,481) ($113,078) (1.00) 2108 OMMERCIAL L ENDING C ($268,719) (1.00) Eliminate Project Manager III from Fund 2108 ($264,986) ($220,787) (1.00) Freeze Project Manager II in Funds 1610, 2108 & 2109 ($223,947) Provide tools and resources for Oakland's business owners and entrepreneurs through commercial G - 59

244 HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Provide residents with the necessary • departments for the provision of IVISION D D ESCRIPTIONS financial and technical assistance to The CDBG program staff services. improve their individual property provides technical assistance to the ( C D ) ’ OMMERCIAL L ENDING CONT and the overall environment of the seven Community Development District loans funded by HUD and the Oakland Districts. Boards and monitors the contracts and Redevelopment Agency. These - Facilitate blight removal, lead • . s funded with CDBG funds program resources promote business attraction, hazard reduc tion, and building code retention and expansion leading to the adherence on all 1 -4 unit residential WNERSHIP & R EHABILITATION H OME O creation of jobs and economic . improvement projects R ENDING L ESIDENTIAL & develop ment primarily in Oakland's low This program provides financial and and moderate income communities and OUSING D EVELOPMENT H technical assistance for the purchase of redevelopment areas. These various -to-substantial homes and minor This program helps implement the City loan programs contribute to Oakland's -low, low and rehabilitation to very and Redevelopment Agency affordable economic revitalization by expanding moderate income persons. Counsels housing development programs. Staff the City's tax base by focusing lending and educates owners and first -time works with for -profit and non- profit activity in the City's economic homebuyers about refinancing, dev elopers to revitalize neighborhoods development target industries; placing purchasing a nd maintaining homes to and increase housing opportunities -moderate income Oakland low promote safe, healthy and accessible through new construction, substantial residents into sustainable jobs created neighborhoods, to identify and thwart rehabilitation and preservation of rental by loan recipients; leveraging private predatory lending practices, as well as, and ownership housing for very low or investment through participation loans; fraudulent home improvement low and moderate income households. and abating blight through financing contracting. It promotes collaboration nual Staff implements the City’s an commercial and mixed -used with lenders, general contractors, code Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) developments. This program awards ent, citizens and other housing enforcem process to make competitive funding professional services contracts to agencies to expand opportunities for all awards for affordable housing projects; Oakland's small business community homebuyers and to provide and monitors the City and Agency and administers several City funded rehabilitation construction management portfolio of over 75 projects to ensure loan programs, lending outreach, services which identify and correct proper management and maintenance servicing of the City's loan portfolio and health and safety hazards and code ncome and compliance with rent and i recruitment for job placement. -occupied homes. violations in owner limits. Priority i s given to assisting seniors and EVELOPMENT B LOCK OMMUNITY C D disabled persons to maintain the ENT R ESIDENTIAL A DJUSTMENT R RANTS G e and security of independenc This program helps maintain decent, Manages and implements the City of homeownership. The Residential safe, affordable, and sanitary residential Oakland’s Community Development Lending Program: rental housing in the City of Oakland by Block Grant (CDBG) program. The City • Elevate pride of ownership and limiting rent increases, monitoring utilizes CDBG funds to rebuild and sustainability in residential t, removal of rental units from the marke revitalize depressed areas and sustain . neighborhoods and limiting evictions. Administers the neighborhoods with full access to life Improvement of the existing housing • Rent Adjustment Ordinance, the Just CDBG program enhancing services. income stock by assisting low- Cause for Eviction Ordinance and the provides funding for housing, economic . homeowners Ellis Act Tenant Protection Ordinance. development and a variety of Build community and foster livable • Additional responsibilities include neighborhood improvement/public neighborhoods . processing appeals of Housing Code service projects for low and moderate • Systematic restoration of citations and appeals of de nials of income residents in the seven neighborhoods within the City relocation benefits for tenants of Community Development • - Provide the city with a well buildings vacated by the Code areas. Distribution of CDBG funds organized mechanism for effectively Compliance section of the Building undergo an extensive citizen rehabilitating the City’s stock of Services Department. participation process resulting in salvageable housing. appr oximately 50 contracts with non - Prevent neighborhood deterioration • profit organizations and several city G - 60

245 PLANNING & BUILDING PLANNING & SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND BUILDING FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 Adopted Actuals Unaudited Adopted Expenditures by Fund Budget Budget Actuals ISSION TATEMENT M S $97,030 $518,139 $41,466 $41,648 General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1010 Recycling Program 1,267 - - - 1710 Our work is founded on the belief 2,435 257,604 40,617 1770 260,866 Telecommunications Land Use that people matter, neighborhoods - 84,635 75,075 HUD-CDBG 2108 - matter, beauty, order, and a clean 800 - - - 2134 California Parks and Recreation environment matter. In short, 198 238 - State of Cal ifornia O ther - 2159 125,680 60,369 - - 2163 Metro Transportation Com: Program Grant enriching people’s lives matters. We 22,087,890 23,266,121 Development Service Fund 2415 26,694,031 26,944,980 are dedicated to improving our 8,466 2999 Miscellaneous Grants 1,239 - - community through our service to - - - 55,462 City Facilities Energy Conservation Projects 4450 the public. Central District Projects 187,881 - 5610 - - - 200,000 - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2009T 5613 - To tha t end, we develop visionary - 27,327 Broadway/MacArthur/San Pablo Projects 5630 42,262 - plans that are community driven, we - - 125,871 Central City East TA Bonds Series 2006A-T (Taxable) - 5643 update the Zoning Code to reflect 1,269,810 305,375 - - Coliseum: TA Bonds Series 2006B-T (Taxable) 5656 community needs and interests, we $23,420,746 TOTAL $25,163,443 $27,244,050 $26,996,545 process development/building 0.2% 2.2% 0.2% 0.4% applications in an efficient and GPF Percent to Total Department effective manner, and we enforce the 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures Zoning Code, the Building Code, and other applicable laws to ensure the health, safety, and well- being of our citizens. AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 OALS B USINESS G Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program Authorized Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE  Add staff to improve turnaround times for permit applications, i.e., Administration 8.00 7.50 8.00 Process Coordinators, Plan 8.00 8.00 2415 - Development Service Fund 7.50 Checkers, and Office Assistants. 31.00 31.00 Development Permit Inspections 27.00  following plans: Complete the 27.00 2415 - Development Service Fund 31.00 31.00 Coliseum Area Specific Plan/EIR o 17.00 18.00 Development Review/Zoning 17.00 o Downtown Specific Plan/EIR 18.00 17.00 2415 - Development Service Fund 17.00 Update the Land Use and o 41.75 31.25 Engineering & Architectural Plan Approval 41.75 0.33 - - 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) Transportation Element (LUTE) - - 0.17 1710 - Recycling Program of the General Plan and 41.75 2415 - Development Service Fund 41.75 30.75 Transportation Element, and the General Plan, Zoning Update & Strategic Analysis 18.00 18.00 14.00 Estuary Policy Plan. 18.00 2415 - Development Service Fund 14.00 18.00  Complete several Zoning Code 3.00 Historic Preservation 3.00 2.00 -wide Begin efforts on t he City 3.00 2.00 2415 - Development Service Fund 3.00 General Plan update. 21.75 16.75 21.75 Livable Neighborhood Code Enforcement Services  Complete work on the Impact Fee 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) - - 4.00 . Nexus Study - 2.00 1720 - Comprehensive Clean-up 2.00 Complete the following revisions  19.75 2415 - Development Service Fund 12.75 19.75 to the zoning code: 140.50 116.50 TOTAL 140.50 o Unattended Donation and Collection Boxes Continue processing of   . Approve new parklets o Mobile Food/Vending approximately 5,500 applications  Continue planning/zoning efforts o Condominium Conversion each year for zoning related to various major projects: Secondary Unit Regulations o permits/approvals. o Army Base o . Parking regulations  Maintain current staffing levels at the Brooklyn Basin o  Form a new Development Review public zoning information counter. Safeway at Broadway and Pleasant o Committee (DRC) to improve Valley Avenue customer service through better Numerous housing projects in the o coordination with OPW, Fire and . pipeline other relevant departments. G - 61

246 PLANNING & BUILDING SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM ROGRAM D ESCRIPTIONS P Revenue DMINISTRATION A FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 Provides agency oversight and support Adopted Midcycle Adopted Program services for policy development; Budget Budget Budget human resource planning; management $2,794,022 $1,844,000 Administration $2,896,773 and training; accounting; budget 11,102,000 Development Permit Inspections 11,051,288 10,349,479 development; fiscal and grants 3,718,175 2,245,000 Development Review/Zoning 3,724,850 management; information technology Engineering & Architectural Plan Approval 8,070,915 9,397,063 9,477,133 systems and support; agenda Livable Neighborhood Code Enforcement Services 1,864,000 1,695,988 1,692,275 management and contract $28,890,069 $28,659,498 TOTAL $24,373,394 administration. Ensures that the department meets its obligations and complies with federal, state, and local Expenditure laws including labor and public records FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 laws, financial management, and Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program auditing. Budget Budget Budget $5,277,995 $5,509,434 Administration $4,538,442 D EVELOPMENT P ERMIT I NSPECTIONS 5,552,207 Development Permit Inspections 5,154,494 5,610,046 This program assures conformance 2,460,522 2,649,606 Development Review/Zoning 2,431,850 with the California Building, Electrical, 6,854,706 5,819,101 6,935,445 Engineering & Architectural Plan Approval Plumbing Mechanical Codes, and the 3,507,834 3,295,258 General Plan, Zoning Update & Strategic Analysis 2,670,710 Oakland Municipal Code regulating the 345,940 349,815 212,131 Historic Preservation construction of residential and non- 3,042,079 3,067,464 Livable Neighborhood Code Enforcement Services 2,672,097 residential buildings and structures, $26,996,545 TOTAL $23,716,581 $27,244,050 public and private infrastructure, and -technical remediation, earthwork; geo and land use conditions. EVELOPMENT D ONING /Z EVIEW R ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM Provides information on zoning regulations and reviews proposed development applications for people PLANNING & BUILDING seeking information or application 140.50 FTE -offs at the Zoning Counter. sign Developmen t applications fall into three main categories: 1) major cases, which are reviewed by the Planning Commission - 10%; 2) administrative Development Permit Administration cases decided by the Zoning Inspections 8.00 FTE Administrator after public notice and 31.00 FTE comments - 40%; and 3) residential design review cases decided by staff - Engineering & Architectural Development 50%. Review/Zoning Plan Approval 41.75 FTE 17.00 FTE RCHITECTURAL & NGINEERING E P LAN A PPROVAL A General Plan, Zoning Update This program assists builders, property Historic Preservation & Strategic Analysis owners, architects, engineers, and 3.00 FTE 18.00 FTE realtors in understanding and processing appropriate construction permits related to buildings and Livable Neighborhood Code infrastructure with applicable state Enforcement Services 21.75 FTE health and safety codes, regional environmental regulations, and city development and land subdivision ordinances, and provides records cataloging, archive retrieval, and interpretation services. G - 62

247 PLANNING & BUILDING SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE (CONT'D) ROGRAM P ESCRIPTIONS D FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE RESERVATION H P ISTORIC General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes This program fosters the economic ($464,632) (4.00) ($458,108) Transfer 2.0 Special ty Combination Inspector to the vitality and quality of life in Oakland by Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) and 2.0 to the means of education, regulations, and Development Services Fund (2415) incentives. Activities include (0.33) ($26,058) ($25,691) Transfer Planning Service Representative from the GPF to Fund 2415 maintaining a library/archive and citywide database on historic FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE ALL Other Funds properties; providing information to Changes Changes residents, real estate agents, 1.00 Add Building Services Manager to Fund 2415 $220,786 $223,947 developers, staff and environmental $231,358 $234,670 2.00 Add Process Coordinator II to Fund 2415 consultants about historic properties; 1.00 $136,746 $134,816 Add Process Coordinator III to Fund 2415 conducting design reviews involving Add Planner IV to Fund 2415 2.00 $312,172 $316,642 historic properties; and providing staff support to the Landmarks Preservation Add Planner III to Fund 2415 1.00 $128,396 $130,234 Advisory Board, which designates and 5.00 $339,905 $335,110 Add Office Assistant II to Fund 2415 reviews landmark projects. $73,113 1.00 $72,082 Add Account Clerk II to Fund 2415 Add Public Service Representative to Fund 2415 1.00 $78,960 $77,845 EIGHBORHOOD N IVABLE L ODE C Add Executive Assistant to the Director to Fund 2415 1.00 $116,757 $118,428 ERVICES S E NFORCEMENT $63,221 Upgrade a Business Analyst II to IV within Fund 2415 $62,329 This program enforces the California $531,582 Repayment of negative fund balance in Fund 2415 $654,368 Housing Law and the Oakland Municipal Code regulating the $611,908 $882,892 Add and reprogram O&M within Fund 2415 maintenance of buildings used for Transfer Special ty Combination Inspector to Fund 1720 from the $232,316 2.00 $229,054 human occupancy and the surrounding GPF property; land use activities on private $232,316 $229,054 2.00 Transfer Special ty Combination Inspector to Fund 2415 from the property, and the vending of food and GPF newspapers and the use of public 0.50 Transfer Public Service Representative to Fund 2415 from the $38,925 $39,483 telephones in the public right- of-way. Recycling Fund (1710) and the GPF (0.17) ($13,235) Transfer Public Service Representative from Fund 1710 to Fund ($13,424) 2415 ENERAL PDATE U Z & P LAN , ONING G FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE A S TRATEGIC NALYSIS Organizational Changes Changes Changes This program manages complex Transfer Engineer, Civil (Office) to OPW within Fund 2415 (1.00) ($172,654) ($175,125) vironmental environmental reviews (en impact reports or EIRs), including EIRs for new specific plan areas and comments on EIRs for other public agencies' projects. It works closely with applicants to expedite projects to the maximum extent feasible while ensuring good quality deve lopment, sensitivity to community issues, and legal defensibility. It manages a full caseload of active projects in various stages of review. G - 63

248 PLANNING & BUILDING NOTES G - 64

249 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND (CONT'D) OAKLAND FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 FY 2016-17 FY 2013-14 Actuals Adopted Unaudited Adopted PUBLIC WORKS Expenditures by Fund Budget Actuals Budget $2,897,432 $2,863,827 $3,732,290 $4,662,593 General Purpose Fund (GPF) 1010 Self Insurance Liability 7,699,552 7,634,623 1100 4,845,746 4,845,746 M ISSION S TATEMENT 272,940 271,443 130,266 Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 1150 58,710 1610 Successor Redevelopment Agency Reimbursement 78,477 26,311 - - Service to the public is our sole 1700 Mandatory Refuse Program 5,302 - - - reason for existence. Oakland Public 3,722,609 8,715,801 8,471,885 Recycling Program 1710 3,841,915 Works plans, builds and maintains Comprehensive Clean-up 17,430,275 19,136,220 1720 21,801,828 21,867,200 1730 Henry J Kaiser Convention Center 157 - - - Oakland’s physical and 1,944,177 1750 Multipurpose Reserve 1,835,982 1,946,959 2,033,253 infrastructure for the environmental 7,730 40,117 HUD-CDBG 2108 - - residents, businesses and visitors of - - 1,675 6,927 2000 Local Law Enforcement Block Grant 2111 the city, making it a sustainable and - - 2116 939,470 Department of Transportation 616,784 desirable place to live, work, invest 2125 Environmental Protection Agency - 601 - - and visit. 2128 - 68 Department of Health and Human Services - - 2129 Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF) State Grant 71,457 112,920 125,000 125,000 - 358,504 133,717 2134 California Parks and Recreation - 2136 California Water Resource Board 990 - - - G USINESS OALS B - - 120,190 1,416 California Department of Conservation 2139 - - 427,752 592,655 California Department of Transportation 2140 Improve livability through  153,632 2144 California Housing and Community Development - 81,158 - sustainable practices for cleaning - - 125,091 128,267 California Integrated Waste Management Board 2154 and maintaining streets, trees, 2158 - - 55,303 6,622 5th Year State COPS Grant, AB 1913, Statutes of 2000 sidewalks, parks, and facilities. 128,863 State of Cal ifornia O ther 124,889 2159 - - - 2160 County of Alameda: Grants (13,405) 41,846 -  Maintain the City’s infrastructure 85,967 Metro Transportation Com: TDA 2162 - - 54,368 to meet current and future needs - - Metro Transportation Com: Program Grant 264,030 17,177 2163 of our neighborhoods, support - - (12) 394,483 Prop 1B Nov 2006 CA Trans Bond 2165 development, and reduce the City’s - (32,258) 49,812 Bay Area Air Q uality Management District 2166 - exposure to liability. - - Alameda County: Source Reduction & Recycling 184,925 429,880 2175 3,124,133 3,064,908 4,922,546 5,119,984 Measure B: ACTIA 2211  Create a sustainable City through 525,589 522,454 519,796 443,808 Measure B: Bicycle/Pedestrian Pass-Thru Funds 2212 implementing green buil dings, - 2214 ACTIA Reimbursable Grants (65,160) 44,728 - renewable energy and efficiency 2,105,164 640,549 349,782 Measure F - Vehicle Registration Fee 2,109,322 2215 projects, alternative fueled - - Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation 2216 5,588,988 2,871,599 vehicles, and recycling/solid waste 2230 7,072,038 9,202,355 6,864,752 6,951,149 State Gas Tax services. 1,582,985 2231 State Gas Tax-Prop 42 Replacement Funds 4,909,423 4,963,960 1,950,733  Leverage existing resources by - 13,401 - 2260 Measure WW: East Bay Regional Parks District Local 58,775 2310 15,508,850 17,076,499 Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 29,773,217 15,544,496 seeking grants, public private - 2321 Wildland Fire Prevention Assess District 607 - - partnerships, and by enhancing 5,775,370 5,398,060 2415 Development Service Fund 3,108,239 3,616,840 volunteerism and sponsorship 562,837 2416 Traffic Safety Fund 399,547 306,020 560,829 opportunities. 2606 Metro Transportation Commission (ARRA) 23,172 - - -  Foster collaborative opportunities - - - (11,410) 2610 State Water Control Board-CWSRF Prog (ARRA) with other agencies and 298,493 Public Works Grants 280,000 280,000 318,069 2990 2999 - - 652,543 292,932 Miscellaneous Grants individuals to improve service 3100 Sewer Service Fund 30,564,785 31,733,241 32,157,394 32,244,370 . delivery 500,000 3150 Sewer Rate Stabil ization Fund - - 500,000 Continue focusing on high -quality  3200 Golf Course 5,688 5,214 - - service and customer satisfaction Equi pment 23,423,655 4100 29,155,367 29,595,255 23,458,727 to be the “provider of choice” for Radio / Telecommunications 23,046 5,089 4200 - - our customers. 4400 24,261,430 26,679,422 City Facilities 28,582,429 28,170,132 4450 City Facilities Energy Conservation Projects 262,669 201,895 - - - 179,059 161,379 Piedmont Pines Underground Assessment District - 5055 P D ESCRIPTIONS ROGRAM - 2012 Reassessment Project Fund 5057 175,182 - 514 - 5130 Rockridge: Library Assessment District 9,749 29,820 - 22,005 - 5200 JPFA Capital Projects: Series 2005 (6,953) - DMINISTRATION A - 5320 Measure DD: 2003A Clean Water,Safe Parks & Open - 30,081 13,738 Administration supports the Public 5321 - 1,770,402 1,762,846 Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water,Safe Parks & Open - Works core functions by providing 5500 Municipal Capital Improvement 15,432 20,131 - - management, administration, fiscal Municipal Capital Improvement: Public Arts 136 - 5505 - - services, human resources support, 5510 Capital Reserves 16,195 11,831 - - business G - 65

250 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY FUND (CONT'D) ROGRAM ESCRIPTIONS P D FY 2013-14 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 DMINISTRATION D A ) ( CONT ’ Actuals Adopted Unaudited Adopted Expenditures by Fund Budget Actuals Budget and information analysis, safety Central District Projects - 605,327 877,827 - 5610 program, public information and - - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2003 145,593 (1,736) 5611 operation of the Public Works Call Central District: TA Bonds Series 2005 16,621 - - - 5612 Center , which handled over 60,000 in 5613 Central District: TA Bonds Series 2009T - - - 1,152,047 2014. 5630 Broadway/MacArthur/San Pablo Projects 520 - - - Central City East Projects - 5640 1,010 419 - - - 5643 Central City East TA Bonds Series 2006A-T (Taxable) 168,228 967,884 ISABILITIES CT A D MERICANS WITH A - - 364,699 43,976 Coliseum Projects 5650 ADA Programs provides 98,852 Coliseum: TA Bonds Series 2003 - - 5653 115,779 comprehensive access compliance Coliseum: TA Bonds Series 2006B-TE (Tax Exempt) - - - 553 5655 as well departments activities to City - 63,501 - 5656 9,930 Coliseum: TA Bonds Series 2006B-T (Taxable) as the disability, business and - - 27,585 23,595 West O akl and Projects 5660 - - 5670 O akland Base Reuse Authority 6,760 (6,760) nonprofit communities, as mandated - - O BRA: Leasing & Util ity 127,025 22,322 5671 by Title II of the Americans with 12,075 5672 - - 28,674 Joint Army Base Infrastructure Disabilities Act. ADA divides staffing - 2,000 12,501 Miscellaneous Capital Projects 5999 - resources between physical and 1,800,114 - 2013 LED Streetlight Acquisition Lease Financing - 1,768,063 6013 ADA programmatic responsibilities. - - 2,250 - Oakland Municipal Employees' Retirement System 7120 support multimillion dollar 7390 Oakland Museum of CA Foundation Museum - - 540,033 - infrastructur e improvement 7540 21,360 22,468 - - O akland Public Library Trust programs, major settlement (685,314) (317,165) (315,198) (69,152) Grant Clearing 7760 $185,026,087 $178,922,759 $161,919,550 $161,487,326 TOTAL agreements, and citywide staff s accommodation efforts. It also 2.1% 2.5% 1.8% 1.8% GPF Percent to Total Department the Commission on Persons with 0.5% 0.5% 0.7% 1.0% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures Disabilities and Commission on Aging. AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM (CONT'D) ACILITIES UILDINGS AND B F FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FY 2014-15 AINTENANCE M ANAGEMENT AND M Adopted Adopted Midcycle Program Budget Budget Authorized Oakland Public Works provides FTE FTE FTE custodial services, security, 51.20 Agency Administration 50.00 51.20 preventative and general 1150 - Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims 1.50 1.50 1.50 maintenance to approximately 300 -owned buildings (estimated 2.5 City 2.00 2.00 2.00 1720 - Comprehensive Clean-up million square feet) ranging in size 1.00 1.00 1.00 2230 - State Gas Tax from Police Administration Building 1.00 1.00 1.00 3100 - Sewer Service Fund (147,900 sq. ft.) to the FROG Park 1.00 1.00 5321 - Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water,Safe Parks & Open 1.00 Space Trust Fund for Oakland restroom (40 sq. ft.). In Fiscal Year’s 43.50 44.70 44.70 7760 - Grant Clearing 15 Council allocated $1million 2013- 3.00 Americans with Disabilities Act 3.00 3.00 per year in funding for minor capital - 0.25 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) - , which has improvement repairs 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA 0.75 0.75 0.75 been used to address immediate 4400 - City Facilities - 0.25 0.25 g repairs to building systems, lightin 2.00 2.00 2.00 7760 - Grant Clearing upgrades, theft and vandalism Buildings & Facilities Management & Maintenance 130.58 127.08 127.08 and overall extending the damage, 21.00 21.00 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 21.00 life and improving the conditions of 4400 - City Facilities 109.58 106.08 106.08 city facilities. 5.34 Electrical Projects 5.34 5.34 5.00 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA - - E LECTRICAL P ROJECTS 2215 - Measure F - Vehicle Registration Fee - 5.00 5.00 Electrical staff provides design 0.34 2416 - Traffic Safety Fund 0.34 0.34 services and electrical engineering Engineering Design 52.50 57.60 57.60 review for project development and 2.15 1.65 2.15 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA construction. Utility coordination, 2415 - Development Service Fund 22.10 23.10 23.10 planning, design and facilitation of 1.20 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 1.20 1.20 assessment engineering are provided 7760 - Grant Clearing 27.55 31.15 31.15 for the utility undergrounding 55.00 Fleet & Equipment Management & Maintenance 55.00 55.00 program. 4100 - Equipment 55.00 55.00 55.00 G - 66

251 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS (CONT'D) AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM D ESCRIPTIONS P ROGRAM FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 D NGINEERING E ESIGN Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program Engineering Design provides long - Authorized Budget Budget range planning for critical FTE FTE FTE infrastructure in Oakland as well as 81.50 Keep Oakland Clean & Beautiful 81.50 81.50 project management, engineering - 1.00 - 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) and inspection services for City 80.30 80.30 79.30 1720 - Comprehensive Clean-up assets, including sanitary sewer 1.20 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 1.20 1.20 rehabilitation, major street 8.00 8.00 8.00 Parking Management – Meter Repair improvements, pavement 8.00 8.00 8.00 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) tation, bridge rehabilitation, rehabili 87.44 75.84 87.44 Parks, Grounds & Medians storm drainage, and sidewalks. The - 8.50 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) - program manages the work of public 1720 - Comprehensive Clean-up 51.48 51.48 29.00 utilities and private excavations 35.96 35.96 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 38.34 within City streets. This program also 44.35 43.65 Project Delivery 44.35 provides project management 0.30 0.60 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA 0.30 services on a wide variety of 2999 - Miscellaneous Grants - 0.80 0.80 technical projects in support of other 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 3.60 3.30 3.30 City departments. The program is a 0.50 0.50 0.50 4400 - City Facilities key resource in emergency response - - 5321 - Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water,Safe Parks & Open 0.80 to assess and manage critical Space Trust Fund for Oakland infrastructure. 39.45 38.15 7760 - Grant Clearing 39.45 9.50 9.50 9.50 Recycling & Solid Waste 9.50 8.00 1710 - Recycling Program 9.50 LEET AND QUIPMENT E F - 1.50 7760 - Grant Clearing - M ANAGEMENT AND M AINTENANCE Sanitary Sewer Management & Maintenance 75.50 77.50 77.50 The City of Oakland owns and 1.00 2215 - Measure F - Vehicle Registration Fee - 1.00 75.50 3100 - Sewer Service Fund operates 1,469 vehicles and major 76.50 76.50 ipment. The City’s fleet pieces of equ 46.00 43.00 Street & Sidewalk Management & Maintenance 46.00 has been reduced by over 350 1010 - General Purpose Fund (GPF) 3.00 - - vehicles in in the last ten years. A - 1720 - Comprehensive Clean-up 2.00 2.00 full -time City staff of 55 mechanics, - 2216 - Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation 11.27 4.00 Commission Sales Tax service workers, technicians, and 11.90 2230 - State Gas Tax 11.90 18.34 administrative staff completing over 15.18 2231 - State Gas Tax-Prop 42 Replacement Funds 7.92 8.92 13,000 vehicle service and repair 12.92 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 12.74 12.91 ity’s aging work orders keep the C Street Light Management & Maintenance 7.99 7.99 7.66 fleet at an 88% availability rate. The - 1.00 1.00 2215 - Measure F - Vehicle Registration Fee average fleet vehicle is 10.7 years old 4.83 - - 2216 - Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation which is more than twice the 5.2 - Commission Sales Tax year replacement age recommended 2230 - State Gas Tax 4.99 1.16 1.16 by the National Association of Fleet 1.00 2.00 6.50 2231 - State Gas Tax-Prop 42 Replacement Funds Administrators (NAFA). Currently, 15.50 15.50 15.50 Sustainable Oakland Program over 55% of City vehicles are over 1710 - Recycling Program 6.83 6.83 3.83 the NAFA recommended - - 1720 - Comprehensive Clean-up 3.00 replacement age. A continued 0.47 2990 - Public Works Grants 0.47 0.47 investment in regular replacement 1.40 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 1.40 1.40 cycles for equipment will 2.60 4400 - City Facilities 2.60 2.60 increase availability, reduce total 1.00 1.00 1.00 4450 - City Facilities Energy Conservation Projects operating costs, and reduce the fleet's carbon footprint. 3.20 3.20 7760 - Grant Clearing 3.20 7.67 7.67 8.00 Traffic Signal Management & Maintenance 1.33 1.33 - 2215 - Measure F - Vehicle Registration Fee O K AKLAND C LEAN AND EEP 4.50 - 2216 - Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation - B EAUTIFUL Commission Sales Tax The Keep Oakland Clean and 2230 - State Gas Tax 0.83 5.33 0.83 Beautiful program maintains and 0.67 2231 - State Gas Tax-Prop 42 Replacement Funds 6.83 0.67 enhances the cleanliness, health, and 0.34 0.34 2416 - Traffic Safety Fund 0.34 appearance of City streets and neighborhoods. Activities include annual) response to 20,000 service G - 67

252 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS AUTHORIZED POSITIONS BY PROGRAM (CONT'D) P ROGRAM ESCRIPTIONS D FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 EEP O AKLAND LEAN AND K C Adopted Adopted Midcycle B CONT ’ ( ) D EAUTIFUL Program Authorized Budget Budget FTE FTE FTE requests for removal of illegal dumping; abatement of over 100 18.00 18.00 Traffic Signs & Markings Management & Maintenance 18.00 homeless encampments annually; 2230 - State Gas Tax 17.00 17.00 17.00 removal of 800,000 sq. ft. of graffiti; 2416 - Traffic Safety Fund 1.00 1.00 1.00 support for volunteer cleanup and Transportation & Pedestrian Safety 25.00 26.00 25.00 beautification events; special events 1.00 1.00 8.82 1750 - Multipurpose Reserve support; and street sweeping of 614 4.40 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA 5.20 4.40 routes monthly to improve the 7.20 2216 - Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation 7.20 - quality of life for Oakland residents 0.20 2416 - Traffic Safety Fund 0.20 0.20 and comply with Clean Water 0.10 0.10 3100 - Sewer Service Fund - regulations. - 5611 - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2003 - 0.07 - 0.31 5613 - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2009T - 12.10 7760 - Grant Clearing 11.40 12.10 ARKING M ANAGEMENT – M ETER P Transportation Planning & Funding 11.40 9.40 11.40 EPAIR R 2.50 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA 1.50 1.50 Oakland has a total of about 7,900 2212 - Measure B: Bicycle/Pedestrian Pass-Thru Funds - 1.70 1.70 parking spaces. It consists of an 1.00 2415 - Development Service Fund 1.00 1.00 estimated 3,900 single parking meter 7760 - Grant Clearing 7.20 5.90 7.20 multi spaces and 567 -space parking 15.00 15.00 Tree Management & Maintenance 15.00 meters that control about 4,000 15.00 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 15.00 15.00 parking spaces. Single space meters 31.50 31.50 Watershed & Storm Drain Management & Maintenance 31.50 have been upgraded to utilize 0.90 2990 - Public Works Grants 1.00 0.90 modern technology and accept 26.30 3100 - Sewer Service Fund 27.10 26.30 various credit cards for payment. 2.90 5321 - Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water,Safe Parks & Open 2.00 2.90 -space parking meters will be Multi 1.40 1.40 7760 - Grant Clearing 1.40 replaced within the next Budget 785.57 764.47 TOTAL 785.57 Cycle. Revenue generated from citations goes directly to the General Purpose Fund. SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM (CONT'D) ARKS ROUNDS AND G , EDIANS P M M AINTENANCE Revenue Oakland Public Works provides FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 landscape maintenance, litter Adopted Midcycle Adopted Program removal and homeless encampment Budget Budget Budget abatement for 134 parks and public Administration $65,560 $0 $0 - spaces. This includes two region 27,899,929 Buildings & Facilities Management & Maintenance 30,915,787 31,328,084 serving parks, nine community Engineering Design 9,519,979 10,880,104 8,274,172 parks, 53 neighborhood parks, 15 20,029,982 23,464,248 23,429,176 Fleet & Equipment Management & Maintenance special use parks, 26 athletic fields, 22,240,024 19,231,270 Keep O akland Clean & Beautiful 22,209,205 -parks, linear parks, plus many mini 740,000 Parks, Grounds and Medians - - and public grounds. There are 129,200 129,200 129,200 Project Delivery another 1,055 acres of Resource 4,366,650 Recycling & Solid Waste 9,299,858 4,382,556 Conservation Area (open space) 3,774,814 Safety & Liability 3,524,791 3,774,814 prima rily in the Oakland hills. 60,000,515 Sanitary Sewer Management & Maintenance 67,185,187 59,086,906 Approximately 100 landscaped 23,812,755 11,159,452 Street & Sidewalk Management & Maintenance 18,902,795 medians and streetscapes are also Street Light Management & Maintenance 1,585,850 123,350 123,350 included in the City's park 191,495 191,495 Sustainable O akland Program 191,495 maintenance responsibility along Traffic Signal Management & Maintenance 123,350 131,710 131,710 with grounds at City facilities. 17,000 17,000 17,000 Traffic Signs & Markings Management & Maintenance New and renovated parks and plans Transportation & Pedestrian Safety 20,963,223 20,180,199 20,092,584 are being developed primarily 2,846,342 Transportation Planning & Funding 1,103,350 1,324,511 funde -supported Measure d by voter Tree Management & Maintenance 17,500 57,500 57,500 DD (2002 Oakland Trust for Clean Watershed & Storm Drain Management & Maintenance 210,000 235,000 235,000 Water & Safe Parks), Measure WW (2008 Preserve Open Space for TOTAL $191,751,169 $202,434,771 $195,867,787 Recreation and Wildlife Habitat), G - 68

253 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL AND ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM (CONT'D) ROGRAM D ESCRIPTIONS P Expenditure G , ARKS M P ROUNDS AND EDIANS ’ ) CONT ( AINTENANCE M D FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 Midcycle Adopted Adopted Program State Park Bond Funds (2002 Budget Budget Budget California Clean Water, Clean Air, ($2,816,927) ($3,149,249) ($3,418,974) Agency Administration Safe Neighborhood Parks, and 643,384 Americans with Disabilities Act 647,723 613,577 Coastal Protection Act) and Buildings & Facilities Management & Maintenance 29,384,518 29,859,083 27,569,149 Redevelopment funds (still funding 1,428,930 1,273,836 Electrical Projects 1,427,852 projects in process). Bonds and 9,323,176 9,267,782 8,024,302 Engineering Design former Redevelopment funds are Fleet & Equipment Management & Maintenance 22,935,652 22,970,724 18,072,022 restricted to supporting the creation 15,546,054 16,455,229 Keep O akland Clean & Beautiful 16,392,237 of a park or other facility, and are not 2,682,888 Parking Management – Meter Repair 2,782,261 2,749,293 available to fund staff or materials Parks, Grounds & Medians 10,661,150 11,250,678 11,264,655 for ongoing maintenance. No funds Project Delivery 3,521,483 2,890,895 2,999,516 have been budgeted to maintain 8,160,250 2,077,630 Recycling & Solid Waste 2,001,403 these newly constructed parks. Park Safety & Liability 8,620,560 8,620,560 8,049,612 maintenance staffing levels for 19,546,050 19,667,613 Sanitary Sewer Management & Maintenance 21,010,575 fulltime staff was reduced nearly 8,911,412 8,845,286 7,443,253 Street & Sidewalk Management & Maintenance 50% in 20 08. These reductions have 3,826,903 3,868,699 4,954,236 Street Light Management & Maintenance impacted the maintenance; resulting 2,864,434 2,803,520 2,786,594 Sustainable O akland Program in a look and feel that Oakland parks Traffic Signal Management & Maintenance 1,960,328 2,362,421 2,323,623 are unkempt and have increased risk 3,271,870 3,245,566 3,122,948 Traffic Signs & Markings Management & Maintenance to the City. 5,559,177 $5,634,529 $5,666,841 Transportation & Pedestrian Safety $2,204,883 1,580,544 Transportation Planning & Funding $2,275,377 AFETY AND L IABILITY S $3,085,450 2,993,452 Tree Management & Maintenance $3,109,771 Serves all Public Works employees 4,924,931 Watershed & Storm Drain Management & Maintenance 5,267,660 5,307,097 and aggressively addresses and $157,801,081 $161,487,326 $161,919,550 TOTAL improves issues of employee safety and training. Reduces workers compensation claims, increases the number of employees returning to work, and decreasing the amount of exposure and liability to the city. SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE (CONT'D) Activities within the program include lth training in sound safety and hea FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) practices, developing and enforcing Changes Changes safety and health rules, and ($374,518) ($373,299) Transfer Landscape and Maintenance Personnel to the (8.50) investigating every accident Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) promptly and thoroughly to Transfer Public Works Maintenance Workers and O &M to Fund (2.00) ($323,400) ($325,434) determine cause and implement 1720 proper measures to prevent Transfer Public Works Supervisor I to the State Gas Tax Fund ($110,337) (1.00) ($111,917) recurrence. This program works (2230) closely with the City Attorney’s ($100,115) (1.00) Transfer Painter to Fund 1720 ($101,548) Office, the City’s Risk Management ($25,151) Transfer Administrative Assistant II to the Facil ities Fund (0.25) ($24,796) Division and the third party (4400) administrator. Reduction in Overheads due to personnel transfers to other ($99,017) - ($99,017) Funds EWER S ANITARY S ANAGEMENT M FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE M AINTENANCE AND ALL Other Funds Changes Changes The City of Oakland has 929 miles of Recycling Program Fund (1710) -maintained sanitary sewer City Transfer of Environmental Personnel - Management Intern, $855,416 $860,301 3.00 pipes, seven pump stations, and over Program Analyst II, Program Analyst III and O &M from Fund 27,000 manholes and structures. 1720 Most of Oakland’s sewer system is 60 ($6,280,000) ($6,185,000) Reduction in Recycling contract expenses due to new to 70 years old. During storm events, franchise sewer flows are significantly increased due to infiltration and inflow (I/I) of storm water into the sanitary sewer system. The Sewer G - 69

254 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS ROGRAM D ESCRIPTIONS P SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE (CONT'D) FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE M EWER ANAGEMENT S S ANITARY ALL Other Funds Changes Changes ) ’ CONT ( D AINTENANCE M AND Comprehensive Clean-up Fund (1720) Service Charge that is collected from ($860,301) ($855,416) (3.00) Transfer of Environmental Personnel - Management Intern, all properties pays for the operating Program Analyst II, Program Analyst III and O&M to Fund and capital expenses of the program. 1710 The sanitary sewer collection system Transfer Landscape and Maintenance Personnel from the GPF 8.50 $373,299 $374,518 is a network of pipes, manholes, $323,400 2.00 Transfer Public Works Maintenance Workers and O &M from $325,434 -outs, pump stations, and other clean the GPF structures used to collect all 1.00 $101,548 Transfer Painter from the GPF $100,115 water and transport it to the waste East Bay Municipal Utility (EBMUD) Transfer Gardener II, Irrigation Specialist, and Park Attendant 11.17 $653,932 $659,364 interceptor and treatment plant. The PT from Fund 2310 City of Oakland sanitary sewer Multipurpose Reserve Fund (1750) system is a collection system only. ($1,677,224) (7.20) Transfer of Transportation Engineers and O&M to Fund 2216 ($1,692,357) Sewage treatment and disposal 0.38 Transfer of O &M and personnel costs from Central District $1,597,105 $1,596,372 occurs at the EBMUD Treatment Capital Bond Funds (5611 and 5613) due to the transfer of Facility near the Bay Bridg e and two O RA garages to the City other facilities —Oakport Wet - Weather Facility and San Antonio Measure B Fund (2211) -Weather Facility. Creek Wet Add Civil Engineer Office and Engineer Assistant II 0.40 $55,740 $56,536 $461,800 Add and reprogram O &M $459,730 Conditions such as ground movement, tree root intrusion, Measure B - Bicycle/Ped Fund (2212) quality of original pipe material, and 1.10 $148,297 $150,420 Add Program Analyst III other factors can significantly decrease the serviceability of sewer Measure F - Vehicle Registration Fund (2215) pipes and manholes. In 1987, a long - 2.33 Transfer of personnel from Fund 2231 due to the reduction in $306,997 $311,340 term capital improvement program gas tax revenues was initiated to rehabilitate about $1,636,422 6.00 $1,636,571 Transfer of personnel and O&M from Fund 2230, Fund 2231 25% of sewer lines that contributed and Administrative Assistant I from Fund 3100 to wet weather overflows. In 2010, Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation Fund (2216) the City, in response to EPA $0 16.60 Transfer of personnel from Fund 2230 due to the reduction in $1,962,865 -year flow mandates, started a two gas tax revenues ng and modeling project to meteri 7.20 $1,677,224 $1,692,357 Transfer of Transportation Engineers and O&M from Fund evaluate system capacity and plan for 1750 the next long -term capital $1,000,000 $500,000 Set-aside funding for the Department of Transportation improvements, with an objective to improve pipe conditions and reduce $542,000 $542,000 Add Pothole and Seam Sealing Crew (1 FTE Street Maintenance 4.00 -weather flows. In 2014, the City wet Leader and 3 FTE Public Works Maintenance Workers) and O&M and the US EPA, along with other reed on a East Bay communities, ag State Gas Tax Fund (2230) 22- year landmark sewer consent 14.93 Transfer of personnel from Fund 2231 due to the reduction in $0 $1,729,745 decree to continue its sewer gas tax revenues rehabilitation program at a rate of 13 Transfer of personnel to Fund 2216 due to the reduction in gas (16.60) ($1,962,865) $0 miles per year. The agreement also tax revenues called for other operational changes 1.00 Transfer Public Works Supervisor I to the State Gas Tax Fund $111,917 $110,337 including 5 -year cyclic system (2230) from the General Purpose Fund (1010) -year cyclic system cleaning, 10 State Gas Tax - Prop 42 Replacement Fund (2231) root inspection, -foaming and other asset management practices needed ($2,036,742) Transfer of personnel to Funds 2230, 2215 & 2216 due to the ($2,274,205) (18.93) reduction in gas tax revenues to reduce sanitary sewer overflows and decrease wet -weather flows into Lighting & Landscape Assessment District Fund (2310) EBMUD facilities. Add O&M for increase in utility costs $488,804 $493,765 ($659,364) Transfer Gardener II, Irrigation Specialist, and Park Attendant ($653,932) (11.17) PT to Fund 1720 Lake Merritt Maintenance funding (transfer from the GPF) $400,000 $400,000 Parks Prioritization Study (transfer from the GPF) $185,000 $15,000 G - 70

255 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS ESCRIPTIONS D CONT ’ D ) ( ROGRAM P (CONT'D) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE S S TREET AND IDEWALK ALL Other Funds Changes Changes ANAGEMENT AND AINTENANCE M M Development Services Fund (2415) The City of Oakland has 806 miles of $172,654 $175,125 Transfer Civil Engineer from Department of Planning and 1.00 -maintained streets. Buses use City Building 150 miles of these streets. Bike $695,000 Add O&M (revenue supported) $666,280 facilities are designated on200 miles of streets. Pavement condition is Revolving funds for private property sidewalk repair $400,000 - rated by a “Pavement Condition Sewer Service Fund (3100) Index” (PCI), a regionally used $23,766 $24,094 Delete Project Manager and Electrician and add Program ranking that rates the condition of Analyst III and Maintenance Mechanic ets on a zero to 100 point system. stre ($86,269) (1.00) ($87,504) Transfer Administrative Assistant I to Fund 2215 th Oakland currently ranks 98 out of $386,182 $386,195 Add and reprogram O &M 109 Bay Area cities in PCI, with a -year average PCI of 60. three The Equipment Fund (4100) current backlog of street $487,166 $485,380 Add O&M for fuel and other supplies and equipment rehabilitation is $443 Million and is growing. Maintaining the existing Facilities Fund (4400) on Oakland’s pavement condition Freeze Stationery Engineer, Custodians and Maintenance ($292,506) ($296,222) (3.50) streets would require an estimated Mechanic, PT $28 million annually, while our 0.25 $24,796 Transfer Administrative Assistant II to the Facil ities Fund $25,151 annual funding for this purpose is (4400) from the General Purpose Fund (1010) totally dependent on federal, state, $550,000 O ne-time funding for City Hall Fire Alarm System (transfer and county allocations which have from the GPF) been less than $6 million in recent Grant Clearing Fund (7760) years. The recent passage of 3.60 $501,641 $508,820 Add Civil Engineer Office and Engineer Assistant II sure BB will hopefully allow Mea 1.00 Add Public Service Representative $82,257 $81,096 Oakland to better address this key asset. 0.90 $121,334 $123,071 Add Program Analyst III The City of Oakland also has 1,100 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 FTE Organizational Changes Changes Changes miles of sidewalk, 17,800 curb ramp locations, and 232 developed stairs Transfer Ball Fields crew from O akland Parks & Recreation to $397,423 $392,710 6.29 O akland Public Works A majority of and pathways. Oakland’s sidewalks, stairs, and paths are in acceptable condition, while 60% of the curb ramps are non- compliant -existing. Oakland or non (HPS) to LED lighting. In general, the initiatives, and leads internal is committed to a long -term plan to fully streetlights in Oakland meet the levels sustainability teams. upgrade all curb ramps and to improve in the Street Lighting Warrants ing The program is dedicated to reduc the condition of sidewalks throughout approved by City Council; however, energy consumption in and maintaining the City. there are areas that could benefit from environmental compliance for enhanced lighting due to increased municipal facilities, conducting pedestrian usage or unsolicited activity. ANAGEMENT AND M TREET L IGHT S environmental assessment and cleanup M AINTENANCE of open spaces, rights- of -way, ROGRAM P AKLAND O USTAINABLE S Oakland has approximately 37,000 waterways and development projects, streetlights covering over 800 miles of The Sustainable Oakland Program leads and implementing broad based roadways and pedestrian passages. the protection of Oakland’s natural ect throughout the sustainability proj Most of the lights are mounted on resources and the improvement to community. The Program supports the wooden poles and fed directly overhead health of our community through efforts of community volunteers to from PG&E. Of the 37,000 streetlights, energy efficiency and increased use of clean, green, and beautify Oakland's 30,000 are “Light Emitting Diode renewable energy sources, pollution streets, parks, and creeks through the (LED)”fixtures on tall poles, while about prevention, environmental cleanup and Adopt a Spot program, and major 7,000 are ornamental p edestrian lights. ation, and promotion of restor beautification events such as Earth Day In FY 2013 -14, City staff responded to sustainability. The program tracks and Creek to Bay Day. 1,901 street lighting service requests Oakland’s progress in becoming a more The program aggressively seeks grants and repaired 1,775 streetlights. In sustainable city, coordinates climate to support these efforts enabling addition, the City converted 30,000 change mitigation and adaptation Oakland to be a top 10 green city in the street lights from High Pressure Sodium nation. G - 71

256 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS D ESCRIPTIONS ( ROGRAM ’ D ) P CONT ORGANIZATIONAL CHART BY PROGRAM S IGNAL ANAGEMENT AND T RAFFIC M M AINTENANCE Oakland’s streets include 677 signalized intersections (which include 18,000 traffic signals and 4,000 pedestri an walk/don’t walk - signals). Signals are reviewed and re timed on the average of once every five to ten years due to the large number of signals (higher than most cities of comparable size) and few staff to collect the traffic counts necessary to make sign al timing changes. Much of the City’s signal equipment is obsolete and/or not compatible with modern communication systems. Maintenance of traffic signals is provided by City staff. The City has developed an Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Master Plan to upgrade and manage the signal system along major corridors. Only a fraction of the system has been built. A Traffic Management Center (TMC) was recently completed and serves as the nerve center for ITS corridors. New areas will be added as part of transportation projects and as funding opportunities become available. T IGNS AND M ARKINGS RAFFIC S M AINTENANCE M ANAGEMENT AND There are over 3,500 signal poles, and on average, 100 traffic signal poles have to be replaced each year from damages. Oakland's streets also include 200,000 traffic signs, 3,600 , and legends are miles of lane striping designed using the California Manual affic Control Devices of uniform Tr specifications and standards as dictated by 23 CFR 655.603. These signs, stripes, and legends are are maintained daily by City staff, and through the course of yearly paving heads, pavement markings. The contracts for streets identified in the pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and curbside program also provides Five -Year Paving Plan. In addition, transit riders on City streets, with management of residential blue zones, striping is maintained as hazards are particular emphasis around schools, and other parking zones to enhance identified or on a complaint basis. parks, senior centers and other public neighborhood economic activity,. This places. Activities include a ssessing program also promotes alternative risks, designing traffic calming systems RANSPORTATION AND EDESTRIAN P T modes of transportation such as and other engineering approaches to S AFETY walking and bicycling. making our community safer, installing The Transportation and Pedestrian or upgrading traffic signals and safety Safety program advances safety for devices, audible pedestrian signal G - 72

257 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS - MRP) that mandates the City been planted by Urban Releaf, Sierra D ESCRIPTIONS ’ D ) ( P CONT ROGRAM implement numerous programs Club, West Oakland Greening Initiative including : New development and h omeowners, far fewer than and T P LANNING AND RANSPORTATION redevelopment permitting and 2006 when the City had a tree pre- F UNDING , Industrial and enforcement planting crew that planted over 1,000 Transportation Planning and Funding commercial site inspections, trees a year. coordinates the grant application enforcement, and control, Illicit Tree staff is also responsible for prioriti zation and submittal process for discharge detection and elimination, processing over 200 tree permits transportation projects and provides Construction site inspections, annually under the City Tree and View review of the impact of large private enforcement, and controls, Public dous Ordinances. All permits and hazar development on transportation. information and outreach, Water tree requests must be inspected by an Deliverables include transportation quality monitoring, Trash load Arboricultural Inspector or Tree policies and long -range plans, bicycle reduction, Mercury, PCBs, copper and Supervisor. There are currently two and pedestrian plans in keeping with legacy pesticide, PBDE, and selenium positions which handle this work. the complete streets Policy. This is Development of plans for controls and Tree Services staffing was reduced by achieved through community outreach, implementation of green infrastructure. 50% since 2006. Tree services are corridor planning, development project The City of Oakland has no fund source limited to managing emergency tree review and the update and dedicated to managing storm water or response. The City ended the tree implementation of the General Plan for water quality compliance. Without a planting and aesthetic tree pruning Circulation Element and TOD and dedicated source of funding for ongoing program in 2008. -First policies. The Division Transit maintenance, capital improvements, coordinates planning of large -scale and water quality efforts the existing transportation projects with AC D RAIN W ATERSHED AND S TORM storm water system will continue to Transit, BART, Caltrans, and the Port of M ANAGEMENT AND M AINTENANCE deteriorate, damage related to flooding Oakland. and infrastructure failure will increase The City’s storm water infrastructure and compliance with water quality includes more than 402 miles of pipe M T REE ANAGEMENT AND regulations will be jeopardized. Much that range from 6” to 98” in diameter, AINTENANCE M of the system is now nearing the end of including trash collection devices such its useful life and is in need of as Vortex Units, 15,000 structures, and Oakland is known for its green tree If water quality replacement. over 80 miles of open creek. The -old Jack London -year canopy; the 100 regulatory requirements, such as trash water majority of the City’s storm Oak tree symbolizes our commitment reduction and PCB reduction are not infrastructure was constructed 60 to 80 to being a Green City. The urban forest tial fines met the City may face poten years ago. Since that time, very little to maintained by OPW consists of over from the Water Board and third party no upgrading of the system has taken 250,000 trees of which 42,642 are An average annual investment lawsuits. place. Much of the system has long street trees (per the 2008 Sidewalk of $20 to $25 million is needed for suffered from inadequate resources Survey ) plus trees found in public storm water system capital projects leading to increasing instances of parks, medians, streetscapes, and and maintenance and for water quality flooding, erosion, and pr operty damage. of -way, the exact within the street right- compliance. Additionally, the City of Oakland is number has not been quantified. water quality subject to storm Several hundred new street trees have regulations (Municipal Regional Permit G - 73

258 OAKLAND PUBLIC WORKS NOTES G - 74

259 TRANSPORTATION -street and the City of Oakland’s on Planning & Building Department with TRANSPORTATION off -street parking. development review, and by participating the development of To support programs and policies  specific and general plans and land -use that improve and expand ISSION S TATEMENT M related policies such as impact fees, transportation choices, such as car Conditions of Approval and parking sharing, bicycle sharing, on -demand To envision, plan, build, operate and requirements. sharing and transit pass ride- maintain a transportation system for the programs for residents and in partnership with City of Oakland - employees. APITAL C RY ELIVE D OMPLETE S TREETS C local transit providers and other Provides project management to  To operate an effective, responsive agencies - which provides safe, -modal develop and deliver multi and accountable organization that can equitable, and sustainable access and transportation, streetscape and public attract and retain top quality staff and mobility for residents, businesses and space improvements on time and on pro vide professional development visitors. budget, including planning and opportunities to all staff in order to development, fundraising, design and successfully innovate and implement UNDING F engineering, community involvement, the best practices to serve the , review and construction environmental evolving needs of residents. -16 Funds totaling $500,000 in FY 2015 management. Capital Projects also To measure performance, provide  and $1.0 million in FY 2016 -17 are set supports partner agencies including comprehensive information to the aside in Oakland Public Works, Measure BART and AC Transit, and other City public, and to guide inve stments in support the creation to BB Fund (2216), agencies, including the Port of Oakland, the City’s transportation assets to of this department. Planning & Building Department and the improve mobility and reduce Economic and Workforce Development operations and management costs Departmen t to realize significant where feasible. OALS G transportation improvements in the city. To attract new funding and manage  ESCRIPTIONS D IVISION D existing revenues to enhance, operate and maintain Oakland’s M OBILITY M ANAGEMENT P ARKING AND F THE O IRECTOR D O FFICE transportation policies, programs, -street parking and Manages the city’s off Directs and coordinates work for the services, and infrastructure. -street parking curb space, including on Department, including legal and including policy, parking infrastructure,  To develop and complete legislative issue s, and policy and meter management and enforcement to transportation capital projects procedure development, as well as other serve the public needs for private through a comprehensive process -departmental and inter -division inter vehicles, transit, taxis, commercial including visioning, planning, project special projects. Oversees loading, bicycle parking, parklets and identification and prioritization, administrative functions, including fiscal other public benefits. Develops and design, and project construction. and personnel management for administers programs and policies that  To support economic development Department. Manages Public improve and expand transportation and housing by implementing the sset Information, Data Analytics and A choices, such as car sharing, bi cycle major projects included in the Management. Collects, analyses, and sharing, and transit pass programs for tywide Transportation Alameda Coun distributes data to provide city and the residents and employees. Plan and local plans, including the public with timely, relevant information Oakland Army Base, the City’s Bicycle on transportation service and projects. AINTENANCE M NFRASTRUCTURE I and Pedestrian Master Plans, and Coordinates transportation asset Monitors the condition of city streets transit -oriented development at West management for cost-effective and and manages pavement maintenance, Oakland, Macarthur, Downtown, istration to transparent. Support Admin sidewalk repair, and bicycle Fruitvale and Coliseum BART develop and track performance metrics infrastructure. stations. for all assigned work. To work closely with BART, AC  LANNING AND P P , P OLICY ROGRAMMING TRANSPORTATION OPERA TIONS AND Transit, Capital Corridor, paratransit -range transportation Carries out long and others to achieve a state of good SAFETY planning, participates in regional repair and support transit service and - Operates and works to improve the day planning efforts to develop stations improvements. to-day operation of the City’s street transportation policy and projects, and  To accelerate the improvement, system, including paving design, traffic works t o identify funding to implement operation and maintenance of signals, and signs, and temporary Traffic the transportation elements of the City’s Oakland’s 805 miles of streets, 1,500 Management Plans. Implements Bicycle adopted plans and policies. Fosters miles of sidewalks, 150 blocks of path and Pedestrian Plan, including bike public and private partnerships to and stairways, and 671 traffic signals. parking, safety improvements, bicycle - support Oakland’s land use, economic related pavement markings, crosswalk To manage and improve performance  development and equity goals. Supports upgrades, signal management, and customer satisfaction with all of current planning by providing the wayfinding and safety signage. G - 75

260 TRANSPORTATION NOTES G - 76

261 NON -DEPARTMENTAL (cont'd) SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL EXPENDITURES AND PROPOSED BUDGET BY FUND NON- FY 2013-14 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Unaudited Actuals Adopted Adopted DEPARTMENTAL Expenditures by Fund Actuals Budget Budget $68,663,906 General Purpose Fund (GPF) $85,823,691 $72,798,414 1010 $73,435,370 400,786 954,863 - - Vital Services Stabilization Fund 1020 -Departmental comprises costs, Non 5,356,496 1100 Self Insurance Liability 8,245,821 5,114,643 8,255,252 programs, activities, debt and lease (2,847,975) (2,864,453) 1150 Worker's Compensation Insurance Claims (1,895,111) (1,869,329) payments that are not assignable to a 71,851,789 59,903,339 65,656,708 Pension Override Tax Revenue 1200 73,974,413 specific department. - - 162 Mandatory Refuse Program - 1700 Henry J Kaiser Convention Center - - 1,758,880 - 1730 8,057 Multipurpose Reserve 2,000,000 1750 5,200,000 (615) - - - 1760 Telecommunications Reserve 280,000 D ROGRAM ESCRIPTIONS P - 379 - 1770 Telecommunications Land Use - - 1,209,689 - 1791 Contract Administration Fee - CTIVITIES C ITYWIDE A Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 2310 (1,451) - 1,734,495 1,700,899 4,308,817 2419 Measure C: Transient O ccupancy Tax (TO T) Surcharge 3,403,325 4,086,694 4,152,272 Citywide Activities include s wide - - 6,543 2995 - Police Grants variety of city- wide costs and 3100 Sewer Service Fund 9,921,893 8,293,480 9,588,487 8,292,080 programs. The other major - - 4100 Equi pment (3,941) 158,878 component is subsidies to - 4200 Radio / Telecommunications - 38,625 - organizations outside City 4400 2,794,000 City Facilities (1,994) (4,483) 6,294,000 governments. Examples of city -wide - - 5311 Measure G: 2006 Zoo, Museum 2,161,727 2,563,431 Central District: TA Bonds Series 2003 5611 - 1,311,000 - - programs, and their annual costs, - 1,887,000 - - Central District: TA Bonds Series 2009T 5613 include the ; Joint Powers Authority 1,734,495 - - 2013 LED Streetlight Acquisition Lease Financing 6013 1,700,899 Membership ($150,0 00) and - 14,100,450 14,073,613 - 6014 Oakland Convention Center 1992 Business Improvement District - - 69,533,000 6027 JPFA Capital Projects: Series 2005 11,200,500 -owned assessment charges on City 8,963,070 8,962,970 Taxable Pension Obligation Bonds: 2012 Series-PFRS 8,966,222 6029 8,966,222 property. Examples of subsidies 6032 Taxable Pension Obligation: Series 2001 40,768,000 42,013,000 44,595,002 43,290,000 wide Arts Grants include City- 6036 18,017,919 17,726,599 17,511,159 17,142,673 JPFA Refunding Revenue Bonds: 2008 Series A-1 (Tax- ($730,000). Exempt Bonds ) 6037 JPFA Refunding Revenue Bonds: 2008 Series A-2 - - - 5,470,053 (Taxable Bonds) AYMENTS EASE /L EBT D P 6063 - 11,241,398 11,164,164 General Obligation Bonds: Series 2005 - 6064 144,345,935 14,736,725 5,632,522 GO Refunding Bonds, Series 2015A - Include payments for debt related to 1,323,863 Measure G: 2006 Zoo, Museum - 6311 1,637,470 - financing of City adm inistration 6,645,725 GOB Series 2012-Refunding Bonds 6312 6,651,475 6,667,977 6,661,227 buildings at Frank Ogawa Plaza ($9 - - 5,887,942 4,611,631 Measure DD: 2009B Clean Water, Safe Parks & Open 6321 various Information million);; Space Trust Fund for O akland Technology lease payments, such as 6455 - - 44 Piedmont Pines 2010 Utility Underground Phase I - - Debt Service costs for the an upgrade to Oracle 6540 32,448 75,819 21,476 Skyline Sewer District - Redemption 35,619 (the City’s financial system) and 236,169 236,169 6555 Piedmont Pines 2010 Utility Underground Phase I - 230,426 232,886 payment for the Oakland -Alameda Debt Service County Coliseum ($10 million). 6570 24,400 23,446 19,263 JPFA Pooled Assessment: 1996 Revenue Bonds - 28,000 Assessment 6587 395,820 399,175 377,771 381,121 2012 Refunding Reassessment Bonds-Debt Service ISCAL F ANAGEMENT M 9,066,350 9,059,156 9,065,650 9,060,638 6612 JPFA Lease Revenue Refunding Bonds (Admin Building): 2008 Series B Fiscal Management includes a variety 6999 21,500,000 21,500,000 Miscellaneous Debt Service - - of fiscal items such as fund transfers, - 7200 Health Insurance Premium Trust: Unrepresented (1,473) - (1,723) overhead cost recoveries, and Retirees contingency line items. The largest 7220 - - (1,677) Health Insurance Premium Trust: Local 790 Retirees (1,627) (122) - - (129) Health Insurance Premium Trust: Western Council of 7260 item is a cost recovery into the Engineers General Purpose Fund for $21.5 7280 - (21) - Health Insurance Premium Trust: I.B.E.W. (21) million from other funds. This 7300 - (4,070) (3,147) Health Insurance Premium Trust: Local 21 Retirees - sents a reimbursement for repre 9,381,820 8,462,481 18,580,952 7320 Police and Fire Retirement System Refinancing 8,296,216 services provided by General Annuity Trust 7640 Oakland Public Museum Trust 32,610 - 32,610 - Government departments such as $293,558,131 $494,534,558 $329,523,361 $305,203,325 TOTAL Personnel, the City Administrator, 23.9% 26.0% 14.8% 23.4% the City Attorney and Finance. Also GPF Percent to Total Department included in Fiscal Management are 14.8% 13.7% 15.4% 16.1% GPF Percent to Citywide GPF Expenditures payments from the General Purpose Fund to other funds with negative balances. G - 77

262 NON -DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL ADOPTED BUDGET BY PROGRAM Revenue FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2014-15 Adopted Adopted Midcycle Program Budget Budget Budget $20,186,563 $38,699,712 $35,998,545 Citywide Activities 207,357,210 205,328,856 230,045,076 Debt\Lease Payments 24,477,646 21,534,531 Fiscal Management 23,487,106 $289,530,727 TOTAL $249,078,304 $268,506,214 Expenditure FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Adopted Midcycle Adopted Program Budget Budget Budget $54,898,378 $44,745,850 $86,092,238 Citywide Activities Debt\Lease Payments 234,154,976 223,633,476 267,482,683 Fiscal Management 18,984,218 19,797,647 16,149,971 TOTAL $331,212,751 $329,523,361 $305,203,325 NON-DEPARTMENTAL - KEY ITEMS FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Expenditure Detail - General Purpose Fund (1010) Adopted Adopted Budget Budget $163,200 Business Improvement District Assessments $163,200 City Memberships (e.g. ABAG, League of CA Cities, etc.) 155,000 155,000 Civic Design Lab * 35,000 - 200,000 Contingency Reserves (Council and City Administrator's) 200,000 - 2,294,512 Contribution to 7.5% Reserve Requirement * 730,120 730,120 Cultural Funding Grants - 312,000 Day Laborer Contract * Employee Appreciation & Training * 500,000 - 10,321,647 13,198,175 Employee Compensation set-aside (including unrepresented) Exempt Part-Time Position Conversion 300,000 700,000 Fire Alarm System updgrade * 550,000 - Graffiti Enforcement * 100,000 - Head Start and O ther Grant O verhead Subsidies 3,623,523 3,516,473 Human Services and O ther Minor Grant Subsidies * 2,501,793 2,688,112 Information Technology Debt Service 3,684,274 3,684,274 Lake Merritt Maintenance 400,000 400,000 Library System Support * 500,000 500,000 70,000 Mayor's Summer Job Program 70,000 Museum Contract 5,080,360 4,880,444 National Night O ut 15,000 15,000 O ther Post Empl oyment Benefit (O PEB) * 12,607,089 3,400,786 Park Prioritization * 185,000 15,000 Safe Passages 150,000 150,000 Scotlan Convention Center Support 720,000 720,000 Set-Aside for Limited Public Financing 77,500 77,500 20,000 20,000 Sister Cities Vital Services Stabilization Fund * 954,862 400,786 Water Conservation * 100,000 - Wildfire Prevention * 500,000 - TOTAL $46,850,880 $35,684,870 * One-time funding G - 78

263 NON -DEPARTMENTAL SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE General Purpose Fund (GPF) Changes Changes Civic Design Lab $0 $35,000 $0 $312,000 Day Laborer Program $0 ($3,000,000) Reduce PERs costs based on pre-funding discount Employee Appreciation & Training Program $0 $500,000 $13,198,175 $10,321,647 Employee Compensation set-aside (including unrepresented) Exempt Part-Time Position Conversion $700,000 $300,000 $100,000 Graffiti Evidence Collection & Enforcement Program $0 $3,400,786 Long-Term Liability Payment for OPEB ($1.1 million ongoing) $12,607,089 Lake Merritt Maintenance - transfer to LLAD Fund (2310) $400,000 $400,000 Library System Support - transfer to Measure Q Fund (2241) $500,000 $500,000 City Hal l Fire Al arm System - transfer to Facil ities Fund (4400) $550,000 $0 $0 Reduce Unemployment Contributions ($2,500,000) $400,786 $954,862 Transfer to Vital Services Stabilization Fund (1020) Water Conservation Program $100,000 $0 Wildfire Prevention - transfer to WPAD Fund (2321) $500,000 $0 Transfer Insurance Premium Payment to Self Insurance Fund ($1,750,000) ($1,750,000) (1100) $1,000,000 Transfer one-time funds to Fund 1100 to off-set increased $0 insurance cost $2,226,892 $1,000,000 Increase O akland Alameda County Coliseum Authority Bond $2,434,170 $2,652,190 Increase subsidy to the Human Services Department (Head Start, Senior Aides, etc.) Pay-Off Kaiser Fund (1730) negative fund balance using one- $1,758,880 $0 time funding to eliminate on-going repayment ($583,937) Eliminate on-going repayment of negative fund balance (Fund ($583,937) 1730) Pay-O ff Contract Compliance Fund (1791) negative fund balance $0 $1,209,689 using one-time funding to eliminate on-going repayment Eliminate on-going repayment of negative fund balance (Fund ($579,605) ($579,605) 1791) Pay down Facilities Fund (4400) negative fund balance using $4,000,000 $0 one-time to reduce on-going repayment ($718,646) Adjust CSO Recovery (increase in non-GPF positions) ($1,033,056) Required set-aside for 7.5% Emergency Reserve $0 $2,294,512 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FTE ALL Other Funds Changes Changes Transfer Insurance Premium Payment to the Self Insurance Fund $1,750,000 $1,750,000 (1100) from the GPF ($20,786,334) ($11,800,324) On June 2, 2015, the City issued General Obligation Refunding Bonds, Series 2015A. The savings achieved from the refunding is passed on to property owners through a property tax rate reduction and therefore does not impact City funds. G - 79

264 NON -DEPARTMENTAL City of Oakland Direct Debt Outstanding as of 7/1/2015 (in thousands) Outstandin FY 2015-16 g Debt Service Principal General Obligation Bonds 6,656 77,635 General Obligation Refunding Bonds 2012 A General Obligation Refunding Bonds 128,895 5,628 2015 Subtotal 206,530 12,284 Pension Obligation Bonds 117,893 Pension Obligation Bonds 43,285 2001 212,540 Pension Obligation Bonds 2012 8,961 330,433 52,246 Subtotal Lease Revenue Bonds and Certificates of Participation 2008 A-1 Oakland JPFA Revenue Refunding Bonds 28,065 17,506 81,890 9,061 2008 B Oakland JPFA Lease Revenue Refunding Bonds (Admin Buildings) Subtotal 26,568 109,955 Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Authority (City's share at 50%) A 6,405 Lease Revenue Refunding Bonds (Coliseum Project) 2012 49,445 39,868 3,535 2015 A Lease Revenue Refunding Bonds (Coliseum Arena Project) 89,313 Subtotal 9,940 101,038 736,231 Total Direct Debt G - 80

265 NON -DEPARTMENTAL City of Oakland Legal Debt Limit Margin as of 7/1/2015 As of July 1, 2015, the City's legal debt limit (3.75% of valuation subject to taxation) was $1,330,916,765. The total amount of debt appl icabl e to the debt l imit was $206,530,000 (i.e. general obl igation debt). The resulting legal debt margin was $1,124,386,765. $ Total assessed valuation (net of exemptions) 47,423,895,746 Less redevelopment tax increments (11,932,782,018) 35,491,113,728 Basis of levy $ Debt Limit: 3.75 pecent of val uation subject to taxation 1,330,916,765 $ Less amount of debt appl icabl e to debt l imit (206,530,000) Legal debt margin $ 1,124,386,765 A copy of the City of Oakland's debt policy can be found in the "Financial Policies" section. Source: County of Alameda and City of O akland Treasury Bureau G - 81

266 NON -DEPARTMENTAL The City of Oakland has undertaken responsibility for gathering information relating to debt issuances for which the City of Oakland, the Oakland Joint Powers Financing Authority, the Oakland - Alameda County Coliseum or Success Authority, and the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Oakland have Continuing Disclosure Obligations. ONDS . As of June 30, 2015 , the City had outstanding a total of $ GENERAL OBLIGATION B ,000 aggregate $206,530 principal amount of general obligation bonds. The bonds are general obl - igations of the City, approved by at least two thirds of the voters. The City has the power and is obligated to levy taxes upon all property within the ad valorem , City subject to taxation without limitation , as to the rate or the amount (except certain property taxable at limited rates) for the payment of principal and interest on these bonds. City of Oakland General Obligation Bonds July 1, 2015 As of (in $000 s) Issuance Final Original Par Issue Name Purpose Date Maturity Par Outstanding 64,545 $ $77,635 General Obligation 2039 7/22/2009 R efund outstanding Series 2002A Measure G and Refunding Bonds (Series 2003A 2012 ) certain Series bonds Measure DD 128,895 6/2/2015 General Obligation 2039 128,895 Refund outstanding Series 2005 Refunding, Series 2006 Refunding Bonds (Series ) 2015 Measure G and Series 2009B Measure DD bonds 206,530 Total $ SEWER REVENUE DEBT. were The City has also issued bonds secured by revenues of its sewer system. These bonds to refund th issued e outstanding Sewer Revenue Bonds, 2004 Series A . City of Oakland wer Revenue Bonds Se July 1, 2015 (in $000s) Issuance Final Original Par Issue Name Date Maturity Par Outstanding Sewer Revenue Refunding Bonds 2014 Series A 3/20/2014 202 9 $ 40,590 $ 36,630 G - 82

267 NON -DEPARTMENTAL . - term lease arrangements that secure lease revenue LEASE OBLIGATIONS The City has entered into various long City from its bonds or certificates of participation, under which the City must make lease payments, payable by the General Fund, to occupy public buildings or use equipment. The table below summarizes the City’s outstanding long - term lease obligations. City of Oakland Lease Obligations July 1, 2015 As of (in $000s) Issuance Original Par Final Issue Name Date Maturity Par Outstanding Leased Asset – Ala meda County Coliseum Coliseum Stadium Oakland 49,445 $ 61,408 5/31/2012 2025 $ Authority Lease Revenue Bonds, (Oakland Coliseum Project), 2012 (1) Refunding Series A Oakland Alamed a County Coliseum Coliseum Arena – 39,868 39,868 2026 4/29/2015 Authority Lease Revenue Bonds, Project), Arena (Oakland Coliseum (1) 5 201 Refunding Series A 107,6 Portion of sewer 28,065 Oakland Joint Powers Financing 4/16/2008 2017 30 Authority Lease Revenue Bonds, 2008 system 1 - Series A Oakland Oakland Joint Po wers Financing 81,890 0 113,45 2026 5/1/2008 Authority Lease Refunding Revenue Administration land Administration Bonds, (Oak Buildings Buildings), 2008 Series B Total $ 199,268 (1) The lease payments securing these bonds are joint and several obligations of both the City and the County of Alameda. Each entity has covenanted to budget and appropriate one - half of the annual lease payments, and to take supplemental budget action if required to cure any deficiency. Principal amounts shown represent half of total original and outstanding par, representing the amount that is directly attributable to the City. G - 83

268 NON -DEPARTMENTAL ONDS. two series of pension obligati on bonds outstanding to fund a portion of PENSION OBLIGATION B The City has the current balance of the City’s Unfunded Actuarial Accrued Liability (“UAAL”) for retirement benefits to members of outstandin g The table below summarizes the current the Oakland Police and Fire Retirement System (“PFRS”). pension obligation bond issue : s City of Oakland gation Bonds Pension Obli July 1, 2015 As of (in $000s) Issuance Final Original Par Date Maturity Par Outstanding Issue Name $195,636 0/17/2001 2023 Taxable Pension Obligation Bonds, Series 2001 $117,893 1 Taxable Pension Obligation Bonds, Series 20 7/12/2012 202 12 5 $ 212,540 212,540 $ 330,433 Total OTHER LONG - TERM BORROWINGS. The City has debt outstanding for three bond issues supported by ass essment districts. Debt service on each of these assessment and reassessment bond issues is paid solely from assessments levied on real property within the respective districts. The City is not responsible for debt service on the bonds in the event that assessment collections are not sufficient. The table below summarizes the City’s outstanding assessment bonds. City of Oakland Special Assessments As of July 1, 2015 (in $000s) Final Par Issuance Original Issue Name Maturity Par ding Outstan Date Oakland Joint Powers Financing Authority Special Assessment 120 8/22/1996 $ 2020 $465 oled Revenue Bonds, Series 1996 Po A Utility Underground Assessment District - 232 , No. 2007 Limited Obligation Improvement Piedmont Pines Phase I, 2010 2,885 2/23/2010 2039 3,148 Bo nds 2012 Limited Obligation Refunding Improvement Bonds, 8/1/2012 20 24 3, 545 3,015 Reassessment District No. 99 - 1 Total $ 6,020 G - 84

269 NON -DEPARTMENTAL Redevelopment Agency SUCCESSOR The City’s Former F OAKLAND. and REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY OF THE CITY O issued several series of tax allocation bonds to provide funding for blight Redevelopment Successor Agency have - income housing. The bonds alleviation and economic development in parts of the City, or for the construction of low re payable from the a Redevelopment Property Tax Trust Fund which were formerly tax revenues deposited into the revenues received from the specific redevelopment project areas. Tax allocation bonds have been issued increment for the Acorn Redevelopment Proj ect Area, the Central District Redevelopment Project Area, the Coliseum Area Redevelopment Project Area, the Central City East Redevelopment Project Area and the Broadway / Mac A rthur /San Pablo that are secured by dedicated housing set - Redevelopment Project Area. In addition, bonds have been issued aside revenues from all the City’s redevelopment project areas. The tables below summarize the Redevelopment Successor Agency’s outstanding tax allocation debt and other financings, including the final maturity da te, original par amounts and amounts outstanding. All information below is pre sented as of July 1, 2015 . TAX ALLOCATION BONDS (In $000s) As of July 1, 2015 City - wide Housing Issuance Final Original Par ng Maturity Issue Name Par Outstandi Date - Aside Revenue $69,375 84,840 4/4/06 Subordinated Housing Set 2037 - Bonds, Series 2006A and 2006A T Aside Revenue Subordinated Housing Set 3/8/2011 2041 46,980 43,240 - T Bonds, Series 2011A - G - 85

270 NON -DEPARTMENTAL TAX ALLOCATION BONDS (In $000 s) July 1, 2015 Broadway/MacArthur/San Pablo Redevelopment Project Area Original Par Final Issuance Maturity Par Outstandin g Issue Name Date 10/12/2006 14,855 Broadway/MacArthur/San Pablo 203 7 17,270 Redevelopment Project Tax Allocation Bonds Series 2006C TE and 2006C - T - Broadway/MacArthur/San Pablo 7,240 7,390 11/2/2010 2040 Second Lien Tax Allocation Bonds Recovery Zone Economic Development Bonds, - Series 2010 T Central City East Redevelopment Project Area Par Issuance Final Original Name Da te Ma turity Par Outstanding Issue 2037 65,575 76,300 Central City East Redevelopment Project Tax 10/12/2006 Allocation Bonds, Series 2006A T - TE and 2006A - Central District Redevelopment Project Area Issuance Final Original Par Issue Name te M a turity Par Outstanding Da 33,135 Central District Redevelopment Project 12,385 11/21/2006 2022 Subordinated Tax Allocation Bonds, Series 2006T 38 32,250 5/20/2009 Central District Redevelopment Project 2020 ,755 Subordinated Tax Allocation Bonds, Series 2009T Central District Redevelopment Project 97,560 102,960 2022 10/3/2013 Bonds, Refunding Subordinated Tax Allocation 13 Series 20 Coliseum Area Redevelopment Project Area Issuance Original Par Final Issue Name Da te Ma turity Par Outst anding 87,710 Coliseum Area Redevelopment Project Tax 102,590 2037 10/12/2006 T - TE and 2006B - onds, Series 2006B Allocation B Total of Tax Allocation Bonds $ 430,190 G - 86

271 NON -DEPARTMENTAL City of Oakland Total Long-Term Debt Service Obligations for Fiscal Years 2015-16 to 2016-17 as of July 1, 2015 ($ in thousands) Fiscal Year 2016-2017 Fiscal Year 2015-2016 Outstanding Original Total Debt Par Par Total Debt Interest Other Service Series Name Principal Interest Other Service Amount Principal Amount General Obligation Bonds $ - $ 6,656 $ 2,980 $ 3,679 $ - $ 6,659 $ 77,635 $ 83,775 Series 2012 (Refunding GO) $ 3,821 2,835 $ 14,732 5,628 8,695 6,037 - 3,763 - Series 2015 (Refunding GO) 128,895 128,895 1,865 $ - $ 12,284 $ 11,675 $ 9,716 $ - $ GO Bonds Subtotal $ 212,670 $ 206,530 $ 4,700 $ 7,584 21,391 Lease Revenue Bonds (1) Series 2008A-1 & Swap (Rev Ref) - $ 17,506 $ 14,380 $ 2,754 $ $ $ 17,134 $ $ 28,065 $ 107,630 13,685 3,821 $ - 3,901 - 9,061 5,395 3,666 Series 2008B (Lease Rev Ref) (Admin Bldg) - 9,061 113,450 81,890 5,160 $ $ - $ 26,568 $ 19,775 $ 6,420 $ - $ 26,195 $ Lease Revenue Bonds Subtotal 221,080 $ 109,955 $ 18,845 7,723 Master Lease Agreements $ - $ 953 $ 464 $ 13 $ - $ 476 $ 891 62 $ 2001 Eastmont Town Center 11,333 $ 1,355 $ 53 - 292 250 43 2004 Solar Panel 292 4,139 1,304 239 - - 479 355 120 139 475 340 2,790 4,940 2006 Lancaster Building - 2010 Parking Access & Revenue Control - 369 349 21 - 369 2,500 1,228 340 29 3,338 65 - 3,403 646 27 - 672 2013 Vehicle & Equipment 11,850 5,315 (2) 1,320 - 1,733 1,327 372 - 1,699 13,530 16,150 2013 LED Street Light (QECB) 413 - - - 411 411 - 411 2013 Oracle No 58097 1,869 1,233 411 - - 191 191 - 191 191 572 866 2013 Oracle No 58099 - 168 - 1,654 1,529 125 - 1,654 2013 IBM No 1 7,948 6,209 1,486 298 - 298 298 - - 298 2014 Oracle No 62528 1,326 895 - - - 65 65 - 65 65 - 2014 Oracle No 65016 287 194 30 - 476 453 23 2014 Parking Meter - 476 2,500 2,061 446 105 - - 105 105 - - 105 419 581 2014 Oracle No 62545 860 94 - 953 884 70 - 953 2014 IBM No 2 4,453 3,586 2,742 - 3,045 2,829 216 - 3,045 15,731 15,731 2014 Vehicle No 1-4 302 - 1,898 1,805 93 - 1,898 9,150 9,150 2015 Telecommunications No 1 115 1,783 (3) 2015 Telecommunications No 2 - - $ - $ 16,325 $ 11,959 $ 1,122 $ - $ 13,081 $ 95,624 $ 14,854 $ 1,471 65,571 $ Master Lease Subtotal Pension Obligation Bonds $ - $ 43,285 $ 16,369 $ 28,221 $ - $ 44,590 $ $ 17,210 117,893 $ 195,636 Series 2001 (Taxable POB) 26,075 $ 8,961 - 8,961 - Series 2012 (Taxable POB) 8,961 - 8,961 212,540 212,540 - $ $ - $ 52,246 $ 16,369 $ 37,182 $ - $ 53,551 $ POB Subtotal 408,176 $ 330,433 $ 17,210 35,036 Sewer Revenue Bonds - $ - $ 3,645 $ 2,045 $ 1,601 $ 1,680 $ 3,646 $ $ 36,630 $ 40,590 Series 2014A (Sewer Rev Ref) 1,965 $ $ 1,680 $ - $ 3,645 $ Sewer Revenue Bonds Subtotal $ 1,601 $ - $ 3,646 $ 40,590 $ 36,630 $ 1,965 2,045 Special Assessment Bonds $ 9 $ - $ 24 $ 20 $ 8 $ - $ 28 $ $ Series 1996A (Pooled Revenue) 465 $ 120 15 - 224 60 162 - 222 2,885 3,148 Series 2010 (Piedmont Pines Rev) 164 60 - - 348 270 81 351 260 3,015 3,545 Series 2012 (Reassess. Dist No 99-1 Rev) 88 $ 262 $ - $ 597 $ 350 $ 251 $ Special Assessment Subtotal $ 601 $ 7,158 $ 6,020 $ 335 - OACCA Bonds (4) Series 2012A (Coliseum) (Rev Ref) 2,472 $ - $ 6,405 $ 4,128 $ 2,276 $ - $ 6,403 $ 49,445 3,933 $ 61,408 $ $ (4) Series 2015A (Arena) (Rev Ref) 1,084 - 3,535 2,900 3,984 39,868 2,700 835 39,868 6,633 $ 3,308 $ - $ 9,940 $ 7,028 $ 3,360 $ - $ 10,387 $ OACCA Bonds Subtotal 101,275 $ 89,313 $ Oakland Redev Successor Agency ---Tax Allocation Bonds--- (5) Series 2006A (Central City East) $ $ - $ 5,115 $ 1,690 $ 3,419 $ - $ 5,109 $ 76,300 1,610 $ 3,505 65,575 $ (5) 2,205 - 6,835 2,310 4,518 - 6,828 102,590 87,710 Series 2006B (Coliseum Area) 4,630 (5) Series 2006C (Broadway/MacArthur) - - 1,154 380 769 789 1,149 14,855 17,270 365 646 - 1,476 875 601 Series 2006T (Central District) - 1,476 33,135 12,385 830 4,000 2,510 - 6,510 5,400 2,149 - 7,549 Series 2009T (Central District) 38,755 32,250 (2) Series 2010T (RZED - Broad/MacAr) - 582 55 528 - 583 7,240 7,390 532 50 11,985 4,509 - 16,494 12,585 3,895 - 16,480 Series 2013 (Central District) (Ref) 102,960 97,560 (5) - - Series 2015 (RPTTF) (Ref) ---Housing Set-Aside Bonds---- (5) 3,891 - 7,411 3,705 3,697 - 7,402 Series 2006A 3,520 69,375 84,840 3,644 - 5,364 1,800 3,529 - 5,329 46,980 43,240 Series 2011A-T 1,720 26,285 $ 24,656 $ - $ 50,941 $ 28,800 $ 23,104 $ - $ 51,904 $ ORA/ORSA Bonds Subtotal 510,220 $ 430,190 $ $ 47,388 $ - $ 101,038 $ 54,847 $ 56,677 53,650 - $ 111,524 $ $ TOTAL Direct Debt Obligations 943,201 $ 736,231 $ 90,826 $ 81,718 $ - $ 172,545 $ 98,001 $ 82,755 $ - $ 180,756 $ TOTAL Debt Obligations 1,596,794 $ 1,274,642 $ (1) 1998A Swap payments to counterparty estimated at 5.6775% (2) Debt service does not include subsidy (3) Issued 7/16/2015 in the amount of $7,095,000 (4) Shows only City's estimated obligation of 50% of total par and debt service. Does not include City's share of operating deficit. (5) Series 2015 issued 9/2/2015 to refund all or a portion of Series 2006A-TE, 2006B-TE, 2006C-TE, 2006A, 2006A-T G - 87

272 NON -DEPARTMENTAL NOTES G - 88

273 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FY 2015-17 CAPITAL Summary by Source IMPROVEMENT FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-17 Adopted Adopted Total Source PROGRAM Budget Budget Budget 1010 - General Fund: General Purpose $1,252,000 $252,000 $1,504,000 15,831,421 2211 - Measure B: ACTIA 8,581,566 7,249,855 798,922 2212 - Measure B: Bicycle/Pedestrian Pass-Thru Funds 928,816 1,727,738 D EFINITION 5,484,066 2216 - Measure BB - Alameda County Transportation 10,426,918 15,910,984 300,000 150,000 150,000 2230 - State Gas Tax is defined as a long A Capital project - 15,000 2310 - Lighting and Landscape Assessment District 200,000 185,000 term investment that builds, replaces 200,000 371,280 2415 - Development Service Fund 171,280 , road, or improves an asset (building 17,873,000 18,001,000 35,874,000 3100 - Sewer Service Fund park , sewer or drainage lines, etc.) 500,000 500,000 4400 - City Facilities and that has a useful design life of at $40,068,580 $32,150,843 $72,219,423 Total least ten years and a minimum cost of $ 100 ,000. ATEGORIES C 17 2015- FY The Capital Improvement Program budget is organized in the categories listed below. B UILDINGS AND F ACILITIES This category of projects includes construction, replacement or new improvement of recreation centers, fire stations, community centers, and other City buildings, facilities, and structures. ARKS AND O PEN S PACE P ojects in this category include Pr improvements to playgrounds and tot lots, park facilities and City swimming pools; and improvements to Oakland’s waterways. EWERS AND S TORM D RAINS S Projects in this category include reconstruction of sewer mains throughout the City as required by an Admin istrative Order issued to Oakland and other Bay Area communities by the G - 89

274 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FY 2015-17 C ATEGORIES Summary by Category RAINS S D EWERS AND TORM S FY 2015-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 ) ’ ONT D (C Adopted Adopted Total Budget Category United States Environmental Budget Budget Protection Agency and the State of California. The Order requires the Buildings and Facilities $2,004,000 $252,000 $1,752,000 City to plan and implement capital 15,000 185,000 Parks & O pen Space 200,000 repairs and replacements to the 17,873,000 Sewers & Storm Drains 18,001,000 35,874,000 aging sewer facilities and implement 9,753,367 15,788,594 25,541,961 Streets & Sidewalks maintenance practices to prevent Traffic Improvements 8,599,462 4,129,476 4,469,986 sewage discharges into creeks, lakes, $ 72,219,423 Total $40,068,580 $32,150,843 and the San Francisco Bay. Funding for emergency repair and replacement of sewer and sto rm drain facilities is also included. S S IDEWALKS TREETS AND Projects in this category include rehabilitation, street paving and street safety projects, street lighting, and sidewalk repair, as well as streetscape beautification. These projects are designed to address the maintenance backlog of City streets and sidewalks. RAFFIC I MPROVEMENTS T This category includes traffic and transportation -related improvements, including traffic calming, traffic signals, traffic signals and modernization of signal controllers, and signal synchronization. They are intended to improve the safety of all modes of travel: pedestrian, cyclist and . automobile G - 90

275 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FY 2015-17 * Projects by Category (Continued) FY 2015-17 FY 2016-17 FY 2015-16 Category Adopted Total Budget Adopted Budget Budget Buildings and Facilities $500,000 $0 $500,000 ADA Transition Plan Survey FY 2015-16 $504,000 $252,000 $252,000 O n-Call ADA Capital Improvement Project Woodminster Phase II ADA Improvements $1,000,000 $1,000,000 $1,752,000 $252,000 Buildings & Facilities Total $2,004,000 Parks & Open Space $185,000 Park Project Prioritization Development $200,000 $15,000 Parks & Open Space Total $200,000 $15,000 $185,000 Sewers & Storm Drains $2,000,000 $1,000,000 Annual Inflow Correction Program $1,000,000 City-Owned Sewer Lateral Rehabilitation $1,000,000 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $2,175,000 Citywide Sanitary Sewer Capacity Upgrades $1,175,000 $1,000,000 Emergency On Call Sewer Rehabilitation $5,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,500,000 $333,000 $333,000 $0 Rehabilitaion of Sanitary Sewers in the Area bounded by E Wetmore Road, MacArthur Boulevard, Mountain Boulevard, and Reinhardt $1,560,000 $1,326,000 $234,000 Rehabilitation of Sanitary Sewer in the Area bounded by 14th Avenue, MacArthur Boulevard, Ardley Avenue, and E 31th Street (58-04) Rehabilitation of Sanitary Sewer in the Area bounded by 21st Avenue, $3,100,000 $0 $3,100,000 17th St, 24th Ave, and 27th Ave $1,870,000 Rehabilitation of Sanitary Sewer in the Area bounded by 23rd Avenue, $330,000 $2,200,000 International Boulevard, 26th Avenue, and E 12th Street(60-04) Rehabilitation of Sanitary Sewer in the Area bounded by Campus Dr, $0 $3,620,000 $3,620,000 Mountain Blvd, Knoll Ave, and Access (83-013) $2,670,000 $2,670,000 $0 Rehabilitation of Sanitary Sewer in the Area bounded by Campus Dr, Mountain Blvd, Knoll Ave, and Access (83-502) Rehabilitation of Sanitary Sewer in the Area Bounded by Hwy 13, $2,810,000 $2,810,000 $0 Reinhardt Dr, 39th Ave, and Aliso Ave (83-501) Mtn View Ave, Leona St, Sunnymere Ave & Seminary Ave (83-402) $219,000 $1,241,000 $1,460,000 Seminary Ave, Avenal Ave, Bancroft Ave, 65th Ave,& Int'l Blvd (83- $426,000 $426,000 $0 103) 24th St, 19th Ave, Beaumont Ave, and 33rd St $4,770,000 $0 $4,770,000 $1,750,000 Sanitary Sewer Root Foaming Services $875,000 $875,000 $18,001,000 Sewers & Storm Drains Total $17,873,000 $35,874,000 Streets & Sidewalks $1,800,000 $900,000 $900,000 ADA 30-year Transition Plan $800,000 Bridge Maintenance Program $400,000 $400,000 $13,220,681 $3,953,367 $9,267,314 Citywide Annual Street Pavement Program $500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 Citywide Emergency Roadway Repairs $600,000 $1,200,000 $600,000 Citywide Sidewalk Repairs $3,000,000 $3,750,000 Matching Funds for Transportation Grant Projects $6,750,000 Paving Assessment $371,280 $200,000 $171,280 $200,000 $200,000 Repair and Rehabilitation of City Paths and Stairs $400,000 $9,753,367 Streets & Sidewalks Total $15,788,594 $25,541,961 Traffic Improvements Bicycle Master Plan Implementation Program $1,149,401 $914,199 $2,063,600 $1,300,000 $650,000 $650,000 Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program $1,935,862 Pedestrian Master Plan Implementation Program $1,020,585 $915,277 Traffic Signal Controller Replacement Program $150,000 $150,000 $300,000 $3,000,000 $1,500,000 Traffic Signal System Management $1,500,000 4,469,986 Traffic Improvements Total 8,599,462 4,129,476 $32,150,843 $40,068,580 $72,219,423 Total * Additional information on individual capital projects is available in the cities FY 2015-16 Adopted Capital Improvement Projects book. G - 91

276 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM NOTES G - 92

277 FINANCIAL POLICIES CITY OF OAKLAND BUDGET AND FINANCIAL POLICIES Resolution/ Page Date of Adoption Financial Policy Ordinance H - 3 Ordinance No. 13279 December 9, 2014 The City of O akland Consolidated Fiscal Policy Resolution No. 84063 October 16, 2012 Debt Management Policy and Swap Policy H - 21 H - 49 Resolution No. 85653 June 17, 2015 City of O akl and Investment Pol icy June 17, 2015 H - 51 Oakland Redevelopment Agency Investment Policy Resolution No. 2015-004 H - 53 Investment Policy for FY 2015-16 June 17, 2015 February 24, 2015 Report Provided In Accordance Report on Assessment of Stakeholder Needs, H - 79 Concerns, & Priorities - Budget Priories Poll with the Consolidated Fiscal Policy H - 1

278 FINANCIAL POLICIES NOTES H - 2

279 FINANCIAL POLICIES H - 3

280 FINANCIAL POLICIES H - 4

281 FINANCIAL POLICIES Exhibit 1 ITY O F C AKLAND O C ONSOLIDATED F ISCAL P OLICY 1 H - 5

282 FINANCIAL POLICIES Section 1. Budgeting Practices Part A. General Provisions st th The City’s Fiscal Year shall run from July 1 year and the of the subsequent through June 30 Budget shall be adopted by resolution as provided by the City charter. st The City shall adopt a two-year (biennial) policy budget by July 1 of odd-numbered calendar st years. The City shall amend its biennial policy budget ( midcycle) by July 1 of even -numbered years. Part B. Policy on Balanced Budgets The City shall adopt balanced budgets, containing appropriated revenues equal to appropriated ifications: expenditures. This policy entails the following additional definitions and qual 1. The budget must be balanced at an individual fund level. 2. City policies on reserve requirements for individual funds must be taken into account. The appropriated expenditures to be included in the balanced budget equation must include the appropriations necessary to achieve or maintain an individual fund's reserve target. Appropriated revenues can include transfers from fund balance where such fund balance 3. is reasonably expected to exist by the end of the fiscal year preceding the year of the adopted budget. Transfers from fund balance are not to be counted as revenue if the fund balance is not reasonably expected to exist by the end of the fiscal year preceding the year of the adopted budget. (Note: The precise definition of 'fund balan ce' will vary from fund to fund, depending on the fund's characteristics and accounting treatment.) 4. Appropriated expenditures can include transfers to fund balance or to reserves. The City Administrator shall be responsible for ensuring that the budget proposed to the City Council by the Mayor, adheres to the balanced budget policy. From time to time the City Council may present changes in policy and consider additional appropriations that were not anticipated in the most recently adopted budget. Fis cal produced required that prior to Council approval of such actions the following occur: Identification of a new or existing viable funding source whose time span reflects the 1. timing of the expenditure or lasts until the approval of the next biennial budget. 2. The budget must be amended in such a way as to maintain a balanced budget where appropriated revenues are equal to appropriated expenditures. Each fiscal year, once prior year information has been made available, the City Administrator shall re port to the Council how actual year-end revenues and expenditures compared to budgeted revenues and expenditures in the General Purpose Fund and such other funds as may be deemed necessary. H - 6

283 FINANCIAL POLICIES Exhibit 1 Part C . Use of Excess Real Estate Transfer Tax (RETT) Revenues To ensure adequate levels of the General Purpose Fund reserves and to provide necessary funding for municipal capital improvement projects and one- time expenses, the City shall require that excess Real Estate Transfer Tax revenues be defined and used as follows: The excess Real Estate Transfer Tax (RETT) revenue is hereby defined: Any amounts of 1. projected RETT revenues whose value exceeds 14% of corresponding General Purpose Fund Tax Revenues (inclusive of RETT). 2. The excess Real Estate Transfer Tax collections, as described in this section, shall be used in the following manner and appropriated through the budget process. a. At least 25% shall be allocated to the Vital Services Stabilization Fund. Until the value in such fund is projected to equal to 15% of General Purpose Fund revenues over the coming fiscal year. b. At least 25% shall be used to fund accelerated debt retirement and unfunded long- : including negative funds balances, to fund the P term obligations olice and Fire Retirement System (PFRS) liability, to fund other unfunded retirement and - pension liabilities, unfunded paid leave liabilities, to fund Other Post E mployment Retirement Benefits (OPEB). c. T time expe nses; augment the General he remainder shall be used to fund one- Purpose Fund Emergency Reserve, and to augment the Capital Improvements Reserve Fund. 3. Use of the "excess" RETT revenue for purposes other than those established above may only be allowed by a super majority vote (6 out of 8) of the City Council through a separate resolution. The resolution shall be supported by a statement explaining the necessity for a. using excess RETT revenues for purposes other than those established above and; b. The resolution authorizing expenditure s using excess RETT revenue for proposes other than those above shall include a finding of necessity by the City Council; and c. The resolution shall also include steps the City will take in order to return to utilizing one -time RETT revenues as described above. 4. Following the completion of the annual audit, audited revenues will be analyzed to determine whether the appropriate value was transferred to the Vital Services Stabilization Fund and to fund accelerated debt retirement and unfunded long- term obligations . If is found that insufficient funds were transferred then a true-up payment shall be made as a part of the next fiscal year’s budget process. If the transfers exceeded 3 H - 7

284 FINANCIAL POLICIES the actual required amounts, then the amounts in excess may be credited against future allocations in the next fiscal year’s budget process. . Use of One Time Revenues Part D 1. From time to time, the City may receive "one time revenues", defined as financial proceeds that will not likely occur on an ongoing basis, such as sale s of property or proceeds from the refinancing of debt, but not including additional Real Estate Transfer Tax revenues discussed in Section "B" above. 2. Fiscal prudence and conservancy requires that one time revenues not be used for recurring expenses. T herefore, upon receipt of one time revenues, such revenues shall be used in the following manner, unless legally restricted to other purposes: to fund one time expenditures, to fund accelerated debt retirement and unfunded long- term obligations: including negative funds balances, to fund the Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS) liability, to fund other unfunded retirement and pension liabilities, unfunded paid leave liabilities, to fund Other Post mployment Retirement Benefits (OPEB);or shall remain - E as fund balance in the appropriate fund. 3. Use of the "one time revenues" for purposes other than those established above may only be allowed by a super majority vote (6 out of 8) of the City Council through a separate resolution a. The resolution shall be supported by a statement explaining the necessity for using one-time revenues for purposes other than those established above; and The resolution authorizing expenditures utilizing one- time revenue for proposes b. other than those above shall include a finding of necessity by the City Council; and c. The resolution shall also include steps the City will take in order to return to utilizing one -time revenues as described above. . Use of Unallocated General Purpose Fund Balance. Part E Any unallocated General Purpose Fund balance, as projected based upon the 3rd Quarter Revenues and Expenditures forecast, and not budgeted for other purposes, shall be used in accordance with Part D. H - 8

285 FINANCIAL POLICIES Exhibit 1 -term obligations from certain Part F. Analysis of Payments for Debt or Unfunded long revenues When allocating funds to fund accelerated debt retirement and unfunded long- term obligations from excess Real Estate Transfer Tax and One Time Revenues the City Administrator shall present his or her analysis and recommendations to the Council based on the best long- term ity. The term Unfunded long- financial interest of the C shall be clearly defined, term obligations as part of the budget process. Part G. Criteria for Project Carryforwards and Encumbrances in the General Purpose Fund. Previously approved but unspent project appropriations ("carryforwards"), as well as funding reserved to fund purchases or contracts that are entered into in the current year , but are not paid for until the following year ("encumbrances"), draw down funding from reserves. Fiscal prudence requires that such drawdowns be limited in the General Purpose Fund (GPF). Therefore: 1. Funding for non- operating projects and purchases shall be restricted within the General Purpose Fund. In cases when non-capital, operating projects and purchases must be funded in the 2. General Purpose Fund, these shall be included in an annual budget and supported with new annual revenues. 3. Carryover of unspent project carryforwards and encumbrances in the GPF from one year into the next, with no new funding, will be allowed only on an exception basis. 4. In the beginning of each fiscal year, before project carryforwards and encumbrances are carried over from the prior year, and no later than September 1: The Budget Director shall liquidate all unspent project carryforwards and encumbrances in the GPF and advise affected City departments of said action. The Budget Director shall provide a report of all unspent project carryforwards and Council for review and direction. encumbrances to the City 5. Departments may request to retain some or all of the liquidated GPF carryforwards and encumbrances only if and when such balances are deemed essential to the delivery of city projects, programs and services, and only if the liquidation of such balances would be in violation of legislative or legal requirements, could lead to health or safety issues, and/or would greatly impact essential City projects, programs and services. 6. A request to retain some or all of the liquidated GPF carryforwards or encumbrances must be submitted in writing to the Budget Director within five (5) working days of receiving an advisory from the Budget Director about said liquidations, and must detail 5 H - 9

286 FINANCIAL POLICIES specific reasons necessitating such a req uest, including but not limited to those stated in item (3) above. 7. The Budget Director, upon review of a department's request, shall recommend an action to the City Administrator within five (5) working days of receiving the department's request. he City Administrator, in consultation with the Budget Director, shall make a final T 8. determination of any and all requests for exceptions by departments, by September 20, and all requesting departments should be so notified by September 30. Part H. Grant R etention Clauses Prior to the appropriation of revenues from any grant outside of the budget process, the City Council shall be informed of any retention clauses that require the City to retain grant-funded staff, services, programs, or operations beyond the term of the grant. The fiscal impacts of such . During the biennial budget process staff shall report to the retention clauses shall be disclosed Council the ongoing projected fiscal impacts of such retention clauses. Part I. Alterations to the Budget Substantial or material alterations to the adopted budget including shifting the allocation of funds between departments, substantial or material changes to funded service levels, shall be made by resolution of the City Council. Part J. Transfers of Funds between accounts. The City Administrator shall have the authority to transfer fund between personnel accounts, and between non-personnel accounts within a department. The City Administrator shall have the authority to transfer funds allocated to personnel accounts to non-personnel accounts within a department provided that cumulative transfers within one fiscal year do not exceed 5% of the original personnel account allocation of that department. The City Administrator shall have the authority to trans -personnel accounts to personnel accounts within a fer funds from non department . For the purposes of this section accounts for the provision of temporary personnel services shall be considered personnel accounts. Part K. Pay- Go Account Expenditures & Grants and Priority Project Fund Expenditures & Grants The City Council herby finds and determines that it is in the public interest to spend Pay- go account fund to facilitate and support programs & services of the City of Oakland, capital improvement pr ojects of the City of Oakland, and programs & capital improvement projects of the public schools and other public entities within the City of Oakland. The Council authorizes Pay -Go account funds to be used for the following purposes: H - 10

287 FINANCIAL POLICIES Exhibit 1 Capital Improvements : 1. To pay for or augment funding for a City of Oakland capital improvement project including planning and pre-construction services for projects such as, but not limited to, feasibility studies and design, landscaping, architectural and engineering services and all services and materials needed to construct a capital improvements such as, but not limited to, contractor services, lumber, concrete, gravel, plants and other landscape materials, fountains, benches, banners, signs, affixed artwork and any other design and decorative elements of the project; and To provide a grant to a public school, including a school chartered by the State of 2. California or Oakland Unified School District, or other public entity for use on capital improvement project within the City of Oakland, including planning and pre-construction services for projects such as, but not limited to, feasibility studies and design, landscaping, architectural and engineering services and all services and materials needed to construct a capital improvements such as, but not limited to, contractor services, lumber, concrete, gravel, plants and other landscape materials, fountains, benches, banners, signs, affixed artwork and any other design and decorative elements of the project; and Furniture, Equipment: 3. To pay for or augment funding for purchase of furniture and equipment, including computer equipment and software, to be used by participants in a program operated by the City of Oakland; and 4. To provide a grant to a public school, including a school chartered by the State of California or Oakland Unified School District, or another public entity to be used for furniture and equipment, including computer equipment and software, to be used by participants in a program operated by the public school or public entity. -go purposes stated above shall operate as restrictions on Pay-go expenditures or Pay- go Pay grants, regardless of the Pay-go account funding source. Pay -go purposes stated above shall apply to any and all Pay-go expenditures or grants made by the Mayor and each City Councilmember . -go expenditures and grants shall be administered by the City Administrator on behalf of All Pay the city, and grant agreements shall be required for all such grants. In accord with the City Council's motion approving the initial allocation of Councilmember Priority Project funds on June 8, 2006, the City Councilmembers must obtain City Council approval for all Priority Project expenditures. All Priority Project fund grants approved by the City Council and shall be administered and executed by the City Administrator on behalf of the city, and grant agreements shall be required for all such grants. 7 H - 11

288 FINANCIAL POLICIES Section 2. Reserve Funds Part A. General Purpose Fund Emergency Reserve Policy 1. Council hereby declares that it shall be the policy of the City of Oakland to provide in each fiscal year a reserve of undesignated, uncommitted fund balance equal to seven and one-half (7.5%) of the General Purpose Fund (Fund 1010) appropriations for such fiscal year (t he "General Purpose Fund Emergency Reserve Policy"). Each year, upon completion of the City's financial audited statements, the City 2. Administrator shall report the status of the General Purpose Funds Emergency Reserve to the City Council and on the adequacy of the of the 7.5% reserve level. If in any fiscal year the General Purpose Fund Reserve Policy is not met, the City Administrator shall present to Council a strategy to meet the General Purpose Funds Emergency Reserve inistrator shall determine whether the 7.5% reserve level Policy. Each year, the City Adm requires adjustment and recommend any changes to the City Council. The amounts identified as the General Purpose Funds Emergency Reserve may be 3. appropriated by Council only to fund unusual, unanticipated and seemingly insurmountable events of hardship of the City, and only upon declaration of fiscal emergency. For the purposes of this Ordinance, "fiscal emergency" may be declared (1) by the Mayor and approved by the majority of the City Council, or (2) by a majority vote of the City Council. 4. Prior to appropriating monies from the General Purpose Funds Emergency Reserve, the City Administrator shall prepare and present such analysis to the City Council. Upon review and approval of the proposed expenditure by the City Council, and appropriate fiscal emergency declaration necessary for the use of GPF reserve, the City Administrator will have the authority to allocate from the reserves. Part B. Vital Services Stabilization Fund Reserve Policy 1. Council hereby declares that it shall be the policy of the City of Oakland to maintain a Vital Services Stabilization Fund. 2. In years when the city projects that total General Purpose Fund revenues for the upcoming fiscal year will be less than the curr ent year's revenues, or anytime service reductions (such as layoffs or furloughs) are contemplated due to adverse financial conditions, use of this fund must be considered so as to maintain existing service levels as much as possible, and to minimize assoc iated impacts; and the adopted budget may appropriate funds from the Vital Services Stabilization Fund to preserve city operations; however, the budget may not appropriate more than sixty percent of the reserve balance in any year. The Mayor and City Adm inistrator and/or their designees will meet and discuss the key features of the Mayor’s proposed draft budget with the labor unions, which represent City employees as duly authorized representatives for their respective bargaining units, in H - 12

289 FINANCIAL POLICIES Exhibit 1 accordance with applicable state labor law, provided the labor unions can respond within the timeline required . The timeline may be restricted and may require short notice. Reasonable notice shall be provided to the labor unions. Further, information contained in the Mayor’s budget prior to release is in draft form and subject to change before a final version is released to the City Council and the public. 3. Any deviations from this policy, including the need to address unusual and temporary increases in baseline expen ditures, must be made by Resolution requiring a minimum of 6 votes. The Resolution must include (1) a statement explaining the necessity for the deviation and (2) a plan for replenishing the reserve. Part C. Capital Improvements Reserve Fund 1. Council hereby declares that it shall be the policy of the City of Oakland to maintain a Capital Improvements Reserve Fund. 2. On an annual basis, an amount equal to $6,000,000 shall be held in the Capital Improvements Reserve Fund. Revenue received from one time activities, including the sale of Real Property, shall be deposited into the Capital Improvements Reserve Fund, unless otherwise directed by a majority vote of the City Council. Interest earnings on monies on deposit in the Capital Improvements Reserve Fund shall accrue to said fund and be maintained therein. 3. Monies on deposit in the Capital Improvements Reserve Fund may be appropriated by Council to funds unexpected emergency or major capital maintenance or repair costs to City -owned facilities and to fund capital improvement projects through the Five- Year Capital Improvement Program. 4. Each year, upon completion of the City's financial audited statements, the City Administrator shall report the status of the Capital Improvements Reserve Fund. If in any fiscal year the Capital Improvements Reserve Fund threshold of $6,000,000 is not met, the City Administrator shall present to Council a strategy to meet said threshold. 9 H - 13

290 FINANCIAL POLICIES Section 3. Budget Process, Fiscal Planning, Transparency, and Public Participation All Timelines apply only to budget development years, normally odd numbered years and not to -cycle revisions to an adopted two- year budget. mid 1. Council Initial Budget Briefing and Priorities Discussion Timeline: January. The Mayor Requirements: and City Council will hold a bi-annual budget workshop soon after the commencement of the Council term. The workshop will include briefings on estimated baseline expenditures, revenue projections and an overview of the City's budgeting process. The workshop will provide the Mayor and Council with the opportunity to begin discussing priorities for the next budget year based on preliminary projected increases or decreases in the next budget. 2. Five Year Forecast Produced and heard by the Counci l's Finance & Management Committee in February. Timeline: Forecast Fact Sheets should be distributed to City community centers and Forecast data should be available on Open Data Portal within two weeks of the Committee hearing. Requirements: Each Budget Cycle, the City Administrator must prepare a Five Year Forecast. The Five- Year Financial Forecast (“Forecast”) is a planning tool that estimates the City's likely -year revenues and expenditures over a future period of at least five s, based on appropriate financial, economic, and demographic data. The purpose of the Forecast is to surface all major financial issues and estimate future financial conditions to support informed long-term planning and decision making regarding issues such as expenditures, labor negotiations, economic development policies, and revenue policies. Such planning provides for greater financial stability, signals a prudent approach to financial management, and brings the City into compliance with current best practices of other governmental entities. he Forecast shall contain the two -year baseline budget for the forthcoming two-year budget T period, clearly reflecting projected expenditures to maintain existing service levels and obligations, plus at least an additional three - year forecast of revenues and expenditures. The Baseline Budget shall consist of projected expenditures necessary to maintain existing staffing and service levels, plus an estimate of anticipated revenues for the two-year period. he F orecast shall also contain information on the variance between prior forecasts and actual T amounts, including the factors that influenced these variances. Revenue estimates shall be based on the most current data available; minimally revenue projections shall take into account projected revenue for the current fiscal year, as reflected in the 2nd quarter Revenue and Expenditure Report, with appropriate trending into future years and an explanation as to how such revenue projections were derived. The report shall include a Five Year Forecast "Fact Sheet” document, which summarizes the H - 14

291 FINANCIAL POLICIES Exhibit 1 Forecast's key findings with simplified text and graphics so as to make this important budgetary information more accessible to the general public. Within two weeks after the Forecast is accepted by the City Council, the City Administrator shall print and distribute the Forecast Fact Sheet to all City libraries, recreation centers and senior centers, including in languages required by Oakland's Equal Access Ordinance. The full Fo recast shall also be posted on the City of Oakland's website. Forecast data shall be available in open data format on Oakland's data portal. Assessment of Stakeholder Needs, Concerns and Priorities 3. Budget Advisory Committee review prior to survey release. Survey completion by Timeline: th. Results publicly available within two weeks of survey's close. February 15 Requirements: During the prior to Budget Adoption of a budget adoption year, the City Administrator should develop or secure a statistically valid survey for assessing the public's concerns, needs and priorities. Whenever feasible, the City should conduct a professional poll administered to a statistically relevant and valid sample of residents that is representative of Oakland's population in terms of race, income, neighborhood, age, profession, family size, homeownership/renter-ship, etc. If that's not possible, then demographic information should be collected and reported out with the survey results. Prior to release, the survey questions shall be submitted to the Budget Advisory Committee for review of bias, relevance, consistency in administration, inclusion of benchmark questions, and ability to assess concerns, needs and priorities. The survey instrument, method of dissemination, and any instructions for administration shall be publicly available. If the City cannot afford a professional survey, an informal survey shall be made available for broad dissemination by the Mayor and Councilmembers through community list serves and other communication channels. A list of those dissemination channels should be publicly available along with survey results. Survey results should be publicly available within two weeks of the survey closes. In the event that City's statistically valid survey has bee n completed, the Mayor and City Administrator shall include in their proposed budget a summary of the survey data and a statement regarding how the data was or was not incorporated into the final proposed budget. Informal surveys and their results shall be made public but not included in their proposed budget document. The City Administrator shall also create an email address, a phone number with voicemail service, and a web -based engagement platform to collect resident input prior to budget development. Furthermore, the City Administrator shall take steps to promote participation, such as issuing a Flyer promoting participation in the survey and methods of participation (survey internet link, email, phone number) and posting such Fliers near publicly available computers in all City libraries, Recreation Centers, and Senior Centers. 11 H - 15

292 FINANCIAL POLICIES 4. Statement of Councilmember Priorities Written submission due by March Timeline: 15th. Requirements: City Council Members will have the opportunity to advise the Mayor and City Administrator publicly of their priorities. Each Councilmember shall be invited to submit up to eline budget seven expenditure priorities in ranked and/or weighted order for changes to the bas as presented in the Five Year Forecast. Councilmember priority statements may either be submitted as part of a report to be heard by the City Council and/or in a publicly available writing to the Mayor and City Administrator. In addition to the priorities, Councilmembers may also submit other suggestions, including revenue suggestions. Administrator's Budget Outlook Message & Calendar Report 5. Timeline: Heard by City Council before April 15th. The City Administrator shall bring as a report to the City Council a Budget Requirements: Outlook Message & Calendar no later than April 15th that provides an overview of the budget development process and lists all key dates and estimated dates of key budget events, including, but not limited to the release of the Mayor and Administrator's Proposed Budget, Community Budget Forums, Council meetings, and formal budget passage dates. This publication shall be posted on the City's website and by other means determined by t he City Administrator. 6. Release of Mayor & Administrator's Proposed Budget& Fact Sheet Timeline: Published and publicly available by May 1st. Heard by City Council and Fact Sheet distributed by May 15th. The Proposed Budget must be released by May 1st and shall clearly indicate any Requirements: substantive changes from the current baseline budget, including all changes to service levels from the current budget. The Proposed Budget shall indicate staffing by listing the number of positions in each classification for each Department, including a listing of each position proposed for addition or deletion. The Council shall hold a public meeting to present the Proposed Budget no later than May 15th in budget adoption years. The full proposed budget document shall be made available online from the City's website, and printed copies shall be available in all City libraries. Additionally, the proposed budget data shall be available in open data format on the City's open data portal by May 1st. Every effort should be made to thoroughly respond to any public request for departmental budget details, such as line item budgets. The requested information shall also be made available on the City's website and open data portal within a reasonable time period follow ing the request. The Proposed Budget must include a Budget Fact Sheet with easy- to-understand graphics and text explaining the City's overall finances, the Proposed Budget and that year's Budget Calendar. The Fact Sheet shall be published in languages req uired by Oakland's Equal Access Ordinance. The Fact Sheet shall be printed and made available in all City Recreation Centers and Senior H - 16

293 FINANCIAL POLICIES Exhibit 1 Centers as well as all City libraries by May 15th or the presentation to the Council, whichever is sooner. Communi ty Budget Forums 7. Timeline: Between May 1st and June 10th R equirements: The Administration and Council shall hold at least three (3) Community Budget Forums at varied times in different neighborhoods away from City Hall. These meetings, organized by the City Administrator's Office shall be scheduled so as to maximize residents' access. These meetings must include sufficient time for question and answer period as well as a presentation of budget facts by City staff. One or more of the meetings must be scheduled in the evening. Another must be scheduled on the weekend. These meetings shall also be scheduled so that Councilmembers have sufficient opportunity to attend a meeting close to their council best effort to attend at least one district. Every member of the City Council shall make their Community Budget Forum. In addition, members of the Budget Advisory Commission shall be requested to attend at least one Community Budget Forum. Translators will be provided by request with forty - ice, per Oakland's Equal Access Ordinance. Sufficient eight hours advance not Fact Sheets in all available languages shall be available at all Forums. M eetings shall be held in ADA accessible facilities served by public transit (BART stop, frequently running bus line, etc. ). Eve ry effort shall be made to record the meeting via video or audio. The City Administrator shall prepare an Informational Report summarizing the Community Forum process, to be heard by the City Council at its the next available budget key areas of discussion following the final Forum. The summary memo shall attempt to identify public agreement and disagreement, as well as respond to the most commonly asked questions. 8. Budget Advisory Commission's Report Timeline: June 1st Requirements: The Budget Advisory Committee (BAC) shall be requested to submit published, written report to the full City Council regarding the proposed budget with any suggested amendments no later than June 1 in budget adoption years. If submitted, the statement shall be published as part of the next budget report to the City Council. The BAC is encouraged to provide similar statements during the mid -cycle budget revise and any other significant budget actions. 9. Council President's Proposed Budget Timeline: June 17th Requirements: The City Council President, on behalf of the City Council, shall prepare a proposed budget for Council consideration to be heard at a Special City Council Budget Hearing occurring before June 17th. The Council President may delegate the duty to prepare a budget proposal to another member of the Council. A costing analysis request for any proposed 13 H - 17

294 FINANCIAL POLICIES amendments must have been submitted to the City Administrator at least five working days prior to the Special City Council Budget Hearing. The City Council may schedule additional Special City Council Budget Hearings or Workshops as needed. 10. Council Budget Amendments Timeline: No later than up to three days prior to final budget adoption In addition to the Council President's proposed budget, any Councilmember or Requirements: group of Councilmembers may submit proposed budget amendments at any time during the budget process. However, the adopted budget shall not contain substantive amendments made on the floor by Councilmembers at the final meeting when the budget is adopted. All substantive amendments must have been published in the City Council agenda packet for at least three days prior to the budget's final adoption. This three-day noticing requirement may be waived by a vote of at least six C ouncilmembers upon a finding that (1) new information impacting the budget by at least $1 million dollars came to the attention of the body after the publication deadline making it not reasonably possible to meet the additional notice requirement and (2) t he need to take immediate action on the item is required to avoid a substantial adverse impact that would occur if the action were deferred to a subsequent special or regular meeting, such as employee layoffs. Additionally, a costing analysis request for the proposed budget amendment must have been submitted to the City Administrator at least five working days prior to the budget's final adoption. 11. Process Feedback & Continual I mprovement th following budget adoption Timeline: September 30 Requirement The Budget Advisory Commission (BAC) shall be requested to submit an s: Informational Report to the Council's Finance and Management Committee containing their ity analysis of the budget adoption process including, but not limited to: 1) the informational qual of the Proposed Budget; 2) the City Administration's and City Council's attention to engaging the public and its impacts on the budget process and product; 3) the level of transparency and open dialogue in all public meetings dedicated to the budget; a nd 4) opportunities for improving the process in future years. In assessing opportunities for continually improving public participation in the budget process, the Administration, City Council and BAC shall be requested to consider the following guiding pr inciples: • Inclusive Design: The design of a public participation process includes input from appropriate local officials as well as from members of intended participant communities. Public participation is an early and integral part of issue and opportunity identification, concept development, design, and implementation of city policies, programs, and projects. • Authentic Intent: A primary purpose of the public participation process is to generate public views and ideas to help shape local government act ion or policy. • Transparency: Public participation processes are open, honest, and understandable. There is clarity and transparency about public participation process sponsorship, purpose, design, and how decision makers will use the process results. H - 18

295 FINANCIAL POLICIES Exhibit 1 • Inclusiveness and Equity: Public participation processes identify, reach out to, and encourage participation of the community in its full diversity. Processes respect a range of values and interests and the knowledge of those involved. Historically excluded individuals and groups are included authentically in processes, activities, and decision and policymaking. Impacts, including costs and benefits, are identified and distributed fairly. and/or access to • Informed Participation: Participants in the process have information expertise consistent with the work that sponsors and conveners ask them to do. Members of the public receive the information they need, and with enough lead time, to participate effectively. Accessible Participation: Public participatio n processes are broadly accessible in terms of • location, time, and language, and support the engagement of community members with disabilities. • Appropriate Process: The public participation process uses one or more engagement formats that are responsive to the needs of identified participant groups; and encourage full, authentic, effective and equitable participation consistent with process purposes. Participation - processes and techniques are well d esigned to appropriately fit the scope, character, and impact of a policy or project. Processes adapt to changing needs and issues as they move forward. • Use of Information: The ideas, preferences, and/or recommendations contributed by community members are documented and given consideration by decision- makers . Local officials communicate decisions back to process participants and the broader public, with a description of how the public input was considered and used. Building Relationships and Community Capacity: Public participation processes invest in • and develop long-term, collaborative working relationships and learning opportunities with community partners and stakeholders. This may include relationships with other temporary or ongoing community participation venues. • Evaluation: Sponsors and participants evaluate each public participation process with the collected feedback and learning shared broadly and applied to future public participation efforts. 15 H - 19

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379 LEGISLATION FY 2015 -17 ADOPTED POLICY BUDGET LEGISLATION Resolution / Page Legislative Item Approval Date Ordinance FINANCIAL POLICIES Appropriations Limit for FY 2015-17 I - 3 Resolution No. 85671 June 30, 2015 June 30, 2015 I - 5 Resolution No. 85672 Budget Adoption and City Council Budget Amendments LOCAL ASSESSMENTS Resolution No. 85632 Landscaping and Lighting Assessment District June 2, 2015 I - 21 LOCAL MEASURES Emergency Medical Services (Measure M) June 22, 2015 Ordinance No. 13317 I - 25 June 22, 2015 Ordinance No. 13318 I - 27 Paramedic Emergency Services (Measure N) June 22, 2015 Ordinance No. 13316 Library Services (Measure Q ) I - 29 VOTER APPROVED MANDATES July 29, 2014 Resolution No. 85149 Public Safety and Services Violence Prevention I - 31 Act of 2014 (Measure Z) Government Ethics Act of 2014 December 8, 2014 Ordinance No. 13278 I - 49 I - 1

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445 GLOSSARY BUDGET TERMINOLOGY African American Museum & Library at Oakland AAMLO ABAT Alcohol Beverage Action Team Distinct from cash basis, a ccrual basis accounting records the financial Accrual Basis Accounting effects of transactions in the periods in wh ich those transactions occur, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. Revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded at the time liabilities are incurred. ACS Automated Collection System C Alameda County Transportation Commiss ion ACT created in July 2010 by the , merger of the Alameda County Congestion Management Agency (ACCMA) . and the Alameda County Transportation Improvement Authority (ACTIA) that are actually realized Actual Actual refers to the expenditures and/or revenues ; opposed to those that are forecasted or budgeted . as ADA Americans with Disabilities Act The status of appropriations as of a specific date between July 1 at the Adjusted Budget beginning of the fiscal period and June 30 at the end of the period. Includes the adopted budget, budget amendments, prior year encumbrances, approved project carryforwards from prior years, and transfers between accounts, divisions and departments. Adopted Budget (budgeted expenditures) appr oved by the City Revenues and appropriations Council in June immediately preceding the new fiscal period. provide assistance in The Affordable Housing Trust Fund was established to Affordable Housing Trust Fund r Ordinance . Pe (AHTF) developing and maintaining affordable housing in the City 3 C.M.S., 25 percent of funds distributed to the City as a taxiing No. 1319 entity under the redevelopment dissolution law is to be allocated to the AHTF. A major unit of the municipal organization which is managed by an Agency / Agency / Department Department Director and comprised of a number of divisions which are functionally related to one another. Appropriation An authorization made by the City Council that permits the City to incur obligations and to make expenditures of resources . Appropriation Resolution The official resolution adopted by the City Council to establish legal authority for City officials to obligate and expend funds. ARRA The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 is an economic stimulus package enacted by the 111th United States Congress in Fe bruary 2009 . J - 1

446 GLOSSARY BUDGET TERMINOLOGY (continued) BAC Budget Advisory Committee t to budgeted expenditures are equivalen B . Balanced Budget udgeted revenues Bay Area Rapid Transit BART Projected revenue and expenditure budgets created as part of the budget Baseline Budget based on the assumption that current policies will development process continue unchanged for the upcoming fiscal period. Business Improvement District BID Biennial Budget Budget lasting or enduring for two fiscal years . the City borrows A B in which ond funds for a defined period of time form of loan capital projects or long - at a fixed interest rate. Bonds are used by finance . term obligations tes their credit quality rating given to bonds the City issues Bond Rating/Credit Rating A , that indica meaning the borrower’s ability to pay the principal and interest in a timely fashion . Private independent rating services include Stand ard & Poor's, Moody's and Fitch. Bond ratings are expressed as letters ranging from 'AAA', whic h is the highest grade, to 'C' ("ju nk"), which is the lowest grade . A financial plan for a specific fiscal period that Budget documents anticipated revenues and associated authorized expenditures. A procedure governed by accountin g controls and City policies through Budget Adjustment City staff revise s budget appropriation s . City staff has the prerogative which to adjust expenditures within departmental budgets. Council approval is required for transfers between departments, and for between funds, dditional appropriations from fund balance or new revenue sources. a The schedule of key dates or milestones that the City follows in the Budget Calendar , and administration of the budget. preparation, adoption Budget Document A financial and plannin g document that reflects the proposed (and later adopted) revenues and appropriations for the (authorized expenditures) historical financial information and City (including operating and capital), , organizational structure and goals. Budgetary Control use of control s and monitoring of a governmental unit or enterprise for The the purpose of keeping expenditures within the approved limits and achieving revenue targets . CAFR Comprehensive Annual Financial Report CalPERS California Public Employees ’ Retirement System Capital Budget A budget for capital expenditures, opposed to operating expenditures. J - 2

447 GLOSSARY BUDGET TERMINOLOGY (continued) A plan that identifies an organization’s capital project needs, p rioritizes the Capital Improvement Program (CIP)/Capital Plan projects, estimates costs, and proposes specific revenues, expenditures, and timeline to complete priority capital projects . Capital Project Projects generally costing $50,000 or more designed to upgrade and repair existing facilities d infrastructure ; purchase technology - related equipment an purchase equipment. and service contracts; and CAO ’s Office City Administrator Carryforward Appropriations brought forward from a previous fiscal year to continue or complete a specific projec t, program or activity. Community Development Block Grant CDBG CEDA Community and Economic Development Agency Capital Improvement Program CIP COIN Caring for Oaklanders in Need The City's fiscal policies Consolidated Fiscal Policy that include the City's policies on budgeting practices, reserve funds, and budget process, fiscal planning, transparency, and public participation. Contingency Reserve An appropriation of funds to cover unforeseen events, such as emergencies, ed programs, shortfalls in revenue or other unforeseen newly requir polic y for the General eventualities. For example, the City Council has set a Fund reserve (of 7.5 percent). Contractual Services and Operating expenditures for services provided by outside organizations etc. businesses, including maintenance contracts, consulting services, Core Services ey City lines of business. K CORE Citizens of Oakland Respond to Emergencies Program CPRB Citizen’s Police Review Board CSO Central Service Overhead , expend itures that are incurred by central service organizations, such as information technology, human resources, legal, to accounting, and management, that are recovered through cost allocation user departments and funds . Debt Service The expenditure requir ed to pay (“service”) interest and principal on outstanding debt. Deferred Capital Investments / eferring capital maintenance or renewal activities that The practice of d total cost of ow w ould be required to minimize a capital asset’s Deferred Maintenance nership in order to reduce short term expenditures. J - 3

448 GLOSSARY BUDGET TERMINOLOGY (continued) Deficit/Shortfall The amount by which budgeted or actual expenditures exceed revenues. A major unit of the municipal organization which is managed by an Agency / Department / Agency Department Director and comprised of a number of divisions which are functionally related to one another. Department of Transportation DOT Human Services Department HSD Discretionary Funds Funds that are not restricted to specif ic purposes. . Division A unit of the municipal organization which reports to a department East Bay Municipal Utilities District EBMUD Economic Development Initiative EDI EEC Enhanced Enterprise Community EEO Equal Employment Opportunity Environmental Impact Report EIR Obligations in the form of purchase orders, contracts or salary commitments, Encumbrance which are chargeable to an appropriation and for which a part of the n the appropriation is reserved. They cease to be encumbrances whe obligations are paid or otherwise terminated. Enterprise Fund A governmental accounting fund in which the services provided are financed and operated similarly to those of a private business. The rate schedules for these services are established to ensure that the revenues are adequate to meet all necessary expenditures. EOC Emergency Operations Center EWD Economic Workforce Development Expenditure The actual expending of financial resources, as recorded in the City’s financial system. Expenditure Category A basis for distinguishing types of expenditures. The major expenditure categories used by the City of Oakland are personnel services; operations and maintenance; and capital outlay. J - 4

449 GLOSSARY BUDGET TERMINOLOGY (continued) Fede FEMA ral Emergency Management Agency - A twelve Fiscal Year month time period signifying the beginning and ending period for recording financial transactions. The City of Oakland has specified July 1 through June 30 as its fiscal year. F Finance Department consists of the following bureaus: Treasury, inance Department The Revenue Management. Controller, and - Year Financial Forecast E ach Budget Cycle the City is required to prepare a Five - Five Financial Year Forecast pursuant to Resolution No. 81399 C.M.S . T he Forecast contains the -year baseline budget for the forthcoming two- two year budget period, clearly reflecting projected expenditures to maintain existing service levels and obligations, plus an additional three year forecast of revenues and . The Five - Year Financial Forecast is not a budget and does not expenditures . include any proposed balancing solutions or changed service levels FMS - Oracle) Financial Management System (old pre Forecast An estimate of future conditions, particularly related to financial conditions . An FTE or full time equivalent is defined as a staff year. For example, two FTE - half time are considered one full time equivalent. - - employees who work one An accounting entity that has a set of self Fund balancing accounts and that - records all financial transactions for specific activities or government functions. he City uses As required by governmental accounting standards, t different funds to account for expenditures from various revenue sources. nded for purposes specified by law or grantor Restricted funds may be expe regulations. Discretionary or unrestricted funds may be spent for any lawful purpose designated by the City Council. Fund Balance The net effect of a fund’s assets less liabilities at any given point in tim e. The total fund balance includes a designated / reserved portion, usually for encumbrances, projects, or other prior commitments, as well as an undesignated / unreserved (i.e. “available”) portion. ns and accounting treatment. The Fund Group A group of funds with similar restrictio seven fund groups included in the City’s budget are: general funds; special revenue funds; enterprise funds; internal service funds; capital projects . funds; debt service funds; and trust GAAP Generally Accepted Account ing Principles General Fund One of seven groups of funds used by the City to account for financial resources for different purposes. General Obligation (GO) Bond A type of bond that is repaid and backed by the City’s f ull financial resources. These are d istinct from revenue bonds, which are repaid using the revenue generated by the specific proje ct the bonds are issued to fund. J - 5

450 GLOSSARY BUDGET TERMINOLOGY (continued) General Purpose Fund One specific fund within the General Fund group of funds. Reven ues from (GPF) of the City's taxes, fees and service charges are deposited into the m any General Purpose Fund. It is the fund from which the City has the most flexibility in making expenditures. Geographic based Information System GIS - A contribution by a government, other organization, or a private individual, Grant activity . Grants may be classified as either categorical to support a particular or block, depending upon the amount of discretion allowed the grantee. Grants may be competitive or based on all ocation. Housing Advisory and Appeals Board HAAB HCD Housing and Community Development Henry J. Kaiser Convention Center HJKCC HMIP Home Maintenance & Improvement Program Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS HOPWA HR Human Re sources Management Department HUD Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning HVAC IAFF International Association of Firefighters Integrated Maintenance Management System IMMS l Surface Transportation Efficiency Act ISTEA Intermoda Information Technology IT ITD Information Technology Department ISF Internal Service Fund JPA Joint Powers Authority KTOP TV Channel 10 — Oakland’s Government Channel LAN Local Area Network LBE Local Business Enterprise J - 6

451 GLOSSARY BUDGET TERMINOLOGY (continued) Letter of Transmittal The opening section of the budget, which provides the City Council and the public with a general summary of the most important aspects of the budget, the previous fiscal years, and the views and recommendations changes from of the City Administrator. Mayor and Landscaping and Lighting Assessment District LLAD Low and Moderate Income Housing Fund LMIHF Emergency Medical Service Retention Act of 1997 Measure M Measure N Paramedic Services Act of 1997 Library Services Retention and Enhancement Act . Approved in 2004, Measure Q Measure O Measure Q is an extension of , which was approved by voters in 1994. Violence Prevention and Public S afety Act of 2004. Funding from this Measure Y Measure Y ended in 2014. P olice Services Parcel Tax and Parking Tax of 2014 Measure Z MIC Municipal Improvement Capital Fund Midcycle Budget adopts a two - year b udget (Biennial Budget). A t the e nd of the firs t The City - if any significant changes in year, a Mid Cycle Budget is adopted warrant changes from the original adopted two - year budget . circumstances Modified Accrual Basis accounting recognizes an economic transaction or Modified Accrual Basis e vent as revenues in the operating statement when the revenues are both measurable and available to liquidate liabilities of the current period. Available means collectible in the current period or soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current period. Similarly, expenditures are generally recognized when an event or transaction is expected to draw on current spendable resources. MSSP Multi Purpose Senior Services Program Municipal Service Center MSC MTC Metropolitan Trans portation Commission NCR Neighborhood Commercial Revitalization Negative Fund Balance The situation in which a fund’s balance is negative, meaning that its liabilities exceed its assets. NEH National Endowment for the Humanities J - 7

452 GLOSSARY BUDGET TERMI NOLOGY (continued) Notice of Funding Availability NOFA NSC Neighborhood Service Coordinator Oakland Animal Services OAS Oakland Base Reuse Authority OBRA OCA Office of the City Attorney OFD Oakland Fire Department Oakland Mus OMCF eum of California Foundation OMERS Oakland Municipal Employees Retirement System - Going On Expenditures or revenues that is recurring . On - going revenues can be spent on both one time and on - going expenditures. Some examples include - funds for salaries or property tax revenues. expenditure of One - Time Expenditures or revenues that is non - recurring . As a best practice, one - time revenues should be spent on one - time expenditures. Some examples include or real estate transfer tax the expenditure of funds for road repaving revenue from a large property sale. OOB Oakland Oversight Board, consists of representatives from the local taxing ; exercises oversight functions over ORSA . entities OPACT Oakland Police and Clergy Together OPL Oakland Public Library Department Other Post - Employment Benefits Employment Benefits refers to benefits due to retirees that are - Other Post ) (OPEB other than pension/retirement benefits. These are primarily composed of retiree medical benefits, but may also include other retiree benefits. OPED Oakland Paratransit for the Elderly & Disabled Operating Budget A financial plan for the provision of direct services and support functions, as distinct from a capital budget. Operations and Mainte nance Expenditures related to operating costs including supplies, commodities, contract services, materials, utilities and educational services. (O&M) OPOA Oakland Police Officers’ Association OPR Oakland Parks & Recreation Department J - 8

453 GLOSSARY TERMINOLOGY (continued) BUDGET S Oakland Redevelopment Successor Agency , successor to the former Oakland A OR Redevelopment Agency that is tasked with winding down all former redevelopment obligations. Open Space, Conservation and Recreation OSCAR OSHA cupational Safety & Health Administration Oc OUSD Oakland Unified School District , such as finance, human , and support costs dministrative Overhead Managerial, a that are critical to operating the City but that are resources, legal, and others, associated with a specific direct service provided to the public. Th ese not costs are subject to a citywide overhead cost allocation plan to distribute costs on an equitable basis to departments and funds that are the beneficiaries of such activities. PAL ice Athletic League Pol Personnel Services Expenditures related to employee compensation including wages and salaries, fringe benefits, retirement, premiums, allowances and special / supplemental pay such as shift differentials. PFRS Fire Retirement System Oakland’s Police and POB Pension Obligation Bond Program Budget identify cross Programs, and associated program codes, are created to . Using division or departmental efforts that have a common purpose program codes, the budget (both revenues and expenditures) can be described in programmatic terms. OPD Oakland Police Department OPRCA Oakland Parks and Recreation Cultural Advisory PSB Public Sector Budgeting, an Oracle module currently used in the City of Oakland to develop the bienni al policy budget. OPW Oakland Public Works ROPS Recognized Obligation Payment Schedule, a schedule every six months of estimated payments of the Oakland Redevelopment Successor Agency that serves as its budget. J - 9

454 GLOSSARY BUDGET TERMINOLOGY (continued) or a separate fund that is restricted for a Reserve A portion of a fund’s balance specific purpose and is, therefore, not available for general appropriation. Funds that can be spent only for the specific purposes stipulated by exter Restricted Funds nal source providers, constitutionally or through enabling legislation. Restrictions may effectively be changed or lifted only with the consent of resource providers. It also includes a legally enforceable requirement that r specific purposes enumerated in the law. the resources can only be used fo RETT Real Estate Transfer Tax Funds that the City receives as income. It includes such items as taxes, Revenue licenses, user fees / charges for services, fines/penalties, grants, and internal revenue. Revolving Loan Fund RLF Redevelopment Property Tax RPTTF Trust Fund SBE Small Business Enterprise Sustainable Community Development Initiative SCDI SHP Supportive Housing Program Small Local Business Enterprise SLBE e Funds Funds, exclusive of the General Fund and capital funds, which are separately Special Purpos administered because they are associated with a distinct function or enterprise. Structural Deficit A situation in which a fund’s expenditures are expected to routine ly exceed its revenues, creating a regular shortfall/deficit. THP Transitional Housing Program Transfer A movement of budgetary or actual revenues or expenditures between organizational units, accounts, projects, programs or funds. Transfers between funds appear as an expenditure (“transfer out”) in one fund and revenue (“transfer in”) in the other. Transfers between fiscal years represent the carryforward of funds received in previous years to be expended in the new year and appear as a revenue in the new year. Transfers between departments, funds or from one fiscal year to another must be approved by City Council. UBC Uniform Building Code J - 10

455 GLOSSARY (continued) BUDGET TERMINOLOGY UCR Uniform Crime Report In reference to financial figures , the term unaudited means prior to the Unaudited completion of a financial audit of an organization’s financial statements. - term Liability (formerly Long rence to A liability for which there is not an offsetting asset, often used in refe - term liabilities. OPEB liabilities and other long referred to as Unfunded Liability) Urban Search and Rescue USAR VLF Vehicle License Fee WIA Workforce Investment Act J - 11

456 GLOSSARY NOTES J - 12

457 INDEX A n Assessment of Stakeholder Report o ... J-1 - Glossary Abbreviation Guide Needs, Concerns, & Priorities – Budget Priories Poll ... H-79 All Funds Expenditures ... E-93 ... E-69 All Funds Revenue Budget by /Division/Bureau/Department Program /Unit ... D-11 Amateur/Professional Sports Capital Improvement Programs ... G- 89 ... G-5 City Administrator Animal Services, Service Impacts ... B-3 ... G-9 City Attorney 11 City Auditor ... G- ... D-10 Attractions 13 City Clerk ... G- City Council ... G-3 Authorized Positions by 53 ... G- Workforce Development Economic & Program /Unit/Division/Bureau/ Department 17 Finance Department ... G- dministrator City A ... G-6 G-19, 22, 25 City Attorney ... G-9 ... G-39 Fire Department City Auditor ... G- 11 Housing 57 ... G- Community Development & ... G- 13 City Clerk man Resources Hu ... G-27 ... G-3 City Council 43 Human Services ... G- ... G- 54 Economic & Workforce Development Info ... G-29 rmation Technology 17 Finance Department ... G- Mayor ... G-1 G- 19, 22, 25 -Departmental Non ... G- 77 Fire Department ... G- 40 ks & Recreation Oakland Par ... G-47 & ... G- Community Development 57 Housing 51 ry Oakland Public Libra ... G- ... G- Human Resources 27 65 Oakland Public Works ... G- 44 Human Services ... G- 61 Planning & Building ... G- Info ... G-29 rmation Technology Police Department ... G-35 Mayor ... G-1 Public Ethics Commission ... G- 15 Oakland Parks & Recreation ... G- 48 33 ... G- Race & Equity ry Oakland Public Libra ... G- 51 Public Works Oakland ... G- 63 Budget Development ... C-1 Planning Building & 61 ... G- 37 Department ... G- Police B udget Guide ... C-1 ... G- 15 Ethics Commission Public ... C-3 Budget Adoption Race & Equity ... G- 33 Budget Amendment ... C-3 Budget Development ... C-2 Budget Process ... C-2 B Budget Process ... C-2 Basis of Budgeting ... E-3 Budget Summary by Fund ... E- 16 2015- FY 43 ... C-3 Budget Adoption 2016 FY -17 55 ... E- Budget Amendment ... C-3 ... J-1 Budgetary Terminology udget and Financial Policies B Business Goals Consolidated Fiscal Policy ... H-3 City Administrator ... G-5 21 Deb t Management Policy FY 2012 -13 ... H- City Attorney ... G-9 49 Investment Policy FY 2014 -15 ... H- City Auditor ... G- 11 Oakland Redevelopment Agency City Clerk ... G- 13 ... H- Investment Policy Resolution 51 City Council ... G-3 K - 1

458 INDEX Ec onomic & Workforce Development ... G- 53 10 ... G- Division by ation Chart Organiz ... G-19 Finance Department ... G- 10 Significant Changes in Budget G-122, 25 ... G-9 Goals Top Priorities & Fire Department ... G- 39 ... G- Housing & Community Development 57 City Auditor ... G-11 ... G- 27 Human Resources by Program Authorized Positions 11 ... G- Human Services ... G- 43 Business Goals ... G- 11 29 Information Technology ... G- Historical Expenditures and Adopted Budget ... G-1 Mayor by Fund ... G- (Summary of) 11 Non -Departmental 77 ... G- and Ad Historical opted Budget 47 ... G- Oakland Parks & Recreation ... G- (Summary of) 11 by Program Oakland Public Library ... G- 51 ... G- Mission Statement 11 65 Oakland Public Works ... G- Organization Chart ... G- 11 by Program ... G- Planning & Building 61 11 ... G- Descriptions Program ... G- 35 Police Department 11 Significant Changes in Budget ... G- Public Ethics Commission 15 ... G- 33 ... G- Race & Equity ... G-13 City Clerk Authorized Positions by Program ... G- 13 ... E-77 Business License Tax Business Goals ... G- 13 Historical Expenditu Adopted Budget res and ... G- 13 by Fund (Summary of) and Adopted Budget Historical C (Summary of) ... G- 13 by Program Mission Statement ... G- 13 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) ... G-89 ... G- by Organization Chart 14 Program Categories ... G- 89 Descriptions Program ... G- 13 Definition ... G- 89 nificant Changes in Budget 14 ... G- Sig ... G- 91 Projects by Category 90 ... G- Summary by Category City Council ... G-3 Summary by Catego ry (Graph) ... G- 90 ... G-3 Authorized Positions by Program 89 ... G- Summary by Source Business Goals ... G-3 89 ... G- City (Graph) Summ ary by Source – ... G-3 sponsibilities Duties and Re Budget Adopted Historical Expenditures and Chabot Space & Science Center ... D-10 (Summary of) ... G-3 by Fund and Adopted Budget Historical ... G-5 City Administrator by Program ... G-3 (Summary of) Division ... G-6 Authorized Positions by ... G-4 Organization Chart by Division ine Bus ss Goals ... G-5 ... G-4 Program Descript ions and Budget Historical Expenditures Adopted Significant Changes in Budget ... G-3 ... G-5 by Fund (Summary of) Historical and Adopted Budget ... D-1 City Facts Department/ by Division (Summary of) ... G-5 Attractions ... D- 10 ... G-5 ... Mission Statement Economic Base ... D-2 Organization Chart ... G-7 by Division ... D-7 Education Descriptions Division ... G-5 ... D-1 General Information ... G-8 in Budget Significant Changes Government ... D-2 Human Services ... D-6 ... G-9 City Attorney History ... D-3 ... G-9 Authorized Positions by Division ... D-5 Infrastructure ... G- 10 Division Descriptions Key Facts ... D- 12 Budget Adopted Historical Expenditures and Library System ... D-7 (Summary of) ... G-9 by Fund Medical Facilities ... D-7 Historical and Adopted Budget Recreation ... D-9 ... G- 10 by Division (Summary of) Public Sa fety ... D-8 Mission Statement ... G-9 Transport ation and Mass Transit ... D-4 K - 2

459 INDEX City -Wide, Service Impacts ... B-5 City Attorney ... G-9 City Auditor ... G- 11 ... H-3 Policy Consolidated Fiscal ... G- City Clerk 13 ... G-3 City Council ... G- Economic & Workforce Development 53 Finance Department ... G- 17 D G- 19, 22, 25 Fire Department 39 ... G- Debt Management Policy and Swap Policy ... H-21 57 ent Housing & Community Developm ... G- Human Resources ... G- 27 Distinguished Budget Presentat ion Award ... Front 43 ... G- Human Services Information Technology ... G- 29 Mayor ... G-1 E ... G- -Departmental Non 77 ... G- Oakland Parks & Recreation 47 51 Oakland Public Library ... G- Economic Base ... D-3 65 Oakland Public Works ... G- 61 ... G- Planning & Building & Workforce nomic Eco Development, 35 Police Department ... G- ... A-1 Service Impacts ... G- 15 Public Ethics Commission ... G- Race & Equity 33 ... G-53 Economic & Workforce Development Authorized Positions by Division ... G- 54 Business Goals ... G- 53 F Division Descriptions ... G-53 Historical Expenditures and Adopted Budget by Fund (Summary of) ... G- 53 Department ... G-17 Finance Historica l and Adopted Budget by Authorized Positions Bureau/Division ... G-17 by Division (Summary of) ... G- 55 ... G- by Unit 19 Authorized Positions Mission Statement ... G- 53 , 27 , 25 22 G- ... G-55 by Division Organization Chart Business Goals ... G-19 ... G-55 Significant Changes in Budget G- 22, 25 Historical Expenditures and Adopted Budget ... D-7 Education by Fund (Summary of )... G-17 G-19, 22, 25 Emergency Medical Services Retention Act and Adopted Budget Historical (Legislation) ... I-25 by 16 Unit (Summary of) ... G- 18, 21, 24 G- Equal Access ... G-27 20 by Organization Chart ... G- Unit G-23, 26 ... G-7 Equal Opportunity Programs Descriptions Division/Unit ... G-17 20, 22, 26 G- Expenditures, Other GPF ... E-101 ... Significant Changes in Budget 18 . G- 20, 24, 26 G- Expenditure Tables ... E-91 93 ... E- All Funds Expenditures ... H-1 Financial Policies ... E- 95 General Purpose Funds Expenditures Consolidated Fiscal Policy ... H-3 98 ... E- GPF Salaries y FY 2012 21 -13 Debt Management Polic ... H- GPF Fringe Benefits ... E-99 4-15 ... H- 49 Investment Policy FY 201 GPF Retirement ... E- 100 Oakland Redevelopment Agency 101 ... E- GPF Other Expenditures Investment Policy Resolution 51 ... H- Report on Assessment of Stakeholder Budget by Fund Expenditures and Adopted Needs, Concerns, & Priorities – Budget Priories (Summary of) ... H-79 Poll ... G-5 ity Administrator C K - 3

460 INDEX Financial Summaries ... E-1 G 93 ... E- All Funds Expenditures 69 All Funds Revenue ... E- General Information ... D-1 Basis of Budgeting ... E-3 Budget Summary by Fund Gen ... E-95 eral Purpose Fund Expenditures ... E- 15 FY 20 43 -16 16 55 ... E- -17 FY 20 ... E-71 General Purpose Fund Revenue Expenditure Forecast ... E-2 ... E- Expenditure Tables 91 General Purpose Fund Revenues ... E-1 Forecasting Techniques ... E-73 (Summary of) ons Sources and Descripti Fund 27 ... E- Gen 95 ... E- eral Purpose Fund Expenditures ... J-1 Budgetary Terminology Glossary, 71 General Purpose Fund Revenue ... E- General Purpose Fund Revenues Government ... D-2 (Summary of) 73 ... E- ... E-1 duction to Financial Summaries Intro GPF Fringe Benefits ... E-99 ... E-113 -Term Liabilities Long ... E- Negative Funds 105 GPF Other Expenditures ... E-101 Other Budget Information ... E- 103 ... E-3 Planning for the Two -Year Budget ... E-100 GPF Retirement Expenditure Forecast & Revenue ... E-1 Methodology GPF Salaries ... E-98 ... E-2, Revenue Forecast Revenue Tables ... E-67 ificant Expenditure Changes (GPF) ... E-8 Sign H -GPF) ificant Expenditure Changes (NON ... E- 15 Sign (GPF) ... E-7 Changes Revenue Significant -GPF) ... E- 15 Significant Revenue Changes (NON History of Oakland ... D-3 ry Tables Summa ... E-5 Ten -Year Negati ve Fund Repayment und orical Expenditures and Budget by F Hist Sched ... E-111 ule (Summary of) ... G-5 City Administrator Fines & Penalties ... E-85 ... G-9 City Attorney 11 City Auditor ... G- ... G-39 Fire Department City Clerk ... G- 13 by Authorized Positions 40 ... G- Division Bureau/ ... G-3 ... City Council Business Goals ... G-39 53 ... G- Economic & Workforce Development Historical Expenditures and A dopted Budget Finance Department 17 ... G- (Summary of) by Fund ... G-39 G- 19, 22, 25 Historical and Adopted Budget ... G- Fire Department 39 by Bureau/ Division (Summary of) ... G-39 Housing & Community Development 57 ... G- ... G-39 Mission Statement Huma n Resources ... G- 27 ... G- Organization Chart 41 Division by Human Services 43 ... G- 40 ... G- Division Descriptions Bureau/ ... G- Information Technology 29 ... G- 41 Significant Changes in Budget ... G-1 Mayor Non 77 ... G- -Departmental Fire & Emergency Services, Service Impacts ... B-1 ... G- Oakland Parks & Recreation 47 51 ... G- Oakland Public Library ... E-1 Forecasting Techniques 65 Oakland Public Works ... G- Planning & Building ... G- 61 ... E-87 Franchise Fees Police Department ... G- 35 Public Ethics Commission ... G- 15 Fringe Benefits, GPF ... E-99 Race & Equity ... G- 33 ... E-27 Sources and Descriptions Fund K - 4

461 INDEX Historical and Adopted Budget by Budget Adopted Historical Expenditures and Program /Unit/Division/Bureau/Department by Fund (Summary of) ... G-43 (Summary of) t and Adopted Budge Historical ... G-5 City Administrator by Division (Summary of) ... G-43 City Attorney 10 ... G- ... G-43 Mission Statement City Auditor ... G- 11 Division Organization Chart by ... G-45 ... G- City Clerk 13 Division Descriptions ... G- 45 ... G-3 City Council Significant Changes in Budget ... G-45 Economic & Workforce Development ... G-55 epartment 18 ... G- Finance D Human Services, Service Impacts ... B-2 23, 26 G- 20, Fire Department 39 ... G- ... G-58 Housing & Community Development I Human Resources ... G- 27 43 ... G- Human Services Information Technology ... G-29 ... G- 30 Information Technology by Authorized Positions 29 Division ... G- ... G-1 Mayor Business Goals ... G-29 Non -Departmental ... G-78 Division Descriptions ... G- 30 47 ... G- Oakland Parks & Recreation Budget Adopted Historical Expenditures and ... G-52 Oakland Public Library by Fund (Summary of) ... G-29 kland Public Works ... G-68 Oa Historical and Adopted Budget ... G-62 Planning & Building 30 by Division (Summary of) ... G- Police Department ... G-36 Mission Statement ... G-29 15 Public Ethics Commission ... G- Division ... G- 30 Organization Chart by 33 Race & Equity ... G- Significant C 30 hanges in Budget ... G- Housing & Communit y Development ... G-57 Interfund Transfers ... E-90 Authorized Positions by Division ... G-57 Business Goals ... G-57 ... E-86 Interest Income Division Descriptions ... G-59 Historica Adopted Budget l Expenditures and ... E-1 Introduction to Financial Summ aries (Summary of) ... G-57 by Fund and Adopted Budget Historical ... H-49 Investment Policy, City FY 2014 -15 ... G-58 (Summary of) by Division ... G-57 Mission Statement by Organization Chart ... G-58 Division K ... G-59 Significant Changes in Budget H ... B-3 ousing Services, Service Impacts Key F acts ... D-12 ... G-27 Human Resources ... G-27 Authorized Positions by Division L Business Goals ... G-27 ... G- 27 Division Descriptions Historical Expenditures and Budget Adopted Lake Merritt ... D-10 27 ... G- (Summary of) by Fund Historical and Adopted Budget Landscape & Lighting Assessment District ... G- by Division (Summary of) 27 ... I-21 (Legislation) Mission Statement ... G-27 Organization Chart by Division ... G- 28 Legislation ... I-1 Significant Changes in Budget ... G- 28 ... I-3 Article IIIB Appropriations Limit Bienni ... I-5 Budget and Council Amendments al ... G-43 Human Services Emergency Medical Services Retention Authorized Positions Divi sion ... G- 44 by Act of 1997 (Measure M) ... I- 25 43 Business Goals ... G- K - 5

462 INDEX Government Ethics Act of 2014 49 ... I- Library Services Retention & Measure Q - Landscape & Lighting Assessment District 21 ... I- Enhancement Act (Legislation) ... I-29 ention & Enhancement Librar y Services Ret 29 ... I- (Measure Q) Act Measure Z - Violence Prevention & Public Paramedic Services Act of 1997 ... I-31 (Legislation) of 2014 Safety Act ... I- 27 (Measure N) Public Safety & Violence Prevention Medical Facilities ... D-7 Z) ... I- 14 Act of 20 31 (Measure ... E-89 laneous Revenue Miscel ittal ... Letter of Transm Front Mission Statement City Administrator ... G-5 Library ... G-51 ... G-9 City Attorney ... G- Authorized Positions by Program 51 City Auditor 11 ... G- 51 ss Goals ... G- Busine City Clerk ... G- 13 Historical Expenditures and Adopted Budget ... G-55 Economic & Workforce Development 51 by Fund (Summary of) ... G- Finance Department ... G-19 Historical and Adopted Budget G- 22, 25 by Program (Summary of) ... G- 52 39 ... G- Fire Department ... G- Mission Statement 51 Housing & Community Development ... G-57 52 ... G- by Program Organization Chart 27 ... G- Human Resources Program Descriptions ... G- 51 43 ... G- Human Services 51 ... G- Significant Changes in Bud get 29 Information Technology ... G- 47 Oakland Parks & Recreation ... G- Library Services Retention and Enhancement Oakland Public Library ... G-51 Act (Legislation) ... I-29 Oakland Public Works ... G-65 Planning & Building 61 ... G- ... B-2 Library Services, Service Impacts ... G-35 Police Department ... E-84 Licenses & Permits ... G-15 Public Ethics Commission 33 Race & Equity ... G- 13 ... E-1 -Term Long Liabilities N M Negative Funds ... E-105 ... G-1 Mayor Negative Fund Ten- payment Year Re Authorized Positions by Program ... G-1 11 ... E-1 Plan Duties and Responsibilities ... G-1 Historical Expenditures and Budget Adopted Non -Departmental ... G-77 (Summary of) by Fund ... G-1 Adopted s and Historical Expenditure Budget and Adopted Budget Historical ... G- (Summary of) by Fund 77 by Program (Summary of) ... G-1 Historical and Adopted Budget Organization Chart ... G-2 by Program by Program (Summary of) ... G-78 ... G-2 Priorities n- Departmental No – Key Items ... G-78 Significant Changes in Budget ... G-1 77 ... G- escriptions Program D Sig ... G-79 nificant Changes ... A-1 Mayor & Council Priorities ... - EMS Retention Act Measure M O ... I-25 (Legislation) - Paramedic Services Act Measure N Oakland International Airport ... D-1, ... I-27 (Legislation) D-4 K - 6

463 INDEX ... G-47 Oakland Parks & Recreation Parking Tax ... E-83 Authorized Positions ... G- 48 by Program 47 Business Goals ... G- Parks and Recreation ... G-47 Historical Expenditures and Budget Adopted by Program ... G- 48 ns Authorized Positio 47 by Fund (Summary of) ... G- 47 Business Goals ... G- and Adopted Budget Historical Historical Expenditures and Adopted Budget 47 ... G- by Program (Summary of) by Fund (Summary of) ... G- 47 ... G- Mission Statement 47 Historical and Adopted Budget Organization Chart by Program ... G- 49 ... G- 47 by Program (Summary of) Program Descriptions 49 ... G- ... G- Mission Statement 47 49 ... G- Significant Changes in Budget Organization Chart by Program ... G- 49 Descriptions Program ... G- 49 Oakland ... G-51 Public Library ... G- nificant Changes in Budget Sig 49 51 ... G- Authorized Positions by Program ... D-9 Parks & Recreation (City Facts) 51 Business Goals ... G- Budget Historical Expenditures and Adopted Parks & Recreation, Service Impacts ... B-2 (Summary of) ... G- 51 by Fund and Adopted Budget Historical ... G-61 & Building Planning 52 (Summary of) ... G- by Program Authorized Positions by Program ... G- 61 Mission Statement ... G- 51 Business Goals ... G- 61 Organization Chart by Program ... G- 52 Adopted Historical Expenditures and Budget ... G-51 Program Descriptions by Fund (Summary o f) ... G- 61 ... G- 51 Significant Changes in Budget Historical and Adopted Budget ... G- 62 by Program (Summary of) ... G-65 Oakland Public Works Mission Statement ... G- 61 66 ... G- Authorized Positions by Program Organization Chart ... G- 62 by Program Business Goals ... G- 65 62 Program Descriptions ... G- Historical Expenditures and Adopted Budget 63 Significant Changes in Budget ... G- 65 ... G- (Summary of) by Fund Historical and Adopted Budget Planning & Building, Service Impacts ... B-4 68 ... G- (Summary of) by Program ... G- Mission Statement 65 anning for the Two Pl -Year Budget ... G-3 72 ... G- by Program Organization Chart 65 ... G- Programs Descriptions P olice Department ... G-35 69 ... G- Significant Changes in Budget Authorized Positions by Division ... G-37 Business G oals ... G-5 ... F-1 Summary Organizational Division Descriptions 32 ... G- ... F-1 Citywide Organizational Chart Adopted Historical Expenditures and Budget Summary of Positions by Agency/Dept by Fund (Summary of) ... G-35 16-17 ... F-2 FY 2009- 10 through FY 20 Historical Revenue and Expenditures Classif ic ... F-3 ation Summary by Department ... G-36 of) Division (Summary Bureau/ by t ... G-35 Mission Statemen ... D-10 Other Attractions ... G-36 by Division Organization Chart Significant Changes in Budget ... G-37 Other Budget Information ... E-103 Other Service Charges ... E-87 ... B-1 Police Services, Service Impacts through -2010 Position Summary FY 2009 by Dept -17 FY 2016 ... F-2 P ... D-11 Professional/Amateur Sports Param edic Services Act (Legislation] ... I-27 Property T ax ... E-73 Revenue Parking ... E-87 Meter K - 7

464 INDEX Public Ethics Commission ... G-15 ... E- 90 Interfund Transfers 15 ... G- by Program Authorized Positions Licenses & Permits Tax ... E- 84 15 Business Goals ... G- ... E- 89 Miscellaneous Adopted Budget Historical Expenditures and ... E- 83 Parking Tax 15 by Fund (Summary of) ... G- 74 Property Tax ... E- Historical and Adopted Budget 81 ... E- Real Estate Transfer Tax 15 by Program (Summary of) ... G- Sales & Use Tax ... E- 75 15 ... G- Mission Statement 87 ... E- Service Charge Organiza tion Chart 15 by Program ... G- 82 ... E- Tax Transient Occupancy 16 ... G- Descriptions Program 79 ... E- Utility Consumption Tax ... G- Significant Changes in Budget 16 Revenue and Expenditure Forecast Public Safety ... D-8 Methodology ... E-1 ... G-65 Public Works Revenue Forecast ... E-2 ... G- 66 Authorized Positions by Program Business Goals ... G-65 ... E-71 Revenue, General Purpose Fund Budget Historical Expenditures and Adopted ... G- 65 by Fund (Summary of) Revenue, Parking ... E-87 Meter and Adopted Budget Historical ... E-87 Revenue, Port by Program (Summary of) ... G-68 65 Mission Statement ... G- Organization Chart by Program ... G- 72 Programs Descriptions ... G-65 S Significant Changes in Budget ... G-69 Salaries, GPF ... E-94 R ... E-5 Sales Tax Service Charges ... E-87 Rental Income ... E-87 ... E-87 Budgeted by Category ... E-87 Other ... E-81 Real Estate Transfer Tax Service Impacts ... B-1 Race & Equity ... G-33 ... B-5 Administration 33 by Program Authorized Positions ... G- Animal Services ... B-3 Business Goals ... G- 33 e ... B-5 -Wid City Budget Adopted Historical Expenditures and ... Economic & Workforce Development B-3 33 ... G- by Fund (Summary of) Finance ... B-5 Historical and Adopted Budget ... B-1 Fire & Emergency Services 33 by Program (Summary of) ... G- General Government ... B-5 Mission Statement ... G- 33 Housing Services ... B-3 Organization Chart ... G- 33 by Program Human Services & Education ... B-2 ... G- Program 34 De scriptions Library Services ... B-2 ... B-5 Parks & Recreation Services ... D-9 ecreation R ... B-4 Planning & Building ... E-100 Retirement, GPF Police Services ... B-1 ... B-4 Public Works & Transportation Revenue Tables ... E-67 All Funds Revenue ... E-69 Changes in Budget and Performance Significant General Purpose Fund Revenue ... E- 71 City Administrator ... G-8 ... E-77 Business License Tax City Attorney ... G- 10 Fines & Penalties ... E- 85 City Auditor ... G- 11 81 Interest Income ... E- City Clerk ... G-14 K - 8

465 INDEX ... E-82 Transient Occupancy Tax City Council ... G-3 Economic & Workforce Development ... G-55 ... G-75 on Transportati 18 Finance Department ... G- Goals ... G-75 G- 20, 24, 26 ... G-75 Division Descriptions Fire Department ... G- 41 ... G-75 Funding 59 Housing & Community Development ... G- 75 t ... G- Mission Statemen Human Resources ... G-28 ... G-45 Human Services ... D-4 Transportation & Mass Transit 30 ... G- Information Technology ... G-1 Mayor Year Budget Two- , Planning ... E-3 Non ... G-79 -Departmental Oakland Parks & Recreation ... G-49 Ten -Year Negative Fund Repayment ... G-52 Oakland Public Library Plan ... D-1 11 Oakland Public Works ... G-69 Planning & Building ... G-63 38 ... G- Police Department ... G-16 Public Ethics Commission U (GPF) Changes Expenditure ... E-8 Significant ... E-79 Utility Consumption Tax (GPF) ... F-7 Significant Revenue Changes V ... D-11 Sports, Professional/Amateur Violence Prevention and Public Safety Act T (Legislation) ... I-31 ... i Table of Contents K - 9

466 INDEX NOTES K - 10

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