quality standards for expanded learning california final

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1 CONTENTS INTRODUCTION / BACKGROUND 3 Quality Standards for Expanded DESCRIPTION OF STANDARDS AND CROSSWALK 4 RECOMMENDED USES 5 Learning in California: QUALITY STANDARDS IN ACTION 6 Creating and Implementing a Shared Vision of Quality 19 SUMMARY OF WORK GROUP PROCESS WORK GROUP PARTICIPANTS 20 1 GLOSSARY OF TERMS 2 REFERENCES 2 2 “This bold initiative provides a road map for improving expanded learning throughout California.” – Tom Torlakson Superintendent of Public Instruction FINAL RELEASE: SEPTEMBER 2014 Informed by Expanded Learning stakeholders and practitioners, and produced in collaboration between the California Department of Education, After School Division, and the California AfterSchool Network.

2 2 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Table of Contents INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND 3 DESCRIPTION OF STANDARDS AND CROSSWALK 4 5 RECOMMENDED USES 6 QUALITY STANDARDS AND STANDARDS IN ACTION 19 SUMMARY OF WORK GROUP PROCESS 20 WORK GROUP PARTICIPANTS 21 GLOSSARY OF TERMS 22 REFERENCES According to the California Department of Education After School Division, “the term Expanded Learning refers to before and after school, summer, intersession learning programs, that focus on developing the academic, social, emotional, and physical needs and interests of students through hands-on, engaging learning experiences. Expanded Learning programs should be student-centered, results-driven, include community partners, and complement but not replicate learning activities in 1 the regular school day/year.”

3 3 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Introduction and Background The California Department of Education After School Division (CDE-ASD or After School Division) was formed in late 2011, implementing a recommendation from Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson’s 2 . Transition Advisory Team’s final report, A Blueprint for Great Schools Since its inception, this new Division has actively engaged multiple stakeholders and practitioners to the state’s direction. The Division recently engaged over 100 stakeholders and practitioners in the creation of a new vision and strategic plan for expanded learning in California through 2016. A cornerstone of this strategic plan is new Quality Standards for Expanded Learning Programs. The Quality Standards were developed in two distinct phases (Phase I and Phase II) through a partnership between the After School Division and the California AfterSchool Network Quality Committee. A Vision for Expanded Learning in California C alifornia’s Expanded Learning programs are an integral part of young people’s education, engaging them in year round learning opportunities that prepare them 1 for college, career, and life.

4 4 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Description of Standards and Crosswalk The Work Groups on Quality Standards (Phase I and II) created a set of 12 Quality Standards and descriptions of what each Standard should look like in action (Standards in Action). Standards in Action are described at the programmatic, staff, and participant levels. In addition, A Crosswalk Between the Quality Standards for was created. This Crosswalk outlines a Expanded Learning and Program Quality Assessment Tools (Crosswalk) number of available tools that can be used for quality assessment and improvement. • Outlines California’s Quality Standards Outlines multiple quality assessment tools • and what each Standard should look that have significant alignment with the California Quality Standards. like in action at the programmatic, staff, and participant levels. Provides a detailed description of each • • Describes recommended uses of the tool, its purpose and properties, cost, Standards. and training support available. • Supports programs in the process of continuous improvement.

5 5 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Recommended Uses The purpose of the Quality Standards is to describe high levels of “Quality” of a program at the programmatic, staff, and participant levels. The quality standards are not intended to serve as a compliance tool, but as the following: A framework of clear expectations for all stakeholders. ■ ■ A guide ■ to inform the After School Division’s decision-making, e.g., technical assistance decisions, language in ■ requests for application, and policy development. A guide for program providers to assess their own programs in order to help determine what they are doing well ■ ■ and what needs improvement. ■ A guide for parents and youth to identify quality programming. ■ A guide for school principals and district superintendents to reinforce and advance key priorities. ■ ■ A complement ■ ■ to other standards in the State of California focused on quality improvement, e.g., Learning in After School and Summer, Quality Self-Assessment Tool, Quality Self-Assessment Rubric, Center for Youth Program Quality, etc. How to use Quality Standards and Crosswalk in a continuous improvement process The Quality Standards are intended to create a framework of clear expectations, and a shared vision of quality among multiple stakeholders. The Standards in Action are intended to provide more detailed information about what the Standards should look like at the programmatic, staff, and student levels. The Quality Standards are a central component of the cycle of quality improvement. They are not assessment or compliance tools, but can be utilized in conjunction Crosswalk with a variety of assessment tools (as outlined in the ) to plan and assess the quality of expanded learning Crosswalk provides more guidance about the cycle of quality improvement. programs. The Continuous quality improvement cycle e s s s s A Assess Program Quality: Collect data on the program using multiple strategies. Data comes from sources including self-assessments, review of program policies and manuals, interviews and surveys conducted with staff, youth, and other stakeholders, and observation of program activities. I m Plan: Reflect on program data and use data to generate and implement an p action plan for program improvement. Action plans can be used to revise r o n and refine organizational strategies and goals, to direct organizational v a resources towards areas that need improvement, and to guide professional l e P development for staff. Improve Program Quality: Implement the action plan, taking time to reflect on progress along the way. Once key goals are met, re-assess and update the action plan accordingly.

6 6 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Quality Standards for Expanded Learning Programs 3 which clearly Learning in After School and Summer Principles The standards should be considered in the context of the five communicate how expanded learning programs contribute to children’s learning. Programmatic Quality Standards Point-of-Service Quality Standards Quality staff Safe and supportive environment 1 7 The program recruits and retains high quality staff The program provides a safe and nurturing environment and volunteers who are focused on creating a that supports the developmental, social-emotional and 7 P positive learning environment, and provides ongoing physical needs of all students. age professional development based on assessed Page 13 staff needs. Active and engaged learning 2 Program design and activities reflect active, meaningful Clear vision, mission and purpose 8 and engaging learning methods that promote The program has a clearly defined vision, mission, collaboration and expand student horizons. Page 8 goals, and measurable outcomes that reflect broad stakeholder input and drive program design, Skill building 3 implementation and improvement. Page 14 The program maintains high expectations for all students, intentionally links program goals and curricula with Collaborative partnerships 9 21st-century skills and provides activities to help students Page 9 achieve mastery. The program intentionally builds and supports collaborative relationships among internal and external stakeholders, including families, schools and community, Youth voice and leadership 4 to achieve program goals. Page 15 The program provides and supports intentional opportunities for students to play a meaningful role in Continuous quality improvement 10 program design and implementation, and provides Page 10 The program uses data from multiple sources to assess ongoing access to authentic leadership roles. its strengths and weaknesses in order to continuously improve program design, outcomes and impact. Healthy choices and behaviors 5 Page 16 The program promotes student well-being through opportunities to learn about and practice balanced Program management 11 nutrition, physical activity and other healthy choices in an The program has sound fiscal and administrative Page 11 environment that supports a healthy life style. practices supported by well-defined and documented policies and procedures that meet grant requirements. Diversity, access and equity 6 Page 17 The program creates an environment in which students experience values that embrace diversity and equity Sustainability 12 regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, income level, national origin, physical ability, sexual orientation The program builds enduring partnerships with the community and secures commitments for in-kind and and/or gender identity and expression. Page 12 Page 18 monetary contributions.

7 7 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Safe and Supportive Environment The program provides a safe and nurturing environment that supports the developmental, social-emotional and physical needs of all students. Safe and supportive environment in action Programmatic Level ■ Program directors work closely with school leaders to create school-aligned health and safety procedures for the ■ expanded learning program. ■ ■ The program develops policies and procedures to: Clearly communicate health, safety, and behavior procedures with staff, participants, and families. • • Clearly identify the health and medical needs of participants. • Ensure that staff are easily identifiable to participants, families, and other stakeholders (e.g., staff shirts, vests, badges, etc.). Ensure that staff, participants, families, and school partners understand where participants are located throughout • the duration of the program. • Ensure that staff are trained in safety and first aid. • Clearly document and communicate incidents (i.e. written reports and phone records). • Maintain an easily accessible list of all participants with current emergency contacts for program activities and field trips. ■ ■ The program connects participants and families to services, organizations and other resources that provide support beyond after school and summer programming (e.g., food security, health and mental health services, parent education, and other identified needs). Staff Level ■ The staff respectfully welcome and release participants from the ■ program. ■ Staff intentionally build and maintain trusting, nurturing, and ■ supportive relationships with participants. ■ ■ Staff intentionally identify participant strengths, interests, and learning styles, and encourage participants to develop skills related to their strengths and interests. ■ ■ Staff hold participants to high expectations for behavior and achievement by: • Actively acknowledging positive behavior and participant accomplishments. • Calmly intervening when youth or adults are engaged in physically and/or emotionally unsafe behavior. ■ ■ Staff participate in on-going health and safety procedures, trainings, and practice drills with participants. Participant Level ■ ■ Participants and staff share responsibility in building a sense of community and belonging. ■ ■ Participants actively co-create behavioral agreements in collaboration with program staff.

8 8 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Active and Engaged Learning Program design and activities reflect active, meaningful and engaging learning methods that promote collaboration and expand student horizons. Active and engaged learning in action Programmatic Level ■ ■ The program provides a variety of activities that are hands-on, project-based, and result in a culminating product. ■ ■ The program uses participant feedback, assessments, and evaluations to guide the development of training, curricula, and projects that fully meet participants’ needs and interests. Staff Level ■ ■ Staff give participants the experience of learning through multiple senses. ■ ■ Staff give participants the opportunity to work in groups that have a clear purpose. ■ ■ Staff provide activities that raise awareness, promote thought-provoking discussion and support collaborative interaction with others in the larger community, other cultures, and even globally. ■ Staff provide opportunities for participants to think critically, as well as act on issues and opportunities that are ■ important but also of high interest and relevance to them. Participant Level ■ ■ Participants gather evidence to support their ideas and understand other perspectives. ■ Participants use modern ■ technology to support their learning. ■ ■ All participants in group work are engaged, cooperate in the group’s accomplishments, and are accountable to one another.

9 9 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Skill Building The program maintains high expectations for all students, intentionally links program goals and curricula with 21st-century skills and provides activities to help students achieve mastery. Skill building in action Programmatic Level ■ ■ The program supports projects and activities in which participants demonstrate mastery by working toward a final product or presentation. ■ ■ The program supports activities in which participants develop and demonstrate 21st century skills. Staff Level ■ ■ Staff select or create projects that relate to young people’s lives. ■ Staff develop learning goals for each activity and communicate these goals to youth. ■ ■ Staff facilitate activities and conversations that increase participants’ 21st century skills, sense of personal and social ■ responsibility, and understanding of life and career options. ■ ■ Staff use practices that support mastery such as: • Providing youth with opportunities to practice skills • Sequencing activities to allow participants to build on previously learned skills. • Facilitating youth reflections and offering constructive feedback to help youth learn from their experiences of successes, mistakes, and failures Helping youth make links between the activity and • their lives outside of the program Participant Level ■ ■ Participants work in groups where they practice skills such as team- building, collaboration, and use of effective communication. ■ ■ Participants are involved in projects, activities, and events that increase their understanding and use of 21st century skills (e.g., creativity, critical- thinking, and information and communications technology).

10 10 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Youth Voice and Leadership The program provides and supports intentional opportunities for students to play a meaningful role in program design and implementation, and provides ongoing access to authentic leadership roles. Youth voice and leadership in action Programmatic Level ■ ■ The program provides participants with opportunities and space to share their viewpoints, concerns, or interests in order to impact program practices or policies. This includes opportunities that are led by youth. ■ ■ The program provides opportunities for participants to actively exercise their leadership skills and address real world problems that they identify in their communities. These are activities that require critical thinking, debate, and action planning. ■ ■ The program trains staff to facilitate youth voice and leadership in ways that promote positive relationships within the program and empower participants to have a positive impact on other individuals and institutions. Staff Level ■ ■ Staff encourage and engage participants on a regular basis to share their perspectives regarding program design, what they want to learn and the quality of their experience in the program. ■ ■ Staff work to recognize the leadership potential in all young people, regardless of their age, and provide opportunities for them to develop their leadership skills by providing authentic leadership roles within their after school program. Participant Level ■ ■ Participants engage in authentic and meaningful leadership roles that are supported by staff and celebrated by the program. ■ ■ Participants share ownership in the design of program activities. ■ ■ Participants take responsibility for completing projects. ■ Participants express their opinions and ■ feedback in surveys or group discussions regarding what they want to learn about, what they want to be able to do, and the development of program offerings that respond to their interests. ■ ■ Participants reflect on learning experiences (formal and informal) and give their opinion about future learning opportunities.

11 11 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Healthy Choices and Behaviors The program promotes student well-being through opportunities to learn about and practice balanced nutrition, physical activity and other healthy choices in an environment that supports a healthy lifestyle. Healthy choices and behaviors in action Programmatic Level ■ ■ The program creates and maintains a healthy culture and environment that is positively influenced by a collaborative and coordinated effort of families, school, and community. ■ ■ The program identifies healthy practices and develops priorities that contribute to the school wellness plan and implementation. ■ ■ The program helps staff promote healthy lifestyles by providing professional development and access to age-appropriate curricula and resources. ■ The program incorporates nutrition and physical activity ■ into all facets of program design and operating procedures (e.g., fundraising, meals/snacks, policies, curricula, incentives, etc.). Staff Level ■ ■ Staff provide daily opportunities for participants to engage in developmentally appropriate, research-based nutrition and physical activities that support program goals. ■ ■ Staff understand how knowledge, skills, and behaviors around health contribute to academic performance and a positive socio-emotional lifestyle. ■ ■ Staff model good nutrition and participation in physical activity during the program. Participant Level ■ Participants have a voice and choice in creating ■ and maintaining a healthy culture and environment within their program. ■ ■ Participants apply their knowledge and experience around nutrition, healthy lifestyles, and physical activity, in order to influence their families, peers, program, and community.

12 12 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Diversity, Access and Equity The program creates an environment in which students experience values that embrace diversity and equity regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, income level, national origin, physical ability, sexual orientation and/or gender identity and expression. Diversity, access, and equity in action Programmatic Level ■ ■ The program actively recruits and hires staff that reflects the community of the students served. ■ ■ The program states its explicit commitment to diversity and equity in its outreach materials and/or policies. ■ ■ The program is aware of and seeks information and strategies to support all participant needs. ■ ■ The program creates a welcoming environment by representing the diversity of the participants through program materials, displays, etc. ■ ■ The program implements a plan that outreaches to all students at the school site. ■ The program celebrates diversity related to participants’ race, color, religion, sex, age, income level, national ■ origin, physical ability, sexual orientation, and/or gender identity and expression. Staff Level ■ ■ Staff participate in on-going diversity and sensitivity training. ■ ■ Staff adapt activities to accommodate the physical and developmental abilities of all participants, and actively encourage their participation in the program. Participant Level ■ ■ Participants and staff are comfortable sharing, and are given opportunities to share, from their diverse experiences and backgrounds.

13 13 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Quality Staff The program recruits and retains high quality staff and volunteers who are focused on creating a positive learning environment, and provides ongoing professional development based on assessed staff needs. Quality staff in action Programmatic Level ■ The program engages in a rigorous recruitment and ■ hiring process that carefully considers experience, knowledge, interest, ability to create a safe environment, diversity, and capacity for engaging children in age appropriate and meaningful learning. ■ ■ The program provides staff and volunteers with: • Clear titles and job descriptions • Continuous training and professional development Resources and materials to deliver activities • On-the-job coaching • ■ The program supports staff with information regarding ■ grant requirements, budgets, and any information that affects the day-to-day operations of the program. ■ ■ The program supports staff with competitive pay. ■ ■ The program creates opportunities for participants and other stakeholders to provide feedback on staff and volunteer quality. Staff Level ■ ■ Staff demonstrate ability to: • Deliver a program that meets grant requirements Facilitate and incorporate district and program curricula, research-based youth development principles and best • practices in program planning and activities • Facilitate activities that engage students in active and meaningful experiences that build mastery and expand horizons • Welcome and engage volunteers in roles that meaningfully and effectively support student learning ■ ■ Staff exhibit: • Integrity, professionalism, caring, and competency as a positive role model • Commitment to building positive relationships with a culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse community of students, staff, and parents Participant Level ■ ■ Participants are involved in the staff selection process. ■ ■ Participants have trusting and positive relationships with staff.

14 14 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Clear Vision, Mission and Purpose The program has a clearly defined vision, mission, goals, and measurable outcomes that reflect broad stakeholder input and drive program design, implementation and improvement. Clear, vision, mission, and purpose in action Programmatic Level ■ The program monitors progress toward its goals and ■ ■ ■ When the program creates its mission, vision, outcomes. goals, and outcomes, it makes sure all stakeholders participate, including: Based on its vision and mission, the program intentionally ■ ■ aligns goals and outcomes with: Youth • Families • Policies and procedures • Program staff • Program plan • • School site partners Budget • Community partners • Staff development • • Communications and marketing material ■ The program ensures that its vision and mission ■ complement each other and are reflected in ■ ■ The program informs participants, families, staff, and program goals and outcomes. partners about their roles and responsibilities in advancing the mission, vision, and goals of the program. ■ ■ The program regularly communicates, reviews, and makes appropriate changes to goals and outcomes in collaboration with all stakeholders. Staff Level ■ ■ Staff share program’s mission, vision, goals, outcomes, and planned activities with families through a variety of strategies (e.g., new family orientations, parent nights, etc.). ■ ■ Staff design activities to make progress toward program’s goals and outcomes. Participant Level ■ ■ Participants know the goals, and outcomes of the program. ■ ■ Participants provide input that is used to impact the program’s vision, mission, goals, and outcomes.

15 15 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Collaborative Partnerships The program intentionally builds and supports collaborative relationships among internal and external stakeholders, including families, schools and community, to achieve program goals. Collaborative partnerships in action Staff Level Programmatic Level The program develops collaborative partnerships ■ Staff engage, communicate, and connect parents to ■ ■ ■ information and services available to them within their that are formalized and clearly articulated community and school. through written agreements, and are maintained through on-going meetings and other systems of ■ ■ Staff meet regularly, both formally and informally, with communication. partners to discuss data and agree upon program goals and design. ■ ■ The program coordinates a seamless and integrated partnership between the instructional day and Staff hold collaborative meetings with both internal and ■ ■ expanded learning program. external partners to discuss impact, highlights, and areas of growth. ■ The program actively outreaches and engages ■ potential partners (public and private) in order to sustain program services. Participant Level ■ The program uses culturally and linguistically ■ ■ Participants share their experiences and feedback about the ■ appropriate strategies to engage families as program to inform program design. advocates for their children’s education and healthy development. ■ ■ The program trains staff to work collaboratively with internal and external stakeholders in order to achieve program goals. ■ ■ Decision-making as part of a process of continuous improvement is informed by stakeholders such as: • Parents Non-profit • organizations • Community partners Public officials • District leadership • • County Offices of • Local businesses • Youth Education ■ The program seeks to collaborate with the ■ appropriate school, community, regional, statewide, and national stakeholders in order to leverage resources. Rural and frontier programs may have the necessity to seek resources outside of their community.

16 16 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Continuous Quality Improvement The program uses data from multiple sources to assess its strengths and weaknesses in order to continuously improve program design, outcomes and impact. Continuous quality improvement in action Programmatic Level ■ The program establishes a clearly defined continuous quality improvement process that: ■ • Outlines improvement goals and action steps • Includes a timeline with dates for action steps and quality improvement discussions Incorporates feedback from staff, youth, parents, and K-12 partners • • Describes the information or data needed to assess quality Clearly describes the responsibilities and roles for each person on the improvement team • ■ ■ The program develops a set of guiding questions that are related to the program design, desired program outcomes, and impact. ■ The program creates a plan for how to gather information from multiple sources that will answer the guiding questions ■ and includes: • The type of information for each guiding question • Whom to collect information from • A timeline for collection ■ ■ The program establishes a clear procedure for getting consent to collect information from stakeholders that addresses the purpose of the information and how it will be used. ■ The program records and keeps track of the information it collects in a manner that protects the confidentiality of ■ stakeholders. ■ The program shares lessons learned and key outcomes from the quality improvement process with stakeholders and ■ requests their feedback. Staff Level ■ Staff demonstrate their commitment to continuous improvement on a daily basis through regular self-assessment of ■ individual performance as well as attending professional development and training opportunities that expand their capacity. ■ ■ Staff help collect data and are supported in using this data to understand strengths and weakness in programming. ■ Staff engage participants in the continuous quality improvement process by regularly soliciting their feedback about ■ program activities. ■ ■ Staff share data about the program strengths and challenges with participants, and involve them in program planning and goal setting sessions. ■ ■ Staff use outcomes to prioritize future work around program design, professional development, and program practices. Participant Level ■ ■ As age-appropriate, participants are actively engaged in assessing strengths and weaknesses, and provide input for improvement based on quality standards.

17 17 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Program Management The program has sound fiscal and administrative practices supported by well-defined and documented policies and procedures that meet grant requirements. Program management in action Programmatic Level ■ The program creates and annually updates manuals that: ■ • Address fiscal management, personnel policies, and program operation Include clearly defined policies, procedures, practices, and staff/partner roles • • Adhere to federal, state, and local requirements ■ ■ The program creates and distributes user-friendly parent handbooks that describe policies and procedures, and that are available in languages spoken by parents. ■ ■ The program has a clear organizational structure, which allows staff to focus on the needs of participants, and includes: • Staff job descriptions • Lines of supervision • Information about who to ask for resources • The percentage of direct service and administrative costs that is allocated for each position ■ ■ The program has a strong fiscal management system that includes: • A well-documented budget with line item expenses and the duration and amount of each revenue source Enough flexibility for managers at the program and site levels to make allocation decisions as needed throughout • the year ■ The program has the appropriate insurance to protect staff, administrators, volunteers, participants, and parents. ■ ■ The program maintains written agreements that define roles and responsibilities of all subcontractors and partners. ■ Staff Level ■ ■ Staff at the program and site level use various well-defined channels of communication, including regular meetings, with all stakeholders. ■ Staff at the program and site level keep up-to-date and accessible records on all participants and employees. ■ ■ ■ Site coordinators manage site-level budgets, have the flexibility to make site-level decisions about spending, track their expenses using the program’s fiscal management system, and have a process for requesting additional funds when needed. ■ ■ Managers at all levels take advantage of opportunities to develop management and leadership skills, and stay informed about new research, best practices, and innovations in expanded learning programs.

18 18 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Sustainability The program builds enduring partnerships with the community and secures commitments for in-kind and monetary contributions. Sustainability in action Programmatic Level: ■ ■ The program plans for sustainability in its initial design and evolves its strategies over time. ■ The program monitors trends and makes changes in order to adapt to emerging threats, opportunities, and conditions. ■ ■ ■ The program communicates its vision and role, and celebrates its impact clearly and regularly across the community and to key stakeholders. ■ ■ The program has strong internal systems, with resource development and financial management clearly identified as the responsibility of specific staff members. ■ ■ The program secures new resources to maintain a diverse portfolio of sources. ■ ■ The program provides staff with an annual overview of the budget and sustainability plan. ■ ■ The program meets regularly with a range of public and private partners in order to ensure on-going communication and sharing of resources, as well as a common mission, vision, and goals. Staff Level ■ Staff plan strategically to use current funding ■ efficiently. ■ ■ Staff build broad-based community support by providing high-quality programming that is valued by children, families, school, and community. ■ ■ Staff cultivate active supporters and honor key champions. Participant Level: ■ ■ Participants are eager and prepared to share their experiences and success with potential supporters and champions.

19 19 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Summary of Work Group Process The Work Group on Quality Standards (Phase I) developed 12 Quality Standards for Expanded Learning Programs in California and specific recommendations for Phase II. The Quality Standards Work Group (Phase II) process resulted in the development of Standards in Action at the programmatic, staff, and participant levels, as well as a Crosswalk between the Standards and multiple assessment tools. Each phase was informed at multiple instances by public input. Work Group Process In the fall of 2012, The California Department of Education After School Division (CDE-ASD) contracted with the California AfterSchool Network (CAN) Quality Committee to recommend a set of clearly defined standards of program quality in California. CAN worked closely with the CDE-ASD (Syma Solovich, CDE, After School Division) and its Quality Committee Co-Chairs (Diego Arancibia, ASAPconnect and Katie Brackenridge, Partnership for The Work Group, selected Children and Youth) to form the Work Group on Quality Standards (Phase I). through a competitive process, represented a broad and diverse set of stakeholders including program providers, K-12 educators, technical assistance providers, and evaluation experts. The Work Group (Phase I) began their process by reviewing existing quality standards and frameworks. The UC Davis CRESS Center was commissioned to review and summarize after school standards from twelve cities or states. Based on its analysis of these existing standards and public input, the Work Group (Phase I) recommended eleven key standards of quality. The Work Group (Phase I) submitted their final recommendations to the After School Division in June 2013. Some revisions were made by the After School Division, most significantly the addition of a twelfth standard for Sustainability. The Quality Standards were adopted by the After School Division and released in the 4 winter of 2013. In early 2014, CAN’s Quality Committee created the Quality Standards Work Group (Phase II). Its charge was to create recommendations for what the approved Quality Standards should look like in action, as well Crosswalk of tools that could be utilized to assess program quality as outlined by the as inform the development of a Standards. The Quality Standards Work Group (Phase II) began its work in March 2014. The work group created a draft of Standards in Action based on public input and existing quality frameworks, and then revised this draft multiple times based on public input and suggestions from Work Group members. The Work Group submitted its final recommendations on Standards in Action, as well as the Crosswalk to the After School Division, in June 2014. Public Input Process Gathering and incorporating public input was an essential step in the process of both work groups. Public input was solicited via online survey and was disseminated by statewide Technical Assistance Providers, including CAN, ASAPconnect, and the Partnership for Children and Youth, as well as Regional Leads. Input was also sought through the facilitation of large groups of stakeholders (i.e. during in-person meetings or conference workshops) addressing the questions outlined in the public input survey. In total, over 450 stakeholders informed the development of Quality Standards and Standards in Action over a yearlong process. Over 450 responses from the field ■ 193 Site Coordinators (oversee single site) ■ ■ ■ 22 CDE Staff Members ■ 85 Program Managers (oversee multiple sites) ■ 19 Technical Assistance Providers ■ ■ ■ ■ 57 School and/or District Administrators (Grant Managers) ■ ■ 10 Teachers 29 Front-Line Staff ■ ■ ■ ■ 42 Other

20 20 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Quality Standards Work Group Chairs CAN Quality Committee Co-Chairs and Quality Standards Work Group Co-Chairs (Phase I and Phase II) Diego Arancibia, ASAPconnect (Phase I and II) ■ ■ ■ Katie Brackenridge, Partnership for Children and Youth (Phase I and II) ■ ■ Syma Solovich, California Department of Education, After School Division (Tri-chair, Phase I) ■ Phase I (Developing Quality Standards) Work Group Members ■ ■ ■ ■ Corey Newhouse, Public Profit Mark Atteberry, Hemet Unified School District Sam Piha, Temescal Associates Kim Boyer, Central Valley Afterschool Foundation ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Mary Jo Ginty, Los Angeles County Office Mike Snell, California Teaching Fellows Foundation ■ ■ ■ of Education ■ ■ Don Taylor, California Department of Education, After School Division Monroe Howard, Sacramento City Unified School ■ ■ District ■ ■ Nancy Taylor, San Diego Science Alliance Kathy B. Lewis, Center for Collaborative Solutions ■ ■ ■ ■ Bruno Marchesi, CAN staff support Special Advisor ■ ■ Nicole Yohalem, Forum for Youth Investment Evaluation Analyst ■ ■ Amy Falk Smith, Ph.D, UC Davis CRESS Center, School of Education Phase II (Developing Standards in Action) ■ Ian Keiller, A World Fit For Kids ■ ■ Roger Adams, Ventura County Office of Education ■ Patrik Lundh, SRI Education ■ ■ ■ Kim Boyer, Central Valley Afterschool Foundation ■ Bruno Marchesi, Healthy Behaviors Initiative ■ ■ ■ ■ Joshua Brady, CDE After School Division ■ ■ Sam Piha, Temescal Associates ■ Tommy Brewer, II, LA’s BEST ■ ■ Jenel Prenovost, THINK Together ■ ■ ■ Frank Escobar, Visalia Unified School District ■ ■ Julie Sesser, Stanislaus County Office of Education ■ Mary Jo Ginty, Los Angeles County Office ■ ■ ■ Harry Talbot, Beyond the Bell – LAUSD of Education Mike Snell, California Teaching Fellows Foundation ■ ■ ■ Keith Herron, Target Excellence ■ Femi Vance, Public Profit ■ ■ ■ Melena Kaye, Ukiah Unified School District – ■ Jeff Davis, CAN staff support ■ ■ Grace Hudson Elementary

21 21 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Glossary of Terms Accommodate: (see diversity section) To take When something is diverse, it consists of Diversity: different forms and types. Diversity in the expanded learning action with the intent of reasonably meeting the needs world often refers to the varied characteristics of people of the learner. The term recognizes that all students involved in a program, including for example, variations learn at different rates and in different modalities and around race, color, religion, sex, age, income level, that students identified with learning disabilities need national origin, physical ability, sexual orientation, and/or additional and intensified, often more frequent supports. gender identity and expression. Active: Activities that involve youth doing something Learning experiences that tap into a youth’s Engaging: through different exposures (ie. seeing, hearing, touching natural curiosity and interest in discovery while at the same and doing) allowing them to be physically active and/ or stimulating their innate curiosity. Being active means time motivating, rather than discouraging their eagerness to 7 youth are physically, emotionally, and intellectually try new activities. engaged through activities that stimulate their curiosity Students who English Language Learners (ELL): and internal motivation. are unable to communicate fluently or learn effectively in The things that students engage in that are Activities: English, who often come from non-English-speaking homes and backgrounds, and who typically require specialized designed to foster their learning around a particular or modified instruction in both the English language and in topic, content area, and/or theme. 6 their academic courses. Collaboration: The act of working together Equity: In education, the term equity refers to the principle with others in order to achieve or do something. Collaboration can enhance the quality and sustainability of fairness. While it is often used interchangeably with the related principle of equality, equity encompasses a wide of a program by maximizing financial resources and blending multiple sources of support. For youth, variety of educational models, programs, and strategies that may be considered fair, but not necessarily equal. It collaboration activities in a program help build team is has been said that “equity is the process; equality is the skills and allow for youth to be accountable to each 3,5 other. outcome,” given that equity—what is fair and just—may not, in the process of educating students, reflect strict 6 Non-profit organizations, Community Partners: equality—what is applied, allocated, or distributed equally. faith-based organizations, city or county agencies, Activities that provide learning Expands Horizons: individuals, volunteer groups, and businesses that demonstrate commitment to the same or similar mission opportunities that take youth beyond their current experiences. Activities that expand horizons also allow of the expanded learning program. 7 youth to learn new things and discover new opportunities. Curriculum: Curriculum typically refers to the What the program ultimately hopes to achieve. Goals: knowledge and skills students are expected to learn, which includes the learning standards or learning Learn by doing: Program activities where youth objectives they are expected to meet; the units and participate in hands-on, project-based learning and where lessons that teachers/staff teach; the assignments, they are actively experiencing something. projects and activities students do; the books, materials, videos, presentations, and readings used; and the Program activities Learn through multiple senses: assessments, and other methods used to evaluate that allow opportunities for youth to learn through their student learning. An individual teacher or staff person’s senses (touch, feel, smell, see, say) as well as through curriculum, for example, would be the specific learning different multiple learning styles (visual/spatial, auditory/ standards, lessons, assignments, and materials used to musical, verbal/linguistic, physical/kinesthetic, logical/ 6 organize and teach a particular course or subject. mathematical, inter/intrapersonal). continued on next page

22 22 QUALITY STANDARDS FOR EXPANDED LEARNING Glossary (continued) References 1 A Vision for Expanded Learning in California: Strategic Plan Meaningful: Program activities that involve youth taking 2014-2016. Developed by the California Department of some ownership of the learning topic where the content is Education After School Division in collaboration with K-12 relevant to their own interests, experiences, and the world in 3 educators, program practitioners, and support providers which they live. http://www.cde. (January 2014). Retrieved June 2014 from Mission: A statement describing how the organization or ca.gov/ls/ba/cp/documents/asdstrategicplan.pdf group will contribute to the fulfillment of their vision. 2 Developed by State A Blueprint for Great Schools. A description of progress made toward a Outcomes: Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson’s Transition program’s stated goals at a given point in time. Advisory Team (August, 2011). Retrieved June 2014 from http://www.cde.ca.gov/eo/in/bp/bpcontents.asp Project-Based: Activities where youth explore real-world 3 problems and challenges. With this type of active and Learning in Afterschool and Summer Principles. Retrieved engaged learning, students are inspired to obtain a deeper http://www.learninginafterschool.org/ June 2013 from 8 knowledge of the subjects they are studying. position.htm 4 Service-Learning: A teaching and learning strategy that Quality Standards for Expanded Learning (Phase I). integrates meaningful community service with instruction Developed by the Work Group on Quality Standards (Phase and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic I), a partnership of the CDE After School Division and the responsibility, and strengthen communities. Through service- Quality Committee of the California AfterSchool Network learning, young people-from kindergarteners to college http://www. (Winter 2013). Retrieved June 2014 from students use what they learn in the classroom to solve real- afterschoolnetwork.org/post/quality-standards-expanded- life problems. They not only learn the practical applications learning-programs of their studies, they become actively contributing citizens 5 9 California After School Program Quality Self Assessment Tool. and community members through the service they perform. Developed by the California AfterSchool Network Quality Shared accountability: A shared obligation or Committee in partnership with the CDE After School Programs willingness to accept responsibility for outcomes and Office. (2009). Retrieved June 2013 from http://www. consequences (and account for one’s actions). afterschoolnetwork.org/post/california-after-school-program- quality-self-assessment-tool Stakeholders: Those who hold a vested interest in the 6 program. They include anyone who is interested in or The Glossary of Education Reform. The Adapted from will benefit from knowing about the program’s progress, Great Schools Partnership. Retrieved June 2013 from such as board members, funders, collaborators, program http://edglossary.org participants, families, school staff (e.g., teachers, principals, 7 Introductory Guide to Integrating the Learning In Afterschool and superintendents), college or university partners, external & Summer (LIAS) Learning Principles in Program Design and evaluators, someone from the next school level (e.g., middle Retrieved from Glossary of Terms March 2014. Practice. school staff for an elementary school-age program), and http://www.learninginafterschool.org community partners. 8 Project-Based Learning Professional Development Strategies: Methods used to make progress toward Guide. Edutopia (2007). Retrieved June 2014 from goals, inclusive of activities http://www.edutopia.org/project-based-learning-guide The overarching purpose of the organization, Vision: 9 Service Learning Overview. Harper College. Retrieved May program, or project. 2014 from http://goforward.harpercollege.edu/services/ involvement/civic/overview.php

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