June2018CUR

Transcript

1 CHANCELLOR'S UNIVERSITY REPORT JUNE 25 2018

2 THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK – JUNE 8 25, CHANCELLOR'S UNIVERSITY REPORT 201 PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS Special Actions Section I: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements Section II: Changes in Degree Programs Section III: Section IV: New Courses V: Section Changes in Existing Courses Section VI: Courses Withdrawn Section VII: Affiliation Agreements PART B: PERSONNEL MATTERS PART C: FISCAL MATTERS [ Trusts, Gifts, and Grants Section III All Fees Section IV Section V Other Financial Matters NOTES Fis cal Matters As the University requires all sponsored program support to be administered by the Research Foundation, Part C - Section III does not differentiate between grants received on behalf of a college or University entity regardless of grants that are or are not administered by the Research Foundation and shall include all dollar amount. PART AA: PERSONNEL ACTIONS REQUIRING WAIVER OF THE BYLAWS ADDENDUM ERRATA

3 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Graduate Center Instructional Appointment Faculty MA/Ph.D. Prgm in Philosophy Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Hrs Components Salary revised Visi ting 8/26/2019 Visiting Professor Rosenthal,David M Visiting > = 8/27/2018 *Base Sal $94,248.00 to read 50% Professor $94,248. Total Action Appointment: 1 Reappointment Faculty MA/Ph.D. Prgm in Pol Sci Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Ef f From Eff To Title Appt Hrs Components 9/1/2018 Dist Professor Distinguished Professor Buck,Susan F Instructors Revised to *Base Sal 8/31/2019 $128,485.00 And Others read *SAB $38,692.00 *Stipend(D) Psc Reappointmen $28,594.00 t as Dist. Professor for 9/1/2018- 8/31/ 2019. Total Action Reappointment: 1 Total Actions Reported: Instructional Appointment Faculty: 1 Reappointment Faculty: 1 Total Instructional: 2 1 of 48 Page

4 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Hunter College Instructional Correction Non-Teaching / Administrative Art Type Comments Title Name Asst To Heo Nguyen,Phi Heo Series Change of Track 13.3B Empl Class from 13.3B to Track 13.3B adn End Date changed to 6/30/18. Total Action Correction: 1 Total Actions Reported: Instructional Correction Teaching / Administrative: 1 Non - Total Instructional: 1 2 of 48 Page

5 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 End of Report ADDITIONAL ENTRIES Baruch College Instructional Appointment Faculty Bert Wasserman Dept Eco & Fin Eff From Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Appt Eff To Amount Comments Hrs Components Assc Professor Assc Professor Wang,Yajun Track *Base Sal 8/26/2019 $106,700.00 8/27/2018 $85,360.00 *SAB Tenure Asst Professor Asst Professor Choi,Youngmin Track *Base Sal $90,149.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 *SAB $72,119.00 Tenure Asst Professor Asst Professor Kukharskyy,Bohda 8/27/2018 Track 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $90,149.00 *SAB $39,851.00 Tenure n Mathematics Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs Asst Professor Asst Professor Obus,Andrew Track $90,149.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 *Base Sal Tenure 8/26/2019 Asst Professor Asst Professor Ou,Yumeng Track *Base Sal 8/27/2018 $81,855.00 Tenure Soberon,Pablo Heo Series *Base Sal Asst Professor $81,855.00 Asst Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Track 13.3B Political Science Comments Functional Title Appt Title Name Type SW Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 8/26/2019 Asst Professor Asst Professor Track *Base Sal $84,354.00 8/27/2018 Hankinson,Michael Page 3 of 48

6 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Title Eff To Appt Components Hrs Tenure Stan Ross Dept Accountancy Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Hrs Components Asst Professor Asst Professor Johannesson,Erik Track *Base Sal 8/26/2019 $90,149.00 8/27/2018 $72,119.00 *SAB Tenure Asst Professor Asst Professor Lock,Brandon Track *Base Sal 8/26/2019 $90,149.00 8/27/2018 $72,119.00 *SAB Tenure W. Newman Dept of Real Estate Title Functional Title Name Type Comments Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt SW Hrs Components Asst Professor Gilbukh,Sophia Track *Base Sal Asst Professor $90,149.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 *SAB Tenure $72,119.00 Asst Professor Krivenko,Pavel Track *Base Sal Asst Professor 8/26/2019 $90,149.00 8/27/2018 $72,119.00 *SAB Tenure Asst Professor Asst Professor Ojeda,Waldo Track *Base Sal 8/26/2019 $90,149.00 8/27/2018 Tenure $72,119.00 *SAB -Teaching / Administrative Non Bursar's Office Amount Type SW Salary Title Functional Title Name Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs Enrollment Bursar Zou,Wei Feng Substitute 5/15/2018 *Base Sal $51,153.00 Asst To Heo 4/16/2018 Coord >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben 3 Reappointment Non -Teaching / Administrative Academic Advisement Functional Title Name Title Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Type Hrs Components $55,837.00 Asst To Heo Acad Advising Coord Dachille Jr,Peter P. Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo Dorcelus,Juliana Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $53,758.00 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Admin Coord Hilaire,Serra 7/1/2018 Heo Series $60,869.00 *Base Sal Track Roopmarine 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo Ruiz,Francisco Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $55,837.00 Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo Sokolovskaya,Yuliy Heo Series 7/1/2018 $48,210.00 *Base Sal Track a 13.3B 4 of 48 Page

7 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Budget And Planning Operations Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs Budget And Planning Operations Name Type Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Title Comments Functional Title Salary Components Hrs Career Services Operations Functional Title Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Name Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components He Associate Makarewycz,Justyn Heo Series 6/30/2020 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $106,700.00 Student Career Track Program Mgr D 13.3B Student Career Plewa - Schottland,L Heo Series He Associate 6/30/2020 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $97,628.00 Program Mgr Track indsey Elizabeth 13.3B $97,628.00 Student Career Pullara,Jack M. Heo Series *Base Sal He Associate 6/30/2020 7/1/2018 Program Mgr Track 13.3B Student Career Ramchal,Tanuja He Associate Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $90,871.00 Program Mgr Track Ishani 13.3B Student Career Verdesoto,Guido He Assistant 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $90,149.00 Program Specl Track Stefano 13.3B Admin Coord Butler,Deborah Heo Series $58,787.00 *Base Sal Asst To Heo 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B College Now Program Appt Name Comments Title Functional Title Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs Acad College Now He Associate Crisostomo,Maziely Heo Series 6/30/2020 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $90,871.00 A Mgr Track 13.3B Continuing & Profl Studies Name Title Salary Comments Amount Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Type Hrs Components He Associate Continuing Chambers,Sonji G Employee 13.3B - 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $84,678.00 attained 13.3b Education Mgr Heo Series status effective 7/1/2018. He Associate Goldstein,Frank 13.3B - *Base Sal Employee $106,700.00 7/1/2018 Continuing Heo Series attained 13.3b Education Mgr status effective 7/1/2018. 7/1/2018 He Associate Continuing Tomanovic Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $97,628.00 Moore,Nevena Education Mgr Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Continuing Castellanos,Minons Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $69,188.00 ka Education Coord Track 13.3B Ctr. Teaching and Learning Comments Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components He Associate It Academic Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $84,678.00 Stone,Craig Technology Mgr Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Admin Coord Waller III,Alfred Heo Series *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $55,837.00 Track 5 of 48 Page

8 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Appt Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Functional Title Comments Eff To Components Hrs 13.3B ZSB Curricular Guidance - Functional Title Name Type Title Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Acad Program Coord Lu,Bang H Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $71,268.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Acad Program Coord Persaud,Amanda Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $39,282.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Dean's Office - SPA Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Title Functional Title Hrs Components $87,495.00 Comms Electronic Heo Series He Associate *Base Sal Epstein,Jason Marc 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track Media Mgr 13.3B Admin Specl Lazov,Diana Heo Series He Assistant *Base Sal $78,477.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Finance Coord Nunez,Leticia Heo Series *Base Sal Asst To Heo $71,268.00 6/30/2020 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Dean's Office - WSAS Appt Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components Enrollm Hunt,Leslie Ann Heo Series He Officer ent Dir *Base Sal $117,120.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Comms And Coll *Base Sal He Associate Rodriguez,Omairys Heo Series 019 6/30/2 $75,110.00 7/1/2018 Track Rels Mgr Grisell 13.3B Dean's Office - ZSB Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Admin Officer - Heo Glenn,Lillie Heo Series He Officer *Base Sal $128,485.00 6/30/2020 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 Jewell,Laura Mila He Officer Comms Marketing 7/1/2018 Heo Series $117,120.00 *Base Sal Track Dir 13.3B $120,450.00 Lepere,Matthew B Heo Series He Officer *Base Sal Acad Center Dir 6/30/2019 7/1/2 018 Track 13.3B 7/1/2018 6/30/2020 He Officer Acad Affairs Dir Vaia,Lisa M Heo Series *Base Sal $128,485.00 $9,535.00 *SAB Track 13.3B 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 He Associate Comms Marketing Kerr,Heidi Lewise Heo Series $75,110.00 *Base Sal Track Mgr 13.3B 6/30/2020 He Assistant It Academic 7/1/2018 Eccles,Michael A Heo Series $78,477.00 *Base Sal Track Applications Specl 13.3B Page 6 of 48

9 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Name Type Salary Title Functional Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Admin Coord Duhaney,Keitha Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $65,028.00 7/1/2018 Tra ck 13.3B Instit Research Asst To Heo Loebis,Sarah Heo Series 6/30/2020 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $69,188.00 Analyst -Aheo Track 13.3B Acad Program Coord Sinclair, Tara Heo Series *Base Sal Asst To Heo $58,787.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Admin Events Coord Stempel,Eileen 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 $71,268.00 *Base Sal Track Robin 13.3B ZS B Executive Programs - Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs Acad Std Suppt Mgr Charlebois,Alison Heo Series He Associate *Base Sal $81,855.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2020 Claire Track 13.3B He Associate F inance Mgr Evans,Ermine 6/30/2020 Heo Series 7/1/2018 $81,855.00 *Base Sal Track Dawn 13.3B He Associate Admin Mgr 7/1/2018 Jacob,Tricilia Aziza Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $81,855.00 Track Brown 13.3B H e Assistant Acad Program Specl Khan,Bibi 6/30/2020 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $81,855.00 Heo Series Track 13.3B He Assistant Travers,Katharine Admissions Specl Heo Series 6/30/2020 *Base Sal $75,110.00 7/1/2018 Jeanne Track 13.3B Ayala,Ava Jarelis Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal Admissions Coord $51,153.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Financial Aid Name Type Title Salary Functional Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Financial Aid Loans Gonzalez,Milton Heo Series 6/30/2019 He Assistant 7/1/2018 $68,351.00 *Base Sal Track Specl 13.3B He Assistant Financial Aid Specl Marshall Jr,Carlton Heo Series 6/30/2020 *Base Sal $65,817.00 7/1/2018 Track A. 13.3B Financial Aid Loans 7/1/2018 Maynard,Kimberly Heo Series 6/30/2019 He Assistant *Base Sal $68,351.00 Track Ann Specl 13.3B Financial Aid Loans Willis,Erin Kathleen Heo Ser ies *Base Sal $71,723.00 He Assistant 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track Specl 13.3B Fine & Performing Arts Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Title Comments Hrs Components He Officer Performing Arts Dir Altschuler,Ted S Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $97,628.00 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Grad Admission/Student Svc- SPA 7 of 48 Page

10 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Enrollment Dir Hah,Young Joo Heo Series He Officer *Base Sal $117,120.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Student Career 6/30/2019 Grossman,Suzann Heo Series He Associate 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $90,871.00 Track e J Program Mgr 13.3B Acad Ad vising Coord Pena,Rawlisha G Heo Series *Base Sal $60,869.00 Asst To Heo 7/1/2018 6/30/2020 Track 13.3B Ryan,Jillian Renee Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $51,153.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Acad Advising Coord Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Truong,Elaine Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $51,153.00 7/1/2018 Acad Advising Coord Track 13.3B Graduate Admissions - ZSB Functional Title Name Type Salary Title nts Comme Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components He Assistant Admissions Specl Taveras,Elma Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $68,351.00 Track Noemi 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Assistant Admissions Specl Watts,Rebecca 7/1/2018 Heo Series $75,110.00 *Base Sal Track Lynn Frei 13.3B Graduate Programs - ZSB Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Acad Program Mgr Green,Taneisha Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2020 $90,871.00 He Associate 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Finance Budget Mgr Pineiro,Myra Heo Series He Associate $94,248.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Track 13.3B Acad Program Specl Hermida,Alicia Heo Series *Base Sal He Assistant 6/30/2019 $65,817.00 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Assistant Acad Program Specl Johnson,Monee Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $65,817.00 Track 13.3B Honors Program Title Functional Title Name Salary Comments Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Type Hrs Components Employee He Officer Acad Program Dir Vaisman,Jody 7/1/2018 13.3B - $117,120.00 *Base Sal attained 13.3b Heo Series Clark status effective 7/1/2018. 7/1/2018 Acad Advising Specl Fatemi,Hannah Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $78,477.00 He Assistant Track Sayedeh 13.3B Inst -Demographic Resrch (CIDR) Comments Appt Title Functional Title Name Salary Eff To Eff From Amount Type Components Hrs 8 of 48 Page

11 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Title Name Type Salary Functional Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs He Officer Marino,Michael Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Research Programs $128,485.00 7/1/2018 Dir Thomas Track 13.3B Lawrence Field Ctr Ent/Sm Bus Name Type Salary Title Functional Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs Community He Associate Neftci,Ulas 13.3B - Employee *Base Sal $106,700.00 7/1/2018 Heo Series attained 13.3b Outreach Prog Mgr status effective 7/1/2018, Provost -Faculty Operations Title Name Type Salary Functional Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs Acad Affairs Dir Fallon,Jennifer Heo Series He Officer *Base Sal $104,461.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Research Programs Peterson,Keisha R Employee He Associate 13.3B - *Base Sal $84,678.00 7/1/2018 Mgr Heo Series attained 13.3b status effective 7/1/2018. Admin Coord Stauffer,Erika M Heo Series *Base Sal $51,153.00 Asst To Heo 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Registrar's Office Appt Salary Title Functional Title Name Type Comments Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs Enrollment Registrar 6/30/2019 Vann,Indira Heo Series He Assistant *Base Sal $75,110.00 7/1/2018 Track Specl 13.3B Enrollment Registrar Yang - Employee 13.3B - He Assistant *Base Sal $78,477.00 7/1/2018 Merine,Wen Specl attained 13.3b Heo Series Juan status effective 7/1/2018. Asst To Heo Enrollment Registrar Bailey,Nicole 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $55,837.00 Coord Track Alexandria 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Enrollment Registrar 7/1/2018 Gutierrez - Symby,Y $51,153.00 Heo Series *Base Sal Track essenia Coord 13.3B Asst To Heo Enrollment Registrar Hill,Dominique 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $58,787.00 Coord Track Nichelle 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Enrollment Registrar 7/1/2018 Khan,Nudrat $58,787.00 Heo Series *Base Sal Track Mazhar Coord 13.3B 7/1/2018 Asst To Heo Enrollment Registrar Lasoff,Shara Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $58,787.00 Track Coord 13.3B Employee Asst To Heo Enrollment Registrar 7/1/2018 Seto,John Jan 13.3B - $60,869.00 *Base Sal attained 13.3b Coord Heo Series status effective 7/1/2018. SEEK 9 of 48 Page

12 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Name Type Salary Title Functional Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Acad Seek Std Suppt He Assistant Lawton,Andrew Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $75,110.00 7/1/2018 Track Specl 13.3B Acad Seek Std Suppt He Assistant Quainoo,Rebecca Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $78,477.00 Specl Track Q 13.3B Acad Resource Ctr Rosen,David Heo Series 6/30/2020 $81,855.00 *Base Sal He Assistant 7/1/2018 Specl Track 13.3B Schwartz Communication Center Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components $108,683.00 Samples,Heather L Heo Series He Officer 6/30/2020 Acad Center Dir 7/1/2018 *Base Sal Track 13.3B He Associate Acad Center Mgr Hoffman,Meechal R Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $90,871.00 Track 13.3B He Assistant Acad Std Suppt 6/30/2019 Goldstein,Julia D Heo Series 7/1/2018 $68,351.00 *Base Sal Track Specl 13.3B Asst To Heo Admin Coord 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $48,210.00 Morrison,Samuel Track 13.3B Skills Assessment Testing Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Acad Testing Coord George,Felyesha Heo Series Asst To Heo 6/30/2019 $48,210.00 7/1/2018 *Base Sal Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Acad Testing Coord Ho,Barry Che Yan Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $65,028.00 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Sponsored Prgs/Research (SPAR) Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Asst To Heo *Base Sal Research Programs Alas Iglesias,Ana C Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 $69,188.00 Coord Track 13.3B Research Programs Smith,Tara Frances Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $71,268.00 Asst To Heo Coord Track 13.3B Student Acad Consult Ctr(SACC) Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs He Associate Acad Resource Ctr Employee Garcia,Nidzaida 13.3B - *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $97,628.00 Heo Series Mgr attained 13.3b status effective 7/1/2018. 6/30/2020 Asst To Heo Admin Coord Dimilta,Teresa Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $71,268.00 Track 13.3B 10 of 48 Page

13 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Undergraduate Admissions Eff From Name Type Salary Title Functional Title Eff To Appt Comments Amount Hrs Components Admissions Mgr Walker,Dajuan E Heo Series He Associate *Base Sal $78,477.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Admissions Specl Mosler,Allison Fay Heo Series He Assistant *Base Sal $63,617.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Admissions Asst To Heo Cleary,Tracy 6/30/2020 Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $58,787.00 Jeanne Advisor Track -Aheo 13.3B Admissions Geraldino,Keith T Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Asst To Heo 7/1/2018 $45,957.00 Track -Aheo Advisor 13.3B $45,957.00 Instit Research Jarvis,Esaline R Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 Asst To Heo -Aheo Analyst Track 13.3B Admissions Coord Lugo,Katy Heo Series Asst To Heo 6/30/2020 *Base Sal $65,028.00 7/1/2018 Track Valentina 13.3B Admissions Coord Navarrete,Yohaly Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $48,210.00 6/30/2020 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Admissions Surillo,Alexandra Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal Asst To Heo $51,153.00 Advisor Track -Aheo 13.3B VP Academic Affairs & Provost Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Appt Eff From Hrs Components He Officer Admin Exec Lemiesz,Linda Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $128,485.00 Officer -Heo Marie Track 13.3B VP for Student Affairs- Enroll Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Enrollment Dir Bachler,Paul 13.3B - He Officer Employee *Base Sal $117,120.00 7/1/2018 attained 13.3b Heo Series status effective 7/1/2018. Finance Budget Dir Islam,Mohammed Heo Series 6/30/2020 *Base Sal He Officer $112,905.00 7/1/2018 Nasirul Track 13.3B 6/30/2020 $87,495.00 He Associate Admissions Mgr Liu,Teresa Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal Track 13.3B Lozada,Alexandra Heo Series Enrollment Mgr *Base Sal $97,628.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2020 He Associate Track 13.3B Enrollment Specl Kunicki,Robert Eric Heo Series *Base Sal He Assistant 6/30/2020 $71,723.00 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 Heo Series He Assistant Student Life Specl Pena,Edward 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $78,477.00 Track 13.3B 7/1/2018 He Assistant Admissions Specl Rainey,Thomas Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $68,351.00 Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Finance Budget 7/1/2018 Gritz,Jillian L Heo Series *Base Sal $55,837.00 Coord Track 11 of 48 Page

14 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Functional Title Appt Comments Components Hrs 13.3B Weissman Ctr for Intl Business Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs $97,628.00 Acad Study Abroad He Associate Tingue,Christopher Heo Series 6/30/2020 7/1/2018 *Base Sal Mgr Spencer Track 13.3B Admin Coord Gascot,Ruth Heo Series *Base Sal Asst To Heo $53,758.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Writing Center Name Type Salary Title Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Amount Components Hrs Acad Resource Ctr Hamilton,Diana S Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 He Officer $108,683.00 Dir Track 13.3B Admin Coord Hiller,Paul Jasper Heo Series *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $48,210.00 6/30/2020 Asst To Heo Track 13.3B Revision Competitive Student Disability Services Appt Title Functional Title Name Comments Type Salary Leave % of Eff To Amount Eff From Pay Hrs Components Cuny Office Appointment Russo,Danielle M Probable *Base Sal $39,614.00 5/7/2018 Cuny Office Asst 4 8/6/2018 100 Assistant Permanent effective date of 04/20/18 as reflected in the April 2018 CUR, revised to 05/07/18. Instructional Appointment Institutional Research Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Guerrero,Gino D. 10/22/2018 Asst To Heo Acad Testing Coord Substitute 4/23/2018 *Base Sal $60,869.00 >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben Non -Teaching / Administrative ASAP Program Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs Heo Series He Officer Acad Asap Program Browne,Nadine 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $120,450.00 7/1/2018 Track Dir 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Associate Acad Asap Program 7/1/2018 Cabrera,Jessica Heo Series *Base Sal $78,477.00 Mgr Track Page 12 of 48

15 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Type Salary Functional Title Name Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Title Hrs Components 13.3B Heo Series He Associate Acad Program Mgr *Base Sal $84,678.00 Frazer,Tica C. 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B He Assistant Acevedo,Maricela Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $56,528.00 Acad Asap Student Adv Track -Heoa 13.3B *Base Sal He Assistant Beltran - Polanco,No 6/30/2019 Acad Asap Student 7/1/2018 $61,593.00 Heo Series Adv -Heoa Track elia 13.3B Acad Asap Student Benjamin,Nicole E Heo Series He Assistant 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $61,593.00 Adv Track -Heoa 13.3B Acad Asap Student He Assistant Brown,Thomasina Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $61,593.00 Adv Track -Heoa Dorothy 13.3B Acad Asap Student He Assistant Elcock,Stephanie Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $56,528.00 7/1/2018 -Heoa Adv Track 13.3B Acad Asap Student Jacobs,Saidia Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 He Assistant $56,528.00 *Base Sal Adv -Heoa Track 13.3B Acad Asap Student 6/30/2019 Logothetis,Maria Heo Series He Assistant 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $65,817.00 Adv -Heoa Track 13.3B Acad Asap Student Miller,Latema S Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 He Assistant $56,528.00 *Base Sal Adv -Heoa Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Assistant Acad Asap Student 7/1/2018 Monte,Nicole Heo Series $56,528.00 *Base Sal -Heoa Adv Track 13.3B Acad Advisor Nau,Richard F Heo Series He Assistant 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $68,351.00 7/1/2018 Track Sr-Heoa 13.3B Acad Asap Student Nunez,Noemi Heo Series He Assistant 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $63,617.00 -Heoa Adv Track 13.3B $63,617.00 He Assistant Acad Asap Student 6/30/2019 Oniszko,Carmela Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B Perkins,Majesty 6/30/2019 He Assistant 7/1/2018 $56,528.00 *Base Sal Acad Asap Student Heo Series Adv -Heoa Track Latif 13.3B He Assistant Acad Asap Student 6/30/2019 Pompey,Suemanda Heo Series 7/1/2018 $56,528.00 *Base Sal Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B He Assistant 7/1/2018 Acad Asap Student Quezada,Laisa Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $63,617.00 Adv -Heoa Track 13.3B Acad Asap Student He Assistant Randall,Christina L Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $61,593.00 Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B Acad Asap Student Rodriguez,Erica L Heo Series He Assistant 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $56,528.00 -Heoa Adv Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Assistant Acad Asap Student 7/1/2018 Smith,Nathaniel M Heo Series $71,723.00 *Base Sal Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Acad Asap Program Aguasvivas,Aysmel Heo Series $55,837.00 *Base Sal Track C Coord 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Acad Asap Admiss 7/1/2018 Coste Cruz,Rafael Heo Series $55,837.00 *Base Sal E Recruit Coord Track 13 of 48 Page

16 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Eff From Name Type Salary Title Comments Functional Title Eff To Appt Amount Hrs Components 13.3B Admin Coord Parrella,Anthony Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $53,758.00 7/1/2018 Track Raffaele 13.3B Acad Asap Admiss Asst To Heo Rosario,Susan Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $51,153.00 Recruit Coord Track 13.3B Academic Success Center Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components He Associate Acad Advising Mgr Walker,Cheryl Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $94,248.00 Track 13.3B *Base Sal Acad Advisor Aheo Adeniji,Jude Heo Series Asst To Heo - $71,268.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Acad Advisor - Aheo Francis,Sherryan Heo Series Asst To Heo 6/30/2019 $71,268.00 7/1/2018 *Base Sal Track 13.3B Levine,Benjamin Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 $71,268.00 *Base Sal Track Jay 13.3B Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo Martell,Diana L Heo Series 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $62,949.00 Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo McKay,Eric 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $62,949.00 Heo Series Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Aheo Quinones,Maribel Heo Series Acad Advisor - *Base Sal $71,268.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B - Aheo Quintero,Fabian Heo Series Asst To Heo Acad Advisor $71,268.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Track 13.3B Asst To Heo - Aheo Rohoman,Shaneza Heo Series *Base Sal Acad Advisor $62,949.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B *Base Sal Aheo Velasquez,Rosa Heo Series Asst To Heo - $62,949.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Acad Advisor Track 13.3B Acad Advisor - Aheo Wilson,Shabazz Heo Series *Base Sal Asst To Heo $62,949.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Admissions Services Amount Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components He Assistant Admissions Specl Ruiz Jr,William Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $63,617.00 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B He Assistant Acad Asap Admiss Saldivar,Christophe 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 $81,855.00 *Base Sal r Edward Sr Adv Track -Heoa 13.3B Asst To Heo Admissions 6/30/2019 Gil,Nathali Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $55,837.00 Advisor Track -Aheo 13.3B -Development AdvComExtR 14 of 48 Page

17 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Eff From Name Type Salary Functional Title Title Eff To Appt Comments Amount Hrs Components Development $78,477.00 Parker,Dijon H eo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal He Assistant 7/1/2018 Research Specl Track 13.3B AdvComExtR -Grants Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Development He Officer Oliva,Juli a P Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $117,120.00 Partnerships Dir Track 13.3B Advncmt Comm & External Reltns Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Title Hrs Components $101,043.00 Development Grants Heo Series He Officer *Base Sal Eisenberg,Judith 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track Dev Dir 13.3B Admin Officer - Heo Wiltshire,Rolly Heo Series He Officer *Base Sal $112,905.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B nx EOC Bro Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components 6/30/2019 Heo Series Eoc Assistant Eoc Admin Coord Dyce,Courtney 7/1/2018 $55,837.00 *Base Sal Track To Heo 13.3B Eoc Acad Resource Heo Series Eoc Assistant *Base Sal Williams,Nayshawn $45,957.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 To Heo Ctr Coord Track 13.3B Eoc He 6/30/2019 Eoc Career Job 7/1/2018 1,855.00 Munoz,Francisco Heo Series $8 *Base Sal -Heoa Devel Sr Track Assistant 13.3B 6/30/2019 Eoc Assistant Eoc Acad 7/1/2018 Brandon,Avery Heo Series $62,949.00 *Base Sal Track Advisor To Heo -Aheo 13.3B 6/30/2019 Eoc Assistant Eoc Career Job Hernandez,Charis Heo Series *Base Sal $67,106.00 7/1/2018 Track Devel -Aheo To Heo ma 13.3B Eoc Career Job Tucker,Justin Heo Series Eoc Assistant $55,837.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Track -Aheo To Heo Devel 13.3B Bursar Appt Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Enrollment Bursar 7/1/2018 Bertz,Lisa Heo Series $60,869.00 *Base Sal Track Coord 13.3B Business Office Appt Title Functional Tit Comments Name Type Salary Eff To Eff From Amount le Components Hrs 15 of 48 Page

18 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Functional Tit le Name Type Salary Eff To Comments Amount Eff From Title Appt Components Hrs Alston,Deborah Heo Series He Officer Finance Budget Dir *Base Sal $128,485.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B He Assistant Finance Budget Martinez,Yinet Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 $75,110.00 *Base Sal Track Specl 13.3B He Assistant Finance Specl Rosenberg,Gregory Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $71,723.00 Track 13.3B Campus & Facilities Planning Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Asst To Heo Admin Coord Qarri,Ariana Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $60,869.00 Track 13.3B Career Development Comments Title Fun ctional Title Name Type Salary Appt Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Student Career 7/1/2018 Perez,Stephanie Heo Series $60,869.00 *Base Sal Track -Aheo Adv 13.3B -Counselors Cd Func tional Title Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components *Base Sal He Assistant Acad Coll Disc Std Pichardo,Leidy Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 $81,855.00 Suppt Specl Track 13.3B College Now Program Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Hrs Components He Associate Acad College Now Rivera,Susana Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $87,495.00 7/1/2018 Mgr Track 13.3B arketing Communications & M Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components 6/30/2019 He Associate Comms Electronic Michelin,Naomi A. Heo Series 7/1/2018 $84,678.00 *Base Sal Media Mgr Track 13.3B Education & Academic Literacy Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 2019 Asst To Heo Acad Program Coord Magloire,Alderson 6/30/ Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $45,957.00 A. Track 13.3B 16 of 48 Page

19 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Human Resources Dept Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Hr Coord Acevedo,Milagros Heo Series *Base Sal Asst To Heo $51,153.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Language Immersion Program Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components He Associate Acad Std Suppt Mgr Eatman - Skinner,Pa Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $75,110.00 Track mela Victoria 13.3B Acad Std Suppt 7/1/2018 Baptiste,Keisha Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $61,593.00 He Assistant Track Specl 13.3B Acad Std Suppt Cardenas,Debra T Heo Series He Assistant *Base Sal $63,617.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Specl Track 13.3B He Assistant Acad Std Suppt Guardia,Olga Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 $61,593.00 *Base Sal Track Specl 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Assistant Acad Std Suppt 7/1/2018 Njoku,Nwanne Heo Series $63,617.00 *Base Sal Specl Track 13.3B Valenzuela,Norma Heo Series 6/30/2019 He Assistant 7/1/2018 $63,617.00 Acad Std Suppt *Base Sal Specl Track 13.3B Math & Computer Sciences Title Functional Title Nam e Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs He Assistant Acad Resource Ctr De la Rosa,Yanil Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $81,855.00 Specl Track 13.3B Purchasing Comments Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components He Officer Finance 6/30/2019 Antonio,Anjanette 7/1/2018 Heo Series $108,683.00 *Base Sal Track A. Procurement Dir 13.3B He Assistant Finance 7/1/2018 6/30/2020 z,Nelda Heo Series $81,855.00 *Base Sal Alvare Track Procurement Specl 13.3B Registrar Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components He Assistant Enrollment Registrar Sabb,Rach el Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $71,723.00 7/1/2018 Track Specl 13.3B Student Affairs 17 of 48 Page

20 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Name Type Salary Title Amount Functional Title Eff To Appt Comments Eff From Hrs Components Student Ath Dir McCarthy,Ryan Heo Ser ies He Officer *Base Sal $84,958.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Student Disability He Associate Pantoja,Maria J Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $66,324.00 7/1/2018 Services Mg Track 13.3B Peloquin,Kelly R. Heo Series He Associate gr *Base Sal Student Athl M $63,811.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Student Life Mgr Polite,Dedra Y Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $87,495.00 He Associate 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B S tudent Leads He Assistant Burger,Preston Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $56,528.00 7/1/2018 Track Support Specl 13.3B Admin Coord Diaz,Lorraine C Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $62,949.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Acad Advisor - Asst To Heo Hernandez Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $71,268.00 Aheo Banegas,Alicia M Track 13.3B Student Athl Thompson,Faith T Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $ Asst To Heo 58,787.00 Program Coord Track 13.3B Student Financial Aid Comments Appt Type Title Functional Title Name Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components He Associate Financial Aid Mgr Hashim,Abdul Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $6 9,193.00 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Financial Aid 6/30/2019 Heo Series *Base Sal $51,153.00 7/1/2018 Collins,Deirdre Antoinette -Aheo Track Advisor 13.3B Asst To Heo Financial Aid Cruz,Guillermo J Heo Series *Base Sal $65,028.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track Advisor -Aheo 13.3B Student Personal Counseling Eff From Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Amount Comments Eff To Components Hrs He Officer Student Counseling 7/1/2018 Torres,Vasiliki H Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $104,461.00 Track Dir 13.3B Student Support/Student Life Amount Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components 7/1/2018 He Assistant Student Life Specl Dubo n,Tiffany Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $78,477.00 Track 13.3B VP for Academic Affairs Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Appt Eff From Components Hrs 6/30/2019 He Officer Acad Affairs Dir na,Richard Heo Series *Base Sal $101,043.00 7/1/2018 LaMan 18 of 48 Page

21 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Eff To Name Type Salary Functional Title Amount Title Eff From Appt Comments Hrs Components Track 13.3B Acevedo He Associate Acad Affairs Mgr Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 $78,477.00 Track Coppa,Katherine 13.3B A cad Esl Program He Associate Davis,Jason H Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $75,110.00 7/1/2018 Track Mgr 13.3B Acad Std Suppt Mgr Odige,Sahidha Heo Series He Associate *Base Sal $94,248.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Acad Std Suppt Carrasco,Vanessa Heo Series He Assistant $68,351.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Track M. Couns (Heoa) 13.3B It Academic He Assistant Sayeed,Delwar H Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $65,817.00 7/1/2018 Track Technology Specl 13.3B Acad Resource Ctr *Base Sal Asst To Heo Bencosme,Merelyn Heo Series 6/30/2019 $71,268.00 7/1/2018 Track Coord F 13.3B VP for Administration & Fin Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Functional Title Hrs Components Asst To Heo Admin Exec Coord Crews,Nicole Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $62,949.00 Track Marion 13.3B 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Asst To Heo Admin Events Coord Polo,Stephanie Heo Series 7/1/2018 $55,837.00 Track 1 3.3B Admin Events Coord Thomson,Barbara Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $60,869.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Classified Appointment PPS -Utility Plant Functional Title Name Title Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs 4/3/2018 $127,034.00 Stationary Engineer Allen,William Probable *Base Sal Stationary 4/2/2019 Engineer Permanent Non -Competitive PPS- Custodial Comments SW Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components Custodial Custodial Asst Andeliz,Manuel T Non - Comp 9 *Base Sal 4/22/201 $29,279.00 4/23/2018 etitive Assistant 4/22/2019 Custodial 4/23/2018 Custodial Asst Carmichael,Jamel Non - Comp $29,279.00 *Base Sal etitive Assistant Bronx CC Institutional Research Appt Comments Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Eff To Amount Eff F rom Components Hrs 10/22/2018 Asst To Heo Acad Testing Coord Guerrero,Gino D. Substitute *Base Sal 4/23/2018 $60,869.00 >=6 Mo Or 19 of 48 Page

22 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 rom Functional Title Type SW Salary Amount Eff F Name Eff To Appt Comments Title Hrs Components Prior Ben Non -Teaching / Administrative ASAP Program Functional Title Name Type Sal ary Comments Title Eff From Eff To Appt Amount Hrs Components Acad Asap Program Browne,Nadine He Officer Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $120,450.00 7/1/2018 Dir Track 13.3B Acad Asap Program He Associate Cabrera,Jessica Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $78,477.00 Mgr Track 13.3B Acad Program Mgr Frazer,Tica C. Heo Series He Associate $84,678.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Track 13.3B Aceved He Assistant Acad Asap Student 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 o,Maricela Heo Series $56,528.00 *Base Sal Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B 6/30/2019 Acad Asap Student Beltran - Polanco,No He Assistant Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $61,593.00 elia Adv Track -Heoa 13.3B istant Acad Asap Student Benjamin,Nicole E He Ass Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $61,593.00 Adv -Heoa Track 13.3B Acad Asap Student He Assistant 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Brown,Thomasina $61,593.00 Heo Series *Base Sal Dorothy Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B He Assistant Acad Asap Student 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Elcock,Stephanie Heo Series $56,528.00 *Base Sal Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Assistant Acad Asap Student 7/1/2018 Jacobs,Saidia Heo Series $56,528.00 *Base Sal Track Adv -Heoa B 13.3 He Assistant Acad Asap Student Logothetis,Maria Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $65,817.00 Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B Acad Asap Student Mill er,Latema S He Assistant 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $56,528.00 Heo Series Adv -Heoa Track 13.3B He Assistant Acad Asap Student Monte,Nicole Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $56,528.00 Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B He Assistant Ac ad Advisor Nau,Richard F Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $68,351.00 Track Sr-Heoa 13.3B He Assistant Acad Asap Student 6/30/2019 Nunez,Noemi 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $63,617.00 Heo Series Adv Track -Heoa 13.3B Oniszko,Carmela He Assistant Acad Asap Student Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $63,617.00 Adv Track -Heoa 13.3B Acad Asap Student Perkins,Majesty 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 $56,528.00 He Assistant *Base Sal Adv -Heoa Track Latif 13.3B He Assistant Acad Asap Student Pompey,Suemanda Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $56,528.00 Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B Acad Asap Student Quezada,Laisa Heo Series *Base Sal $63,617.00 7/1/2018 He Assistant 6/30/2019 Trac k Adv -Heoa 13.3B He Assistant Acad Asap Student 6/30/2019 Randall,Christina L Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $61,593.00 Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Assistant Acad Asap Student Rodriguez,Erica L Heo Series *Base Sal $56,528.00 7/1/2018 20 of 48 Page

23 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Name Type Sal ary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Functional Title Comments Components Hrs Heoa Adv Track - 13.3B Acad Asap Student 7/1/2018 Smith,Nathaniel M Heo Series 6/30/2019 He Assistant *Base Sal $71,723.00 Adv Track -Heoa 13.3B Asst To Heo Aguasvivas,Aysmel Heo Series Acad Asap Program 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $55,837.00 7/1/2018 Track C Coord 13.3B Acad Asap Admiss Asst To Heo Coste Cruz,Rafael Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $55,837.00 7/1/2018 Track E Recruit Coord 13.3B Admin Coord Parrella,Anthony Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Asst To Heo $53,758.00 7/1/2018 Raffaele Track 13.3B Acad Asap Admiss Asst To Heo Rosario,Susan Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $51,153.00 7/1/2018 Recruit Coord Track B 13.3 Academic Success Center Eff From Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff To Appt Hrs Components Acad Advising Mgr Walker,Cheryl Heo Series *B ase Sal He Associate $94,248.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B - Aheo Adeniji,Jude Heo Series Acad Advisor Asst To Heo *Base Sal $71,268.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Acad Advisor - Aheo Francis,Sherryan Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $71,268.00 7/1/2018 k Trac 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo Levine,Benjamin 7/1/2018 Heo Series $71,268.00 *Base Sal Jay Track 13.3B - Aheo Martell,Diana L Heo Series Acad Advisor *Base Sal Asst To Heo $62,949.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Acad Advisor - Aheo McKay,Eric Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $62,949.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo Quinones ,Maribel Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $71,268.00 Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo Quintero,Fabian 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $71,268.00 Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo 7/1/2018 Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $62,949.00 Rohoman,Shaneza Track 13.3B $62,949.00 Aheo Velasquez,Rosa Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal - 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Acad Advisor Track 13.3B Asst To Heo ad Advisor - Aheo Wilson,Shabazz Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $62,949.00 7/1/2018 Ac Track 13.3B Admissions Services Comments Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 6/30/2019 He Assistant Admissions Specl Ruiz Jr,William Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $63,617.00 Track 13.3B /30/2019 6 He Assistant Acad Asap Admiss 7/1/2018 Saldivar,Christophe $81,855.00 Heo Series *Base Sal Sr Adv Track r Edward -Heoa 13.3B 21 of 48 Page

24 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Functional Title Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Name Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Admissions Asst To Heo Gil,Nathali Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $55,837.00 7/1/2018 Track -Aheo Advisor 13.3B AdvComExtR -Development Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components $117,120.00 He Officer Oliva,Julia P Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Development Partnerships Dir Track 13.3B -Grants AdvComExtR Title Functional Title Name Type Salary omments C Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components He Officer Development 6/30/2019 Oliva,Julia P Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $117,120.00 Track Partnerships Dir 13.3B Advncmt Comm & External Reltns Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff T Title Appt o Components Hrs He Officer Development Grants 6/30/2019 Eisenberg,Judith Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $101,043.00 Track Dev Dir 13.3B He Officer Admin Officer - Heo Wiltshire,Rolly 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $112,905.00 7/1/2018 Heo Series Track 13.3B Bronx EOC Appt Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Hrs Components Eoc Assistant Eoc Admin Coord Dyce,Courtney Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $55,837.00 7/1/2018 Track To Heo 13.3B $45,957.00 Eoc Acad Resource Heo Series Eoc Assistant *Base Sal Williams,Nayshawn 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track Ctr Coord To Heo 13.3B Eoc Career Job 6/30/2019 Munoz,Francisc o Heo Series 7/1/2018 Eoc He $81,855.00 *Base Sal Assistant Track Devel Sr -Heoa 13.3B Eoc Acad 6/30/2019 Brandon,Avery Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal Eoc Assistant $62,949.00 To Heo Advisor Track -Aheo 13.3B 6/30/2019 Eoc Career Job Hernandez,Charis Eoc Assistant Heo Series 7/1/2018 $67,106.00 *Base Sal ma To Heo Track Devel -Aheo 13.3B Eoc Career Job 6/30/2019 Tucker,Justin Eoc Assistant 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $55,837.00 Heo Series To Heo Devel Track -Aheo 13.3B Bursar Name Comments Title Functional Title Appt Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components Enrollment Bursar Bertz,Lisa Heo Series Asst To Heo 9 *Base Sal 6/30/201 $60,869.00 7/1/2018 Track Coord 13.3B Business Office Name Type Title Salary Comments Amount Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components 6/30/2019 Heo Series He Officer Finance Budget Dir Alston,Deborah 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $128,485.00 Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Ass istant Finance Budget 7/1/2018 Martinez,Yinet Heo Series $75,110.00 *Base Sal Track Specl 13.3B 019 6/30/2 He Assistant Finance Specl Rosenberg,Gregory Heo Series *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $71,723.00 Track 22 of 48 Page

25 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Title Name Type Salary Functional Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs 13.3B Campus & Facilities Planning Name Type Salary Title Functional Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Admin Coord Qarri,Ariana Heo Series *Base Sal Asst To Heo $60,869.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Career Development Eff From Name Type Salary Title Functional Title Eff To Appt Comments Amount Hrs Components Asst To Heo Perez,Stephanie Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $60,869.00 Student Career Adv -Aheo Track 13.3B Cd -Counselors - Counselo Counselors Cd Cd Counselors Cd - Counselors Cd - Coun - Cd Cd - Counselors Cd - Counselo Co - Cd - Coun Cd Couns Cd - - selors rs unsel elors rs selors ors - Counselo Cd Cd - Counselors Cd - Counselors Cd - Coun Counselors - Cd - Counselors Cd - Counselo Cd Co Cd - Coun - Cd Cd - Cou ns rs elors selors unsel rs selors ors Communications & Marketing Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs $84,678.00 Michelin,Naomi A. Heo Series 6/30/2019 He Associate 7/1/2018 Comms Electronic *Base Sal Media Mgr Track 13.3B Education & Academic Literacy Type Comments Title Functional Title Name Appt Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components Asst To Heo Acad Program Coord Heo Series Magloire,Alderson *Base Sal $45,957.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 A. Track 13.3B Human Resources Dept Eff From Type Functional Title Salary Amount Name Eff To Appt Comments Title Components Hrs Hr Coord Acevedo,Milagros Heo Series *Base Sal $51,153.00 Asst To Heo 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Language Immersion Program Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components He Associate Eatman - Skinner,Pa Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sa l 7/1/2018 $75,110.00 Acad Std Suppt Mgr Track mela Victoria 13.3B 6/30/2019 Heo Series He Assistant Acad Std Suppt 7/1/2018 Baptiste,Keisha $61,593.00 *Base Sal Track Specl 13.3B Acad Std Suppt Cardenas,Debra T Heo Series He Assistant 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $63,617.00 7/1/2018 Track Specl 13.3B Acad Std Suppt Guardia,Olga Heo Series He Assistant 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $61,593.00 7/1/2018 Track Specl 13.3B nne 6/30/2019 He Assistant Acad Std Suppt 7/1/2018 Njoku,Nwa Heo Series $63,617.00 *Base Sal Track Specl 13.3B 6/30/2019 He Assistant Acad Std Suppt 7/1/2018 Valenzuela,Norma Heo Series $63,617.00 *Base Sal Track Specl 13.3B Math & Computer Sciences Appt Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Eff From Amount Components Hrs 23 of 48 Page

26 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Type Salary Functional Title Name Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Title Hrs Components He Assistant De la Rosa,Yanil Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $81,855.00 7/1/2018 Acad Resource Ctr Track Specl 13.3B Purchasing ctional Title Name Type Salary Title Fun Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs Finance He Officer Antonio,Anjanette Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $108,683.00 Track Procurement Dir A. 13.3B Finance He Assistant Alvarez,Nelda Heo Series 6/30/2020 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $81,855.00 Procu Track rement Specl 13.3B Registrar Functional Title Type Salary Amount Eff From Name Eff To Appt Comments Title Hrs Components Enrollment Registrar He Assistant Sabb,Rachel Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $71,723.00 7/1/2018 Spe cl Track 13.3B Registrar Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Enrollment Registrar Sabb,Rach el Heo Series He Assistant 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $71,723.00 7/1/2018 Track Specl 13.3B Student Affairs Name Type Title Salary Comments Amount Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components 6/30/2019 He Officer Student Ath Dir McCarthy,Ryan Heo Series 7/1/2018 $84,958.00 *Base Sal ck Tra 13.3B Student Disability He Associate Pantoja,Maria J Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $66,324.00 7/1/2018 Track Services Mg 13.3B Student Athl Mgr Pelo quin,Kelly R. Heo Series He Associate *Base Sal $63,811.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Track 13.3B Student Life Mgr Polite,Dedra Y Heo Series $87,495.00 *Base Sal He Associate 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Leads Student Burger,Preston Heo Series He Assistant 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $56,528.00 7/1/2018 Track Support Specl 13.3B Admin Coord Diaz,Lorraine C Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $62,949.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Heo Series Asst To Heo Acad Advisor - Aheo Hernandez 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 $71,268.00 *Base Sal Track Banegas,Alicia M 13.3B $58,787.00 Heo Series Student Athl *Base Sal Thompson,Faith T 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Track Program Coord 13.3B Student Financial Aid Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Heo Series 6/30/2019 He Associate Financial Aid Mgr Hashim,Abdul 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $69,193.00 Track 13.3B 7/1/2018 Asst To Heo Collins,Deirdre Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $51,153.00 Financial Aid Advisor -Aheo Antoinette Track 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Financial Aid 7/1/2018 $65,028.00 Cruz,Guillermo J Heo Series *Base Sal Track -Aheo Advisor 13.3B Page 24 of 48

27 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Student Personal Counseling Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components $104,461.00 Torres,Vasiliki H Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal He Officer 7/1/2018 Student Counseling Dir Track 13.3B Student Support/Student Life Eff From Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Amount Comments Eff To Hrs Components $78,477.00 Dubon,Tiffany Heo Series *Base Sal He Assistant 6/30/2019 Student Life Specl 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B VP for Academic Affairs Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Components Hrs He Officer Acad Affairs Dir LaManna,Richard Heo Series 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $101,043.00 Track 13.3B He Associate Acad Affairs Mgr Acevedo Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $78,477.00 Track Coppa,Katherine 13.3B He Associate Acad Esl Program Davis,Jason H Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $75,110.00 Mgr Track 13.3B He Associate Acad Std Suppt Mgr Odige,Sahidha Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 *Base Sal $94,248.00 Track 13.3B He Assistant Acad Std Suppt Carrasco,Vanessa 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 $68,351.00 *Base Sal Couns (Heoa) Track M. 13.3B He Assistant It Academic Sayeed,Delwar H Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $65,817.00 7/1/2018 Technology Specl Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Acad Resource Ctr 7/1/2018 Bencosme,Merelyn $71,268.00 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Heo Series Track F Coord 13.3B VP for Administration & Fin Eff From Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff To Appt Functional Title Hrs Components Asst To Heo Admin Exec Coord Crews,Nicole Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 $62,949.00 Track Marion 13.3B Asst To Heo Admin Events Coord Polo,Stephanie Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $55,837.00 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Asst To Heo Admin Events Coord Thomson,Barbara Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2019 $60,869.00 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B PPS- Utility Plant Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Stationary Engineer Stationary Allen,William Probable 4/2/2019 *Base Sal $127,034.00 4/3/2018 Permanent Engineer -Competitive Non PPS- Custodial Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Custodial Custodial Asst Andeliz,Manuel T Non - Comp 4/22/2019 *Base Sal $29,279.00 4/23/2018 etitive Assistant Custodial Custodial Asst Carmichael,Jamel Non - Comp 4/22/2019 *Base Sal $29,279.00 4/23/2018 etitive Assistant Custodial Custodial Asst Cosme,Alex Non - 4/9/2018 *Base Sal $33,084.00 Comp etitive Assistant 4/22/2019 Custodial Custodial Asst Martinez,Manuel A Non - Comp *Base Sal $29,279.00 4/23/2018 25 of 48 Page

28 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Title Eff To Appt Eff From Hrs Components etitive Assistant Custodial Asst Washington,David Non - Comp Custodial *Base Sal 4/22/2019 $29,279.00 4/23/2018 etitive Assistant Revision Competitive PPS- Utility Plant Functional Title Name Type Amount Eff From Eff To Leave % of Title Appt Comments Salary Components Hrs Pay Stationary Stationary Engineer Allen,William Probable *Base Sal 100 $127,034.00 4/2/2019 4/3/2018 Engineer Permanent Brooklyn College Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above VP for Inst Advancement Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Title Comments Hrs Components $250,000.00 Vice President Vp Institl Galitz,Todd Michael Ecp (Not *Base Sal 5/10/2018 Acting) Advancement Revision ECP Vice President and Above VP for Inst Advancement Type Title Functional Title Name Comments Salary Appt Leave % of Amount Eff From Eff To Pay Components Hrs Vice President Vp Institl 100 Galitz,Todd Michael Ecp Acting 5/9/2018 *Base Sal 3/26/2018 $250,000.00 <6 Months Advancement Total Action Revision: 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above: 1 ECP Below Vice President: 1 Revision ECP Vice President and Above: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 3 26 of 48 Page

29 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Fiscal and Business Affairs Eff From Type SW Salary Functional Title Title Name Eff To Appt Comments Amount Hrs Components Finance Coord Fredericks,Fluquee Heo Series *Base Sal Asst To Heo 6/30/2018 $44,308.00 4/17/2018 n Track 13.3B Office of Comptroller Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Finance Specl Fredericks,Fluquee Substitute 10/16/2018 *Base Sal $56,528.00 He Assistant 4/17/2018 n >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben Authorized Leave Competitive Campus & Community Safety Svcs Eff To Type Title Name Comments Functional Title Eff From Expected return Campus Peace Campus Peace Adams,Wendi Permanent 3/1/2018 to work 5/1/2018. Officer Officer 1 Borough of Manhattan CC Non -Teaching / Administrative Functional Title Title Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Name Components Hrs Cintron,Nancy Heo Series 6/30/2018 He Assistant *Base Sal Acad Asap Student 4/30/2018 $61,593.00 Track -Heoa Adv 13.3B 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 He Assistant Acad Asap Student $61,593.00 Cintron,Nancy Heo Series *Base Sal -Heoa Adv Track 13.3B - Half Year Fellowship Leave Faculty Academic Literacy & Linguistic Name Type Salary Amount Title Eff From Eff To Leave % of Comments Pay Components Torres,Rosario Tenured *Base Sal 100 $87,495.00 8/27/2018 1/24/2019 Assc Professor English Language/Literatures Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Leave % of Pay Components Stahl,Jan Tenured *Base Sal $94,248.00 Assc Professor 100 1/24/2019 8/27/2018 Fellowship Leave - Full Year Faculty Academic Literacy & Linguistic Salary Leave % of Title Name Type Comments Eff To Eff From Amount Pay Components Finn,Heather Track Assc Professor *Base Sal 80 $84,678.00 8/27/2018 8/31/2018 Tenure Bobrow Morvay,Gabriella Tenured *Base Sal Assc Professor $94,248.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 80 Assc Professor Sepp,Mary Tenured 80 *Base Sal 8/26/2019 $97,628.00 8/27/2018 80 Asst Professor Koniski,Elisa 8/27/2019 Tenured *Base Sal $81,855.00 8/27/2018 80 Lecturer Johnson,Katherine 8/26/2019 Cce *Base Sal 8/27/2018 $74,454.00 Certificate M 27 of 48 Page

30 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Eff To Type Salary Title Comments Amount Name Leave % of Eff From Pay Components Continuous Emp Art & Music Name Type Salary Comments Leave % of Amount Eff From Eff To Title Pay Components Tenured *Base Sal Haviland,Sarah $97,628.00 Assc Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 80 English Language/Literatures Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Leave % of Pay Components Professor 80 Fish,Cheryl J Tenured *Base Sal $120,450.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Assc Professor Barrow,Margaret R Tenured *Base Sal $97,628.00 8/27/2018 80 8/26/2019 80 Assc Professor Delano,Page Tenured *Base Sal $97,628.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Modern Languages & Literatures Assc Professor Alvarez - 80 Tenured *Base Sal $87,495.00 1/25/2019 1/26/2020 Olarra,Silvi a 80 Assc Professor Means,John 8/26/2019 Tenured 8/27/2018 $87,495.00 *Base Sal Thomas Science Type Salary Title Name Amount Eff From Eff To Leave % of Comments Pay Components Liang,Jun Tenured *Base Sal 8/26/2019 $90,871.00 8/27/2018 80 Assc Professor Social Science Name Type Salary Amount Comments Title Eff From Eff To Leave % of Pay Components Professor Isserles,Robin G Tenured *Base Sal $112,905.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 80 Speech/Communication/Theatre A Type Salary Name Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Leave % of Pay Components Dowling,Diane Tenured *Base Sal Professor 8/27/2018 80 8/26/2019 $117,120.00 Revision Non -Teaching / Administrative Continuing Education Total Action Revision: 1 Total Actions Reported: Instructional Appointment Faculty: 6 Non - Teaching / Administrative: 8 Reappointment Faculty: 41 Laboratory / Research: 7 Non - Teaching / Administrative: 247 Salary Incr - Not New Step (INST - Half Year Fellowship Leave 28 of 48 Page

31 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Faculty: 2 - Full Year Fellowship Leave Faculty: 14 Central Office Comm Colleges Classified Authorized Leave Competitive Security Operation Eff To Functional Title Type Eff From Name Comments Title MLOA Expected Campus Peace Campus Peace Smith,Shawn Permanent 6/3/2018 Lunsford Officer 1 Leave End Date Officer 07/09/18 Total Action Authorized Leave: 1 Total Actions Reported: Classified Authorized Leave Competitive: 1 Total Classified: 1 Controller Operations Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Appt Title Amount Eff From Eff To Comments Hrs Components Finance Coord Yeung,Priscilla Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $48,210.00 4/26/2018 6/30/2018 Track 13.3B Name Type SW Salary Title Functional Title Eff From Eff To Ap pt Comments Hrs Components 6/30/2018 He Officer Univ 4/1/2018 Roel,Ronald Substitute *Base Sal >=6 Mo Or Communications Dir Prior Ben UAPC Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Amount Prev Salary Comments Prev Am ount Eff From Components Components Univ Enrollment Budnik,Anna Heo Series Asst To Heo $58,787.00 *Base Sal $53,758.00 4/23/2018 *Base Sal Coord Track 13.3B $58,787.00 Chery,Katia Heo Series 4/23/2018 $53,758.00 *Base Sal Asst To Heo Univ Enrollment *Base Sal Track Coord 13.3B 4/23/2018 Asst To Heo Univ Enrollment $53,758.00 Kontrakul,Vanita Heo Series *Base Sal $58,787.00 *Base Sal Track Coord 13.3B Asst To Heo Univ Enro llment 4/23/2018 Mottola,Thomas J. Heo Series $58,787.00 *Base Sal *Base Sal $62,949.00 Track Coord 13.3B Asst To Heo 4/23/2018 Munz - Shetia,Rebec Heo Series *Base Sal $65,028.00 $60,869.00 *Base Sal Univ Admissions Ops Coord ca Becher Track 13.3B Total Actions Reported: Instructional Appointment Non Teaching / Administrative: 16 - Appointment Page 29 of 48

32 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Competitive Managerial Strategic Planning Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components It Computer It Computer Sys Mgr 4/23/2018 Mammen,Madhu M Provisional *Base Sal $100,000.00 3 Systems Mgr Non -Competitive Managerial Security Operation Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Appt Eff From Eff To Hrs Components Campus Campus Security Dir Ferrandino,Michael Non Comp *Base Sal $120,000.00 4/16/2018 - Security Dir etitive 4 Competitive Media Relations Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Title Comments SW Hrs Components $51,374.00 It Asst It Assistant 1 Zamora,Norali Provisional *Base Sal 5/10/2018 Total Action Revision: 1 Total Actions Reported: Classified Appointment Competitive Managerial: 1 -Competitive Manager ial: 1 Non Competitive: 1 College of Staten Island Registrar Name Functional Title Type SW Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Asst Exec Dir Enroll 3 month Rosenrauch,Yechie Ecp Acting 7/26/2018 *Base Sal $135,000.00 4/27/2018 Mgt -Astadm extension l J Administrator >=6 Mo Or r Ben Prio Chge/Reclass: 1 Reappointment Faculty Biology Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Assc Professor Assc Prof essor Phillips,Greg Track *Base Sal $90,871.00 8/27/2018 8/31/2018 Tenure Assc Professor Phillips,Greg Reappointment *Base Sal Assc Professor $90,871.00 9/1/2018 Track Tenure with early tenure History Comments Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components Lecturer Lecturer Batson,Michael Lecturer *Base Sal $72,373.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Track Cce Marketing Comments Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components Lecturer Lecturer Porzio,Ralph Lecturer *Base Sal $82,709.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Track Cce Mathematics Appt Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary o Eff T Amount Eff From Hrs Components 30 of 48 Page

33 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Name Type Salary Title Functional Title Amount Eff From Eff T o Appt Comments Components Hrs Johnson,Tobias Asst Professor Track *Base Sal Asst Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 $81,855.00 Tenure Lee Nursing Functional Title Title Name Type Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs Asst Professor Paradiso,Catherine Track Asst *Base Sal $84,354.00 Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Laboratory / Research Media Culture Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Title Hrs Components lege Lab Col College Lab Lovell,Mitchell C Track 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $51,378.00 8/27/2018 Tenure Class Tech- Tech Total Action Reappointment: 7 Promotion Faculty Computer Science Comments Functional Title Eff From Nam e Type Salary Title Prev Amount Amount Prev Salary Components Prior Func Title Prior Title Components $101,043.00 Huo,Yumei Tenured *Base Sal Professor *Base Sal $97,628.00 8/27/2018 Professor Assc Professor Assc Professor Engineering Sci ence & Physics Comments Functional Title Eff From Name Type Salary Title Prev Amount Amount Prev Salary Components Prior Func Title Prior Title Components *Base Sal Professor $87,628.00 8/27/2018 Professor $97,628.00 Benimoff,Alan Tenured *Base Sal Lecturer Doc Sch Lecturer Doct Sch History Title Comments Functional Title Eff From Name Type Salary Prev Amount Amount Prev Salary Components Prior Func Title Prior Title Components Professor Professor 8/27/2018 Tenured *Base Sal $101,043.00 *Base Sal $97,628.00 Mbah,Emmanuel Assc Professor Assc Pro fessor Library omments Title Functional Title Name C Type Salary Amount Prev Salary Prev Amount Eff From Prior Func Title Prior Title Components Components *Base Sal Assc 8/27/2018 $90,149.00 $94,248.00 *Base Sal Dzurak,Ewa Tenured Assc Professor -Librarian Professor Asst Professor Asst - Professor Librarian Mathematics Eff From Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount Prev Salary Prev Amount Prior Title Prior Func Title Components Components 8/27/2018 Professor $97,628.00 Champanerkar,Abh Tenured *Base Sal *Base Sal $101,043.00 Professor ijit Assc Professor Assc Professor Professor Professor 8/27/2018 Huang,Zheng Tenured *Base Sal $97,628.00 $101,043.00 *Base Sal Assc Professor Assc Professor Psychology Eff From Title Comments Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount P rev Salary Prev Amount Prior Title Prior Func Title Components Components Professor $101,043.00 Professor Cumiskey,Kathleen Tenured *Base Sal *Base Sal $97,628.00 8/27/2018 Assc Professor Assc Professor M WORLD LANGUAGES & LITERATURES Fellowsh ip Leave - Full Year Faculty Page 31 of 48

34 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Accounting/Finance Chemistry Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Leave % of Pay Components 8/27/2018 Track lowship leave *Base Sal Fel $84,678.00 Assc Professor Loverde,Sharon 8/26/2019 80 Tenure Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 Library Fellowship leave Professor Jones,Wilma Tenured *Base Sal 80 $128,485.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 17 Scholar Incentive Award Faculty English Name Type Title ary Comments Leave % of Amount Eff From Eff To Sal Pay Components Professor Scholar Incentive Hoeller,Hildegard Tenured *Base Sal 25 $120,450.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 History Leave % of Title Comments Type Salary A mount Eff From Eff To Name Pay Components Professor Tenured *Base Sal Scholar Incentive $117,120.00 8/27/2018 Ivison,Eric 8/26/2019 25 Leave Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 Political Sci & Global Affairs Title Name Type Salary Comments Leave % of Amount Eff From Eff To nts Compone Pay Karacas,Cary Tenured *Base Sal Scholar Incentive $97,628.00 Assc Professor 1/25/2019 7/31/2019 25 Spring 2019 LOA w/Incr Cr, w/o Pay Faculty Mathematics Title Type Eff From Eff To Comments Name Hamkins,Joel David Tenured 8/27/2018 Professor 8/26/2019 Media Culture Title Name Type Eff From Eff To Comments Professor Tenured 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Zhu,Ying Title Asst Professor Total Action Revision: 4 Total Actions Reported: Instructional Appointment Faculty: 1 Laboratory / Research: 3 Non - Teaching / Administrative: 3 Title Chge/Reclass - Appointment 32 of 48 Page

35 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Non - Teaching / Administrative: 1 Reappointment Faculty: 6 Laboratory / Research: 1 Promotion Faculty: 8 Fellowship Leave - Full Year Faculty: 17 Scholar Incentive Award Faculty: 3 LOA w/Incr Cr, w/o Pay Faculty: 2 Revision Faculty: 4 Total Instructional: 49 33 of 48 Page

36 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 City College Provost's Office Functional Title Name Type Salary Prev Salary Comments Amount Title Eff From Prev Amount Components Components Asst Vp Enroll Mgt Lloyd,Celia P Ecp (Not *Base Sal Functional title Asst Vice $165,000.00 *Base Sal $153,195.00 4/1/2018 change AVP Acting) Std Success President Enrollment Management to AVP Enrollment Management & Student Success -Department Chair Designation Faculty SEEK Cnsl'g/Stud. Support Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Eff To Amount Eff From Components Designated 6/30/2018 Assc Professor Assc Professor Rings,Sherri L Tenured *Base Sal 2/1/2018 $97,628.00 Acting Department Chairperson of SEEK Economics and Business Title Functional Title Name Type Comments Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Leave % of Salary Pay Hrs Components Reported on the 100 Assc Professor Assc Professor Shankar,Kameshw 8/31/2017 Track *Base Sal 8/25/2017 $97,628.00 ari Tenure October 2017 CUR as Promotion to Associate Professor effective 8/25/2017 at $90,871 base salary and $6,211 SAB. S/B at $97,628 base salary *Base Sal Reported on the Assc Professor Assc Professor Shankar,Kameshw Tenured 9/1/2017 $97,628.00 100 October 2017 ari CUR as reappointment with tenure effective 9/1/2017 at $90,871 base salary and $6,211 SAB. S/B at $97,628 base salary Total Actions Reported: Instructional Appointment 4 Designation - Department Chair Faculty: 1 Appointment 34 of 48 Page

37 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Competitive Information Technology Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components It Associate 1 Lopez,Kimberly Provisional *Base Sal $66,710.00 It Associate 5/10/2018 Appointment -Title Chge/Reclass -Teaching / Administrative Non Library Registrar Comments Amount Title Eff To Functional Title Eff From Name Type Salary Prev Amount Prev Salary Components Prior Func Title Prior Title Components He Officer 6/30/2018 Enrollment Registrar 4/2/2018 $100,211.00 *Base Sal Lee,Cheuk Heo Series $100,211.00 *Base Sal Track He Associate Dir Enrollment Registrar 13.3B Mgr Salary Incr -Not New Step (INST Faculty Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff From Amount Prev Salary Prev Amount Components Components 5/1/2018 Research *Base Sal Shereen,Ahmed Instructors $91,350.00 *Base Sal $120,000.00 Research Faculty -Assc Prof Associate And Others Psc Professor Academic Planning And Programs Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Title Eff From Eff To Leave % of Appt Pay Hrs Components Graduate Asst Cancel Graduate Assistant Meza 100 Instructors 8/26/2018 8/25/2017 *Base Sal $5,268.00 Martinez,Silvia appointment; as D And Others D previously Psc Elena reported on October 2017 CUR Office of Dean for Acad Affrs Comments Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Leave % of Eff To Amount Eff From Pay Hrs Components Yom,Sae Young Instructors Cancelled *Base Sal $11,969.00 8/25/2017 Graduate Asst 8/26/2018 Graduate Assistant B 100 And Others appointment; as B Psc previously reported on October 2017 CUR Non -Teaching / Administrative Non -Teaching / Administrative Name Appt Title Functional Title Comments Type Salary Leave % of Eff To Amount Eff From Components Pay Hrs *Base Sal Cancel 100 Asst To Heo Admin Events Coord Meyers,Alyssa J Heo Series 7/1/2018 $42,407.00 Track reappointme non- 13.3B nt eff. 7/1/2018 as previously reported in 4/2018 X Report. Page 35 of 48

38 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Hostos CC -Teaching / Administrative Non ASAP Name Type Salary Title Functional Title Amount Prev Salary Comments Prev Amount Eff From Components Components Acad Asap Student $65,817.00 He Assistant Skaria,Ancy Heo Series 4/9/2018 *Base Sal $68,351.00 *Base Sal -Heoa Track Adv 13.3B Hunter College Appointment Faculty Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Amount Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs DeVito,Taylor Hccs Asst Track Hccs Asst Teacher *Base Sal $28,510.00 4/13/2018 6/30/2018 Tenure Danielle Teacher Laboratory / Research School of Nursing Amount Name Type SW Salary Title Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Sr College Lab 9/28/2018 Owens,Jeffrey B Substitute 3/29/2018 Sr College Lab *Base Sal $71,665.00 >=6 Mo Or Class Tech- Tech Prior Ben VP For Student Affairs Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components 10/8/2018 He Officer Acad Program Dir Lassonde,Stephen 4/9/2018 Substitute $108,683.00 *Base Sal >=6 Mo Or Arthur Prior Ben Competitive Buildings & Grounds Amount Type SW Salary Functional Title Name Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Title Components Hrs Stationary Engineer Labarca,Dean Probable 9/14/2018 Stationary *Base Sal 3/15/2018 $146,912.00 Permanent Sr Engineer Sr Benn,Richard Probable Stationary *Base Sal Stationary Engineer $127,034.00 4/3/2018 4/2/2019 William Engineer Permanent 4/2/2019 4/3/2018 Stationary Stationary Engineer Benn,William Probable $127,034.00 *Base Sal Engineer Permanent HCCS B&G Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Appt Amount Eff From Eff To SW Hrs Components 4/25/2019 Oiler Oiler Sanchez,Kenneth J Probable 4/26/2018 *Base Sal $119,371.00 Permanent John Jay College First Year Experience Appt Comments Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 6/30/2018 He Assistant Acad Program Specl Gupta,Himani Heo Series 5/1/2018 *Base Sal $75,110.00 Track 13.3B 36 of 48 Page

39 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Registrar Eff From Type SW Salary Functional Title Title Name Eff To Appt Comments Amount Hrs Components Enrollment Registrar Nardin,Stacy Ann Heo Series 6/30/2018 Asst To Heo *Base Sal $39,282.00 5/1/2018 Coord Track 13.3B First Year Experience Gupta,Himani Heo Series He Assistant Acad Program Specl $75,110.00 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Track 13.3B Registrar Enrollment Registrar Nardin,Stacy Ann Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal Asst To Heo 7/1/2018 $39,282.00 Coord Track 13.3B Appointment Competitive DOIT Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components It Associate 1 Goto,Miho Provisional It Associate $66,710.00 4/23/2018 *Base Sal Campus Campus Security 4/28/2019 Samedi,Jean 4/29/2018 Probable $26,464.00 *Base Sal Asst Permanent Laurin Security Asst Non -Competitive Buildings And Grounds Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Comments SW Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components Burke,Alyshia Probable *Base Sal $33,084.00 Custodial 4/23/2018 Custodial Asst 4/22/2019 Ramono Assistant Permanent Kingsborough CC -Teaching / Administrative Non Vice President&Provost Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Arnold,Alyssa Substitute *Base Sal Asst To Heo $60,869.00 Admin Coord 8/31/2018 5/6/2018 <6 Mo No Prior Svc Law School VP Administration Functional Title Appt Title Comments Name Type SW Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components $61,593.00 Kowalczyk,Carolina Heo Series *Base Sal He Assistant 6/30/2018 Admin Events Specl 4/23/2018 Track 13.3B VP Administration Appt Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components He Associate Admin Events Mgr Manocchia,Karyn Heo Series 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 *Base Sal $94,248.00 Track 13.3B Lehman College Plan Page 37 of 48

40 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Appointment ECP Below Vice President Office Of The President Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Title Appt Components Hrs Y Asst Vp Strategic Gagliardi,Jonathan Ecp (Not Asst Vice *Base Sal 5/1/2018 $182,000.00 Acting) Planning President Administrator Exec Counsel - Labor 4/1/2019 Tulier,Esdras Ecp Acting 4/2/2018 *Base Sal $193,000.00 >=6 Mo Or -Adm Des Prior Ben Revision ECP Vice President and Above VP for Institutional Adv Title Vice President Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Below Vice President: 2 Revision ECP Vice President and Above: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 3 Math Name Title Functional Title Type SW Salary Comments Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Hrs Components Does Not Apply Faculty Open Rank Zeinalian,Mahmoud Tenured *Base Sal $120,450.00 8/27/2018 Non -Teaching / Administrative Academic Skills- Seek Title Name Type SW Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Functional Title Comments Hrs Components *Base Sal Colon,Nancy Heo Series It Academic Asst To Heo $45,957.00 4/9/2018 6/30/2018 Technology Coord Track 13.3B Business Office Title Functional Title Name Type SW Comments Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Salary Hrs Components He Officer Confidential Pinnock,Andrea T Instructiona *Base Sal $128,485.00 4/26/2018 6/30/2018 l - Excluded Business Mgr -Heo Asst To Heo Financial Aid Coord Sanchez,Brenda M Substitute 10/22/2019 4/23/2018 *Base Sal $39,282.00 >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben Registrar Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs He Assistant Enrollment Registrar 6/30/2018 Ortiz,Jacob Rafael Heo Series 4/23/2018 *Base Sal $49,193.00 Track Specl 13.3B Steps: 2 38 of 48 Page

41 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 -Title Chge/Reclass Appointment Non -Teaching / Administrative Registrar Comments Functional Title Name Title Type Salary Eff To Eff From Amount Prev Salary Prev Amount Components Components Prior Func Title Prior Title He Assistant Enrollment Specl 6/30/2018 Ramos,Nelsy E Heo Series 4/9/2018 $40,815.00 *Base Sal $49,193.00 *Base Sal Asst To Heo Track Enrollment Coord 13.3B Chge/Reclass: 1 Early Payment of New Steps Faculty Economics and Business Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Eff From Amount Prev Salary Prev Amount Components Components 1/27/2018 Assc Professor Assc Professor Petkov,Rossen Tenured *Base Sal $87,495.00 $97,628.00 *Base Sal Eff From Name Type Salary Comments Title Functional Title Eff To Leave % of Appt Amount Pay Hrs Components He Officer The end date, Enrollment Registrar 100 Lucente,John Heo Series 6/30/2018 *Base Sal 12/26/2017 $108,683.00 Dir 6/30/18 was Track 13.3B entered. The empl class, 13.3b, is revised to read, track 13.3b. Total Actions Reported: Instructional Appointment Faculty: 8 Non - Teaching / Administrative: 11 Salary Above Base & New Steps Non - Teaching / Administrative: 2 - Title Chge/Reclass Appointment Non - Teaching / Administrative: 1 Appointment Title Chge/Reclass - Non Teaching / Administrative: 1 - Early Payment of New Steps Faculty: 1 Reappointment Faculty: 33 Laboratory / Research: 4 Fellowship Leave - Half Year Faculty: 1 Full Year - Fellowship Leave Page 39 of 48

42 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Name Type Salary Title Amount Prev Salary Comments Functional Title Eff From Prev Amount Components Components Faculty: 9 Revision Laboratory / Research: 2 - Non Teaching / Administrative: 2 Total Instructional: 75 Medgar Evers College Dept Of Soc & Behav. Sci Amount Name Type SW Salary Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Title Components Hrs Lecturer Lecturer Substitute *Base Sal 7/31/2018 $72,373.00 1/27/2018 Nunez,Esther D >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben SEEK -Academic Dept Name Type SW Title Salary Amount Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components *Base Sal Grand - Pierre,Rose - 9/17/2018 Substitute 3/18/2018 It Academic $42,407.00 Asst To Heo Technology Coord >=6 Mo Or Taelle Prior Ben 9/17/2018 Asst To Heo Acad Program Coord Lujan - Brooks,Dere 3/18/2018 Substitute $51,153.00 *Base Sal >=6 Mo Or k Vladimir Prior Ben Office Of The Provost $71,723.00 Confidential Exec Sarafoglou,Alexand 6/30/2019 Instructiona 7/1/2018 *Base Sal He Associate ra Aphrodite Assc- l - Excluded Hea Registrar Enrollment Registrar 6/30/2019 Grant,Kashima J Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal Asst To Heo $39,282.00 Track Coord 13.3B Competitive B & G -Maintenance Carpenter Wilson,Robert Temporary Carpenter *Base Sal 10/9/2017 $91,131.00 7/10/2017 <6 Months Carpenter 1/9/2018 Carpenter Wilson,Robert Temporary 10/10/2017 *Base Sal $91,131.00 <6 Months Transfer to Another College Competitive Security Office 5/8/2018 Campus Peace $38,791.00 Campus Peace *Base Sal Tomlin,Devon Earl Probable Permanent Officer 1 Officer 3/16/2018 Campus Security Cadogan,Ian T Permanent *Base Sal $30,673.00 Campus Asst Security Asst Guttman Community College Student Engagement 6/30/2019 He Assistant 7/1/2018 Romero,Victoria Heo Series *Base Sal $81,855.00 Acad Std Suppt 40 of 48 Page

43 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Holly Track Couns (Heoa) 13.3B NYC College of Technology ECP Vice President and Above Enrollment Management Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Functional Title Hrs Components Vice President Vp Student Affairs Hodge,Michel Ecp Acting *Base Sal 6/25/2018 $185,000.00 6/5/2018 <6 Months Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 1 Enrollment Management Comments Functional Title Name Type SW Title Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs Camacho,Jose A Heo Series 6/30/2018 *Base Sal 5/1/2018 $48,210.00 It Academic Asst To Heo Technology Coord Track 13.3B Admission Services Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Appt Comments Components Hrs *Base Sal He Assistant Admissions Specl Archie - Blackman,S Heo Series 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 $63,617.00 Track hereese T 13.3B Eoc He Eoc Admin Specl McIlwain,Sonya D Heo Series 6/30/2019 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 Assistant Track 13.3B Business Office/Fin Operations Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Components Hrs He Assistant Finance Payments Heo Series *Base Sal $65,817.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Mcdonald,Wanda Track Specl 13.3B It Academic Camacho,Jose A Heo Series *Base Sal Asst To Heo 7/1/2018 6/30/2019 Technology Coord Track 13.3B Registrar Asst To Heo Enrollment Registrar 7/1/2018 Shelefka,Emma L Heo Series $60,869.00 *Base Sal 6/30/2020 Track Coord 13.3B Vice President And Provost Acad Std Suppt Alterman,Chelsea 6/30/2019 Heo Series 7/1/2018 *Base Sal He Assistant $58,555.00 Eve Specl Track 13.3B Computer Center Type Title Functional Title Name SW Salary Comments Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Hrs Components It Associate It Associate 1 Crucey,Jose Provisional *Base Sal 4/23/2018 $66,710.00 Page 41 of 48

44 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Reappointment w/ Disciplinary -Competitive Non BEOC Title Eoc Custodial Asst Eoc Custodial Asst Competitive Managerial: 1 Competitive: 10 Reappointment w/ Disciplinary Non - Competitive: 2 Total Classified: 13 Queensborough CC Social Sciences Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components $75,110.00 Byers,Patrick D Track *Base Sal Asst Professor Asst Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Reappointment Non -Teaching / Administrative Disabled Students Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components He Officer Student Disability 7/1/2018 Freier,Benami H Heo Series $108,683.00 *Base Sal Track Services Di 13.3B Mathematics & Computer Science Eff From Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount Title Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components $62,949.00 Asst To Heo Baek,Namsik 13.3B - *Base Sal 7/1/2018 Acad Resource Ctr Heo Series Coord Student Learning Center Comments Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components He Officer Acad Resource Ctr 7/1/2018 Cook,Bonnie 13.3B - $120,450.00 *Base Sal Heo Series Dir Authorized Leave Faculty English Title Functional Title Name Type Eff From Eff To Comments Assc Professor of Leave Assc Professor Murley,Jean Tenured 8/27/2018 Special Absence without pay. Total Actions Reported: Instructional 42 of 48 Page

45 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Name Type Eff From Eff To Comments Title Functional Title Appointment Faculty: 10 Laboratory / Research: 1 Non - Teaching / Administrative: 16 Reappointment Non Teaching / Administrative: 3 - Promotion Faculty: 3 Full Year Fellowship Leave - Faculty: 1 Authorized Leave Faculty: 1 Total Instructional: 35 Queens College Anthropology Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Title Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs Asst Professor Madimenos,Felicia Track Asst Professor *Base Sal $81,855.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Asst Professor Rodriguez Track 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $81,855.00 Asst Professor 8/27/2018 e Tenur Aponte,Juan Tache,Karine Track *Base Sal Asst Professor $81,855.00 Asst Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Computer Science Functional Title Comments Title Appt Name Type Salary Eff To Eff From Amount Componen Hrs ts Asst Professor Chen,Chao Track Asst Professor *Base Sal $90,149.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Asst Professor Goswami,Mayank Track *Base Sal $90, 149.00 Asst Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure $90,149.00 Rozovskaya,Alla Track *Base Sal Asst Professor Asst Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Library 8/26/2019 Instructor Instructor - Librarian Williams,David Instructors 8/27/2018 *Base Sal $72,065.00 And Others Psc Secondary Ed & Youth Services Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components 8/26/2019 Clinical 8/27/2018 Clinical Professor Branch - Smith,Edwi $82,709.00 Instructors *Base Sal na Professor And Others Psc Urban Studies 43 of 48 Page

46 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Asst Professor Track *Base Sal $81,855.00 Rosa,Brian 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Asst Professor Tenure Asst Professor Vena,Natalie Track Asst Professor *Base Sal $75,110.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Larson,Scott M. Lecturer *Base Sal $72,949.00 Lecturer Doct 8/27/2018 Lecturer Doc Sch 8/31/2018 Sch Track Cce *Base Sal Larson,Scott M. Cce Lecturer Doc Sch Lecturer Doct $72,949.00 9/1/2018 Sch Certificate Continuous Emp Distinguished Dist Lecturer Mccarthy,Sheryl Instructors 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $99,576.00 8/26/2018 And Others Lecturer Psc Distinguished Mccormick,Gavin Instructors Dist Lecturer 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $75,867.00 8/27/2018 And Others Lecturer Psc Earth & Environmental Sciences Colle College Lab 8/26/2019 Festa,Katie A Track 8/27/2018 *Base Sal ge Lab $48,756.00 Tenure Tech Tech- Class Michael Harrington Center Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components 8/26/2019 Researc h Assc Research Associate Vogelsang,John D Instructors 8/27/2018 *Base Sal $81,335.00 And Others Psc Art Name Type Salary Comments Title Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Amount Hrs Components Admin Coo rd Nocera,Amanda Heo Series Asst To Heo *Base Sal $44,308.00 6/30/2020 7/1/2018 Track 13.3B Ctr Eth Racial & Religious Und Comments Name Type Salary Functional Title Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Acad Resource Ctr Gray,Aysa Heo Series 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo *Base Sal $51,153.00 7/1/2018 Track Coord 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Acad Resource Ctr 7/1/2018 Rosenstock,Yael R Heo Series $58,787.00 *Base Sal Track Coord 13.3B Library Eff From Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount Title Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Tam,Tina Heo Series *Base Sal 6/30/2020 $45,957.00 Admin Coord 7/1/2018 Asst To Heo Track 13.3B Psychology Appt Comments Na Title Functional Title me Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 6/30/2019 He Officer Student Counseling 7/1/2018 Caro,Yvette Heo Series $112,905.00 *Base Sal Track Dir 13.3B 6/30/2019 Asst To Heo Admin Coord Lord,Danielle 7/1/2018 $58,787.00 *Base Sal Heo Series ck Tra 13.3B Page 44 of 48

47 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Queens College Venue Rentals Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Admin Officer - Heo Nussbaum,Dale M Heo Series He Officer *Base Sal $108,683.00 6/30/2019 7/1/2018 Tr ack 13.3B School of Journalism Functional Title Name Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Leave % of Appt Title Comments Type Hrs Components Pay Revised title to Prof School Mendelson,Andre Ecp (Not *Base Sal *Base Psch Assoc Dn 1/5/2015 100 w L. Sal*Base read Prof Acad Affairs Acting) Assoc Dean Sal$200,000.0 School Assoc Dean as 0 previously reported in 1/2015 CUR. Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Revision ECP Below Vice President: 2 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 2 Steps: 1 Salary Incr -Not New Step (INST Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Prev Amount Prev Salary Eff From Prev Amount Prev Salary Components Components Components $105,123.00 *Base Sal 7/1/2018 *SAB $46,600.00 York College Chge/Reclass: 1 Reappointment Faculty Accounting and Finance Functional Title Name Type Title Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components *Base Sal Assc Professor Assc Professor Vasquez,Geraldo Track 8/26/2019 $94,248.00 8/27/2018 Tenure Behavioral Sciences Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Components Hrs Asst Professor Asst Professor Track *Base Sal $81,855.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Apkarian,Jacob Tenure Asst Professor Asst Professor Berwid,Olga Track *Base Sal 8/26/2019 $81,855.00 8/27/2018 Tenure Asst Professor Davies,Kristin Track *Base Sal $81,855.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Asst Professor Tenure Marie Biology Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 8/26/2019 Asst Professor Asst Professor - Boyd,Lou Track *Base Sal $81,855.00 8/27/2018 Bradbury 45 of 48 Page

48 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Title Eff To Appt Eff From Components Hrs is Tenure Asst Professor Asst Professor Emtage,Lesley Track *Base Sal 8/26/2019 $81,855.00 8/27/2018 Tenure Rachel Roesche Business and Economics Functional Title Name Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Title Comments Type Hrs Components Asst Professor Asst Professor Annansingh - Jamies Track 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $81,855.00 8/27/2018 Tenure on,Fenio P Asst Professor Asst Professor Cline,Paul E. Track 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $78,477.00 8/27/2018 Tenure Kolmos,John Asst Professor Track *Base Sal $78,477.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Asst Professor Tenure Anthony Asst Professor Korkou,Efstathia Track * Base Sal $81,855.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Asst Professor Tenure Chemistry Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Eff To Amount Eff From Hrs Components $81,855.00 Musumeci,Daniele Track *Base Sal Asst Professor Asst Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Earth and Physical Sciences Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Appt Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 8/27/2018 Asst Professor Asst Professor Roberts 8/26/2019 Track *Base Sal $75,110.00 Tenure Semple,Dawn Allison English Amount Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Hrs Components Dinsman,Melissa Asst Professor Asst Professor Track 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $75,110.00 8/27/2018 Tenure Lauren Asst Professor Asst Professor Track *Base Sal $78,477.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Garley,Matthew Tenure Asst Professor Milanes,Patricia A. Track *Base Sal $78,477.00 Asst Professor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Health Professions Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Hrs Components Assc Professor Assc Professor Depalma,Helene Track *Base Sal $106,700.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Tenure Asst Professor Asst Professor Deutsch - Keahey,Di Track *Base Sal $90,149.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Tenure ane History -Philosophy -Anthropolog Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Track Asst Professor Asst Professor Benedito,Roberto 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 *Base Sal $81,855.00 M Tenure Asst Professor Githuku,Nicholas Track *Base Sal $78,477.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 Asst Professor Tenure Lecturer Lecturer Silva 8/26/2019 Lecturer 8/27/2018 *Base Sal $68,210.00 Sibilin,Casandra Track Cce Library Page 46 of 48

49 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs Asst Asst Professor Diao,Junli Track *Base Sal 8/26/2019 $71,723.00 8/27/2018 Tenure -Librarian Professor Asst Miller,Christina Track 8/26/2019 *Base Sal Asst Professor $81,855.00 8/27/2018 Tenure -Librarian Professor Librarian Powers,Meredith Track *Base Sal $61,325.00 - Instructor 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Instructor Tenure Anne Math & Computer Science Name Type Salary Comments Title Amount Functional Title Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Asst Professor Asst Professor Thompson,Virginia Track 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $81,855.00 8/27/2018 Tenure L Wang,Yu Track Asst Professor *Base Sal Asst Professor $81,855.00 8/27/2018 8/31/2018 Tenure Asst Professor Wang,Yu Tenured *Base Sal Asst Professor $81,855.00 9/1/2018 Nursing Comments Type Title Functional Title Name Salary Appt Amount Eff From Eff To Components Hrs Assc Professor Assc Professor Mcfarquhar,Claudet 8/26/2019 Track *Base Sal 8/27/2018 $97,628.00 te V Tenure Asst Professor Asst Professor 8/26/2019 Alexandre,Margaret Track *Base Sal $90,149.00 8/27/2018 Tenure t Occupational Therapy Title Name Type Salary Amount Functional Title Eff To Appt Comments Eff From Hrs Components *Base Sal Clinical Henry,Elise K Instructors Clinical Professor $87,676.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Professor And Others Psc Performing & Fine Arts Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs Assc Professor Assc Professor Hajikano,Maki Track *Base Sal $84,678.00 8/27/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Asst Professor Asst Professor Gieseler,Carly Track 8/26/2019 $75,110.00 8/27/2018 *Base Sal Tenure Michelle Asst Professor Asst Professor Lam,George Track *Base Sal $75,110.00 8/2 7/2018 8/26/2019 Tenure Tsz -Kwan Asst Professor Sandoval de Asst Professor Track 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $78,477.00 8/27/2018 Tenure Leon,Carlos Eduardo Asst Professor Asst Professor Zlabinger,Thomas Track *Base Sal $81,855.00 8/26/2019 8/27/2018 A Tenure $68,210.00 Lecturer Lecturer Adams,Mark Lecturer 8/26/2019 *Base Sal 8/27/2018 Track Cce Queens EOC Appt Comments Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs Eoc Lecturer Eoc Lecturer Amatullah,Maryam Lecturer 8/26/2019 *Base Sal $68,210.00 8/27/2018 Track Cce Laboratory / Research Biology 47 of 48 Page

50 Chancellor’s University Report Errata Report June 2018 Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Components Hrs College Lab 8/26/2019 Feliciano,Omar 8/27/2018 Track College Lab $54,003.00 *Base Sal Tech Alexis Tenure Class Tech- College Lab 8/26/2019 ILyayev,Kseniia Track 8/27/2018 *Base Sal $48,756.00 College Lab Tenure Class Tech- Tech Performing & Fine Arts Functional Title Name Type Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components College Lab 8/26/2019 Fraser,Nicholas J Track *Base Sal 8/27/2018 $52,692.00 College Lab Tech- Tenure Class Tech Promotion Faculty Chemistry Comments Eff From Title Prev Amount Functional Title Prev Salary Name Type Salary Amount Prior Func Title Components Prior Title Components Professor Professor Chang,Emmanuel Tenured *Base Sal $97,628.00 *Base Sal $97,628.00 8/27/2018 Assc Professor Assc Professor $97,628.00 Professor Professor 8/27/2018 Fearnley,Stephen Tenured *Base Sal $97,628.00 *Base Sal Assc Professor Assc Professor Reappointment Faculty: 36 Laboratory / Research: 3 Promotion Faculty: 2 Transfer from Another College Non -Competitive Buildings & Grounds -Custodial Eff From Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Components Transfer from Custodial 4/30/2018 Custodial Asst Desposito,Anthony Perm/Disc $33,084.00 *Base Sal Medgar Evers Rights Only Assistant College effective 4/30/2018. Transfer from Another College - Competitive: 1 Non Page 48 of 48

51 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 Baruch College Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Below Vice President Dean's Office - ZSB Name Title Functional Title Comments Type SW Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components *Base Sal Asst Exec Dir Com Rel Wf Shedd,Hubert Ecp (Not $180,000.00 6/11/2018 Acting) Dev - Astadm Administrator Clayton Total Action Appointment: 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Below Vice President: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 1 1 of 13 Page

52 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 Brooklyn College Executive Compensation Plan Salary Change -Not Title (ECP) ECP Vice President and Above VP for Enrollment Management Comments Eff From Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Amount Prev Salary Prev Amount Components Components 7/1/2018 Vice President Vp Enrollment Mgt O'Reilly,Lillian Ecp (Not $165,000.00 *Base Sal $190,000.00 *Base Sal Acting) Total Action Salary Change -Not Title (ECP): 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Salary Change - Not Title (ECP) ECP Vice President and Above: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 1 2 of 13 Page

53 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 Instructional Waiver of Bylaws Faculty Kinesiology Comments Bylaw Waiver Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Components Hrs Professor $108,683.00 Professor Florence,Namulund Waiver Of Bylaw Tenured *Base Sal 5/1/2018 ah 9.1(B) Is Granted For The Appointment Of Professor Florence To Serve As A Department Chair. The Waiver Is Needed Due To The Fact That Professor Florence Is A Member Of The Department Of Secondary Education And She Will Serve As Chair Of Th e Kinesiology Department. She Will Serve From 5/1/2018 To 6/30/2020. Total Action Waiver of Bylaws: 1 Total Actions Reported: Instructional Waiver of Bylaws Faculty : 1 Total Instructional: 1 3 of 13 Page

54 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 Central Office Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above Chancellor's Office Amount Type SW Salary Functional Title Name Eff From Eff To Appt Comments Title Components Hrs Univ Chancellor Rabinowitz,Vita Ecp Acting Chancellor $400,000.00 11/30/2018 6/1/2018 *Base Sal <6 Months Exec VC And Univ Provost Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components Univ Exec Vc And 11/30/2018 Bowers,Jane 6/1/2018 Ecp Acting $320,000.00 *Base Sal Exec Vice Palatini Provost <6 Months Chancellor ECP Below Vice President Accelerated Studies/Assoc Prog Comments Appt Type Title Functional Title Name SW Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs Appoint with a University Univ Assc Vc Acad 6/26/2018 Linderman,Donna Ecp (Not $224,000.00 Y *Base Sal Acting) Affairs Associate Vc Search Waiver effective June 26, 2018 Institutional Advancement Eff To Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Title Amount Eff From Appt Hrs Components University Univ Assc Vc Corp Gorelik,Elina Ecp (Not *Base Sal $168,000.00 6/5/2018 Fnd Maj Gfts Associate Vc Acting) Total Action Appointment: 4 ECP Study Leave ECP Vice President and Above Chancellor's Office Eff From Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Comments Leave % of Amount Eff To Pay Components Milliken,James B Chancellor Univ Chancellor Expected leave Ecp (Not 100 *Base Sal $670,000.00 6/1/2018 end date is Acting) 1/1/2019 Page 4 of 13

55 ’s University Report Chancellor Addendum Report June 2018 Total Action ECP Study Leave: 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above: 2 ECP Below Vice President: 2 ECP Study Leave ECP Vice President and Above: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 5 5 of 13 Page

56 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 Graduate Center Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Below Vice President Office Of Human Resources Title Functional Title Name Comments Type SW Salary Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components *Base Sal 7/16/2018 Assc Exec Dir Human Boxill,David Ecp (Not $150,000.00 Acting) Res - Ascadm Administrator Antonio Total Action Appointment: 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Below Vice President: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 1 6 of 13 Page

57 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 Hunter College Executive Compensation Plan Correction ECP Vice President and Above Provost's Office Comments Name Type Title Vice President Kaufman,Seth Ecp Acting >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben Total Action Correction: 1 Appointment ECP Vice President and Above Provost's Office Eff To Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Comments Amount Eff From Appt Hrs Components Vice President Vp Academic Aff And Kaufman,Seth Ecp (Not *Base Sal $275,000.00 6/26/2018 Acting) Provost Total Action Appointment: 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Correction ECP Vice President and Above: 1 Appointment ECP Vice President and Above: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 2 7 of 13 Page

58 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 John Jay College Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above Instiutional Advancement Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Hrs Components $220,000.00 Appointment with Vice President Vp Institl 6/26/2018 Merle,Robin Ecp (Not Y *Base Sal Advancement Search Waiver, Acting) effective 06/26/2018. Provost's Office Functional Title Name Type SW Title Comments Amount Eff From Eff To Appt Salary Hrs Components Sr Vice 7/15/2018 Sr Vp Acad Aff And $275,000.00 Li,Yi Ecp (Not *Base Sal President Provost Acting) Total Action Appointment: 2 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above: 2 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 2 8 of 13 Page

59 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 Lehman College Executive Compensation Plan Revision ECP Below Vice President Office Of The President Appt Title Functional Title Name Type Salary Leave % of Eff To Amount Comments Eff From Pay Hrs Components Asst Vice Asst Vp Strategic 100 Ecp (Not *Base Sal $182,000.00 6/18/2018 The start date Gagliardi,Jonathan Planning 5/1/18, is revised President Acting) to read, 6/18/18. Total Action Revision: 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Revision ECP Below Vice President: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 1 Page 9 of 13

60 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 NYC College of Technology Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above Enrollment Management Appt Comments Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs Vice President Vp Student Affairs Hodge,Michel Ecp (Not 6/26/2018 *Base Sal $185,000.00 Acting) Total Action Appointment: 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 1 10 of 13 Page

61 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 Queensborough CC Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above VP Student Affairs Appt Salary Title Functional Title Name Type SW Comments Eff To Amount Eff From Components Hrs 6/4/2019 Vice President Vp Student Affairs Kerr,Brian A Ecp Acting 6/5/2018 *Base Sal $170,000.00 >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben Total Action Appointment: 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Vice President and Above: 1 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 1 11 of 13 Page

62 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 CUNY GradSch ofPub H and H Pol Executive Compensation Plan Appointment ECP Below Vice President Student Affairs and Services Comments Appt Amount Title Functional Title Name Type SW Salary Eff To Eff From Hrs Components Prof School Sr Psch Sr Assc Dn Joshi,Ashish Y *Base Sal $213,656.00 6/7/2018 Sr. Assc. Dean Ecp (Not for Academic and Academic Aff Assoc Dean Acting) Student Affairs. Total Action Appointment: 1 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compensation Plan Appointment Below Vice President: 1 ECP Total Executive Compensation Plan: 1 Page 12 of 13

63 Chancellor ’s University Report Addendum Report June 2018 End of Report 13 of 13 Page

64 1 2018 Chancellor’s University Report June – ADDENDUM PART B MATTERS - PERSONNEL BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEGE – TRANSFER AND APPOINTMENT OF FACULTY FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL COUNSELING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND ACADEMIC LITERACY: RESOLVED, fective August 27, 2018 the following faculty member of the Department of General Counseling be transferred from the that ef Department of General Counseling and appointed to the Department of Education and Academic Literacy: NAME FULL TIME SENIORITY DATE PRESENT RANK FORMER DEPT. NEW DEPT. APPOINTMENT (NEW DEPT.) DATE (COLLEGE) * (Last, First) TENURED MEMBER Ingram, Ted Professor General 9/1/2007 Education and 8/27/2018 Counseling Academic Literacy EXPLANATION: Contingent upon approval by the Board of Tr ustees, the above named member of the instructional staff will be transferred from the Department of General Counseling to the Department of Education and Academic Literacy. * Pursuant to Section 6212 of the New York State Education Law, seniority of tenu red persons is governed by the date of appointment to the department. Tenured persons transferred and appointed effective the same date to the Department of Academic Literacy shall have the same date of seniority as a result of these transfers. The President, therefore, shall break these ties in seniority between and among the tenured members by using each member’s original date of appointment to his or her first full -time instructional staff title at the College. The impacted instructional staff member has been advised of his seniority date in the new department.

65 2 COLLEGE – TRANSFER AND APPOINTMENT OF FACULTY FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL BRONX COMMUNITY TO THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES COUNSELING : RESOLVED, that effective August 27, 2018 ollowing facul ty members of the Department of General Counseling be transferred from the the f : Department of General Counseling and appointed to the Department of Social Sciences Present Rank Former Dept. Name New Dept. Seniority Date Full Appointment (New Dept.) ) * Date (College (Last, First) TENURED MEMBERS Associate Reynoso, Nelson General 9/1/1998 Social Sciences 8/27/2018 Professor Counseling Assistant 9/1/2004 General Walker, Vincent Social Sciences 8/27/2018 Professor Counseling Name * Pr esent Rank Former Dept. New Dept. Seniority Date Date of CCE (New Dept.) (Last, First) CERTIFICATED LEC TURERS Lecturer General 9/1/2006 Social Sciences 8/27/2018 Nyarko, Kwame Counseling Social Sciences - Lecturer General Stoute, Sa Rawla 8/27/2018 9/1/2 011 Counseling EXPLANATION: he above named members of the instructional staff will be transferred Contingent upon approval by the Board of Trustees, t from the Department of General Counseling to the Department of Social Sciences . * Pursuant to Section 6212 of the New York State Education Law, seniority of tenured persons is governed by the date of appointment to the department. Tenured persons transferred effective the same date to the Department of Social Sciences shall have the same date of seniority as a result of these transfers. The President, therefore, shall break these ties in seniority between and among the tenured members by us ing each member’s original date of appointment to his or her first full -time instructional staff title at the College.

66 3 d lecturers transferred effective the same day to the Department of Social Sciences shall have the same date of seniority as a Certificate using result of these transfers. The President, therefore, shall break these ties in seniority between and among the tenured member s by each member’s original date of award of the Certificate of Continuous Employment at the College. Each impacted instructional staff member has been advised of his seniority date in the new department. /her BROOKLYN COLLEGE – TRANSFER AND APPOINTMENT OF FACULTY FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF PUERTO RICAN AND LATINO STUDIES TO THE DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES RESOLVED , that effective August 2 7, 2018, the following faculty member of the Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies be transferred from the Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies and appointed to the Department of Modern Languages: TENURED MEMBER NAME FULL TIME SENIORITY PRES ENT RANK FORMER DEPT. NEW DEPT. DATE (NEW (Last, First) APPOINTMENT DEPT.) DATE (COLLEGE) * Perez, Vanessa Associate 9/1/2007 Puerto Rican and Latino 8/27/2018 Modern Languages Studies Professor Contingent upon the Board of Trust ees’ approval at its June 2018 meeting, the member of the instructional staff listed above Explanation: will be transferred and appointed to the Department of Modern Languages, effective August 27, 2018 *Pursuant to Section 6212 of the New York State Education Law, seniority of tenured persons is governed by the date of appointment to the department. Tenured person transferred and appointed effective the same date to the Department of Modern Languages shall hav e the same date of seniority as a result of this transfer. The President, therefore, shall break this tie in seniority by using the member’s original date of appointment to his or her full -time instructional staff title at the College. CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK - SCHOOL OF EDUCATION – TRANSFER AND APPOINTMENT OF FACULTY FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND CULTURE; THE DEPARTMENT OF SECONDARY EDUCATION AND THE DEPARTMENT OF LEADERSHIP AND SPECIAL EDUCATION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION RESOLVED , that effective July 1, 2018, the following faculty of the Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture; the Department of Secondary Education; and the Department of Leadership and Special Education will be transferred from the Department of Teachi ng, Learning and Culture; the Department of Sec ondary Education; and the Department of Leadership and Special Education to the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, as indicated in the following table:

67 4 NAME FORMER DEPT. NEW DEPT. SENIORITY PRESENT RANK FULL TIME APPOINTMENT DATE (NEW DEPT.) DATE (COLLEGE) * (Last, First) TENURED MEMBERS Associate Professor Secondary Education Curriculum and Epstein, Shira July 1, 2018 9/1/2008 Instruction Associate Professor Lamboy, Edwin Secondary Education Curriculum and 9/1/2008 July 1, 2018 Instruction Secondary Education Curriculum and Associate Professor Ratner, Andrew July 1, 2018 2/1/2004 Instruction Curriculum and Associate Professor Secondary Education Rorschach, 1/1/1993 July 1, 2018 Instruction Elizabeth Steinberg, Richard Professor Secondar y Education Curriculum and 9/1/1999 July 1, 2018 Instruction Professor Secondary Education Curriculum and Stylianou, Despina July 1, 2018 9/1/2003 Instruction Wyner, Yael Associate Professor Secondary Education Curriculum and /2008 July 1, 2018 9/1 Instruction Gupta, Amita Professor Teaching, Learning 9/1/2003 Curriculum and July 1, 2018 and Cultur Instruction e Professor Teaching, Learning 9/1/2002 Curriculum and Blumenreich, July 1, 2018 and Culture Instruction Megan Associate Professor Teaching, Learning Crismond, David Curriculum and July 1, 2018 9/1/2007 and Culture Instruction Curriculum and Falk, Beverly Professor Teaching, Learning 9/1/1999 July 1, 2018 Instruction and Culture

68 5 Associate Professor Teaching, Learning Franklin, Catherine Curriculum and 8/22/2002 July 1, 2018 Instruction and Culture Associate Professor Teaching, Learning Curriculum and Gellert, Laura 9/1/2008 July 1, 2018 Instruction and Culture Associate Professor Johnson, Gretchen Teaching, Learning Curriculum and 9/1/2000 July 1, 2018 Instruction and Culture Valle, Jan Teaching, Learning 9/1/2003 Curriculum and July 1, 2018 Associate Professor and Culture Instruction 001 Teaching, Learning Associate Professor Curriculum and Wilgus, Anne 9/1/2 July 1, 2018 and Culture Instruction Secondary Education Chief College Lab 9/1/2006 Grasserbauer, Curriculum and July 1, 2018 Instruction Technician Doris NAME PRESENT RANK FORMER DEPT. NEW DEPT. SENIORITY DATE FULL TIME APPOINTMENT (NEW DEPT.) DATE (COLLEGE) * (Last, First) UNTENURED MEMBERS Teaching, Learning and Cardwell, Nancy Curriculum and July 1, 2018 1/27/2014 Assistant Professor Culture Instruction Present Rank Former Dept. Name New Dept. Seniority Date Date of CCE* (New Dept.) Certificated Lecturers Katona, Je nnifer Lecturer - Doctoral 9/1/2012 July 1, 2018 Curriculum and Teaching, Learning and Culture Instruction CCE - Schedule Kavanakudiyil, 9/1/2015 Lecturer CCE Teaching, Learning July 1, 2018 Curriculum and Instruction and Culture Sobha

69 6 Present Rank F ormer Dept. New Dept. Seniority Date Name Full time Appointment Date (New Dept.) (College)* Non Certificated Members Brozen, Randy Teaching, Learning 8/25/2017 Curriculum and Lecturer July 1, 2018 Instruction and Culture EXPLANATION: Contingent upon approval of the abolishment of the Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture; Department of Secondary Education; and Department of Leadership and Special Education by the Board of Trustees, the above named instructional staff will be transferred from the Dep artment of Teaching, Learning and Culture; Department of Secondary Education; and Department of Leadership and Special Education to the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. * Pursuant to Section 6212 of the New York State Education Law, seniority of tenured persons is governed by the date of appointment to the department. Tenured persons transferred and appointed effective the same date to the Department of Curriculum and Instruction shall have the same date of seniority as a result of these transfer s. The President, therefore, shall break these ties in seniority between and among the -time instructional staff title at the College. tenured members by using each member’s original date of appointment to his or her first full At such time as the untenur ed faculty member (s) may become tenured, his/her/their seniority would be governed by the date of appointment to the new department and the President will apply the same tie- breaking principle. Certificated lecturers transferred effective the same day to the Department of Curriculum and Instruction have the same date of seniority in the department as a result of these transfers. The President, therefore, shall break these ties in seniority between and amo ng the tenured members by using each member’s orig inal date of award of the Certificate of Continuous Employment at the College. At such time as the non- certificated faculty member (s) may achieve CCE, his/her/their seniority would be governed by the date of appointment to the new department and the Pres ident will apply the same tie- breaking principle. Each impacted instructional staff member has been advised of his/her seniority date in the new department.

70 7 SCHOOL OF EDUCATION – TRANSFER AND APPOINTMENT OF FACULTY FROM THE CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK - ARTMENT OF LEADERSHIP AND SPECIAL EDUCATION AND THE DEPARTMENT OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND CULTURE DEP : TO THE DEPARTMENT OF LEADERSHIP AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT RESOLVED , that effective July 1, 2018 the following faculty of the Department of Leadership and Special Education and the Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture will be transferred to the Department of Leadership and Human Development, as indicated in the following table: NAME PRESENT RANK FORMER DEPT. NEW DEPT. SENIORITY FULL TIME DATE (NEW APPOINTMENT DATE DEPT.) (Last, First) (COLLEGE) * TENURED MEMBERS Associate Professor Leadership and Leadership and Carter, Hazel July 1, 2018 9/1/2007 Special Education Human Development Leadership and Leadership and Crevecoeur, Yvel, Associate Professor July 1, 2018 9/1/2008 Special Education Human Development Driscoll, Mary Erina Professor Leadership and Leadership and 8/1/2012 July 1, 2018 Human Development Special Education Leader Leadership and Huang, Carol ship and Assistant Professor 5/1/2004 July 1, 2018 Special Education Human Development Rader, Laura Assistant Professor Leadership and Leadership and 9/1/2006 July 1, 2018 Special Education Human Development Semel, Susan Professor Leadership and Leadership and 9/1/2001 July 1, 2018 Human Devel Special Education opment Stern, Nancy Associate Professor Teaching Learning 9/1/2003 Leadership and July 1, 2018 Human Development and Culture

71 8 Yawn, Christopher Leadership and Leadership and July 1, 2018 9/1/2008 Associate Professor D. Human Development Special Education Associate Professor Teaching, Learning Davis, Joseph Leadership and 2/1/1998 July 1, 2018 Human Development and Culture Associate Professor Teaching, Learning 5/1/2007 Kleyn, Tatyana Leadership and 8 July 1, 201 and Culture Human Development July 1, 2018 Teaching, Learning Norton, Nadjwa Leadership and 9/1/2004 Associate Professor Human Development and Culture TIME FULL NAME FORMER DEPT. NEW DEPT. SENIORITY PRESENT RANK DATE (NEW APPOINTMENT DEPT.) DATE (Last, First) (C OLLEGE)* UNTENURED MEMBERS Lopez, Dina Assistant Professor Teaching, Learning 8/27/2012 Leadership and July 1, 2018 Human Development and Culture July 1 Leadership and Watson, Terri Leadership and 8/27/2012 , 2018 Assistant Professor Human Development Special Education Name Present Rank Former Dept. New Dept. Date of CCE* Seniority Date (New Dept.) Certificated Lecturers Castiglioni, Maria Lecturer - Doctoral 2/1/2012 Leadership and Leadership and July 1, 2018 Special Education Schedule (CCE) Human Development Fraga, Jesus Lecturer CCE Teaching, Learning 9/1/2013 Leadership and July 1, 2018 and Culture Human Development Stober, Marvin Lecturer (CCE) Leadership and Leadership and 9/1/2012 July 1, 2018 Human Development Special Education

72 9 Presen t Rank Former Dept. New Dept. Name Full time Seniority Date (New Dept.) Appointment Date (College)* Non Certificated Members Lubetsky, Robert Clinical Professor Leadership and Leadership and 8/25/2017 July 1, 2018 Human Development Special Education EXPLANATION: Contingent upon approval of the abolishment of the Department of Leadership and Special Education and the Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture by the Board of Trustees, the above named instructional staff will be transferred from the Departm ent of Leadership and Special Education and the Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture to the Department of Leadership and Human Development. * Pursuant to Section 6212 of the New York State Education Law, seniority of tenured persons is governed by the date of appointment to the department. Tenured persons transferred and appointed effective the same date to the Department of Leadership and Human Development ore, shall break these ties in seniority between and shall have the same date of seniority as a result of these transfers. The President, theref among the tenured members by using each member’s original date of appointment to his or her first full -time instructional staff title at the College. At such time as the untenured faculty member (s) may become tenured, his/her/their seniority would be governed by the date of appointment to the new department and the President will apply the same tie- breaking principle. Certificated lecturers transferred effective the same day to the Department of Leadership and Human Development have the same date of seniority in the department as a result of these transfers. The President, therefore, shall break these ties in seniority between and among the tenured members by using each member’s original date of award of the Certificate of Continuous Employment at the College. At such time as the non- certificated faculty member (s) may achieve CCE, his/her/their seniority would be governed by the date of appointment to the new department and the President will apply the s ame tie -breaking principle. Each impacted instructional staff member has been advised of his/her seniority date in the new department.

73 Chancellor’s University Report Report Summary June 2018 University Summary Community Colleges All Schools Senior Colleges Classified 36 71 107 Appointment 3 3 0 Appointment-Title Chge/Reclass 59 24 35 Reappointment 1 0 1 Transfer from Another College 4 2 2 Transfer to Another College 0 1 1 Transfer Another College-CLSD 1 1 0 Promotion 10 11 1 Authorized Leave 1 0 1 Probation Period Transfer 1 0 1 Reinstatement 1 0 1 Reappointment w/ Disciplinary 0 5 5 Salary Increase (CLSD) 10 9 1 Revision Instructional 61 293 232 Appointment 1 1 0 Appointment w/ Equivalencies 2 0 2 Salary Above Base & New Steps 10 3 7 Appointment-Title Chge/Reclass 20 20 0 Appointment-Title Chge/Reclass 3 3 0 Change in Salary Above Base 12 12 0 Early Payment of New Steps 612 1842 2454 Reappointment 0 1 1 Transfer from Another College 2 2 0 Transfer to Another College 0 2 2 Designation-Department Chair 44 10 34 Election-Department Chair 40 21 61 Promotion 49 26 23 Promotion 0 8 8 Promotion w/Equivalencies 16 5 11 Salary Incr-Not New Step (INST 0 1 1 Phased Retirement 14 9 5 Fellowship Leave - Half Year 83 3 80 Fellowship Leave - Full Year 3 0 3 Scholar Incentive Award 7 10 3 Library Reassignment Leave 5 5 0 LOA w/Incr Cr, w/o Pay 1 12 11 Authorized Leave 1 0 1 Termination after Charges 16 72 88 Revision Executive Compensation Plan 26 2 24 Appointment 3 3 0 Title Change - ECP 5 5 0 Salary Change-Not Title (ECP) 1 0 1 Revision 3435 849 2586 Totals for all Actions are

74 Chancellor’s University Report Summary Report June 2018 John Jay School of Senior College York College Medgar School of City College Graduate Queens CUNY School Lehman CUNY NYC College Baruch Hunter College of Brooklyn Law School Central Office Staten Island Evers Center of Medicine GradSch College College College Professional College College College of Journalism ofPub H and Technology College Studies H Pol Summary Executive 7 2 0 1 1 1 3 2 1 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Appointment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Title Change - ECP 1 Salary Change-Not Title 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 (ECP) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 Revision Instructional 7 8 14 7 2 7 9 9 7 31 47 19 13 12 16 2 3 19 Appointment Salary Above Base & 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 New Steps 1 0 Appointment-Title 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 Chge/Reclass 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 15 Appointment-Title 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 Chge/Reclass 0 0 0 0 1 Change in Salary Above 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Base 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 Early Payment of New 0 1 0 3 3 1 0 0 0 Steps 86 8 4 234 183 9 32 6 756 23 4 92 142 3 59 68 128 5 Reappointment 1 0 0 Transfer from Another 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 College 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Transfer to Another 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 College Designation-Department 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Chair 0 0 5 0 0 0 2 0 0 Election-Department 0 5 0 0 0 10 0 0 12 Chair 0 0 0 1 22 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 0 6 0 Promotion 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 10 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 Promotion 0 1 0 Salary Incr-Not New Step 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 (INST 0 0 0 0 0 0 Fellowship Leave - Half 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 Year 0 0 2 27 20 0 Fellowship Leave - Full 0 1 11 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 17 Year 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Scholar Incentive Award 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 Library Reassignment 0 Leave 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 LOA w/Incr Cr, w/o Pay 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 4 Authorized Leave 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Termination after 0 0 Charges 0 2 0 0 14 0 5 3 0 8 0 0 2 23 2 3 3 7 Revision Classified 0 11 2 7 2 2 3 7 2 1 9 0 0 6 8 0 11 0 Appointment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Appointment-Title Chge/Reclass 5 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 16 1 1 5 0 3 Reappointment 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Transfer from Another College 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Transfer to Another 0 0 College 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 4 Authorized Leave 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Reinstatement 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Reappointment w/ Disciplinary 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Salary Increase (CLSD) 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 Revision 128 11 42 23 Totals Are Campus 145 111 187 30 259 317 46 25 129 12 23 211 77 810

75 Chancellor’s University Report Report Summary June 2018 LaGuardia CC Guttman Queensborou Community College Bronx CC Borough of Kingsborough Central Office Hostos CC CC Summary Comm Community Manhattan gh CC College CC Colleges Executive 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 Appointment Instructional 20 8 4 1 4 8 8 8 Appointment 1 0 0 Appointment w/ 0 0 0 0 0 Equivalencies 2 0 0 0 Appointment-Title 1 0 0 0 Chge/Reclass 1 0 137 0 147 83 15 229 Reappointment Election-Department 0 2 0 4 4 0 0 0 Chair 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 0 Promotion 14 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 Promotion 0 Promotion 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 w/Equivalencies 0 3 Salary Incr-Not New 0 1 0 1 0 0 Step (INST 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Phased Retirement 0 Fellowship Leave - Half 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 Year Fellowship Leave - Full 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Year 0 2 0 0 Library Reassignment 5 0 0 0 Leave 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Authorized Leave 2 0 4 1 0 2 7 0 Revision Classified 0 12 14 0 3 2 0 5 Appointment 6 0 0 0 4 0 7 7 Reappointment 1 Transfer to Another 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 College 0 0 0 0 Transfer Another College- 0 0 1 0 CLSD 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Promotion 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Authorized Leave 0 Probation Period 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Transfer 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Revision 25 155 197 138 75 252 5 2 Campus Totals Are

76 June 2018 Baruch College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters Part A: Academic Matters Section AI: Special Actions AI. 1 Change in Doctor of Professional Studies (DPS) program in Business, Baruch College, Zicklin School of Business (HEGIS Code: 0501.00; Program Code 38259: NY State Approval Program Approval Letter dated July 25, 2016): Change in admission and transfer credit requirements The following revises the program proposal submitted to the State of New York: RESOLVED, that candidates must have a graduate degree from an accredited college or university. We require prior graduate-level courses in each of these six disciplines: accountancy, economics, finance, marketing, management, statistics/information systems. There are 18 credits of prerequisites from a prior graduate degree (or courses even if a degree wasn’t awarded) applied toward the executive business doctorate degree, provided that: • he or she completed the courses with grades of B or higher within an appropriate period preceding the time of application, • the courses were taken at a regionally- or AACSB-accredited school, and • they are equivalent to comparable ones at the Zicklin School of Business. credits from prior graduate studies were completed in a recognized college or university and reflect academic coverage in the candidates designated area of research interest. The courses are subject to evaluation by the program’s executive director and admissions committee. Evaluation of prerequisites is subject to the approval of the EBD program Academic Director. Any student with a deficiency in any of these areas prerequisites will be able to make up the deficiency with approved courses completed in the core MBA program at Baruch, or other AACSB-accredited institution or another recognized, accredited institution. Thus, a candidate who does not have an MBA or related MS degree, may be conditionally can be admitted to the program, and will be advised by the admissions committee of specific courses needed to graduate. and will be formally admitted only once he or she has completed these courses. This applies to a candidate who has significant business experience but no prior graduate business courses.

77 The executive doctorate in business program requires 60 graduate-level credits, the passing of Examinations 1 and 2, and a publicly-defended dissertation. The typical student will be allowed to transfer 18 credits from an accredited Master’s program or by taking graduate-level courses at a recognized accredited university. An assessment of all transfer credits will be conducted and approved by the executive director and the admissions committee. EXPLANATION: Schools such as Oxford and Cambridge, to this day, are not listed as AACSB accredited. AACSB accreditation is relatively new on the world stage. Even if a school is accredited today, our executive applicants graduated 10-15 years ago, and technically they did not take courses from an AACSB school. There will be a thorough, overall vetting of student credentials to provide the necessary information for admissions decisions. We currently require prior graduate-level courses in each of the following disciplines: accountancy, economics, finance, marketing, management, statistics, and information systems. This poses several problems: A CPA partner in a big 4 accounting firm likely graduated with only a BA degree 15 plus years ago when State licensing agencies only asked for 120 credits to sit the CPA exam. So we would require a partner to take a Masters level accounting class under this rule. The requirement for coverage in each of these disciplines is beyond what we ask for in a PhD program. This is also not comparable to any other program that we could find executives have broad bases of experience and would have been exposed to many areas covered in the specified disciplines. Effective for students admitted Fall 2017 or later. Approved by the DPS in Business Executive Committee, April 12, 2018. A1. 2 Center for Trading and Financial Markets Research Resolved: The Board of Trustees of the University of the City of New York approves the creation of a Center for Trading and Financial Markets Research, to be housed within the Zicklin School of Business at Baruch College, effective September 1, 2018. The Center will be financed by a $5 million gift already received. Explanation: Through research, conferences, curriculum development, and outreach to other universities nationally and internationally, the Center will serve as a focus for promoting the understanding of the importance/complexities/challenges of trading in financial markets and for its role as a critical component of finance education. Section AIII: Changes in Degree Programs

78 AIII. 1 The following revisions are proposed for the Executive MBA in Healthcare Administration in the Zicklin School of Business Program: Executive MBA in Healthcare Administration 120200 HEGIS Code: Program Code: 01952 Effective: January 2019 To: Executive MBA in Healthcare Administration From: Executive MBA in Healthcare Administration Course Course Description Crs Description Crs Courses in Specialization (49.5 credits) Courses in Specialization (49.5 credits) credits) Required Courses (24 credits) Required Courses (49.5 Managerial Statistics 3 STA 9708 Managerial Statistics 3 STA 9708 Societal and Governmental BUS 9100 3 BUS 9100 Societal and Governmental 3 Environment of Business Environment of Business Legal Aspects of Health Care 3 LAW 9213 Legal Aspects of Health Care 3 LAW 9213 Admin Admin Strategy and Competitive 3 3 MGT 9600 Strategy and Competitive MGT 9600 Advantage Advantage Managing People and MGT 9301 MGT 9301 Managing People and 3 3 Organizations Organizations ECO 9766 Healthcare Economics 3 ECO 9766 Healthcare Economics 3 IBS 9763 Global Perspectives in 1.5 IBS 9763 Global Perspectives in 1.5 Healthcare Management Healthcare Management 3 MGT 9994 Special Topics in 3 Special Topics in MGT 9994 Entrepreneurship: Healthcare Entrepreneurship: Healthcare Ventures Ventures 1.5 1.5 IBS 9791 Special Topics in International IBS 9791 Special Topics in International Business: International Study Business: International Study Tour Tour ACC 9110 Financial Accounting 3 Functional Skills Courses (9 credits) FIN 9770 Corporate Finance 3 Choose 9 credits from the list below: MKT 9703 Marketing Management ACC 9110 Financial Accounting 3 3 MGT 9700 3 FIN 9770 Corporate Finance 3 Managing Business Operations MGT 9722 Healthcare Informatics and 3 3 MKT 9703 Marketing Management Quality 3 Managerial Accounting and ACC 9313 3 MGT 9700 Managing Business Operations Applications to Healthcare BUS 9793 Special Topics in Sustainable 3 CIS 9000 Information Technology 3 Business: Emerging Issues In Strategy

79 the Healthcare Industry MGT 9330 Leadership and Managerial 3 MGT 9722 Healthcare Informatics and 3 Quality Effectiveness Special Topics in Economics: 1.5 Elective Courses (16.5 credits) ECO 9792 Population Health Assessment Rationale: The current program designates all of its courses included in the 49.5 credits as “required.” This proposed change designates 33 of the 49.5 credits as “Required,” and allows 16.5 credits to be offered as “Electives.” The new “Required” course list conforms to the general MBA requirements and remains unchanged. Designating the other courses as “Electives” allows the Program’s curriculum committee to incorporate topics that address most recent developments in the healthcare industry, the most turbulent of all sectors in the US economy. In addition, it provides staffing flexibility and the opportunity to navigate through difficulties that arise from the limited availability of high-caliber instructors. The electives are to be designated by the academic administration in order to 1) preserve the cohort format of the program; and 2) provide timely and relevant course offerings that address recent developments in the healthcare industry. Approved by the Executive MBA in Healthcare Administration Curriculum Committee on Dec. 11, 2017. Section AIV: New Courses The following recommendations of the Executive Committee of the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program were approved at the Zicklin School of Business faculty Meeting on October 12, 2017, effective the Fall 2017 semester. The courses are being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record, and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes, at this time. The courses are in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. AIV. 1.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Zicklin School of Business Department(s) [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Research Methods Course Prefix DBA Course Number 90101 Course Title Research Design and Methodology Catalogue In this seminar, students learn how to design and execute research that Description produces quantitative data for analysis. The seminar introduces the students to methodologies such as experiments, field studies, and surveys, along with their possibilities and limitations. The selection of methods is presented in the larger context of the overall research process, which includes conception, design, and execution. In this context, students learn how to progress from theoretical research questions to scientifically rigorous research designs, and how to

80 interpret the results of their studies. Students will be exposed to foundational readings in Research Methods, as well as recent research studies using quantitative methods. With the knowledge gained from these sources and their application in a semester-long project, students will develop a strong understanding of how to design sound empirical studies and how to produce academically rigorous and practically relevant research. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 [ ] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) ____ Major Course Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 In order for the students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program to Rationale: conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.2 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Research Methods Course Prefix DBA Course Number 90102 Course Title Econometric Methods for Business Research I Catalogue The objective of the course is to provide an introduction to models and

81 Description techniques that are useful to conduct business research. The goal is to enable students to competently apply the methods and to assess the empirical validity of the assumptions to conduct inference. The course will discuss concepts from probability and statistics, estimation and inference in the multiple linear regression model, functional forms, as well as qualitative choice models and time series models. Several applications will be discussed in class to demonstrate the relevance of these techniques to marketing, management, accounting, and finance. Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3 3 Contact Hours [ ] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) ____ Major Course Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Fall 2017 Effective Term In order for the students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program to Rationale: conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced econometric methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October, 12, 2017 and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.3 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Leadership Theory Course Prefix DBA

82 Course Number 90103 Foundations of Leadership Theory and Competency Course Title The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills Catalogue Description to understand the multidisciplinary academic field of leadership. Through a systematic study, students will examine the major theories and empirical research used to lead and manage people, teams, and organizations. It aims to help students develop critical leadership skills through understanding, critical appreciation, and application of the theories, tools, and techniques of historical and contemporary management thought. It is known that individual, team, organizational, community and societal success is largely determined by the ability of individuals to lead and follow in complex situations with integrity, authenticity, ethics, and a pragmatic sense of community, societal and global understanding. Given the search for this understanding is both elusive and complex, the instructor will primarily focus on a rich and multi-faceted understanding of leadership, emergent leadership theory and practice, and the formulation of one’s own personal stance on the theory and practice of leadership. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 Rationale: Doctoral students are provided with current theories of leadership. This provides a link between theory and practice needed for doctoral studies in the program. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October, 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.4

83 CUNYfirst Course ID Zicklin School of Business Department(s) Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Qualitative research DBA Course Prefix Course Number 90111 Qualitative Methods in Business Research Course Title Catalogue This course is designed as an introductory seminar on qualitative research as it is used in the field of business. The course balances the acquisition of basic Description knowledge about the conduct of qualitative research with the application of that knowledge to business research. The balance is reflected in the reading material, which consists of basic texts and exemplary studies from leading business research journals. The course introduces the student to various qualitative research approaches, with a focus on case study research, action research, ethnographic research, and grounded theory. The course covers several data collection techniques that are widely used in qualitative research, such as interviews, participant observation, focus groups, fieldwork, and using internet communications and social media. Students are introduced to data coding, memo writing, theoretical sampling, data presentation, and the use of qualitative data analysis software. Perspectives on what it means to draw conclusions and build theory from qualitative data are explored. Students will be given the opportunity to apply what they have learned in project work. The course concludes with some guidance on how to write and publish qualitative research. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program 3 Credits 3 Contact Hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society

84 ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they Rationale: need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October, 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.5 CUNYfirst Course ID Zicklin School of Business Department(s) [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Career [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Research Design and Methodology Course Prefix DBA Course Number 90112 Course Title Econometric Methods for Business Research II Catalogue This is a course on multivariate statistical methods for econometricians and Description empirical researchers in other business disciplines. We begin with descriptive statistics (graphical and numerical summaries) for multivariate data, and review the basics of matrix algebra. We then develop some probability theory for random vectors and matrices (specifically the multivariate normal and related distributions), which gives us a foundation for inference about one, two, or many mean vectors (MANOVA). We then move on to exploratory and inferential multivariate methods including: discrimination and classification, canonical correlation, principal component analysis, factor analysis, clustering and multidimensional scaling. The emphasis throughout will be on the application of statistical methods to real data from marketing, management, accounting and finance. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures

85 ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Fall 2017 Effective Term Rationale: In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October, 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.6 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Economics and Competition Course Prefix DBA Course Number 90113 Course Title Competition Analysis and Regulation Catalogue The objective of this course is to twofold. First, the course aims at Description understanding how market structure shapes a firm’s competitive behavior and its impact on prices and consumer welfare. A second objective is to identify the relevant policy tools for each type of market structure. The center of attention will be firms’ strategic behavior, and the emphasis will be on how the competition, economic environment, and structure of demand shape firms’ decisions. Ultimately, the goal is to address the question of firm and market regulation, showing that different situations call for different policies. The course will consist of a mix of theoretical and practical applications using case studies. Students will learn how to use basic game theory to analyze competition and see the similarities or disparities between different types of markets. The course will also offer the opportunity to put microeconomics “in practice” by studying how consumer behavior and firms’ decisions can shape economic outcomes. Emphasis will be placed on how economic theory can help to analyze and lead to a deeper understanding of market competition. The course will also devote a great amount of time to study and discussion of various regulatory policies by considering both theoretical approaches to market regulation and case studies. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3

86 Contact Hours 3 [ ] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Fall 2017 Effective Term Rationale: In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October, 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV 1.7 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Business Subject Area Course Prefix DBA Course Number 90120 Course Title Position Paper Research Catalogue Preparation for the initial research paper. Description Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program. Course is graded Pass/Fail. Credits 1 Contact Hours 1 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No

87 Course Attribute The summer position paper is an independent research paper demonstrating (e.g. Writing the ability to apply the concepts learned in the program to a research area of their interest. Pass/Fail grading Intensive, Honors, etc.) ____ Major Course Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Fall 2017 Effective Term In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they Rationale: need to have advanced research methods training. Students will take this course in Year 1, Summer Session. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October, 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. Note: Pass/fail grading was approved by the Zicklin faculty, but inadvertently omitted from the NYSED proposal. AIV. 1.8 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Marketing Subject Area Course Prefix DBA Course Number 90201 Course Title Understanding the Consumer Journey Catalogue Advertising Age recently declared: “The Customer Journey Officer is the new CMO.” Defined as the complete sum of experiences that customers go through Description when interacting with a company and brand, a clear and actionable understanding of the customer journey is increasingly essential to success in today’s marketplace. This course focuses on a conceptual understanding of the customer journey, not from the perspective of the brand or company, as is typically the case in the business world, but from the perspective of the consumer her or himself. The core premise of the course is that the customer journey can be most meaningfully understood as a problem-solving process,

88 and it works through each step of this process, with the goal of engendering novel and useful ways of thinking about, and ultimately harnessing this journey for business success. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 Rationale: In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October, 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.9 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Finance Course Prefix DBA Course Number 90202 Course Title International Corporate Finance and Governance Catalogue The primary objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge Description and skills necessary to understand and analyze the relationships among corporate financial policy, corporate governance, and international financial

89 markets to create shareholder value. In this context, the course will focus on raising capital overseas via cross-listings, investing capital through cross- border mergers and acquisitions, raising/investing international venture capital and conducting IPOs, payout/repurchase decisions around the world, and understanding how corporate governance mechanisms at the firm- and country-levels might potentially curb management misappropriation and/or dominant investors’ ability to expropriate minority investors (through excessive perquisites and compensation, overinvestment, cronyism, self-dealing, diversion of corporate resources for personal consumption, and outright theft). In short, the course will examine investment, financing, and payout decisions in the international context. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Fall 2017 Effective Term Rationale: In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.10 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

90 Subject Area Management DBA Course Prefix Course Number 90203 Ideation, Technology, and Entrepreneurship Course Title Catalogue This course introduces and explores the fundamental building-blocks and Description concepts of entrepreneurship. Innovation, conceptual thinking as developed through an “ideation” process, is validated by such technology supported resources as: analytics, crowd sourcing, crowd funding social analytics. Students will review and apply current research and the latest studies in this emerging field. Students will develop a strategic foundation that will facilitate their deployment in related areas of research and development. Instructors will present a mix of cutting-edge empirical findings and knowledge and student will apply this knowledge in active, practical research application based exercises. The course requires both online and class participation in a wide range of related topics and their application. While the course is designed for students with technical or non-technical backgrounds it requires preparation and continuous active participation. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 [ ] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 Rationale: In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst

91 administrative purposes. AIV. 1.11 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Management Course Prefix DBA 90204 Course Number Management of Innovation Course Title Catalogue Innovation, the successful introduction of a new device, method, or material, is Description acknowledged to be the most important driver of competitive success in many industries and has crucial impact for societal and economic development. Interest in management of innovation has traditionally centered on firm-internal aspects, such as the organization of internal innovation processes, activities and collaborators, and how to deal with the dynamics stemming from industrial or technological changes. In recent years, however, there has been a surge in interest among scholars and practitioners in methods, tools, and approaches that allow firms to tap firm-external sources and (social) networks to fill their innovation pipelines. The emergence of this phenomenon has given rise to novel and promising research agendas for the years to come and has been associated with labels such as open and user innovation, crowd sourcing, and open source. In acknowledgement of this development, the aim of this class is to provide students with an advanced understanding of the management of innovation and covers a broad range of literature from foundational theories to most recent research in the field. Given the interdisciplinary nature of the field, the course will reflect the theoretical underpinnings of management of innovation in related research streams such as organization theory, management science, organizational economics, psychology, and sociology to tackle the different levels of analysis of innovation: on the individual, group, organizational, and industry levels. The course will thereby address particularly the challenges, research questions and (practical) implications related to product and service innovation with substantial elements of technological change. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major

92 Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 Rationale: In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.12 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Management DBA Course Prefix 90205 Course Number Human Capital and the Triple Bottom Line Course Title The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills Catalogue Description necessary to understand and analyze the relationship between organizational productivity and human capital variables. In this context, human capital is conceptualized as the knowledge, skills, ability, and personal characteristics that drive employee behavior. Organizational productivity is conceptualized broadly as the “triple bottom line” – the interconnectedness of economic, social, and environmental performance. The instructor will present a mix of cutting-edge empirical findings and knowledge gleaned from practical applications of organizational behavior and talent management research. Students will gain a strong understanding of how organizational-level variables relate to (and motivate) employees’ responsible behaviors; how to select, train, and lead for individual productivity and responsibility; and how to use people-based analytics to improve organizational productivity. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program

93 Credits 3 3 Contact Hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they Rationale: need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.13 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Information Systems Course Prefix DBA Course Number 90206 Course Title Understanding the Employee and the Customer as Users of Technology Catalogue In this seminar, students will review key studies on the impact of technology on Description individual users as a way to better understand employee and consumer behavior. The course highlights a number of theories and empirical research methods for identifying and understanding key issues for users of technology that are important to most businesses. The instructor will present a mix of cutting-edge empirical findings and knowledge gleaned from established and emerging theories in information

94 systems, psychology, and marketing research. Students will gain a strong understanding of how the interaction of users with technology impacts the way they work, both individually and in groups, and how they manage processes and other employees in an organization. Students will also learn about the different ways in which technology continuously defines and changes consumer behavior. Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 [ ] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) ____ Major Course Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they Rationale: need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.14 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Information Systems Course Prefix DBA Course Number 90207 Course Title Information-based Strategies

95 Catalogue The field of strategy is constantly evolving as the competitive environment facing firms changes. One of the most significant changes has been the Description dramatically falling costs and increasing speeds and volumes of transmitting and processing of information. This ongoing phenomenon is changing the structure of entire industries and is altering the profitable opportunities available to many firms. The ability to target profitable market segments and to identify individual customers is reducing the value of scale-based operations and the strategic advantage of large firms with existing market share. The ability to monitor the performance of business units abroad, without regard to distance or time zones, is increasing the value of cooperative partnerships. This is leading to greater reliance upon outsourcing, benefiting manufacturing as well as many service industries. At the same time, the impact of information technology on the transparency and efficiency of securities markets is destroying the profits of entire segments of financial services. All aspects of the firm - production, service, sales, marketing, and strategy - are affected. The increase in information available to firms, and the increasing variety of strategies available for the use of information - from dynamic repricing to online distribution, from labor productivity enhancements to labor arbitrage, and automation and outsourcing - requires a revision of strategic decision-making models in an increasingly digital age. Clearly, some firms will win and others will lose; nearly all will have to change. And yet, fundamental laws of economics have not been repealed. How can previous economic theory, and previous experience with rapid technological change, provide insights for the development of sound, information-based strategies? To answer this question, the course integrates recent experience in the impact of information technology upon diverse industries with relevant theory. Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017

96 Rationale: In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.15 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Information Systems Subject Area DBA Course Prefix 90208 Course Number Technology-driven Organizational Change Course Title The main aim of this research seminar is to gain a broad understanding of how Catalogue Description Information Technology is transforming contemporary organizations. We will utilize readings from a variety of sources – recent research articles, selections from relevant books and cases – to explore both the strategic and business value implications of IT. Specifically, on the strategic side of the ledger, we will investigate how firms are leveraging business and IT strategies to enhance value for customers as well as the evolution of business and technical platforms that enable these transformations. The business implications theme will focus on IT investment value pathways, IT Governance, IT Risk Management among other areas. A secondary but a critical objective of the course will be to introduce students to additional research methods that will complement the concepts they have learned in the first year of the program. The course will provide a brief overview of Social Network Analysis, Machine Learning, and Fuzzy Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA) among others. Please note that these methods are introduced as a way of studying the primary topics in the course. For example, fsQCA will be introduced when studying how “IT can help organizations build a strategic advantage in turbulent environments” (El Sawy et al., 2010). Machine Learning concepts will be introduced when studying the impact of Big Data. Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.)

97 Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 Rationale: In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 1.16 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Zicklin School of Business Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Marketing Course Prefix DBA 90209 Course Number Marketing Communications Strategy Course Title The design of effective marketing communications strategies must be based on Catalogue Description a careful consideration of (a) how target customers process information and (b) the firm’s objectives and performance expectations. Current research in both of those factors will be studied and analyzed for insights into best practices Pre/ Co Requisites Open to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Business program Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability

98 ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ___ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2017 Rationale: In order for the students in the Doctoral program to conduct graduate level research, they need to have advanced research methods training. This course was approved by the Zicklin School of Business faculty on October 12, 2017, and appears in the proposal for a new degree program approved by the New York State Education Department on July 25, 2016: HEGIS Code 0501.00; Program Code 38259. The course is being submitted to the Chancellor’s Report for the record and for CUNYfirst administrative purposes. AIV. 2 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Paul H. Chook Department of Information Systems & Statistics Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Information Systems Course Prefix CIS Course Number 9558 Information Technology Audit Course Title This course covers, at both the conceptual and practitioner levels, the audit and Catalogue Description control of computer information systems. Topics covered include audit considerations of project development, database administration, cybersecurity, controls of data, assessment of data integrity, efficiency, and effectiveness, and industry standards for IT audit. Pre or Corequisite None Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course ____ Major Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - Flexible ____ Gen Ed - College Option

99 ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail __________________________________ ____ Science ____ ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 With information technologies now fully woven into business models and processes, various Rationale: industry players are paying much more attention to the management of their IT resources. This course will augment our graduate offerings in the areas of data assurance and cybersecurity, and is an elective in the MS/IS program. The content is targeted to IS, Accountancy, and Operations Management students, but its content is relevant to all business disciplines. This course has been offered for several semesters as a special topics course, with enrollments running around 20-25 students per semester. Approved by the Paul H. Chook Department of Information Systems & Statistics, September 12 2017. The Change to Program form, indicating the addition of this course as an elective in the MS/IS program, appears in the January 2018 Chancellor’s Report, where this New Course form should also have been included. Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses AV. 1 CUNYFirst Course ID TO FROM Narendra Paul Loomba Departments Departments Narendra Paul Loomba Department of Management Department of Management BUS 9601: Business Course BUS 9601: Business Consulting Course Consulting Prerequisite 26 credits Prerequisite All foundational and fundamental skills courses (18 credits) and nine credits of functional skills courses (9 credits) . ECO 9730 (Firms in the Global Economy) AND IBS 9600 (Introduction to

100 International Business) AND LAW 9201 (Overview of Business Law and Ethics) AND MGT 9200 (Business and Society Relationships) AND MGT 9301 (Managing People and Organizations) AND MGT 9600 (Strategy and Competitive Advantage) AND STA 9708 (Managerial Statistics) AND [BUS 9558 (Business Communication) OR [BUS 9551 (Business Communication I) AND (BUS 9552 (Business Communication II) OR BUS 9553 (Business Communication II))]] Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Intensive, Honors, etc.) etc.) ____ Major Course ____ Major Course Applicability Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ____Gen Ed Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ____Gen Ed Flexible ___ Gen Ed Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its ____ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and ____ Individual and

101 Society Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World ____Gen Ed – College Option College Option Detail Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: This course is designed to be a culminating experience, which builds off of the foundational/fundamental skills courses and the student’s chosen functional skills and electives. The previous requirement was to have completed 26 (of 57) credits, but did not specify which courses were required. The review of the initial launch of this course as a culminating experience identified a need for students to share a common course background. Therefore, we propose that all foundational/fundamental skills courses and 9 credits of functional skills courses are completed prior to enrolling in BUS 9601. AV. 2 CUNYFirst Course ID TO FROM Departments Paul H.Chook Department of Paul H.Chook Department of Departments Information Systems and Information Systems and Statistics Statistics CIS 9655: Data Visualization Course CIS 9655: Data Visualization Course CIS 9310 or CIS 9650 Pre or Pre or corequisite CIS 9310 or CIS 9650 (pre or corequisite co-requisite) 3 Hours Hours 3 3 Credits 3 Credits This course examines how to This course examines how to Description Description design transform data into visual representations so that and use interactive visualization for decision makers can effectively use analytical reasoning. Students need to interactive visualization for analytical be competent in the basics of Topics covered in this reasoning. programming to register for the course course include 1) analytical reasoning (preferably a programming techniques, 2) visual language representations that is used for data analytics). and interaction techniques, 3) Topics

102 data covered in this course include 1) representation and analytical reasoning techniques, transformation, and 2) 4) techniques to support visual representations and production, interaction presentation and dissemination techniques, 3) data of the representation and results. This course will blend transformation, and 4) various techniques to theoretical and applied technical support production, presentation and concepts of visual analytics dissemination of the results. This course will blend various theoretical and applied technical concepts of visual analytics. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, Intensive, Honors, Honors, etc.) etc.) ____ Major Course ____ Major Course Applicability Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ____Gen Ed Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ____Gen Ed Flexible ____ Gen Ed Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its ____ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society

103 ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World ____Gen Ed – College Option College Option Detail Spring 2019 Effective Term Rationale: The course is based on python-based visualization libraries. Students with just C++ background via CIS9310 have typically struggled in the course. They find it too burdensome to self-learn python (and python-based analytics) while simultaneously learning visualization theory and concepts. Removing CIS9310 as a pre-requisite and keeping only CIS9650 as either pre or co-requisite will ensure that students have python background and will be better prepared for the course. Last Modified: April 10, 2018 Section AVI. Courses Withdrawn (Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance) AVI. 1.1 ECO 8000 Macroeconomics Rationale: This course has been replaced by ECO 9740 Fundamentals of Macroeconomics that is required or an elective for MBA and MS students. The Department proposes to eliminate this course since all introductory macroeconomic content will be delivered through ECO 9740. AVI. 1.2 ECO 9250 Health Care Economics & Finance Economics in the Health Care MBA is provided in the ECO 9766 course and covers the Rationale: same content of this course. The Department proposes to eliminate this course and maintain only ECO 9766 as the vehicle to deliver economics content to the HCMBA. AVI. 1.3 ECO 9700 Economic Analysis This course represented an introductory course that was offered for MBA students and Rationale: covered both microeconomics and macroeconomics. For several decades we have moved to a separate offering of the two topics, currently in the form of ECO 9730 and ECO 9740 (both 1.5 credit courses). The Department is proposing to eliminate this course as the offering is most likely to continue in the current format. AVI. 1.4 ECO 9704 Economic Analysis for Business Decisions Rationale: This 3-credit course represented an introductory course that was offered for MBA students and covered both microeconomics and macroeconomics. For several decades we have moved to a separate offering of the two topics, currently in the form of ECO 9730 and ECO 9740 (both 1.5 credit courses). The Department is proposing to eliminate this course as the offering is most likely to continue

104 in the current format. AVI. 1.5 ECO 9705 Managerial Economics The course is a 3 credit microeconomic course that was offered to MBA students. In the last Rationale: 10 years the microeconomic content for MBA students has been delivered in the format of a 1.5 credit course called ECO 9730 Firms in the Global Economy which makes this course obsolete. The Department proposes to eliminate it from the catalogue. AVI. 1.6 ECO 9705L ECO 9705 Lecture We propose also to eliminate the auxiliary ECO 9705L course in relation to the proposed Rationale: elimination of ECO 9705. AVI. 1.7 ECO 9707 Economic Fluctuations & Forecasting The content of Economic Fluctuations & Forecasting used to be offered as an elective for Rationale: MBA students majoring in Economics. Even before the elimination of majors, demand for this course was negligible given its limited business relevant content. The Department is thus proposing to eliminate the course from the curriculum since it is neither required nor an elective. AVI. 1.8 ECO 9708 Microeconomics This course has been replaced by ECO 9730 Firms in the Global Economy that is required Rationale: or an elective for MBA and MS students. The Department proposes to eliminate this course since all introductory microeconomic content will be delivered through ECO 9730. AVI. 1.9 ECO 9709 Macroeconomics This course has been replaced by ECO 9740 Fundamentals of Macroeconomics that is Rationale: required or an elective for MBA and MS students. The Department proposes to eliminate this course since all introductory macroeconomic content will be delivered through ECO 9740. This course carries the same name as ECO 8000, which we also propose to eliminate. AVI. 1.10 ECO 9711 Environmental Economics Rationale: The content of Environmental Economics used to be offered as an elective for MBA students majoring in Economics. Even before the elimination of majors, demand for this course was negligible given its limited business relevant content. The Department is thus proposing to eliminate the course from the curriculum since it is neither required nor an elective. AVI. 1.11

105 ECO 9712 National Accounts Analysis & Fluctuations In the 1970s lots of emphasis was given to the construction and analysis of national Rationale: accounts data. Since then, this topic is typically covered in the first week of an introductory macroeconomic course. The Department proposes to eliminate this course as it is obsolete and does not reflect current offering of economic courses. AVI. 1.12 ECO 9714 Public Finance I Rationale: The content of Public Finance I used to be offered as an elective for MBA students majoring in Economics. Even before the elimination of majors, demand for this course was negligible given its limited business relevant content. The Department is thus proposing to eliminate the course from the curriculum since it is neither required nor an elective. AVI. 1.13 ECO 9730H Fundamentals of Microeconomics Rationale: Since there is no honors program at the graduate level, it seems redundant to have an honors version of the course ECO 9730 Firms in the Global Economy. The Department proposes the elimination of this course. AVI. 1.14 ECO 9731 Eco Development The content of Economic Development used to be offered as an elective for MBA students Rationale: majoring in Economics. Even before the elimination of majors, demand for this course was negligible given its limited business relevant content. The Department is thus proposing to eliminate the course from the curriculum since it is neither required nor an elective. AVI. 1.15 ECO 9760 Labor Economics The content of Labor Economics used to be offered as an elective for MBA students Rationale: majoring in Economics. Even before the elimination of majors, demand for this course was negligible given its limited business relevant content. The Department is thus proposing to eliminate the course from the curriculum since it is neither required nor an elective. AVI. 1.16 ECO 9774 Economics of Urban Areas Rationale: The topic of this course broadly overlaps with graduate level offering from the Real Estate department. We propose to eliminate this course as it is not include as a required or elective on any of our programs and students can take RE courses as an alternative. AVI. 1.17 ECO 9791 Special Topics in Economics

106 Rationale: The Department offers occasionally 1.5 or 3 credit courses on Special Topics, but never the 1 or 2 credit version. We thus propose to eliminate this 1-credit course. AVI. 1.18 ECO 9793 Special Topics in Economics The Department occasionally offers 1.5 or 3 credit courses on Special Topics, but never the Rationale: 1 or 2 credit version. We thus propose to eliminate this 2-credit course. AVI. 1.19 ECO 99001 Research Method for Sem This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is not required or an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.20 ECO 99002 Research Seminar Rationale: This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is not required or an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.21 ECO 99301 Research Methods for Thesis Rationale: This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is not required or an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.22 ECO 99302 Thesis This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is not required or an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.23 FIN 105 Dummy Finance Rationale: The Department could not find historical records on the rationale that lead to the creation of this course. The most likely interpretation is that this course was an introductory course in finance for graduate students, but that role is currently taken by FIN 9770 Corporate Finance. We thus propose to

107 eliminate FIN 105 from the catalogue. AVI. 1.24 FIN 15 Executive MS in Finance The Department is not aware of the rationale for the existence of a FIN 15 course that Rationale: carries the name of an Executive program. Providing a rationale for its elimination is thus challenging and the best we can argue is that it seems reasonable to eliminate what seems to be an error in the catalogue. AVI. 1.25 FIN 6 MS in Finance The Department is not aware of the rationale for the existence of a FIN 6 that carries the Rationale: name of an MS in Finance program. Providing a rationale for its elimination is thus challenging and the best we can argue is that it seems reasonable to eliminate what seems to be an error in the catalogue. AVI. 1.26 FIN 9332 Seminar Hca Finance Management This course was used as a Special Topics course and was replaced with the use of Rationale: dedicated 1, 1.5, 2, and 3 credit Special Topics courses. Since then it has not been used and the Department proposes its elimination. AVI. 1.27 FIN 9740 Technical Analysis From its introduction, this course relied on a single adjunct lecturer to teach it and is believed Rationale: to have been offered only once. The content is not academically rigorous and is practitioner oriented. The Department does offer such courses as shorter, 1.5 credit, special topics practitioner-taught courses and plans to include Technical Analysis in that group. Hence, we propose to eliminate FIN 9740 from the catalogue. AVI. 1.28 FIN 9741 Corporate Restructuring & Turnaround Management Rationale: The content of this course is currently offered as FIN 9759 Mergers & Acquisitions, which represents a more up-to-date way of providing this content. The Department will continue offering FIN 9759 and proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue as it is not required or an elective in any program. AVI. 1.29 FIN 9758 Mergers Rationale: The content of this course is currently offered as FIN 9759 Mergers & Acquisitions, which represents a more up-to-date way of providing this content. The Department will continue offering FIN 9759 and proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue as it is not required or an elective in any program.

108 AVI. 1.30 FIN 9770L FIN 9770 Lecture FIN 9770 represents the introduction finance course for MBA students. However, the Rationale: Department has never used this FIN 9770L course and there is no recollection of having created this course even among the senior colleagues. We thus propose to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.31 FIN 9775 E-Finance Rationale: The E-Finance course was developed in response to the internet boom of the late 90s, early 2000s. As far as we can tell it was never offered. Furthermore, while Internet and Finance continue to be an interesting area, the focus and even the terminology are changing fast. Hence, in the near future the Department plans to offer courses that focus on various aspects of interaction between Internet and Finance as Special Topics courses staffed by industry practitioners. We thus propose to eliminate FIN 9775 from the catalogue. AVI. 1.32 FIN 9785 Financial Markets/Intermediaries Rationale: This course on the microstructure of financial markets and the role of intermediaries is a very specialized course that has not been offered in recent years. Its content substantially overlaps with two other electives that the department keeps, FIN 9784 – Management of Financial Institutions and FIN 9789 Equity Markets – Trading and Structure. The Department proposes its elimination. AVI. 1.33 FIN 9798 Analysis of Industrial Securities Rationale: The analysis of industrial securities is now broadly referred to as Investment Analysis which is covered in FIN 9783 Investment Analysis and FIN 9793 Advanced Investment Analysis. The Department will continue offering these two courses which makes FIN 9798 redundant and we propose to eliminate it from the catalogue. AVI. 1.34 FIN 9799 Municipal & State Securities This course is on a rather specialized subject that has been offered for many years as part of Rationale: the course FIN 9881 Debt Securities. The Department considers very unlikely that we will return to offering this standalone course and we thus propose to eliminate it from the catalogue as it is not currently a required or elective course in any program. AVI. 1.35 FIN 9890 Special Topics in Investments Rationale: The Department offers occasionally 1.5 or 3 credit courses on Special Topics, but never the 1 or 2 credit version. We thus propose to eliminate this 1-credit course.

109 AVI. 1.36 FIN 9892 Special Topics in Investments The Department offers occasionally 1.5 or 3 credit courses on Special Topics, but never the Rationale: 1 or 2 credit version. We thus propose to eliminate this 2-credit course. AVI. 1.37 FIN 9894 Special Topics in Corporate Finance The Department offers occasionally 1.5 or 3 credit courses on Special Topics, but never the Rationale: 1 or 2 credit version. We thus propose to eliminate this 1-credit course. AVI. 1.38 FIN 9896 Special Topics in Corporate Finance The Department offers occasionally 1.5 or 3 credit courses on Special Topics, but never the Rationale: 1 or 2 credit version. We thus propose to eliminate this 2-credit course. AVI. 1.39 FIN 99001 Research Methods for Investments and Finance This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.40 FIN 99002 Research Seminar in Investments Rationale: This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.41 FIN 99011 Research Seminar in Corporate Finance I This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.42 FIN 99012 Research Seminar in Corporate Finance II Rationale: This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had

110 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.43 FIN 99001L FIN 99001/2 Lecture This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.44 FIN 99021 Research Seminar in International Finance I This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.45 FIN 99022 Research Seminar in International Finance II Rationale: This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.46 FIN 99041 Research Seminar in Financial Institutions I Rationale: This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.47 FIN 99042 Research Seminar in Financial Institutions II This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.48 FIN 99301 Research Methods for Thesis Rationale: This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had

111 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.49 FIN 99302 Thesis This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is neither required nor an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 1.50 FIN 9981 Selected Topics in Corporate Finance The Department offers occasionally "Topics" courses on current issues that might not be Rationale: part of the existing curriculum. Since the course used for this type of offering is FIN 9897 Special Topics in Corporate Finance , we propose to eliminate 9981, which the Department is not planning to offer in the future, as it overlaps with the 9897. AVI. 1.51 FIN 9983 Selected Topics in Investments Rationale: The Department offers occasionally "Topics" courses on current issues that might not be part of the existing curriculum. Since the course used for this type of offering is FIN 9893 Special we propose to eliminate 9983, which the Department is not planning to offer in Topics in Investments, the future, as it overlaps with 9893. AVI. 1.52 FIN 9851 Classical foundations of Risk Management Rationale: This course was developed to provide the foundational knowledge to students in MS in Financial Risk Management (MSFRM) when the program was planned as an Executive program. The Department is now offering MSFRM as a regular MS program where students obtain the foundational knowledge from other required courses – FIN 9770, FIN 9783, ECO 9723. This makes FIN 9851 redundant (we have never offered FIN 9851) and we propose to eliminate it from the catalogue. AVI. 1.53 INS 9720 Risk Management and Control Rationale: Since the Department started offering the MS in Financial Risk Management the content of this course has been split in several specialized 1.5 credit courses that cover market, credit, and operational risk. We thus propose to eliminate this 3 credit course from the catalogue. Section AVI. Courses Withdrawn (Paul H. Chook Department of Information Systems and Statistics) AVI. 2.1

112 STA 7900 Statistics Elective Rationale: We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This course has been replaced by Special Topics courses. AVI. 2.2 STA 851 Comp Sim In Bus Res We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Rationale: There is no record of this course in any of our degree programs. AVI. 2.3 STA 8000 Introductory Business Statistics We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has been replaced by STA 9708. AVI. 2.4 STA 9000 Regression & Forecast We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course was originally intended for MBA students and has now been replaced by STA 9700. AVI. 2.5 STA 9050 Statistical Analysis in Healthcare Administration We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course was originally a special course for MBA students in Healthcare Administration. It has now been replaced by STA 9708. AVI. 2.6 STA 9100 Intermediate Statistical Methods with SAS We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has been replaced by STA 9750. AVI. 2.7 STA 9172 Applying Information, Research, and Analysis II We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course is offered under PAF 9172 and is no longer offered as STA 9172. AVI. 2.8 STA 9470 Statistical Analysis for Public Administration We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course was offered for Public Administration students and is now offered as a PAF course.

113 AVI. 2.9 STA 9703 Introduction to Stochastic Processes We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has been replaced by STA 9783. AVI. 2.10 STA 9707 Mathematical Tools for Business We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course was offered as a preliminary course for the MS in statistics. It has now been replaced by MTH 3010 or equivalent. AVI. 2.11 STA 9709 Advanced Statistical Methods We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has been replaced by specialized advanced statistics courses. AVI. 2.12 STA 9711 Advanced Sampling Theory & Practice We have not offered this course in many years and based on the direction of the MS Rationale: program, we do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.13 STA 9712 Advanced Linear Models We have not offered this course in many years and based on the direction of the MS Rationale: program, and new courses developed for the Data Science track, we do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.14 STA 9716 Nonparametric & Semiparametric Methods of Data Analysis We have not offered this course in many years and based on the direction of the MS Rationale: program, and new courses develop for the Data Science track, do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.15 STA 9751 Basic Electronic Data Processing We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has been replaced by other specialized statistics courses. AVI. 2.16 STA 9752 Numerical Methods for Computation

114 Rationale: We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This course has been replaced by other specialized statistics courses. AVI. 2.17 STA 9756 Advanced Computer Programming We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has been replaced by STA 9850. AVI. 2.18 STA 9768 System Design Plan & Operations We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has been replaced by CIS graduate courses. AVI. 2.19 STA 9771 Special Topics in Graphics We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has been replaced by CIS graduate courses. AVI. 2.20 STA 9800 Problem Solving, Computer Applications, and Research in Statistics We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has not been offered for any degree program in recent years. AVI. 2.21 STA 99001 Research Methods for Seminar We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course has been replaced by special topics courses. AVI. 2.22 STA 99301 Research Methods for Thesis This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is not required or an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 2.23 STA 99302 Research Methods for Thesis Rationale: We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. A thesis is no longer an option for the MS in statistics.

115 AVI. 2.24 STA U702 Advanced Statistical Inference We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: was a doctoral course and is no longer offered. Students now take STA 9719. AVI. 2.25 STA U880 Research Seminar in Quantitative Methods We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: was a doctoral course and is no longer offered. AVI. 2.26 CIS 8000 Introduction to Microcomputers and Applications We have not offered this one credit course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the Rationale: future. The contents of CIS 8000 have been replaced by CIS 9467 (3 credits). AVI. 2.27 CIS 9100 Program Data and File Structure The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that are more suitable in Rationale: the computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology, people, and business processed. CIS 9100 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.28 CIS 9101 Computer Hardware Concepts Rationale: The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that would be more suitable in a computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology, people, and business processed. CIS 9101 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.29 CIS 9333 Information Technologies and the Small Business Enterprise Rationale: We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Some of the contents of CIS 9333 is now covered in CIS 9000. The Entrepreneurship program now offers more suitable courses that covers this topic. AVI. 2.30 CIS 9365 Operating System Principles The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that would be more suitable Rationale:

116 in a computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology, people, and business processed. CIS 9365 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.31 CIS 9420 Mainframe Computer Applications in Business With the emergence of new technologies, this course is not as attractive to students at it was Rationale: several decades ago. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.32 CIS 9550 Emerging Trends in Information Technologies We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. We Rationale: have identified several key trends with staying power and have created new courses (CIS 9444 eBusiness; CIS 9557 Business Analytics; CIS 9440 Data Warehousing and Analytics) that cover these specific technologies. AVI. 2.33 CIS 9610 Business Applications of Expert Systems Technology Rationale: With the emergence of a new breed of Artificial Intelligence techniques, this course is not as relevant to students at it was two decades ago. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. The new breed of artificial intelligence applications are covered piecemeal in several IS and Stats courses. AVI. 2.34 CIS 9741 Bus Data Process I Rationale: We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Some of the relevant content from this course is now covered in CIS 9440 Data Warehousing and Analytics and CIS 9700 Integrating Information Technology and Business Processes. AVI. 2.35 CIS 9742 Bus Data Process II Rationale: We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Some of the relevant content from this course is now covered in CIS 9440 Data Warehousing and Analytics and CIS 9700 Integrating Information Technology and Business Processes. AVI. 2.36 CIS 9743 Survey Communication Organization and Systems Software The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that would be more suitable Rationale: in a computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology,

117 people, and business processed. CIS 9743 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.37 CIS 9750 Computer Technology Quantitative Analysis The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that would be more suitable Rationale: in a computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology, people, and business processed. CIS 9750 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.38 CIS 9759 Advance Programming Business Applications Rationale: We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Instead we offer a range of programming courses in its place – CIS 9650, 9655, 9310 and 9410) AVI. 2.39 CIS 9760 Computer Simulation for Business Problem Solving We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. The Rationale: department offers OPR 9730 that provides a more comprehensive coverage of topics in simulation. AVI. 2.40 CIS 9761 Discrete Programing Application Systems The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that would be more suitable Rationale: in a computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology, people, and business processed. CIS 9761 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.41 CIS 9762 Assembly Language and Assembler Rationale: The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that would be more suitable in a computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology, people, and business processed. CIS 9762 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.42 CIS 9764 Sorting Data Base Principles Rationale: The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that would be more suitable in a computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology,

118 people, and business processed. CIS 9764 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. In its place, we offer a course that is more suitable for the Business School: CIS 9340 Principles of Database Management Systems. AVI. 2.43 CIS 9768 Systems Analysis and Design The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that would be more suitable Rationale: in a computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology, people, and business processed. CIS 9768 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. In its place, we offer a course that is more suitable for the Business School: CIS 9490 Systems Analysis and Design. AVI. 2.44 CIS 9770 Microcomputers Applications Rationale: This course was more relevant several decades ago when the impact of IT on business was still nascent. The department is now offers several courses in its place that are more specific (CIS 9444; CIS 9557; CIS 9555; CIS 9556 among others). Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.45 CIS 9776 Comparative Programming Languages The department has moved its focus away from offering courses that would be more suitable Rationale: in a computer science engineering department. Instead the department has moved towards offering courses in the information systems area that examines the interaction among information technology, people, and business processed. CIS 9776 is one of those courses oriented towards computer science. Consequently, we have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. AVI. 2.46 CIS 9850 Advance Computer Technology for QA Rationale: We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. The department now offers a more updated version of the course: CIS 9650 Programming for Analytics. AVI. 2.47 CIS 99001 Res Method for Sem This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is not required or an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 2.48

119 CIS 99002 Research Seminar Rationale: We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This was a doctoral course and is no longer offered. AVI. 2.49 CIS 99301 Res Meth for Thesis We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. A Rationale: thesis is no longer an option for the MS in IS. AVI. 2.50 CIS 99302 Thesis We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. A Rationale: thesis is no longer an option for the MS in IS. Section AVI. Courses Withdrawn (Department of Law) AVI. 3.1 LAW 9102 Partnerships, Limited Partnerships, and Corporations This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no Rationale: plans to offer the course in the future. If the Department were to offer a course on business organizations, a faculty member would be asked to design a new course in the area. To the extent there are important topics covered in this course they are now included in other courses. Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 9102. AVI. 3.2 LAW 9702 Law of Corporations Rationale: This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no plans to offer the course in the future. If the Department were to offer a course specifically on business organizations, a faculty member would be asked to design a new course in the area. To the extent there are important topics covered in this course they are now included in other courses. AVI. 3.3 LAW 9703 The Law of Negotiable Instruments This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no Rationale: plans to offer the course in the future because: (1) it does not fit within the strategic plan of the Department; (2) there is no evident student demand for this course; and (3) the Department has no faculty to teach it. AVI. 3.4 LAW 9704 Law of Sales Rationale: This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no

120 plans to offer the course in the future because: (1) it does not fit within the strategic plan of the Department; (2) there is no evident student demand for this course; and (3) the Department has no faculty to teach it. AVI. 3.5 LAW 9707 Law of Agency and Partnership This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no Rationale: plans to offer the course in the future. If the Department were to offer a course, specifically on business organizations, it would not be limited to agency and partnership and a faculty member would be asked to design a new course in the area. To the extent there are important topics covered in this course they are now included in other courses. AVI. 3.6 LAW 9712 Antitrust Laws Rationale: This course has not been offered in the past 20 years. If the Department were to offer a course on Antitrust Law a faculty member would be asked to develop a new course in this area. Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 9712. AVI. 3.7 LAW 9711 Unfair Trading Practices This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no Rationale: plans to offer the course in the future. This course is completely out of date. The course description includes a reference to the “recent” BETAMAX case, which is a Supreme Court case from 1984. Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 9711. AVI. 3.8 LAW 9715 Law and the Business Environment Rationale: This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no plans to offer the course in the future. To the extent there are important topics covered in this course they are now included in Law 9000 (Legal and Ethical Environment of Business Law) and Law 9201 (Overview of Business Law and Ethics). Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 9715. AVI. 3.9 LAW 9750 (PAF 9312) Law for the Educational Administrator This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no Rationale: plans to offer the course in the future because: (1) it does not fit within the strategic plan of the Department; (2) there is no evident student demand for this course; and (3) the Department has no faculty to teach it. AVI 3.10 LAW 9781 Secured Creditor Transactions Rationale: This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no

121 plans to offer the course in the future because: (1) it does not fit within the strategic plan of the Department; (2) there is no evident student demand for this course; and (3) the Department has no faculty to teach it. Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 9781. AVI. 3.11 LAW 9782 Law of Sec. Markets This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no Rationale: plans to offer the course in the future. To the extent there are important topics covered in this course they are now included in other courses. AVI. 3.12 LAW 9890 Special Topics in Law Currently the Department of Law has four “Special Topics” courses at the nine thousand Rationale: level. This one-credit course has never been offered and the Department has no plans to offer it. The Department plans to retain the one and a half and three credit special topics courses. AVI. 3.13 LAW 9892 Special Topics in Law Currently the Department of Law has four “Special Topics” courses at the nine thousand Rationale: level. This two-credit course has never been offered and we have no plans to offer it. The Department plans to remove the one and two credit special topics courses and to retain the one and a half and three credit special topics courses. Section AVI. Courses Withdrawn (Narendra Paul Loomba Department of Management) AVI. 4.1 OPR 9704 Quantitative Analysis for Business Decisions We have not offered this course in over 20 years and do not intend to offer it in the future Rationale: based on the direction of our MS in QMM program. Based on the title, it is presumed that some of the material included in this course is now covered in OPR 9721. AVI. 4.2 OPR 9720 Decision Making Under Uncertainty We have not offered this course in over 20 years and do not intend to offer it in the future Rationale: based on the direction of our MS in QMM program. AVI. 4.3 OPR 9722 Linear Programming We have not offered this course in over 20 years and do not intend to offer it in the future Rationale: based on the direction of our MS in QMM program. AVI. 4.4

122 OPR 9729 Mathematical Programming Modeling Techniques We have not offered this course in over 20 years and do not intend to offer it in the future Rationale: based on the direction of our MS in QMM program. Based on the title, it is presumed that some of the material included in this course is now covered in OPR 9724. AVI. 4.5 OPR 99301 Research Methodology (Thesis I) This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had Rationale: 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is not required or an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 4.6 OPR 99302 Thesis (Thesis II) Rationale: This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is not required or an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 4.7 OPR 9950 Master's Project Rationale: This course was introduced in the 1980s to fulfill the requirement that graduate students had 6 credits of research methodology. Since then the requirement has been removed and the course is not required or an elective in any graduate program currently offered. The Department proposes to eliminate this course from the catalogue. AVI. 4.8 BUS 9110 Business & Society This course was last taught in 2004 and was replaced by BUS 9100 (Business and Society). Rationale: As a part of the restructuring of the MBA curriculum, this course has more recently been replaced by MGT 9200 (Business and Society Relationships) to incorporate updated content. MGT 9200is a required foundational skills course for the MBA. AVI. 4.9 MGT 9300 Management: A Behavioral Approach Rationale: This course was replaced in the MBA core by MGT 9301 (Managing People and Organizations) and is not offered in other programs. Given the large redundancy between MGT 9300 and MGT 9301, the Department does not plan to offer this course again. AVI. 4.10 MGT 9310 Management and Organization Theory

123 Rationale: This course has not been offered in decades, and no foreseeable demand exists. Content that is still relevant has been incorporated into the broader MGT 9301 (Managing People and Organizations). AVI. 4.11 MGT 9320 Organizational Design and Behavior This course has not been offered in decades, and no foreseeable demand exists. Content Rationale: that is still relevant has been incorporated into the broader MGT 9301 (Managing People and Organizations). AVI. 4.12 MGT 9370 Research Methodology in Organization This course has not been offered in decades, and no foreseeable demand exists. Content Rationale: that is still relevant has been incorporated into the broader MGT 9301 (Managing People and Organizations). AVI. 4.13 MGT 9391 Special Topics in Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management (One credit) Rationale: This course was created to provide multiple options for special topics courses. It has never been offered and no foreseeable demand exists. AVI. 4.14 MGT 9393 Special Topics in Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management (Two credits) This course was created to provide multiple options for special topics courses. It has never Rationale: been offered and no foreseeable demand exists. AVI. 4.15 MGT 9430 Managerial Careers and Interpersonal Relations This course has not been offered in decades, and no foreseeable demand exists. Content Rationale: that is still relevant has been incorporated into the broader MGT 9301 (Managing People and Organizations). AVI. 4.16 MGT 9480 Dispute Resolution This course is largely redundant with MGT 9660 (Negotiation) and thus has not been offered Rationale: in a decade. The Department has no plans to offer this narrower course. AVI. 4.17 MGT 9494 Seminar in Labor Relations

124 Rationale: This course has not been offered in decades, and no foreseeable demand exists. The Department has no plans to offer this narrower course. AVI. 4.18 MGT 9495 Capstone Research Seminar This course was part of a previous program’s structure and is no longer offered. Rationale: AVI. 4.19 MGT 9702 Service Operations I This 1.5 credit course was replaced by MGT 9700 (Introduction to Operations Management), Rationale: a 3 credit course, and is not offered in other programs. AVI. 4.20 MGT 9704 Service Operations II This 1.5 credit course was replaced by MGT 9700 (Introduction to Operations Management), Rationale: a 3 credit course, and is not offered in other programs. Section AVI. Courses Withdrawn (Allen G. Aaronson Department of Marketing and International Business) AVI. 5.1 MKT 9700 Sales Repres American Business This course is no longer relevant for our students due to the evolving business landscape, Rationale: and has not been taught in several years. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9700. AVI. 5.2 MKT 9711 Market Forecasting We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course is no longer relevant for our students due to the evolving business landscape, and so there is no demand for this course. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9711. AVI. 5.3 MKT 9712 Qualitative Problems in Marketing The content of this course longer relevant for our students due to the evolving business Rationale: landscape, and so there is no demand for this course. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9712. AVI. 5.4 MKT 9718 Communicating with Consumers Rationale: This course is not topical for our students due to the evolving business landscape, and so

125 there is no demand for this course. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9718. AVI. 5.5 MKT 9720 Advertising Research The contents of this course are no longer relevant for our students due to the evolving Rationale: business landscape, and so there is no demand for this course. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9720. AVI. 5.6 MKT 9725 Advertising Copy Techniques We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future due Rationale: to a lack of demand for this course. So, we propose deleting MKT 9725. AVI. 5.7 MKT 9736 Direct Marketing II This course is no consistent with the evolving business landscape, and so there is no Rationale: student demand for this course. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9736. AVI. 5.8 MKT 9754 Computer Applications for Marketing Managers We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future due Rationale: to a lack of demand for this course. So, we propose deleting MKT 9754. AVI. 5.9 MKT 9757 Business Market Research This course is no longer relevant for our students due to the evolving business landscape, Rationale: and so there is no demand for this course. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9757. AVI. 5.10 MKT 9761 International Commodity Trade We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. This Rationale: course is no consistent with the evolving business landscape, and so there is no student demand for this course. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9761. AVI. 5.11 MKT 9763 International Trade Operation This course is no longer relevant for our students due to the evolving business landscape, Rationale:

126 and so there is no demand for this course. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9763. AVI. 5.12 MKT 9765 Comparative Marketing Systems The contents of this course are not pertinent to the current business landscape, and so there Rationale: is no student demand for this course. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9765. AVI. 5.13 MKT 9770 International Transportation We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. The Rationale: contents of this course are not pertinent to the current business landscape, and so there is no student demand for this course. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9770. AVI. 5.14 MKT 9771 Transport & Container This course is no longer relevant for our students due to the evolving business landscape, Rationale: and so there is no demand for this course. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9771. AVI. 5.15 MKT 9781 Internet & Entrepreneurship Due to the evolving business landscape, the contents of this course are no longer relevant Rationale: for our students. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of MKT 9781. AVI. 5.16 IBS 9600H International Business Fundamentals The IBS 9600 is offered as a core course, therefore eliminating the need for an Honors Rationale: section for the same course. Therefore, we propose the deletion of IBS 9600H. AVI. 5.17 IBS 9760 International Business Analysis This course has been replaced with IBS9600 and is therefore no longer offered. Therefore, Rationale: we propose the deletion of IBS 9760. AVI. 5.18 IBS 9762 The Global Competitiveness of the US Economy This course is no longer relevant for our students due to the evolving business landscape, Rationale:

127 and so there is no demand for this course. We have not offered this course in many years and do not intend to offer it in the future. Therefore, we propose the deletion of IBS 9762. AVI. 5.19 IMK 9761 International Commodity Trade The IMK course listings are obsolete and have not been offered for close to 20 years. We do Rationale: not intend to offer these in the future. This course is also no longer relevant for our students due to the evolving business landscape, and so there is no demand for this course. Therefore, we propose the deletion of IMK 9761. Section AVI. Courses Withdrawn (William Newman Department of Real Estate) AVI. 6 RES 9000 Real Estate Principles This course has not been offered in over ten years. It is not part of the current curriculum of Rationale: the department’s MS in Real Estate program; therefore, we do not plan on offering the course in the future. Part A: Academic Matters The following recommendations of the committee on Undergraduate Curriculum were approved at the Zicklin School of Business faculty Meeting on April 26, 2018 effective Spring 2019 semester pending approval of the Broad of Trustees. Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses AV:1 Change Course Prerequisite to be offered in the Paul H. Chook Department of Information Systems & Statistics 130266 CUNYFirst Course ID FROM TO Paul H. Chook Paul H. Chook Departments Department of Department of Information Systems & Information Systems & Statistics Statistics CIS 4170 Data Course Course CIS 4170 Data Visualization Visualization Pre-requisites CIS 3100 or CIS 3120, Pre- or Co-requisite: Pre- requisites CIS 3120, No ZICK or No ZICK or ZKTP code required ZKTP code required Hours 3 Hours 3 Credits 3 Credits 3 Description This course examines how to Description This course examines how transform data into visual to transform data into visual representations so that representations so that

128 decision makers can decision makers can effectively use interactive effectively use interactive visualization for analytical visualization for analytical reasoning. Topics covered in reasoning. Topics covered in this course include 1) this course include 1) analytical reasoning analytical reasoning techniques, 2) visual techniques, 2) visual representations and representations and interaction techniques, 3) interaction techniques, 3) data representation and data representation and transformation, and 4) transformation, and 4) techniques to support techniques to support production, presentation and production, presentation and dissemination of the results. dissemination of the results. This course will blend This course will blend various various theoretical and theoretical and applied applied technical concepts of technical concepts of visual analytics. visual analytics. Requirement Business Business Requirement Designation Designation [ ] Yes [ x ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Liberal Arts Course Course Attribute Attribute (e.g. (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Intensive, Honors, etc) Honors, etc) Course __x__ Major __x__ Major Course Applicability Applicability ____ Gen Ed Required ____Gen Ed Required ____ English ____ English Composition Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___Gen Ed Flexible ___ Gen Ed Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in ___ US Experience in its Diversity its Diversity ___ Creative ___ Creative Expression Expression ___ Individual and ___ Individual and Society Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World

129 _____Gen Ed – College Option College Option Detail Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale : In CIS 4170, only the Python-based visualization libraries are used. Students who have taken only CIS 3100 (but not CIS 3120) learn C++ but not Python. Without any Python knowledge, the students struggle significantly in this course (CIS 4170), at times failing the course. It is too burdensome for the students to self-learn Python (and Python based analytics) while simultaneously learning visualization theory and concepts of this course. Removing CIS 3100 as an (acceptable alternate) prerequisite and leaving only CIS 3120 as a co- or pre- requisite will ensure that all students in CIS 4170 will have the necessary Python background for the course. Since the use of Python begins in the second half of CIS 4170, it is possible for students to take CIS 3120 at the same time as CIS 4170, so it can also be a co-requisite. Section AVI. Courses Withdrawn (Department of Law) AVI. 1.1 LAW 1012 Law and the Family Rationale: This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no plans to offer the course in the future because: (1) it does not fit within the strategic plan of the department, (2) it is not vital for the study of the legal regulation of business and (3) the department has no faculty to teach it. Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 1012. AVI. 1.2 LAW 3103 Law of Negotiable Instruments Rationale : This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no plans to offer the course in the future because: (1) it does not fit within the strategic plan of the department; (2) there is no evident student demand for this course; and (3) the department has no faculty to teach it. Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 3103. AVI. 1.3 LAW 3104 Law of Mercantile Transactions This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no plans to Rationale: offer the course in the future because: (1) it does not fit within the strategic plan of the department; (2) there is no evident student demand for this course; (3) the department has no faculty to teach it; and (4) to the extent that there are important topics in this course, such material can be covered in other existing courses. Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 3104. AVI. 1.4 LAW 3110 Debtor & Creditor Law Rationale: This course has not been offered in the past 20 years, and the Department of Law has no plans to offer the course in the future because: (1) it does not fit within the strategic plan of the department; (2) there is no evident student demand for this course; and (3) the department has no faculty to teach it. If we ever hire

130 faculty with expertise in Bankruptcy and Restructuring, they would be asked to design a new course in the area. Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 3110. AVI. 1.5 LAW 3303 The Law of Real Estate Finance This course was only offered twice: in the spring 2001 (when it was cancelled due to low Rationale: enrollment) and fall of 2001 (when it only had two students). The Real Estate Department has indicated that it no longer has any interest in the Department of Law’s offering of this course. Furthermore, the Department of Law has no faculty to teach this course. Thus, the Department of Law proposes removing LAW 3303. PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS The following recommendations of the Committee on Undergraduate Curriculum were approved at the Mildred and George Weissman School of Arts and Sciences Faculty Meeting on May 1, 2018 effective the Spring 2019 semester, pending approval of the Board of Trustees. AI: Special Actions AI.1.1 Proposal to Increase Student Mastery in Calculus This pilot program, which consists of two parts, will run as an experiment for academic years 2018- 2019 and 2019-2020. The first part is to allow any student who earns grades of C-, D, or D+ to retake precalculus to achieve greater mastery. MTH 2003 and MTH 2009 (a new course effective spring 2019) are Baruch’s precalculus courses; MTH 2000 and MTH 2001 are the precalculus courses for which transfer students receive credit. By allowing students to repeat the course, they are provided with an opportunity to improve both their course mastery and grade. Students will only receive credit for precalculus once. This proposal does not affect college policy of allowing students to take the course a maximum of three times. The policy on repeating courses covers any combination of MTH 2003 and MTH 2009, e.g., one course taken three times, or a one-and-two combination. All combinations will be treated identically as three attempts. A repeat for mastery course will not be eligible for TAP or Excelsior. Students may also repeat e-permit courses per the host college’s policies. Students who earn grades of C or better in the repeated precalculus course may replace their previous passing grades in the calculation of the overall GPA. The precalculus repeat for mastery option is part of college’s existing 16-credit maximum for grade replacements. It will not retroactively effect a student’s pre-existing academic status. The following points should be noted: * A maximum of 16 credits of failing and/or repeat for mastery grades may be deleted from the calculation of the cumulative GPA during an undergraduate’s enrollment in CUNY. Whether students remain at a single college or transfer from one CUNY college to another, no more than 16 credits of grades can be replaced in the calculation of

131 the cumulative GPA. Should the 16-credit limit be reached at a college other than Baruch, a student will not be permitted to replace credits at Baruch. * For a grade of C or better to replace a grade of C-, D, or D+ in the calculation of the cumulative GPA, the repeated course must be taken at Baruch. Students may repeat precalculus for mastery on permit to another institution, but the original grade will not be replaced. If a student retakes precalculus on permit at another CUNY campus, both the original and the new grade will be calculated in the overall GPA. If a student takes precalculus on permit at a non- CUNY institution, only the original grade will be calculated in the overall GPA. * If a student has more than one repeatable precalculus grade and subsequently earns a grade of C or better in the course, the previous grades will be deleted from the calculation of the GPA, subject to the 16- credit limit. * The cumulative GPA calculated on the basis of this policy is to be used for purposes of retention and graduation from the College and the admission to and continuance in a major or specialization. It will not be used to calculate the GPA for graduation honors or the Dean’s List. The second part of the proposal is to include a precalculus grade prerequisite in MTH 2205 and 2207. Effective with the fall 2018 semester, the prerequisites for MTH 2205 and MTH 2207 are to be as follows (separate entries are included in section AV of this report): MTH 2205 Prerequisite: MTH 2003 or MTH 2009 with a grade of C- or better. MTH 2207 Prerequisite: Placement or grade of C- or better in MTH 2000 or 2001 or the equivalent. Rationale: Enrollment Management has produced significant data indicating the strongest predictor of student success in a first calculus course is their mastery of precalculus. AII: Changes in Degree Programs AIII.1.1 The following revisions are proposed for the BA in Actuarial Science Program: BA in Actuarial Science

132 Program Codes: 82292 and 60001 (Macaulay Honors) 1799.00 HEGIS Code: Spring 2019 Effective: FROM TO The field of actuarial science applies The field of actuarial science applies mathematical mathematical principles and techniques to principles and techniques to problems in the problems in the insurance industry. Progress in insurance industry. Progress in the field is the field is generally based upon completion of generally based upon completion of examination examination given by the Society of Actuaries. given by the Society of Actuaries. The Baruch The Baruch College major is designed to prepare College major is designed to prepare students to students to pass the P, FM, IFM (formerly MFE), MFE, MLC, and C pass the P, FM, exams offered LTAM (formerly MLC), and STAM (formerly C) by the Society of Actuaries. Classes are offered exams offered by the Society of Actuaries. that fulfill current VEE (Validation by Educational Classes are offered which fulfill current VEE Experience) requirements in economics, finance, (Validation by Educational Experience) and statistics. Students interested in this highly requirements in economics, finance, and structured program are urged to meet with an statistics. Students interested in this highly advisor in the Department of Mathematics as early structured program are urged to meet with an as possible for assistance in formulating an advisor in the Department of Mathematics as appropriate course of study. early as possible for assistance in formulating an appropriate course of study. Math Program Prerequisites Math Program Prerequisites Based on placement, follow one of the following Based on placement, follow one of the following preliminary calculus options below: preliminary calculus options below: Course Description Crs Course Description Crs 8 Calculus AP Exam (BC) Option 1 8 Calculus AP Exam (BC) Option 1 credits credits with a score of 4 or 5 with a score of 4 or 5 (transfers to Baruch as (transfers to Baruch as MTH 3010 Calculus II) MTH 3010 Calculus II) And one of the following: And one of the following: MTH 3020 Intermediate MTH 3020 Intermediate Calculus Calculus MTH 3050 Multi-Variable MTH 3050 Multi-Variable and Vector Calculus * and Vector Calculus * or or Option 2 Calculus AP Exam (AB) 12 Calculus AP Exam (AB) Option 2 12 with a score of 4 or 5 credits credits with a score of 4 or 5 (transfers to Baruch as (transfers to Baruch as MTH 2610 Calculus I) MTH 2610 Calculus I) And And MTH 3010 Calculus II MTH 3010 Calculus II

133 And one of the following: And one of the following: MTH 3020 Intermediate MTH 3020 Intermediate Calculus Calculus MTH 3050 Multi-Variable MTH 3050 Multi-Variable and Vector Calculus * and Vector Calculus * or or Option 3 MTH 2610 Calculus I 12 Option 3 MTH 2610 Calculus I 12 credits credits And And MTH 3010 Calculus II MTH 3010 Calculus II And one of the following: And one of the following: MTH 3020 Intermediate MTH 3020 Intermediate Calculus Calculus MTH 3050 Multi-Variable MTH 3050 Multi-Variable and Vector Calculus * and Vector Calculus * or or 12-13 MTH 2205 or MTH 2206 Option 4 MTH 2205 or MTH 2206 12-13 Option 4 credits Applied Calculus credits Applied Calculus or or MTH 2207 Applied MTH 2207 Applied Calculus and Matrix Calculus and Matrix Applications Applications And the following two And the following two courses: courses: MTH 3006 Integral MTH 3006 Integral Calculus Calculus MTH 3030 Analytic MTH 3030 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II Geometry and Calculus II or or Option 5 MTH 2205 or MTH 2206 12-13 MTH 2205 or MTH 2206 Option 5 12-13 Applied Calculus credits credits Applied Calculus or or MTH 2207 Applied MTH 2207 Applied Calculus and Matrix Calculus and Matrix Applications Applications And And

134 MTH 3006 Integral MTH 3006 Integral Calculus Calculus And And MTH 3007 Infinite Series MTH 3007 Infinite Series And one of the following: And one of the following: MTH 3020 Intermediate MTH 3020 Intermediate Calculus Calculus MTH 3050 Multi-Variable MTH 3050 Multi-Variable and Vector Calculus * and Vector Calculus * or or MTH 2630 Analytic 10 MTH 2630 Analytic Option 6 10 Option 6 credits Geometry and Calculus I Geometry and Calculus I credits MTH 3030 Analytic MTH 3030 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II Geometry and Calculus II * MTH 3050 is not open to students who * MTH 3050 is not open to students who completed MTH 3020, MTH 3030, MTH 3035, or completed MTH 3020, MTH 3030, MTH 3035, or their equivalents. their equivalents. Business Program Prerequisites Business Program Prerequisites ACC 2101 Principles of Accounting 3 ACC 2101 Principles of Accounting 3 BUS 1000 Introduction to Business ** BUS 1000 Introduction to Business ** 3 3 or or 3 Business Fundamentals: BUS 1011 3 Business Fundamentals: BUS 1011 The Contemporary The Contemporary Business Landscape ** Business Landscape ** 3 3 CIS 2200 Introduction to Information Introduction to Information CIS 2200 Systems and Systems and Technologies ** Technologies ** ECO 1001 Micro-Economics 3 ECO 1001 Micro-Economics 3 ECO 1002 Macro-Economics ECO 1002 Macro-Economics 3 3 Business Statistics I ** STA 2000 STA 2000 Business Statistics I ** 3 3 FIN 3000 Principles of Finance 3 FIN 3610 Corporate Finance 3 NOTES: NOTES: ** Students who have completed MTH 4120 or ** Students who have completed MTH 4120 or

135 both MTH 3120 and MTH 4119, may have the both MTH 3120 and MTH 4119, may have the following FIN 3000 prerequisites waived: BUS following FIN 3000 prerequisites waived: BUS 1000/BUS 1011, CIS 2200, and STA 2000. 1000/BUS 1011, CIS 2200, and STA 2000. Please consult the Weissman Associate Dean’s Office to Please consult the Weissman Associate Dean’s Office to request registration permission. request registration permission. Required Courses Required Courses 3 MTH 3300 MTH 3300 Algorithms, Computers, 3 Algorithms, Computers, and Programming I and Programming I MTH 4120 Introduction to Probability MTH 4120 Introduction to Probability 4 4 *** *** 4 Theory of Interest 4 MTH 4410 MTH 4410 Theory of Interest MTH 4500 4 Students must also complete three of the Introductory Financial following five courses: Mathematics FIN 3000 3 Principles of Finance 4 MTH 4420 Actuarial Mathematics FIN 3610 3 Actuarial Mathematics II 4 Corporate Finance MTH 4421 4 Short-Term Mathematics MTH 4451 Short-Term Mathematics II 4 MTH 4452 Introductory Financial 4 MTH 4500 Mathematics *** Students who have completed MTH 3120 *** Students who have completed MTH 3120 cannot enroll in MTH 4120. They must satisfy the cannot enroll in MTH 4120. They must satisfy the probability requirement by registering for MTH probability requirement by registering for MTH 4119 as an independent study (please consult 4119 as an independent study (please consult the the Department of Mathematics). Department of Mathematics). In addition, one course must be Electives - In addition, one course must be Electives - chosen from the following list of electives: chosen from the following list of electives: 4 4 MTH 4115 Numerical Methods for Numerical Methods for MTH 4115 Differential Equations in Differential Equations in Finance Finance Introduction to Stochastic 4 MTH 4125 MTH 4125 Introduction to Stochastic 4 Processes Processes MTH 4130 Mathematics of Statistics 4 MTH 4130 Mathematics of Statistics 4 MTH 4135 Methods of Monte Carlo 3 3 MTH 4135 Methods of Monte Carlo Simulation Simulation Actuarial Mathematics MTH 4420 Actuarial Mathematics 4 MTH 4420 4 MTH 4421 4 MTH 4421 Actuarial Mathematics II 4 Actuarial Mathematics II MTH 4451 Short-Term Mathematics 4 MTH 4430 Mathematics of Inferential 4 Statistics 4 Stochastic Calculus for MTH 5500 4 MTH 4451 Short-Term Mathematics Finance MTH 4452 Short-Term Mathematics II 4

136 Introductory Financial MTH 4500 4 Mathematics 4 MTH 4600 Data Analysis and Simulation for Financial Engineers 4 Stochastic Calculus for MTH 5500 Finance The following courses are recommended, but not The following courses are recommended, but not required. They are not applicable toward the required. They are not applicable toward the major. major. Intermediate Micro- 3 ECO 3100 ECO 3100 Intermediate Micro- 3 Economics Economics ECO 3200 Intermediate Macro- 3 3 ECO 3200 Intermediate Macro- Economics Economics 41-56 Subtotal: Subtotal: 47-64 (Mathematics Program (Mathematics Program Prerequisites, Business Program Prerequisites, Business Program Prerequisites, Required Courses, and Major Prerequisites, Required Courses, and Major Elective) Elective) Total credits required for the BA degree: 120 Total credits required for the BA degree: 120 Rationale: The updates to the major are commensurate with recent additions and updates to the courses offered in the mathematics department related to actuarial science. Courses related to material for five of the primary introductory topics required by the Society of Actuaries (SOA) are now offered at least once per year. These updates enhance the mathematical rigor of the program, which will strengthen the major. Under the new proposed course of study, students will have completed classes related to material which will help them to prepare for at least four of the required SOA professional exams. These updates will allow our students to remain viable in an increasingly competitive field. Simultaneously, the additional options for the requirements will allow the students greater flexibility in pursuing the major. AIII.1.2 The following revisions are proposed for the BA in Communication Studies Program: BA in Communication Studies 36820 Program Code: HEGIS Code: 0699.00 Effective Term: Spring 2019 From: Major in Communication Studies To: Major in Communication Studies Communication Studies (CS) is both a Communication Studies (CS) is both a scholarly and scholarly and professional academic field professional academic field that focuses on processes of that focuses on processes of communication ranging from the spoken word to global communication ranging from the spoken media in interpersonal, organizational, cultural, political, word to global media in interpersonal, and international contexts. organizational, cultural, political, and

137 The major is an ideal springboard for a variety of graduate international contexts. degrees and - due to the spread of globalization and digital communication - the basis for an increasing The major is an ideal springboard for a number of new careers. variety of graduate degrees and - due to the spread of globalization and digital Interested students should contact the Department of communication - the basis for an Communication Studies at 646-312-3720 or visit the increasing number of new careers. department's website. Interested students should contact the Communication Studies Major with Specializations in Department of Communication Studies at department's 646-312-3720 or visit the * Interpersonal and Group Communication website. * Intercultural and International Communication Communication Studies Major with Specializations in * Rhetoric and Public Advocacy * Interpersonal and Group Communication * Digital Communication and Culture * Intercultural and International Communication * Rhetoric and Public Advocacy * Digital Communication and Culture Program Prerequisite Program Prerequisite PHI Ethics and Critical Thinking 3 PHI 1100 Ethics and Critical Thinking 3 1100 Required Course Required Couse COM 3 COM Introduction to Communication 3 Introduction to Studies Communication Studies 2000 2000 credits) (12 Foundation Courses Required Foundation Courses Choose one course each from the three areas that are not your credits) (9 concentration COM Communication Law and Free 3 3045 Speech Interpersonal and Group COM 3 Introduction to Digital Communication 3057 and Culture Communication COM Interpersonal 3 COM Intercultural Communication 3 3077 3069 Communication COM 3 Group Communication 3 COM Interpersonal Communication 3077 3078 Intercultural and International Concentrations – Choose one of the following ( 9 credits) Communication COM Interpersonal and Group Communication Intercultural Communication 3 3069 COM International 3 COM Group Communication 3 3076 Communication 3078

138 Gender, Ethnicity, and Race in 3 COM 3079 Communication Rhetoric and Public Advocacy Virtual Teamwork COM 3 3080 Communication Law and Gender Communication 3 COM 3 COM Free Speech (PHI 3045) 3082 3045 COM 3 COM 3 Nonverbal Communication Persuasion 3090 3070 Digital Communication and Culture COM Facework Communication: Impression 3 3095 Management COM Introduction to Digital 3 3 COM Intercultural Training, Coaching, and 3057 Communication and Culture 3096 Consulting 3 Studies in Electronic Media COM COM Conflict Resolution 3 4901 3062 3 COM Language and Social Interaction 4905 COM Work-Life Communication 3 4907 Choose one of the Concentrations – 12 following ( credits) Interpersonal and Group Intercultural and International Communication Communication Interpersonal COM International Communication 3 3 COM 3076 Communication 3077 COM Gender, Ethnicity, and Race in 3 Plus three of the following: Communication 3079 COM Group Communication 3 COM Virtual Teamwork 3 3080 3078 COM 3 Gender, Ethnicity, and Race Organizations in International 3 COM 3081 in Communication 3079 Development 3 3 COM Facework Communication: COM Virtual Teamwork Impression Management 3095 3080 COM Gender Communication 3 COM Intercultural Training, Coaching, and 3 3082 3096 Consulting COM 3 Nonverbal Communication 3 COM Globalization of English (ENG/SOC) 4015 3090 COM Conflict Resolution Selected Topics * COM 3 3 4901 4101 (Subject to departmental approval. Please check the departmental website for approved courses in this concentration)

139 COM Topics in Communication 3 Language and Social Interaction COM 3 4905 Studies 4900 (Subject to departmental approval. Please check the departmental website for approved courses in this concentration) Language and Social COM 3 Interaction 4905 Intercultural and International Rhetoric and Public Advocacy Communication 3 Intercultural Communication COM COM Classical Rhetoric 3 3064 3069 COM American Public Address 3 Plus three of the following: 3065 3 International Modern Frontiers of Rhetoric 3 COM COM Communication 3066 3076 Gender, Ethnicity, and Race COM 3 COM Persuasion 3 3079 3070 in Communication COM 3 Virtual Teamwork 3 COM Argumentation and Debate 3071 3080 COM 3 COM 3 Organizations in Elements of Legal Argumentation 3074 International Development 3081 COM 3 COM Gender Communication Markets, Media, and Meaning 3 3111 3082 COM The Globalization of English 3 COM Work-Life Communication 3 4015 (ENG 4015, SOC 4015) 4907 Selected Topics * Digital Communication and Culture 3 COM 4101 (Subject to departmental approval. Please check the departmental website for approved courses in this concentration) 3 Topics in Communication Ethics of Image Making: Film, COM 3 COM 3058 Television, and Digital Media Studies 4900 (Subject to departmental approval. Please check the departmental website for approved courses in this concentration) COM 3 Language and Social Video Communication and Production 3 COM 3059 Interaction 4905 COM Media Analysis and Criticism 3

140 3060 COM Studies in Electronic Media 3 Rhetoric and Public 3062 Advocacy COM Communication Law and 3 COM American Television Programming 3 3067 3045 Free Speech (PHI 3045) International Communication COM 3 3076 Contemporary Issues in Digital Media 3 COM Plus three of the following: 3110 COM Classical Rhetoric 3 COM 3 Markets, Media, and Meaning 3111 3064 3 Advanced Video Communication and 3 COM American Public Address COM 4059 3065 Production 3 Modern Frontiers of COM 3066 Rhetoric COM Persuasion 3 3070 3 Argumentation and Debate COM 3071 COM Elements of Legal 3 Argumentation 3074 3 Markets, Media, and COM 3111 Meaning Selected Topics * 3 COM 4101 (Subject to departmental approval. Please check the departmental website for approved courses in this concentration) Digital Communication and Culture Communication Studies Electives: Choose any two COM courses at the 3000- level, 5000 including COM Introduction to Digital 3 COM Special Topics 3 3057 4101 Communication and Culture Plus three of the following: COM Communication Research Strategies 3 4906 (recommended for students with plans for graduate studies) Internship in Business and Public 3 COM Ethics of Image Making: COM 3 5010 Communication Film, Television, and Digital 3058 Media (recommended for students planning to enter the workforce following

141 graduation) 3 COM Video Communication and 3059 Production Media Analysis and * Students may enroll in COM 4101 COM 3 Criticism 3060 more than once if the topic is different. COM Studies in Electronic Media 3 3062 3 COM American Television 3067 Programming 3 International COM Communication 3076 3 Contemporary Issues in COM Digital Media 3110 3 COM Markets, Media, and Meaning 3111 3 COM Advanced Video Communication and 4059 Production Communication Studies Electives: Choose any two COM courses at the 3000-level or above Especially recommended: COM 3 Communication Research 4906 Strategies COM Internship in Business and 3 Public Communication 5010 * Students may enroll in COM 4101 more than once if the topic is different. Subtotal: 33 (Program Prerequisite, Required Course, Subtotal: 33 (Program Prerequisite, Required Required Course, Foundation Courses, Foundation Courses, Concentration Concentration Courses, and Major Courses, and Major Electives) Electives) Total credits required for the BA degree: 120 Total credits required for the BA degree: 120 Rationale: The major in Communication Studies is now in its fourth year, and the department recently took inventory. Enrollment has exceeded expectations, but some structural elements of the major have proven inefficient. In particular, the current foundation- and required concentration-course structure is overly complicated and spreads resources too thin. Evaluations of the major have shown that the core concern of students

142 is accessibility to required and semi-required courses. By reducing the number of foundation courses from eight to four and making the previously required courses in each concentration part of the new foundation course section, we not only simplify the structure and eliminate convoluted guidelines, but are able to focus more resources on the required courses. The fact that different sections of COM 4101, the department’s special topics course, all have the same number but different content is a source of confusion for students. Adding to the confusion, our assigning different 4101s to different concentrations by course title, trying to inform students, and updating handouts and major declaration forms every semester, has proven difficult, if not unworkable. Moving 4101s to the open “Communication Studies Electives” category, while creating regular courses for some of the frequently offered special topics, will make the curriculum clear and prevent enrollment mistakes. In sum, the proposed changes eliminate confusing guidelines, inefficiencies, and management problems while simplifying the structure with a resulting clean look and organization. Most important, by tightly defining and limiting the number of required courses, the department will be able to increase section numbers, thus better addressing the imperative of students graduating in a timely manner. AIII.1.3 The following revisions are proposed for the BA in Mathematics BA in Mathematics Program: 01961 and 60019 (Macaulay Honors) Program Codes: 1701.00 HEGIS Code: Effective: Spring 2019 TO FROM The major in mathematics is designed to enable The major in mathematics is designed to enable the student to enter the marketplace (industrial or the student to enter the marketplace (industrial or educational) or to pursue further studies in educational) or to pursue further studies in mathematics or allied fields at the graduate level. mathematics or allied fields at the graduate level. Interested students should meet with an advisor in Interested students should meet with an advisor in the Department of Mathematics as early as the Department of Mathematics as early as possible for assistance in formulating an possible for assistance in formulating an appropriate course of study. appropriate course of study. Math Program Prerequisites: Math Program Prerequisites: As a preliminary requirement, students must As a preliminary requirement, students must complete the calculus prerequisite, which may be complete the calculus prerequisite, which may be achieved by any one of the six options. achieved by any one of the six options. Course Description Crs Course Description Crs Option 1 Calculus AP Exam (BC) with 8 Calculus AP Exam (BC) with Option 1 8 credits a score of 4 or 5 (transfers credits a score of 4 or 5 (transfers to Baruch as MTH 3010 to Baruch as MTH 3010 Calculus II) Calculus II) And one of the following And one of the following MTH 3020 Intermediate MTH 3020 Intermediate

143 Calculus or Calculus or MTH 3050 Multi-Variable MTH 3050 Multi-Variable and Vector Calculus * and Vector Calculus * or or Option 2 12 Option 2 Calculus AP Exam (AB) with 12 Calculus AP Exam (AB) with a score of 4 or 5 (transfers credits credits a score of 4 or 5 (transfers to Baruch as MTH 2610 to Baruch as MTH 2610 Calculus I) Calculus I) And And MTH 3010 Calculus I MTH 3010 Calculus I And one of the following And one of the following MTH 3020 Intermediate MTH 3020 Intermediate Calculus or Calculus or MTH 3050 Multi-Variable MTH 3050 Multi-Variable and Vector Calculus * and Vector Calculus * or or MTH 2610 Calculus I Option 3 12 MTH 2610 Calculus I Option 3 12 credits credits And And MTH 3010 Calculus II MTH 3010 Calculus II And one of the following And one of the following MTH 3020 Intermediate MTH 3020 Intermediate Calculus or Calculus or MTH 3050 Multi-Variable MTH 3050 Multi-Variable and Vector Calculus * and Vector Calculus * or or Option 4 MTH 2205 or MTH 2206 12-13 MTH 2205 or MTH 2206 Option 4 12-13 credits Applied Calculus credits Applied Calculus or or MTH 2207 Applied Calculus MTH 2207 Applied Calculus and Matrix Applications and Matrix Applications And the following two And the following two courses: courses: MTH 3006 Integral Calculus MTH 3006 Integral Calculus MTH 3030 Analytic MTH 3030 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II Geometry and Calculus II

144 or or MTH 2205 or MTH 2206 Option 5 MTH 2205 or MTH 2206 Option 5 12-13 12-13 Applied Calculus credits Applied Calculus credits or or MTH 2207 Applied Calculus MTH 2207 Applied Calculus and Matrix Applications and Matrix Applications And And MTH 3006 Integral Calculus MTH 3006 Integral Calculus And And MTH 3007 Infinite Series MTH 3007 Infinite Series And one of the following And one of the following MTH 3020 Intermediate MTH 3020 Intermediate Calculus or Calculus or MTH 3050 Multi-Variable MTH 3050 Multi-Variable and Vector Calculus * and Vector Calculus * or or Option 6 MTH 2630 Analytic 10 MTH 2630 Analytic Option 6 10 credits Geometry and Calculus I Geometry and Calculus I credits MTH 3030 Analytic MTH 3030 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II Geometry and Calculus II * MTH 3050 is not open to students who * MTH 3050 is not open to students who completed MTH 3020, MTH 3030, MTH 3035, or completed MTH 3020, MTH 3030, MTH 3035, or their equivalent. their equivalent. Required Courses Required Courses All students must take the following three courses: All students must take the following three courses: MTH 3300 Algorithms, Computers and 3 3 credits MTH 3300 Algorithms, Computers and Programming I credits Programming I MTH 4010 Mathematical Analysis I 3 credits MTH 4010 Mathematical Analysis I 3 credits Linear Algebra and Matrix 3 credits MTH 4100 Linear Algebra and Matrix MTH 4100 3 Methods Methods credits Electives Electives Students must complete at least 15 elective Students must complete at least 15 elective credits from the following group of courses: credits from the following group of courses: MTH 4000 Bridge to Higher 3

145 Mathematics credits Proof Writing for Advanced Proof Writing for Advanced 1 credit MTH 4009 1 credit MTH 4009 Calculus Calculus MTH 4020 Advanced Calculus II 3 Advanced Calculus II MTH 4020 3 credits credits 3 credits MTH 4030 Topology 3 MTH 4030 Topology credits Ordinary Differential 3 credits MTH 4110 Ordinary Differential 3 MTH 4110 Equations credits Equations 4 4 credits MTH 4115 Numerical Methods for Numerical Methods for MTH 4115 credits Differential Equations in Differential Equations in Finance Finance Introduction to Probability 4 credits MTH 4120 Introduction to Probability ** 4 MTH 4120 credits 4 4 credits MTH 4125 Introduction to Stochastic MTH 4125 Introduction to Stochastic Process credits Process MTH 4130 Mathematics of Statistics MTH 4130 Mathematics of Data 4 credits 4 credits Analysis Computational Methods in MTH 4135 3 credits MTH 4135 Computational Methods in 3 Probability Probability credits MTH 4140 Graph Theory 3 credits MTH 4140 Graph Theory 3 credits MTH 4145 Mathematical Modeling * 3 credits MTH 4145 Mathematical Modeling * 3 credits MTH 4150 3 credits MTH 4150 Combinatorics 3 Combinatorics credits MTH 4200 3 credits MTH 4200 Theory of Numbers 3 Theory of Numbers credits Elements of Modern Algebra 3 credits MTH 4210 Elements of Modern Algebra 3 MTH 4210 credits MTH 4220 Introduction to Modern 3 credits MTH 4220 Introduction to Modern 3 Geometry Geometry credits MTH 4230 History of Mathematics 3 credits MTH 4230 History of Mathematics 3 credits MTH 4240 Differential Geometry * 3 credits MTH 4240 Differential Geometry * 3 credits Algorithms, Computers and 3 credits MTH 4300 Algorithms, Computers and 3 MTH 4300 Programming II Programming II credits MTH 4310 Methods of Numerical 3 3 credits MTH 4310 Methods of Numerical Analysis credits Analysis MTH 4315 Introduction to Mathematical 3 credits MTH 4315 Introduction to Mathematical 3 Logic Logic credits MTH 4320 Fundamental Algorithms 3 credits MTH 4320 Fundamental Algorithms 3 credits

146 MTH 4420 4 credits 4 Actuarial Mathematics I MTH 4420 Actuarial Mathematics I credits 4 credits Actuarial Mathematics II 4 Actuarial Mathematics II MTH 4421 MTH 4421 credits MTH 4430 Mathematics of Inferential 4 Short-Term Insurance MTH 4451 4 credits credits Statistics Mathematics 4 credits Short-Term Insurance 4 MTH 4451 Introductory Financial MTH 4500 Mathematics Mathematics credits 4 credits MTH 4452 Short-Term Insurance 4 MTH 4600 Data Analysis and Mathematics II credits Simulation for Financial Engineers MTH 5010 3 credits MTH 4500 Introductory Financial 4 Advanced Calculus III * Mathematics credits 4 MTH 4600 3 credits MTH 5020 Data Analysis and Theory of Functions of a credits Simulation for Financial Complex Variable Engineers MTH 5030 Theory of Functions of Real 3 credits MTH 5010 Advanced Calculus III * 3 Variables* credits 3 4 credits MTH 5020 Theory of Functions of a MTH 5100 Partial Differential Equations Complex Variable credits and Boundary Value Problems* Stochastic Calculus for Theory of Functions of Real 4 credits MTH 5030 MTH 5500 3 Variables* credits Finance 4 MTH 5100 Partial Differential Equations credits and Boundary Value Problems* MTH 5500 Stochastic Calculus for 4 credits Finance * These courses are offered infrequently, subject * These courses are offered infrequently, subject to student demand. to student demand. ** Students may use the combination of MTH 3120 and MTH 4119 in the place of MTH 4120 as elective credit toward the major. Subtotal: 32-37 (Mathematics Program Subtotal: 32-37 (Mathematics Program Prerequisites, Required Courses, and Major Prerequisites, Required Courses, and Major Electives) Electives) Total credits required for the BA degree: 120 Total credits required for the BA degree: 120 Rationale: This update adds MTH 4000 to the list of elective course options to correct an earlier omission. A clarification was added to indicate that the combination of MTH 3120 and MTH 4119 is deemed equivalent to MTH 4120 in the major. Two new courses are being added to the electives list – MTH 4430 and MTH 4452 (this course was submitted in the May 2018 CUR). AIII.1.4 The following revisions are proposed for the MS in Financial Engineering

147 Program: MS in Financial Engineering 24276 Program Code: 1703.00 HEGIS Code: Fall 2018 Effective Term: From : MS in Financial Engineering To : MS in Financial Engineering The Baruch College Financial Engineering MS The Baruch College Financial Engineering MS Program is a professional Masters Program Program is a professional Masters Program which which graduates competitive, high-quality graduates competitive, high-quality individuals who individuals who successfully pursue careers in successfully pursue careers in quantitative finance. quantitative finance. The Master of Science in Financial Engineering The Master of Science in Financial Engineering (MFE) requires the completion of 36 credits, (MFE) requires the completion of 36 credits, five 3-credit including a 1.5 required courses, and 2 credits to be completed from including 1 credit internship course he remaining 19.5 credits . T are credits to be 21 required courses and to be completed from elective courses. Students completed from elective courses. Students entering the program with exceptional mathematical entering the program with exceptional or financial skills may be permitted to replace one or mathematical or financial skills may be more of the required courses with additional permitted to replace one or more of the required electives. courses with additional electives. The curriculum of the MFE Program is designed to provide students with the background required for The curriculum of the MFE Program is designed modeling and solving problems that arise in the to provide students with the background financial services industry across various markets required for modeling and solving problems that and asset classes. All courses are offered in the arise in the financial services industry across various markets and asset classes. All courses evening to accommodate students with work commitments. are offered in the evening to accommodate students with work commitments. (36 credits) Courses in Specialization (36 credits) Courses in Specialization (16.5 Required Courses credits) Required Courses credits) (12 Financial Markets and 3 MTH 9814 credits MTH 9814 Financial Markets and 1.5 Securities Securities credits MTH 9815 3 Software Engineering in credits MTH 9815 Software Engineering for 1.5 Finance Finance credits MTH 9821 Numerical Methods for 3 3 credits MTH 9821 Numerical Methods for Finance Finance I credits 3 Probability and Stochastic 3 credits MTH 9831 MTH 9831 Probability and credits Processes for Finance I Stochastic Processes for Finance I MTH 9902 Internship Course 1.5 credits MTH 9903 Capstone Project and 3 Presentation credits 3 credits Capstone Project and MTH 9903 Presentation

148 Elective Courses (19.5 Elective Courses (24 credits) credits) Choose from the following courses: Choose from the following courses: MTH 9760 Big Data Technologies 3 Big Data Technologies MTH 9760 3 credits credits Statistical Natural Language MTH 9796 Statistical Natural 1.5 MTH 9796 1.5 credits Processing Language Processing credits 1.5 credits MTH 9797 Advanced Data Analysis 1.5 Advanced Data Analysis MTH 9797 credits 1.5 credits MTH 9816 Fundamentals of Trading 1.5 MTH 9816 Fundamentals of Trading credits Statistics for Finance 3 credits MTH 9841 Statistics for Finance 3 MTH 9841 credits Linear and Quadratic MTH 9842 MTH 9842 Optimization Techniques 1.5 1.5 credits credits Optimization Techniques in Finance Market and Credit Risk 3 credits MTH 9845 Market and Credit Risk 3 MTH 9845 Management credits Management Elements of Structured MTH 9848 3 credits MTH 9848 Elements of Structured 3 Finance Finance credits Numerical Methods for 3 3 credits MTH 9852 Numerical Methods for MTH 9852 Finance II credits Finance II MTH 9855 Asset Allocation and 3 credits MTH 9855 Asset Allocation and 3 Portfolio Management Portfolio Management credits 3 MTH 9862 3 credits MTH 9862 Probability and Probability and Stochastic credits Stochastic Processes for Processes for Finance II Finance II 1.5 credits MTH 9863 Volatility Filtering and 1.5 MTH 9863 Volatility Filtering and Estimation Estimation credits 1.5 MTH 9864 Model Review for 1.5 credits MTH 9864 Model Review for credits Quantitative Models in Quantitative Models in Finance Finance Commodities and Futures MTH 9865 1.5 credits MTH 9865 Commodities and Futures 1.5 Trading credits Trading 1.5 Modeling and Market 1.5 credits MTH 9866 MTH 9866 Modeling and Market credits Making in Foreign Making in Foreign Exchange Exchange Time Series Analysis and MTH 9867 MTH 9867 Time Series Analysis and 3 3 credits Algorithmic Trading Algorithmic Trading credits MTH 9868 Advanced Risk and Portfolio 3 3 credits MTH 9868 Advanced Risk and Portfolio Management credits Management MTH 9871 Advanced Computational 3 3 credits MTH 9871 Advanced Computational Methods in Finance credits Methods in Finance MTH 9873 Interest Rate Models and 3 3 credits MTH 9873 Interest Rate Models and Interest Rate Derivatives Interest Rate Derivatives credits

149 MTH 9875 The Volatility Surface MTH 9875 The Volatility Surface 3 3 credits credits MTH 9876 MTH 9876 Credit Risk Models 3 Credit Risk Models 3 credits credits Interest Rate Models MTH 9877 MTH 9878 3 credits Interest Rate and Credit 3 Models credits 3 3 credits MTH 9878 Interest Rate Models MTH 9879 Market Microstructure Models credits MTH 9881 3 credits MTH 9879 Current topics in 3 Market Microstructure Models credits Mathematical Finance Fixed Income Risk Current topics in 1.5 credits MTH 9881 MTH 9882 3 Mathematical Finance credits Management 1.5 credits MTH 9882 Fixed Income Risk 1.5 Structured Security MTH 9883 Management credits Valuation in the Primary Market 1.5 MTH 9883 Structured Security Emerging Markets and MTH 9886 1.5 credits credits Inflation Modeling Valuation in the Primary Market Blockchain Technologies in 1.5 1.5 credits MTH 9886 MTH 9887 Emerging Markets and Inflation Modeling credits Finance Introduction to Applied MTH 9891 MTH 9887 Blockchain Technologies 1.5 1.5 credits Financial Econometrics in Finance credits MTH 9893 Time Series Analysis 1.5 credits MTH 9891 Introduction to Applied 1.5 Financial Econometrics credits Machine Learning 1.5 credits Time Series Analysis 1.5 MTH 9894 MTH 9893 credits Behavioral Finance MTH 9896 MTH 9894 Algorithmic Trading 1.5 1.5 credits credits Systematic Trading 1.5 credits MTH 9896 Behavioral Finance 1.5 MTH 9897 credits MTH 9898 Data Science in Finance I: 1.5 credits MTH 9897 Systematic Trading 1.5 credits Big Data in Finance Data Science in Finance II: 1.5 1.5 credits MTH 9899 Data Science in Finance MTH 9898 I: Big Data in Finance Machine Learning credits ECO 1.5 (Term I) Econometrics I 3 credits MTH 9899 Data Science in Finance II: Machine Learning 82100 credits (Term II) Financial ECO ECO 82100 (Term I) Econometrics I 3 3 credits 82100 Econometrics credits FIN 9770 Financial Markets and 3 3 credits ECO 82100 (Term II) Financial Econometrics credits Institutions FIN 9782 Futures and Forward 3 3 credits FIN 9770 Financial Markets and Institutions credits Markets FIN 9783 Investment Analysis 3 credits FIN 9782 Futures and Forward 3 Markets credits

150 FIN 9786 International Financial 3 credits FIN 9783 Investment Analysis 3 credits Markets Seminar in Finance 3 credits FIN 9786 International Financial 3 FIN 9790 Markets credits Advanced Investment Seminar in Finance 3 credits FIN 9790 FIN 9793 3 credits Analysis Options Markets 3 credits FIN 9793 Advanced Investment FIN 9797 3 credits Analysis Modern Regression 3 credits FIN 9797 Options Markets 3 STA 9700 Analysis credits STA 9701 Time Series: Forecasting 3 3 credits STA 9700 Modern Regression Analysis and Statistical Modeling credits STA 9701 Time Series: Forecasting 3 and Statistical Modeling credits Total credits required for the MA degree: 36 Total credits required for the MA degree: 36 Rationale: We propose to reduce the number of required credits to 12 credits, and to increase the number of elective credits to 24 credits, thus providing more flexibility for our students. Two of the required courses, MTH 9814 Financial Markets and Securities and MTH 9815 Software Engineering for Finance, will change from 14-week/3 credit courses to 7-week/1.5 credit courses. This will be accomplished by eliminating the teaching of programming languages (C++ and Python) from MTH 9815, and requiring the students to amass this knowledge prior to beginning the program, and by eliminating the teaching of redundant topics from stochastic calculus and numerical methods from MTH 9814. The job market for people with financial engineering skills has recently begun to shift back to more sophisticated interest rate and credit derivatives. To better equip our students for the current demands of the job market, we propose introducing a new elective course covering pricing, hedging and trading of such instruments, MTH 9877 Interest Rate and Credit Models The name of one course, MTH 9842, will be changed to Optimization Techniques in Finance in order to better reflect the content of the course, which has changed since the course was first offered. Section AIV. New Courses AIV.1.1 Department(s) Communication Studies Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Communication Studies Course Prefix COM Course Number 3096 Course Title Intercultural Training, Coaching, and Consulting Catalogue Intercultural competence is a required skill of anyone wishing to work Description internationally. This course examines how to achieve intercultural competence in domestic as well as international contexts through training, coaching, and

151 consulting. The focus will be on theories of intercultural competence and the application of intercultural training, coaching, and consulting techniques in a variety of educational and professional contexts. Topics include the use of intercultural simulation games, effective case study design, discussion and role play facilitation, workshop design, and career opportunities. The course is highly experiential and will aid students in the development of intercultural communication skills as well as skills for intercultural careers. Prerequisites COM 1010 3 Credits Contact Hours 3 [x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability ____ Not Applicable __x__ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Spring 2019 Effective Term Rationale: Intercultural Training, Coaching, and Consulting is a standard course in Intercultural and International Communication programs and applicable to Interpersonal and Group as well as Corporate Communication programs. The course was created to expand the electives roster of the Intercultural and International Communication (IIC) as well as the Interpersonal and Group Communication (IGC) concentration of the growing Communication Studies (CS) major. It has been offered once as a special topics course (COM 4101), and has been very well received. COM 3096 will be offered every year with a projected enrollment of 28 students. The course will serve as a concentration elective [ Intercultural and International Communication or Interpersonal and Group Communication ] and as major elective within the Communication Studies major (NYSED program code 36820); as an elective within the Business Communication major with specialization in Corporate Communication (NYSED program codes 86011 and 60002); as an elective within the minor in Communication Studies; or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, and BS degrees. AIV.1.2 Department(s) Communication Studies Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate

152 Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Communication Studies Subject Areas Course Prefix COM Course Number 4901 Course Title Conflict Resolution This course explores conflict resolution in interpersonal, intergroup, intercultural, Catalogue and international communication. Topics include models, theories, causes, and Description manifestations of conflict; strategies and tactics of conflict resolution, including de-escalation, mediation, and collaborative conflict communication; and factors influencing conflict communication, including conflict styles and cross-cultural differences. Prerequisites COM 1010 Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 [x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability ____ Not Applicable __x__ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: The Department of Communication Studies offers disparate topics with the same capstone course number: COM 4900 Topics in Communication Studies. While this is not a problem with respect to capstones in the minor, major electives in Communication Studies, or electives in Corporate Communication (all of the 4900s are suitable), it is a problem with respect to the concentration electives in IGC and IIC (the other 4900s are not a good fit for those concentrations). This is a constant source of confusion for students in the IGC and IIC concentrations. We propose to give the Conflict Resolution course a unique number (e.g., 4901) to eliminate the confusion and prevent enrollment mistakes. COM 4901 will be offered every semester with a projected enrollment of 28 students. This course will serve as a concentration elective [ Interpersonal and Group Communication or Intercultural and International Communication ] and as a major elective within the Communication Studies major (NYSED program code 36820); as an elective within the Business Communication major with specialization in Corporate Communication (NYSED program codes 86011 and 60002); as an elective

153 or capstone within the minor in Communication Studies; or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, and BS degrees. AIV.1.3 Department(s) Communication Studies Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Communication Studies Course Prefix COM Course Number 4907 Course Title Work-Life Communication Catalogue The purpose of this class is to explore and critique historic and contemporary work and family discourses and practices in U.S. society. Public, organizational, Description and family/interpersonal communication perspectives and theories provide students understand and critically evaluate work-life policies and interactions in their everyday lives. Prerequisites COM 1010 Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) ____ Not Applicable Course Applicability __x__ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Spring 2019 Effective Term Rationale: Work-Life Communication was offered as a special topics course (COM 4101), and was well received by students. COM 4907 will be offered once per year with a projected enrollment of 28 students. This course will serve as a concentration elective [ Interpersonal and Group Communication or Rhetoric and Public Advocacy ] and as a major elective within the Communication Studies major (NYSED program code 36820); as an elective within the Business Communication major with specialization in Corporate Communication (NYSED program codes 86011

154 and 60002); as an elective or capstone within the minor in Communication Studies; or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, and BS degrees. AIV.1.4 Department(s) Fine and Performing Arts Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Theatre Subject Area Course Prefix THE 3020 Course Number Applied Theatre Workshop Course Title This course is an introduction to applied theatre, a field that uses theatre as a Catalogue Description medium for real-world education, activism, therapy, and civic engagement. We will study key forms of applied theatre including educational theatre, Playback, Theatre of the Oppressed, prison theatre, drama therapy, and other approaches to using theatre for a practical purpose. Students will design and carry out a collaborative, community-based applied theatre project. Prerequisites THE 1041 or THE 1043; or departmental permission Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 [x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability ____ Not Applicable __x__ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: Applied theatre is a rapidly growing field that prepares students to use theatre-based skills in a wide range of applications. For students in the college’s Ad Hoc Major in Arts Administration (Theatre specialization), particularly for the majority who are interested in pursuing non-performance based theatre careers, applied theatre offers an introduction to a world of theatre organizations and opportunities that they might not otherwise encounter. For students in our theatre minor, applied theatre

155 offers a way to merge their theatre skills with careers in other fields, including teaching, politics, community development, museum work, social services, and law. As such, applied theatre adds an important practical component to our existing theatre program and offers students access to a growing array of professional pathways. THE 3020 will be offered once every two years with a projected enrollment of 20 students. It may serve as an elective within the recommended sequence for the Arts Administration (Theatre specialization) liberal arts ad hoc major (NYSED program codes 01975 and 60016); as an elective within the Theatre minor; or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, and BS degrees. AIV.1.5 History Department(s) Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level History Subject Area HIS Course Prefix Course Number 3065 Course Title The History and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt Catalogue This is an introductory course to the history and archaeology of ancient Egypt Description and Nubia from early dynastic times until the Roman Period. This course pairs rich archaeological material with documentary sources in order to fully document life in ancient Egypt and Nubia. Experiential learning, through museum visits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Brooklyn Museum, is integrated into the course. Prerequisites ENG 2150 and one 1000-level history course; or instructor permission Credits 3 3 Contact Hours [x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) ____ Not Applicable Course Applicability __x__ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Spring 2019

156 Rationale: This class contributes to History majors and minors. HIS 3065 will also have a global learning component through a COIL (Collaborative International Online Learning) collaboration. HIS 3065 will be offered every two years with a projected enrollment of 35 students. It may serve as an “Africa” geographical area elective within the History major (NYSED program codes 01972 and 60012); as an elective within the history minor; or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, and BS degrees. AIV.1.6 History and the Asian and Asian American Studies Program Department(s) Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area History, Asian and Asian American Studies Course Prefix HIS/AAS Course Number 3780 Vietnam at War Course Title Catalogue This is an upper-level course on the Vietnam War. It introduces students to the historical context of the war by analyzing primary sources from fiction, film, Description memoirs, and photography as a means to integrate the experiences of various participants. This course will be heavily weighted towards the Vietnamese, providing perspectives often overlooked or marginalized in American histories of the war. ENG 2150 and one 1000-level history course; or instructor permission Prerequisites Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 [x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability ____ Not Applicable __x__ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Spring 2019

157 Rationale: This class contributes to History majors and minors. HIS 3870 will be offered every two years with a projected enrollment of 40 students. It may serve as an “Asia” geographical area elective within the History major (NYSED program codes 01972 and 60012); as an elective within the history minor; or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, and BS degrees. AIV.1.7 Department(s) Mathematics Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Mathematics MTH Course Prefix 2009 Course Number Precalculus Course Title Catalogue This course integrates material from pre-calculus with introductory topics from Description applied calculus, including a detailed study of functions, limits and continuity, the circle, tangent lines, rates of change, differentiation of algebraic functions, matrices, and systems of linear equations. Applications from economics and finance will be included and the use of the TI 89/92 calculator as well as Excel will be required. Students may receive credit for MTH 2009 or MTH 2003, not both. These courses may substitute for each other in the F-grade replacement policy. (This course is also not open to students who completed MTH 2000, 2001, 2010, 2030, 2205, 2206, 2207, 2610, or 2630 or any mathematics course at the 3000-level or above.) NOTE: The policy on repeating courses covers any combination of MTH 2009 and MTH 2003, e.g., one course taken three times, or a one-and-two combination. All combinations will be treated identically as three attempts. Prerequisites MTH 1023 or departmental permission Credits 3 Contact Hours 4.5 Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability ____ Not Applicable ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures __x__ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression

158 __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Spring 2019 Effective Term Rationale: This course covers the same content as MTH 2003 Precalculus and Elements of Calculus, and is designed for the students who complete MTH 1023 Intermediate and College Algebra. As these students initially required the co-requisite model to cover the prerequisite material, this course will use the same delivery method as its prerequisite, meeting more frequently, and it will have a required tutoring component administered by SACC (Student Academic Consulting Center). This proposal does not exclude students who are eligible to take MTH 2003 from taking MTH 2009 in its place with departmental permission. In particular, it may make educational sense for students who fail MTH 2003 to instead take MTH 2009 and use it for F replacement.) MTH 2009 will be offered every semester with a projected enrollment of 200 students (25 students per section). It may be used as a math program prerequisite for the Biological Sciences major (NYSED program code 35195), as a math program prerequisite for the BA in Economics (NYSED program codes 09171 and 60008), as a Pathways Required Core: Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning course (per the 5/4/18 CCCRC approval), or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, or BS degrees. AIV.1.8 Mathematics Department(s) Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Mathematics Course Prefix MTH Course Number 4430 Course Title Mathematics of Inferential Statistics This class provides a calculus-based introduction to inferential statistics. Basic Catalogue Description concepts of random sampling and statistics including confidence intervals, bias, the method of moments, percentile matching, and sampling distribution estimators will be covered. Additional topics include hypothesis testing using concepts such as the t-test, Chi-square test, goodness-of-fit test, and the Neyman-Pearson Lemma; maximum likelihood estimators; Bayes estimators; sufficient and robust statistics; information criteria; and an introduction to inference on linear models. Prerequisites MTH 4120; or MTH 3120 and MTH 4119 Credits 4 Contact Hours 4 Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability ____ Not Applicable

159 __x__ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: This course intended as an introduction to inferential statistics from a mathematical perspective. This course will cover all of the topics required for the Society of Actuaries’ updated Validation by Educational Experience certification requirements for mathematical statistics. Other topics which will be useful for students in actuarial science are included to enhance the relevance for students within the actuarial science major. These topics are not covered in MTH 4130 Mathematics of Statistics, but they are crucial topics for students in actuarial science and statistics, so a new course in inferential statistics needs to be created. This course is highly mathematical, and all topics will be calculus-based. MTH 4430 will be offered every semester with a projected enrollment of 20-35 students. It may be used as an elective within the Actuarial Science major (NYSED program codes 82292 and 60001); as an elective within the Mathematics major (NYSED program codes 01961 and 60019); as an elective or capstone course within the minor in Mathematics; as an elective for the BA in Statistics (NYSED program codes 01962 and 60028); or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, and BS degrees. AIV.1.9 Department(s) Psychology Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Psychology PSY Course Prefix Course Number 3061 Course Title Positive Psychology Catalogue Positive Psychology is the scientific study of optimal human functioning. This Description course explores the history, theoretical perspectives, empirical research, and evidence based applications of Positive Psychology. Topics covered include happiness, well-being, flow, peak-experience, self-esteem, resilience, gratitude, creativity, and mindfulness. Through critical review of research and primary source readings, integrated multimedia, and experiential activities, students will gain an in depth understanding of the foundations, relevance, and applications of this expanding field. Prerequisites PSY 1001 Credits 3 Contact Hours 3

160 Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) ____ Not Applicable Course Applicability __x__ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: The field of Positive Psychology emerged to fill the void of research into states of optimal human functioning and fulfillment, and to facilitate the promotion of well-being through research-based interventions. Since being introduced as a new branch of psychology in 1999 by Martin Seligman, the field of Positive Psychology has generated a trove of empirical research and academic study on both the undergraduate and graduate levels across the country and around the world. Several peer- reviewed journals bolster this burgeoning field, including the Journal of Positive Psychology (est. 2006), International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology (est. 2016), Journal of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing (est. 2017), and the Journal of Happiness Studies (est. 2000), along with steady research published within journals across the broader field of psychology. A course in Positive Psychology will provide students with the opportunity to critically review research findings and primary source readings; learn of empirically based applications to clinical, organizational and educational settings; and stimulate original thought through written assignments, on-line reflections, and in-class presentations. PSY 3061 will be offered every year with a projected enrollment of 40 students. It may serve as an applied elective within the Psychology major (NYSED program codes 01963 and 60023); as an applied elective within the minor in Psychology; or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, and BS degrees. AIV.1.10 Department(s) SEEK Career [x] Undergraduate [] Graduate Academic Level [ ] Regular [ x ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area First Year Seminar Course Prefix FYS Course Number 0001 Course Title SEEK Summer Seminar Catalogue The SEEK Summer Seminar is a six-week pre-college preparation program that Description prepares incoming first-year SEEK students to succeed in college via workshops

161 designed to develop academic skills, support their transition into college, clarify intent through introspection, and introduce students to the SEEK community and other communities on campus. Prerequisites Students must have graduated H.S. and be accepted as incoming SEEK first- year students Co-requisites 0-credit immersion math based on math placement Credits 0 Contact Hours 6 Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability __x__ Not Applicable ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Summer 2018 Rationale: The SEEK Summer Seminar is an early extension of the existing SEEK freshman seminars sections - FRO 1000 and FRO 2000. It is an early start to, and is integrated with, the existing SEEK FRO courses. SEEK students are admitted to the college with SAT scores and College Admissions Averages below those that the college would normally accept. These students are also income-eligible (low-income), facing substantial financial hardship. The SEEK Summer Seminar is an intensive program that will serve as the start for students to develop their skills to handle the rigors of college work, support their transition from high school to college, and provide tools SEEK students need to succeed alongside their regularly admitted peers. It is the start of building connections and relationships between the SEEK team, peer mentors and students, and between the students themselves to form new communities. These connections support student success during the first year and beyond. FYS 0001 will be offered every summer with a projected enrollment of 150 students. This course is graded on a pass/repeat basis. The following recommendations of the Graduate Affairs Committee were approved at the Mildred and George Weissman School of Arts and Sciences Faculty Meeting on May 1, 2018 effective the Spring 2019 semester, pending approval of the Board of Trustees. AIV.1.11

162 Department(s) Communication Studies [] Undergraduate [x] Graduate Career Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Communication Studies Subject Area Course Prefix COM 9670 Course Number Course Title Global Communication, Media, and Culture Catalogue This graduate seminar is designed to expand and enhance students’ understanding of the dynamics of transcultural communication on a global scale. Description The course will assist students in becoming knowledgeable about and improving intercultural communication skills through a focus on theory, communicative tools, and critical analysis. Prerequisites none Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability __x__ Not Applicable ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Spring 2019 Effective Term Rationale: This course was developed to respond to and amplify students’ increasing interest in and attention to global flows of media and culture. The course prioritizes a dialogic approach to global communication, and the readings and content are designed to be inclusive of non-dominant perspectives. Designed as a thematic overview of some of the major issues and problems that arise in instances of intercultural communication, this course will prepare students to be culturally intelligent members of an increasingly global workforce. COM 9670 will be offered every year with a projected enrollment of 25 students. It may be used as an elective for the MA in Corporate Communication (NYSED 22302). AIV.1.12

163 Department(s) Communication Studies [] Undergraduate [x] Graduate Career Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Communication Studies Subject Area Course Prefix COM 9671 Course Number Course Title Organizational Responses to Social Movements and Social Media Catalogue Terms like “Corporate Social Responsibility," "Corporate Citizenship," and "Sustainable Development” have become catchphrases for movements within Description corporations and amongst consumers. In this class, we will consider the historical backgrounds of contemporary social movements as a way to contextualize contemporary discussions. We will study the organizational strategies of social movements and the effects of social movements on corporate culture and marketing before the emergence of the Internet and social media platforms. From this historical context, we will examine the interactions between and permutations of contemporary corporations, social movements, and social media platforms. Students will be evaluated through written reflection papers, a term paper, and in-class presentations. Prerequisites none Credits 3 3 Contact Hours [x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability __x__ Not Applicable ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: This course has been developed to prepare students for a diverse, cross-cultural corporate environment by encouraging students to seek out and analyze multiple interpretations of contemporary social movements. Students will first study historic social movements, and then will contextualize contemporary movements that have used social media to advance their causes. This dual historic and contemporary approach encourages students to contextualize contemporary events and design policy

164 proposals which are informed by the success and failures of past reforms. COM 9671 will be offered every year with a projected enrollment of 25 students. It may be used as an elective for the MA in Corporate Communication (NYSED 22302). AIV.1.13 Department(s) Communication Studies [] Undergraduate [x] Graduate Career Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Communication Studies Subject Area Course Prefix COM Course Number 9672 Course Title Visual Culture This course examines the role of visual culture in the history and contemporary Catalogue Description processes of globalization and global cultural flows. Exploring the concept of the visual construction of the social field, the course compares the means by which cultures visualize themselves and frame encounters with outsiders. The course provides a survey of contemporary theoretical engagements with cultural memory, consumerism, and colonialism and decolonization, looking at the role played by visual culture in changing concepts of national identity, globalization, and cultural politics. The course examines the tensions between the emerging identities of transnationalism and globalization and the traditional frameworks of national memory and upon the role of visual culture in the unfolding development of globalization. Prerequisites none Credits 3 3 Contact Hours [x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) __x__ Not Applicable Course Applicability ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Spring 2019

165 Rationale: This course was developed in response to growing student interest in confronting the increasing importance of visual culture in shaping business practices, consumer behavior, and processes of individual and national identity formation across the globe. The course responds to recent scholarly and disciplinary reconceptualization of the fields of international communication, media studies, critical theory, and art history in order to bring current scholarly insights and methods to the curriculum. COM 9672 will be offered every year with a projected enrollment of 25 students. It may be used as an elective for the MA in Corporate Communication (NYSED 22302). AIV.1.14 Communication Studies Department(s) Career [] Undergraduate [x] Graduate Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Communication Studies COM Course Prefix Course Number 9673 Course Title Theories of Globalization and Culture Catalogue This course examines issues related to the globalization of communication, culture, and media. Beginning with a historiography of these terms, the course Description will examine multiple theoretical perspectives and case studies of cultural meeting, clash, and coalescence. Positive and negative aspects of globalizations will be explored through historic readings and contemporary case studies. Prerequisites none Credits 3 3 Contact Hours [x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability __x__ Not Applicable ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World

166 Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: This course responds to student requests for an internationalization of the curriculum and a foundation in the theoretical issues effecting their studies and careers. The course provides a solid theoretical grounding in Communication theory regarding globalization, and then invites students to construct case studies and policy proposals that address their specific interests. From this class, students will be better versed in globalization theory and practice, and will have a detailed understanding of the positive and negative effects of globalization. COM 9673 will be offered every year with a projected enrollment of 25 students. It may be used as an elective for the MA in Corporate Communication (NYSED 22302). AIV.1.15 Department(s) Communication Studies Career [] Undergraduate [x] Graduate Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Communication Studies Subject Area Course Prefix COM Course Number 9674 Course Title International Perspectives on Digital and Media Literacy Catalogue This course will create a history of media literacy and digital literacy by focusing Description on how these discourses develop in relationship to changing industrial, technological, and political landscapes. In this pursuit, we will be contrasting between how these concepts have been formulated differently at different times in different regions including the U.S., Canada, the UK, Latin America, and East Asia. Throughout the course students will be given the opportunity to directly engage with practitioners to get a more robust idea of the pedagogical aspects of media literacy and digital literacy training. Prerequisites none Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability __x__ Not Applicable ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression

167 __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Spring 2019 Effective Term Rationale: Though scholars and practitioners hotly debate the meaning of media literacy and digital literacy, they all agree that a critical understanding of the technological capabilities, political context, and cultural values of contemporary media is an essential part of being both a communication professional and a citizen. This course seeks to cultivate a critical understanding of how we consume and use media by providing a history of the most significant experiments and debates within this subfield as well as an opportunity for students to assess in detail the training strategies developed by a media or digital literacy training program of their choice. After completing this course, students will be able to reflect more critically on how meaning is constructed through technology in their professional and personal lives. COM 9674 will be offered every year with a projected enrollment of 25 students. It may be used as an elective for the MA in Corporate Communication (NYSED 22302). AIV.1.16 Department(s) Mathematics [] Undergraduate [x] Graduate Career Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Mathematics Course Prefix MTH Course Number 9877 Course Title Interest Rate and Credit Models The course introduces mathematical models used to price and risk manage Catalogue Description financial derivatives in the interest rate and credit derivatives markets. The course offers a thorough introduction to all major quantitative methodologies currently used in the financial industry, including curve construction, volatility modeling, term structure modeling, credit risk, and counterparty credit risk modeling. Prerequisites MTH 9814, MTH 9831 Credits 3 Contact Hours 3.0 (14 weeks; 3 hours per week) Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability __x__ Not Applicable ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option

168 ____ English Composition __ World Cultures ____ Mathematics __ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail _ ____ Science __ Creative Expression __ Individual and Society __ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Rationale: Interest rate and credit derivatives markets are by far the largest financial markets. Knowledge of interest rate and credit products and mathematical models describing them is in high demand across the financial industry. The course provides an in-depth overview of the most common interest rate and credit products and their mathematical modeling, and will enhance the competitiveness of our students in the job market. This is an elective course in the Financial Engineering MS Program. MTH 9877 will be offered every year with a projected enrollment of 35 students. It may serve as an elective for the MS in Financial Engineering (NYSED program code 24276). Section AV. Changes in Existing Courses AV.1.1 Change in Course Title and Description to be offered by the Library CUNYfirst Course 092492 ID FROM TO Library Departments Departments n/c Course LIB 4900 Social Informatics Course LIB 4900 Advanced Topics in Information Studies n/c Prerequisite ENG 2100 and two 3000- Prerequisite level LIB courses, or departmental permission Hours 3 Hours n/c Credits n/c Credits 3 Description Social informatics can be This course serves as the Description defined as the study of the capstone for the Information Studies minor. Students will production, distribution and engage in a focused analysis of consumption of information a selected topic in information from social and studies and the debates around organizational perspectives. In this course, students will it, from the local to the global. analyze systems of Discussions will include the information in context to gain social, political, psychological, insight into the basic and ethical aspects of principles of social information and communication informatics, as well as technologies. Students will relevant social and moral develop and undertake a

169 semester-long, original research issues. This course satisfies project related to the course the capstone requirement of the Tier III Library Minor. This topic. course may serve as the capstone course for students who have completed two 3000-level courses chosen from the minor course listing for the Library minor. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Effective Spring 2019 Rationale: Social Informatics is just one of many advanced topics in information studies that may be taught for the capstone. The change allows for other advanced topics in information studies to be taught for the capstone which will draw from the broad knowledge and expertise of department faculty. The research project, which is the focal point of the course, gives students an opportunity to apply and develop the information skills they have acquired in the previous courses in the sequence, while at the same time examining in detail aspects of an information studies topic. AV.1.2 Change in Course Prerequisites to be offered by the Mathematics Department CUNYfirst Course 093155

170 ID FROM TO Mathematics Departments Departments n/c Course MTH 2205 Applied Calculus n/c Course Prerequisite MTH 2003 or MTH 2009 with a Prerequisite MTH 2003 grade of C- or better 4 Hours n/c Hours 3 Credits n/c Credits n/c Description This course will include the Description first and second derivative tests, optimization, exponential and logarithmic functions, Riemann sums, areas, antiderivatives and business applications. This course is not open to students who have completed MTH 2201, 2206, 2207 or 2610. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition _x__ Mathematics __x__ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Effective Fall 2018

171 Rationale: Enrollment Management has produced significant data indicating the strongest predictor of student success in a first calculus course is their mastery of precalculus. Consequently, effective with the fall 2018 semester, the prerequisites for MTH 2205 and MTH 2207 are being changed to include a minimum grade. This action is paired with the two-year repeat for mastery pilot program for precalculus courses. AV.1.3 Change in Course Prerequisites and Description to be offered by the Mathematics Department CUNYfirst Course 093157 ID TO FROM Mathematics Departments n/c Departments Course Course n/c MTH 2207 Applied Calculus and Matrix Applications Prerequisite Placement or completion of Prerequisite Placement or completion of MTH 2000 or MTH 2001, or the MTH 2000 or MTH 2001, or equivalent with a grade of C- or the equivalent. better 4 Hours n/c Hours 4 Credits Credits n/c This course contains the Description This course contains the Description calculus included in MTH 2003 calculus included in MTH and MTH 2205 and the matrix 2003 and MTH 2205 and the algebra found in MTH 2003. matrix algebra found in MTH Topics to be discussed include 2003. Topics to be discussed algebra of matrices; inverses; include algebra of matrices; linear systems of equations; inverses; linear systems of Gaussian elimination; intuitive equations; Gaussian and geometric definitions of the elimination; intuitive and limit; derivatives of algebraic, geometric definitions of the exponential and logarithmic limit; derivatives of algebraic, functions; optimization exponential and logarithmic problems; related rates; curve functions; optimization sketching and an introduction to problems; related rates; curve integration. (Not open to sketching and an introduction students who have completed to integration. (Not open to MTH 2003, MTH 2009 students who have completed , 2205, or MTH 2003, 2205, or 2610.) 2610.) Requirement Requirement Designation Designation [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education ____ Not Applicable General ____ Not Applicable

172 Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition __x__ Mathematics __x__ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Effective Fall 2018 Rationale: Enrollment Management has produced significant data indicating the strongest predictor of student success in a first calculus course is their mastery of precalculus. Consequently, effective with the fall 2018 semester, the prerequisites for MTH 2205 and MTH 2207 are being changed to include a minimum grade. This action is paired with the two-year repeat for mastery pilot program for precalculus courses. The course description is being updated to include that MTH 2207 is not open to students who take MTH 2009, a new precalculus course being proposed by the Mathematics department. AV.1.4 Change in Course Title, Prerequisites, and Description to be offered by the Mathematics Department CUNYfirst Course 093169 ID TO FROM Mathematics n/c Departments Departments Course : R MTH 3040 Actuarial Seminar Science MTH 3040 Actuarial Course Theory and Problem for Actuaries Seminar MTH 3020 or MTH 3030 , and Prerequisite MTH 3020 or MTH 3030 or MTH Prerequisite 3050 MTH 4120 Hours n/c Hours 2 Credits 2 Credits n/c Mathematics 3040 is the Description This course is an introduction to Description study and analysis of R programming with applications in actuarial science. challenging examples in such areas as differentiation and Although many applications may integration, infinite series, be related to topics in theory of equations, complex probability, interest theory,

173 number, and function of one insurance and risk modeling, and mathematical finance, no and several variables. Techniques taught are prior knowledge of these topics is presupposed. beyond the scope and level presented for the comparatively routine types of questions encountered in ordinary mathematics classes and are designed to develop the kinds of approaches and thinking required for actuarial work and examinations. (Direct actuarial applications are not included.) Requirement Requirement Designation Designation [ x ] Yes [ ] No [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Spring 2019 Effective Rationale: The course description and title are being updated to reflect a change in the focus of the course commensurate with changes within the actuarial profession. The R programming language is becoming more important within the field of actuarial science, and students are expected to have a working knowledge of the language when analyzing modern insurance products. This course will provide an introduction to basic R syntax, programming techniques, and statistical data analysis tools that are recommended by the Society of Actuaries.

174 AV.1.5 Change in Course Description to be offered by the Mathematics Department CUNYfirst Course 093173 ID FROM TO n/c Departments Mathematics Departments Course n/c Course MTH 3300 Algorithms, Computers, and Programming I Prerequisite n/c MTH 2610 (2010), MTH Prerequisite 2630, MTH 3006, or MTH 3010; or permission of the department. Hours 4 Hours n/c Credits n/c Credits 3 Description The objective of this course is The objective of this course is to Description to provide the basic provide the basic knowledge knowledge and experience and experience necessary to necessary to use computers use computers effectively by effectively by developing an developing an understanding of understanding of the interplay the interplay between the between the computer, its computer, its associated associated languages, and languages, and the structured the structured development of development of algorithms. algorithms. Topics to be Topics to be covered include covered include computer computer organization and organization and operation, operation, data representation, data representation, algorithm algorithm development and development and specification, and programming specification, and languages and techniques. programming languages and These topics are developed techniques. These topics are through the study and developed through the study application of a higher-level and application of a higher- language. MTH 3300 is not open level language. MTH 3300 is to students who have completed not open to students who CIS 3120. CIS 3100 or have completed CIS 3120. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable General __x__ Not Applicable

175 Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Effective Fall 2018 Rationale: This serves as a correction to the course description revision in the January 2018 CUR. Due to the updated articulation between courses in the Departments of Mathematics and Information Systems and Statistics, students who have completed CIS 3100 now are eligible to enroll in MTH 3300. AV.1.6 Change in Course Title, Prerequisites, and Description to be offered by the Mathematics Department CUNYfirst Course 093190 ID FROM TO Departments Mathematics Departments n/c Course MTH 4130 Mathematics of Data Course MTH 4130 Mathematics of Analysis Statistics MTH 4120 Prerequisite MTH 4120; or MTH 3120 and Prerequisite MTH 4119 Hours Hours n/c 4 Credits 4 Credits n/c Description This course is an introduction This course is an introduction to Description statistics with a focus on data to linear single and multiple analysis. Topics covered during regression analysis and linear time series models. Topics the first half of the course include confidence intervals, include: least squares hypothesis testing, and linear estimates, model utility tests such as the adjusted R2 and regression. The second half of overall F tests, significance the course concerns time-series testing of independent with topics including exponential

176 variables, confidence and smoothing models, autoregressive and moving prediction intervals, dummy average models. Topics and variables, autocorrelation, methods in cluster analysis such seasonal analysis, exponential smoothing, and as K-means cluster analysis and forecasting. hierarchical cluster analysis will be covered near the end of the semester. Students are introduced to practical data analysis skills using statistical software such as SAS or MATLAB, or using the R programming language. Not open to students who have completed STA 3155. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation [ x ] Yes [ ] No [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) __x__ Not Applicable General Education __x__ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Effective Spring 2019 Rationale: The course description and title are being updated to reflect the course content more accurately than the previous description. This course covers regression and time-series analysis techniques in statistics. Other statistical topics in inferential statistics will be covered in the newly created MTH 4430 course. The addition of cluster analysis will enhance the relevance of the course for

177 actuarial science majors who will be required to know this material for the newly created SRM exam offered by the Society of Actuaries. An additional remark is being added to proscribe students from taking both MTH 4130 and STA 3155 as the two classes cover similar content. AV.1.7 Change in Course Prerequisites and Description to be offered by the Mathematics Department 093212 CUNYfirst Course ID FROM TO n/c Departments Departments Mathematics Course Course n/c MTH 4500 Introductory Financial Mathematics MTH 3020 or MTH 3030; and Prerequisite MTH 3020 or MTH 3030 or MTH Prerequisite MTH 3120 or MTH 4120 3050 ; and MTH 3120 or MTH 4120 4 Hours n/c Hours 4 n/c Credits Credits Description This course is an introduction Description This course is an introduction to to the mathematical methods mathematical methods used in used in finance and their finance and their applications. practical No prior knowledge of finance is The applications. course begins with a review Basic financial assumed. of discrete and continuous instruments such as forward probability, including and futures contracts, options, Brownian motion. The finite and bonds are introduced. The difference methods, Monte course is built around three major themes: (i) risk-free Carlo simulation, Newton’s method, and the least assets and the term structure of squares problem will be interest rates; (ii) Markowitz portfolio optimization and the studied. These methods will Capital Asset Pricing Model; (iii) be applied to solve the Black- No Arbitrage principle and its Scholes equation, price applications including pricing American options, price exotic and hedging of derivative options, and find the zero securities in the context of the curves. Other methods multi-period binomial model and include forwards and futures, arbitrage pricing theory, its continuous analog, the Black- bonds and swaps, Scholes model. Students are bootstrapping, European and expected to use their knowledge American options, put-call of probability, single and multi- parity, binomial trees for variable calculus, and basic options pricing, and exotic linear algebra to master options. mathematical finance theories and apply them in real world situations. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation

178 Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Effective Spring 2019 Rationale: MTH 3050 is being added as a possible prerequisite to correct an earlier oversight. The course description has been updated to reflect a shift in focus that is consistent with changes made by the Society of Actuaries along with changes in the financial industry itself. AV.1.8 Change in Course Title, Prerequisites, and Description to be offered by the Natural Sciences Department CUNYfirst Course 090334 (BIO 3030) and 091501 (ENV 3030) ID FROM TO Departments Natural Sciences Departments n/c BIO/ENV 3030 Principles of Course Course BIO/ENV 3030 History and Evolution of Life Evolution : Processes, Patterns, and the History of Life A one-semester college natural Prerequisite A one-semester college Prerequisite *, science course with laboratory natural science course with laboratory and departmental preferably in environmental permission. studies or biology, and departmental permission. * Note: This includes the

179 college’s paired Pathways science courses: BIO 1011L and BIO 1012; BIO 1015L and BIO 1016; CHM 1003L and CHM 1004; ENV 1003L and ENV 1004; or PHY 2001 and PHY 2002L Hours n/c 2.0 lecture, 1.0 recitation, 2.0 Hours lab 4 Credits n/c Credits Description This course focuses on the Description This course examines the impact and applications of principles of biological evolution. Darwin's theory of evolution Topics include the impact and application of Darwin’s theory of in biology and covers the natural selection, and evolution of life from its contemporary concepts of beginnings to modern time. adaptation, molecular evolution, Topics include the ecology of populations, the origin of formation of new species, the fossil record, biogeography, and eukaryotic cells, the evolution and extinction of dinosaurs, principles of classification. and the use of DNA data as Laboratory and field work may include trips to museums , zoos evidence of relationship. and field observations. Students Sources include texts, will present oral reports on articles, museum displays, current discoveries and Laboratory and the Internet. controversies related to and field work include trips to evolutionary biology. museums and field observations. Students will This course is equivalent to ENV present oral reports on 3030. Students will receive current discoveries and credit for either BIO 3030 or controversies related to ENV 3030. These courses may evolutionary biology , and they substitute for each other in the F will write reports and Web grade replacement policy. pages. This course is equivalent to ENV 3030. Students will receive credit for either BIO 3030 or ENV 3030. These courses may not substitute for each other in the F grade replacement policy. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.)

180 General Education __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Education Component ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Spring 2019 Effective Rationale: This course in evolution has not been offered for many years, and the revised version will fill an intellectual gap in the offerings of the Natural Sciences Department. BIO/ENV 3030 will be offered once per year with a projected enrollment of 22 students. It may be used as an elective within the Interdisciplinary Minor in Environmental Sustainability and within the Natural Sciences Minor; as an elective within the Biological Sciences Major (NYSED program code 35195), or as a general elective for the BA, BBA, or BS degrees. AV.1.9 Change in Course Number, Prerequisites and Description to be offered by the Political Science Department CUNYfirst Course 093756 ID FROM TO Political Science n/c Departments Departments State and Local Course POL 3220 State and Local POL 2220 Course Government Government Prerequisite ENG 2100 or equivalent Prerequisite ENG 2100 or equivalent , and one of the following: POL 1101 or 2353; or departmental permission. Hours 3 Hours n/c Credits 3 Credits n/c Description A study of Description This course examines the legislative and the administrative process of legislative and administrative states, counties, process of states, counties,

181 municipalities, and special municipalities, and special the districts. Students analyze districts. This course analyzes increasing importance of the the increasing importance of administrative and the executive the administrative and the in modern government; the executive in modern relationship among the government; the relationship executive, legislative, and among the executive, judicial branches of the legislative, and judicial government; and the influence branches of the government; of political parties, pressure and the influence of political groups, and public opinion upon parties, pressure groups, and legislation and administration. public opinion upon legislation and administration. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Effective Spring 2019 Rationale: Students want to learn more about three basic authorities—police, health and welfare regulations, and land use— which state and local governments control and have more immediate impacts on their daily lives as citizens. But few upper-division level courses are currently provided, except some introductory or survey level courses. Faculty in department want to satisfy such a growing student demand. Also, currently, as a 2000 level course, POL 2220 can be used by students only as an elective or to satisfy political science major requirements. By elevating it to a 3000-level, the course will have broader utility as it could also be used to satisfy political science minor requirements.

182 AV.1.10 Change in Course Prerequisites and Description to be offered by the Psychology Department 136991 CUNYfirst Course ID TO FROM Departments Departments n/c Psychology Course Course n/c PSY 2100 Statistics for Social Science One of the following courses: Prerequisite Prerequisite One of the following courses: MTH 1023; MTH 1030; MTH 2003; MTH MTH 1030; MTH 2205; MTH 2206; MTH 2207; MTH 2003; 2000; MTH 2001; MTH 2610; or any MTH MTH 2009; MTH 2205; MTH course at the 3000-level or 2206; MTH 2207; MTH 2610; or above. any MTH course at the 3000- level or above. Neither MTH 2140 nor 2160 serves as a prerequisite for Neither MTH 2140 nor 2160 this course. serves as a prerequisite for this course. Hours Hours n/c 4 Credits Credits n/c 3 Description This course is an introduction Description n/c to statistical concepts and methods of organizing, presenting, and analyzing quantitative data used in the conduct of scientific research. Topics include measurement scales; descriptive statistics; basic probability and probability distributions; concepts of sample, population, and sampling distribution; elements of statistical inference; correlation; regression; one- sample and two-sample t- tests; and analysis of variance. The following distributions are examined and applied to the solution of problems: binomial, normal, t, and F distributions. Techniques for using statistical software as a tool to analyze data will be introduced.

183 This course is not open to students who have taken BIO/ENV 2100, STA 2100, or STA 2000 and is not an option for BBA majors. PSY 2100 cannot be used in lieu of STA 2000 to satisfy the pre– business core requirement for a Zicklin major or to satisfy the prerequisite for any intermediate or advanced STA course. STA 2100 and PSY 2100 may substitute for each other in the F- replacement policy. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Effective Fall 2018 Rationale: The course prerequisites are being revised to include MTH 2000 and MTH 2001 (two old Baruch course numbers that many students still transfer to the college), and two new courses, MTH 1023 and MTH 2009, which serve as alternates to the existing college algebra and precalculus courses. As MTH 1023 and 1030 overlap significantly with respect to the material that is covered, the

184 Psychology Department has agreed to accept MTH 1023 as an alternative prerequisite for PSY 2100. AV.1.11 Change in Course Description and New Cross-listing to be offered by the Sociology/Anthropology Department 094382 CUNYfirst Course ID FROM TO Sociology and Anthropology Departments n/c Departments Course SOC/ANT SOC 3137 Sociology of Course 3137 Sociology of Health and Illness Health and Illness Prerequisite Prerequisite n/c SOC 1005 or ANT 1001; and ENG 2100 3 n/c Hours Hours Credits n/c 3 Credits The course is designed to Description This course is designed to Description develop sociological ideas introduce students to the social within the context of health scientific and cross-cultural study of health and illness care and to apply the tools of (including the conceptual sociological analysis to the differences among illness, study of important practical issues in such areas as sickness, and disease): health and illness are universal features treatment patterns and of human experience. We will patient care. Emphasis will be on the attitudes and also critically analyze the structural determinants of who values that various segments falls sick, explore the meanings of the population have toward of “medicine,” “bodies, ” and health, illness, and medical care; the relations among “technologies,” and investigate doctors, patients, and other the roles that cultural beliefs and social institutions play in shaping paramedical staff; and the social organization of health sickness in different societies care institutions, including around the world. hospitals, health centers, Students will receive credit for private medical practice, either ANT 3137 or SOC 3137. insurance companies, the These courses may substitute drug industry, and consumer for each other in the F grade movements in health care. replacement policy. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable General __x__ Not Applicable

185 Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Spring 2019 Effective Rationale: The prior course description was limited to a strictly sociological study of health and illness, primarily in the United States. Since the department is also an anthropology department that offers a minor in anthropology, and in light of Baruch College’s emphasis in recent years on expanding studies of globalization across schools and departments, the updated description addresses both these changes, requiring the course now be cross-listed as ANT 3137. AV.1.12 Change in Course Hours and Credits to be offered by the Mathematics Department CUNYfirst Course 093247 ID FROM TO Mathematics Departments Departments n/c Course MTH 9814 Financial Markets Course n/c and Securities n/c Prerequisite Two semesters of calculus Prerequisite and either a probability or a statistics undergraduate course. Hours 1.5 (7 weeks; 3 hours per week) Hours 3 Credits 3 Credits 1.5 Description n/c Description This course presents some of the fundamental derivative securities traded in the financial markets: options, forwards, futures, and swaps. Pricing principles such as

186 arbitrage pricing, risk-neutral pricing, the Black-Scholes formula, and binomial trees will also be discussed. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Fall 2018 Effective Rationale: This course was offered every fall semester since 2005 on a 14-week schedule. A third of the course was devoted to fundamental probability topics and other topics that are now covered in the MTH 9831 Stochastic Processes for Finance. Two other class sessions were devoted to numerical methods for pricing and hedging derivative securities, now covered in MTH 9821 Numerical Methods for Finance. The program proposes a 7-week, 1.5 credit course that covers the same markets and instruments as the 14-week course (equities, interest rate, and credit), building on knowledge amassed in other courses while eliminating redundancies. This will increase the flexibility of the curriculum and the ability of the students to take the course in conjunction with other course offerings. AV.1.13 Change in Course Hours and Credits to be offered by the Mathematics Department CUNYfirst Course 093248 ID FROM TO Departments Mathematics Departments n/c

187 Course MTH 9815 Software Course n/c Engineering in Finance Prerequisite n/c Prerequisite Knowledge of C++ programming (as provided by an undergraduate level class) Hours 3 Hours 1.5 (7 weeks; 3 hours per week) Credits 1.5 Credits 3 n/c Description This course involves the Description careful examination of software development techniques for solving problems in finance. Emphasis is placed on productivity and the development of software engineering skills including automation, source control, and API design. The course is aimed at students who have a basic understanding of C++ and quantitative finance. The primary development language is Python. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society

188 ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Fall 2018 Effective Rationale: This course was offered every fall semester since 2003 on a 14-week schedule. Forty percent of the course was devoted to teaching C++ and Python which are now required to be known in advance by the students. The program proposes a 7-week, 1.5 credit course that covers the same topics as before while eliminating the teaching of C++ and Python. This will increase the flexibility of the curriculum and the ability of the students to take the course in conjunction with other course offerings. AV.1.14 Change in Course Title and Description to be offered by the Mathematics Department CUNYfirst Course 093253 ID TO FROM Departments n/c Departments Mathematics MTH 9842 Linear and Course Course MTH 9842 Optimization Techniques in Finance Quadratic Optimization Techniques MTH 9814 and MTH 9821 n/c Prerequisite Prerequisite Hours 1.5 Hours n/c 1.5 Credits n/c Credits This course will cover linear Description Description Optimization techniques play a and quadratic optimization as key role in the industry both on well as other nonlinear This the buy and sell sides. Applications from techniques. course will cover linear and quadratic optimization as well as finance will include problems other nonlinear techniques and in game theory and portfolio their applications to finance. optimization. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Component Education ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ Flexible

189 ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Fall 2018 Effective Rationale: This course has a strong emphasis on applying optimizations techniques for financial applications. The new name and description of the course better communicate the broadness of the course and its focus on financial applications. Section AVI. Courses Withdrawn AVI.1.1 THE 3010 Workshop in Children’s Theatre Rationale: THE 3010 Workshop in Children’s Theatre has not been offered in many years, and there is no evidence of student demand. The Department of Fine and Performing Arts has developed a new course, THE 3020 Applied Theatre Workshop, which is better suited to the current landscape of educational theatre. CHANCELLOR’S UNIVERSITY REPORT ADDENDUM April 2018, EFFECTIVE FALL 2018 PART ACADEMIC MATTERS A: BARUCH COLLEGE SECTION AIV. New Courses June 2017 Item AV.1.1 The following revisions are proposed for the Pre/co-requisites of ECO Chancellor’s 3140 (Game Theory): University Report Pre-requisites: ECO 1001 AND [ (ZICK or ZKTP student group) or Official ASCI-BA or Official ECO-BA or Official ECO Liberal Arts Minor]. SECTION AIV. New Courses June 2017 Item AV.1.2 The following revisions are proposed for the Pre/co-requisites of ECO Chancellor’s 4010 (Applied Micro-Econometrics): University Report Pre-requisites: ECO 4000 AND [ (ZICK or ZKTP student group) or Official ECO-BA or Official ECO Liberal Arts Minor]. SECTION AIV. New Courses June 2017 Item AV.1.3 The following revisions are proposed for the Pre/co-requisites of ECO Chancellor’s 4120 (Behavioral Economics): University Report Pre-requisites: [ECO 3100 or ECO 3140 or ECO 4000] AND [ (ZICK or ZKTP student group) or Official ECO-BA or Official ECO Liberal Arts Minor ].

190 June 2017 SECTION AIV. New Courses Item AV.1.4 The following revisions are proposed for the Pre/co-requisites of MKT Chancellor’s University 4630 (Marketing Analytics with Big Data): Report Pre-requisites: MKT 3000 AND (ZICK or ZKTP student group). SECTION AV. Change of Course Number, Title, Description, Credits, Hours, Co or January 2018 Pre-requisites Chancellor’s Item AV.1.2 The following revisions are proposed for the Pre/co requisites changes University to RES 4550 (Analytical Skills in Real Estate): Report Pre-requisites: RES 3200 AND (ZICK or ZKTP student group). CHANCELLOR’S UNIVERSITY REPORT ERRATA, NOVEMBER 2017 Part A: Academic Matters Baruch College November 2017 CUR, Section AIV: New Courses; Chancellor’s Report Item AIV.1.2: BUS 9558 is not open to MBA students who have completed BUS 9551 and either BUS 9552 or BUS 9553. Not open to MS students who have completed BUS 9551.

191 June 2018 Borough of Manhattan Community College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters Part A: Academic Matters Section 1: SPECIAL ACTIONS: A1: Curriculum Revisions A1.1 The following proposal is to reclassify the AA in Business Administration to AS in Business Administration Program Code: 01076 Effective: Fall 2018 Resolved: That the Borough of Manhattan Community College AA in Business Administration (Program Code 01076) be reclassified to an AS in Business Administration. Rationale: Based on research of student performance at senior institutions and the recommendations of external evaluators BMCC proposes to reclassify its AA in Business Administration to an AS in Business Administration so that students in the program will receive a solid foundation in business including a capstone experience (BUS 200) that reinforces prior concepts taught in the program.

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225 A1.2 The following revisions are proposed for the AS in Public Health Program Code: 38660 Effective: Fall 2018 FROM: TO: Required Common Core Required Common Core English Composition 6 English Composition 6 1 1 3 3 Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning

226 2 2 3 3 Life & Physical Science Life & Physical Science 12 Total Required Common Core Total Required Common Core 12 Flexible Core Flexible Core Creative Expression 3 3 Creative Expression World Culture & Global Issues 3 World Culture & Global Issues 3 U.S. Experiences in its Diversity 3 U.S. Experiences in its Diversity 3 Individual & Society 3 Individual & Society 3 3 3 6 6 Scientific World Scientific World 18 Total Flexible Core 18 Total Flexible Core 30 Total Common Core Total Common Core 30 Curriculum Requirements Curriculum Requirements 3 HED 110 Comprehensive Health Education 3 HED 110 Comprehensive Health Education 1 3 HED 280 History and Principles of Public 3 HED 280 History and Principles of Public Health 1 Health HED 285 Social and Behavioral Determinants of 3 HED 285 Social and Behavioral Determinants 3 of Health Health HED 290 Principles and Practices of Behavior 3 HED 290 Principles and Practices of Behavior 3 2 2 Change Change 2 3 HED 295 Epidemiology for Public Health 3 Practice HED 295 Epidemiology for Public Health 2 Practice 3 3 HED 296 Applied Biostatistics in Public 3 HED 296 Applied Biostatistics in Public Health 3 Health 1 3 HED 275 HIV/AIDS: Public Health 3 HED 275 HIV/AIDS: Public Health Implications 1 Implications 6 Program Electives Program Electives 6 Complete at 6 Credits from the following Complete at 6 Credits from the following : 4 Courses Courses HED 201 Health Education and Exercise HED 201 Health Education and Exercise HED 202 Drug Use in American Society HED 202 Drug Use in American Society HED 210 Contemporary Health Issues (2cr) HED 210 Contemporary Health Issues (2cr) HED 211 Critical Health Issues and Topics 3 .HED 220 Human Sexuality HED 220 Human Sexuality HED 225 Health Concerns of Women HED 225 Health Concerns of Women HED 230 Consumer Health Survey HED 230 Consumer Health Survey HED 235 Nutrition for Health HED 235 Nutrition for Health HED 240 First Aid, Safety and Cardiopulmonary HED 240 First Aid, Safety and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Resuscitation HED 250 Stress: Awareness, Understanding & HED 250 Stress: Awareness, Understanding & Management Management HED 260 Wellness & Cardiovascular Care HED 260 Wellness & Cardiovascular Care

227 HED 270 Health Perspectives Of Death and Dying 3 HED 270 Health Perspectives Of Death and Dying 4 4 3 3 General Elective General Elective 30 Total Curriculum Credits Total Curriculum Credits 30 Total Program Credits 60 60 Total Program Credits 1. These courses will have HED 110 as a pre-requisite. 2. These courses will have HED 110 and HED 280 as pre-requisites. 3. This course will have HED-110, HED 280 and MAT-150 as prerequisite. 4. Part of the general elective credits may be fulfilled by STEM variants. HED 211 is an appropriate elective for this curriculum. Rationale: A1.3 The following revisions are proposed for the AA in Gender and Women’s Studies Program Code: 38689 Effective: Fall 2018 FROM: TO: Required Common Core Required Common Core 6 English Composition 6 English Composition 1 1 3 3 Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning 2 2 3 3 Life & Physical Science Life & Physical Science 12 Total Required Common Core Total Required Common Core 12 Flexible Core Flexible Core Creative Expression 3 Creative Expression 3 3 World Culture & Global Issues 3 World Culture & Global Issues 3 U.S. Experiences in its Diversity U.S. Experiences in its Diversity 3 3 Individual & Society 3 Individual & Society 3 3 6 6 Scientific World Scientific World Total Flexible Core 18 Total Flexible Core 18 Total Common Core Total Common Core 30 30 Curriculum Requirements Curriculum Requirements GWS 100 Introduction to Gender and Women’s 3 3 GWS 100 Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies Studies GWS 300 Capstone in Gender and Women’s 3 3 GWS 300 Capstone in Gender and Women’s Studies Studies COM 265 Gender and communication 3 COM 265 Gender and communication 3 SOC 210 Gender and Society 3 SOC 210 Gender and Society 3

228 XXX xxx Liberal Arts electives 3 XXX xxx Liberal Arts electives 3 1 1 6 XXX xxx General Electives XXX xxx General Electives Complete any three of the following courses: Complete any three of the following courses: 3 3 AFN 128 Black Women in the Americas and AFN 128 Black Women in the Americas and the 3 the Caribbean Caribbean AFN 129 The Black Man in Contemporary Society 3 AFN 129 The Black Man in Contemporary 3 Society 3 3 ANT 210 The Roles of Woman in a changing ANT 210 The Roles of Woman in a changing world world 3 3 3 3 COM 245 The Mass Media COM 245 The Mass Media 3 3 3 3 COM 255 Intercultural Communication COM 255 Intercultural Communication 3 ECO 230 Feminist Economics 3 ECO 230 Feminist Economics 3 ENG 346 Queer Literature 3 ENG 346 Queer Literature ENG 353 Women in Literature 3 ENG 353 Women in Literature 3 FRN 161 French Women Writers in 3 Translation GWS xxx Gender and Women’s Studies Electives 3 GWS xxx Gender and Women’s Studies 3 Electives HED 225 Health Concerns of Women 3 3 HED 225 Health Concerns of Women HIS 225 History of Women 3 HIS 225 History of Women 3 LIN 300 Language, Gender and Sexuality 3 3 POL 120 Gender and Politics 3 POL 120 Gender and Politics PSY 245 Psychology of Women 3 PSY 245 Psychology of Women 3 SPN 400 Latin American Women Writers 3 SPN 400 Latin American Women Writers 3 THE 305 Women in US-American Theatre 3 THE 305 Women in US-American Theatre 3 Total Curriculum Credits 30 30 Total Curriculum Credits 60 Total Program Credits Total Program Credits 60 1. These credits can be satisfied by taking STEM variants in the Common Core. 2. No more than two courses in any discipline or interdisciplinary field can be used to satisfy Flexible Core requirements. 3. Student must select specific sections of this course. Rationale: These are appropriate electives for the program. A1.4 The following revisions are proposed for the AAS in Paramedic Program Code: 88036 Effective: Fall 2018

229 FROM: TO: Required Common Core Required Common Core 6 6 English Composition English Composition 3 Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning 3 Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning Life & Physical Science 4 Life & Physical Science 4 CHE 118 Fundamentals of Chemistry CHE 118 Fundamentals of Chemistry CHE 121 Fundamentals of General, Organic & CHE 121 Fundamentals of General, Organic & Biological Chemistry Biological Chemistry 13 Total Required Common Core 13 Total Required Common Core Flexible Core Flexible Core 3 Creative Expression Creative Expression 3 Scientific World 7 Scientific World 7 10 Total Flexible Core 10 Total Flexible Core 23 Total Common Core 23 Total Common Core Curriculum Requirements Curriculum Requirements EMC 101 Emergency Medical Care/Paramedic I 6 EMC 101 Emergency Medical Care/Paramedic 6 I EMC 102 Emergency Medical Care/ Paramedic II 6 6 EMC 102 Emergency Medical Care/ Paramedic II 6 EMC 201 Emergency Medical Care/ Paramedic 6 EMC 201 Emergency Medical Care/ Paramedic III III EMC 202 Emergency Medical Care/ Paramedic IV 6 EMC 202 Emergency Medical Care/ Paramedic 6 IV EMC 301 Emergency Medical Care/Clinical 1 EMC 301 Emergency Medical Care/Clinical 1 Internship I Internship I 2 EMC 302 Emergency Medical Care/ Clinical 2 EMC 302 Emergency Medical Care/ Clinical Internship II Internship II EMC 303 Emergency Medical Care/ Clinical 3 EMC 303 Emergency Medical Care/ Clinical 3 Internship III Internship III BIO 426 Anatomy & Physiology II 4 4 BIO 426 Anatomy & Physiology II Elective 4 EMC 100 Emergency Medical Care 3-4 Or EMC 100 Emergency Medical Care Total Curriculum Credits 37-38 Total Curriculum Credits 38 Total Program Credits 60-61 Total Program Credits 61 Rationale: Students who have a certification for EMC 100 prior to admission to this program will automatically receive credit for prior learning for the course and eliminate confusion regarding appropriate courses for the program. A1.5

230 The following Program Policy change is proposed for the AAS in Respiratory Therapy Program Code: 01096 Effective: Fall 2018 FROM: TO: Repeat/Withdrawal Policy Repeat/Withdrawal Policy In order to maintain eligibility in the program, Respiratory Therapy Students have one opportunity to FAIL or WITHDRAW in each students must attain an average of “C” or better in all RTT courses. Students who fail any Respiratory one of the following: RTT 100, 101, 201, 202, Therapy course may repeat such course only once. 210, 301, 302, 310, 320, 401, 403, and 410. Students who have been academically dismissed Students repeating a Respiratory Therapy must attain A Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.0 or Course are required to earn a grade of C+ (77- above in order to re-enter the Respiratory Therapy 79) or higher in order to pass that repeated course. Students repeating a Respiratory program. BMCC students wishing to transfer into Respiratory Therapy must also have attained a GPA Therapy Course that receive a “C” (73-76) or of 2.o or above. less will receive the grade earned, but the student will NOT be allowed to continue in the Respiratory Therapy Program. Rationale: To allow RTT students who have withdrawn from an RTT course the opportunity to repeat that course. A1.6 Resolved: Students who complete and pass NFTE Entrepreneurship (Owning your Future) or Virtual Enterprise Entrepreneurship Course 1 & 2 or the ESB Certiport Exam for Entrepreneurship with a “C” or higher will receive 3 credits for SBE 100: Entrepreneurship-Product and Service Creation. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: NFTE Entrepreneurship, Virtual Enterprise 1 & 2, and ESB Certiport are nationally recognized programs and the material covered is equivalent to BMCC’s SBE 100 course.

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259 A1.7 Resolved: That Borough of Manhattan Community College amend its Writing Intensive Policy to include the following language: Effective Spring 2018, entering students will be required to pass a writing intensive course beyond ENG 201 in order to graduate. However, any student possessing a bachelor degree or higher will be exempt from this policy. Rationale: Graduates with a Bachelor’s degree or higher have demonstrated writing proficiency and therefore have met the writing intensive requirement.

260 SECTION II: CHANGES IN GENERIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS AII Courses Approved for Pathways Inclusion AII.1 Course Title Pathways Area Scientific World Introduction to Programming CSC 111 AII.2 Course Title Pathways Area Critical Thinking and Social Justice CRT 120 Individual and Society AII.3 Title Pathways Area Course SPN 485 New York Literature in Spanish World Cultures and Global Issues AII.4 Course Title Pathways Area SPN 420 Introduction to Spanish Theatre World Cultures and Global Issues AII.5 Course Pathways Area Title Chinese Culture and Civilization World Cultures and Global Issues CHI 203 AII.6 Title Pathways Area Course CHI 107 Elementary Chinese for Heritage Speakers World Cultures and Global Issues AII.7 Course Pathways Area Title GIS 101 Digital Earth Scientific World Section IV: NEW COURSES AIV.1 Department: Mathematics Course Number: MAT 214.5 Title: Mathematics for Elementary Education with Algebra

261 Prerequisites: Student must have passed or be exempt from MAT 51 or MAT 12 None Co-requisites: 8 hours Hours: Credits : 4 Course Description: This course covers mathematics recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) for prospective elementary school teachers, including problem solving, numeration, computation, real numbers, and number theory with an additional 60 hours focusing on intermediate algebra concepts. MAT 214.5 focuses on a learner-oriented approach to teaching mathematics. Emphasis is placed on mathematical concepts and skills, as well as techniques of inquiry and critical thinking. The course includes a survey of elementary mathematical concepts with appropriate materials to assist teachers in the classroom setting. MAT 214.5 meets the mathematics requirement for students who plan to teach on the elementary school level. In addition, the course will cover topics from MAT 56, Intermediate Algebra, including such topics as properties of real numbers, polynomials and factoring, equations and inequalities in one and two variables, systems of linear equations and inequalities, rational expressions and functions, rational exponents and roots, quadratic functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and an introduction to trigonometry. This course will consist of: 1. Numeration Systems 2. Alternate Algorithms and Methods of Computation 3. Number Theory and Types of Numbers 4. Rational and Irrational Numbers, Measurement 5. Problem Solving and Patterns 6. Sets and Logic Algebra Topic will be infused throughout the course (see end of this syllabus for more detail). The topics correspond with the NCTM strands of Number and Number Sense, including developing early number concepts and number sense, developing whole-number place-value concepts, developing meanings and strategies for the operations, developing fraction concepts and strategies for fraction computation, developing concepts of decimals and percents, patterns and algebra, including developing algebraic thinking: generalizations, patterns, and functions, and measurement, including developing measurement concepts. Rationale: This is an appropriate course for students who will teach Mathematics in elementary school. AIV.2 Department: Academic Literacy and Linguistics Course Number: LIN 101.6 Pilot Course Title: Introduction to Linguistics: ESL Prerequisites: None Co-requisites: None

262 Hours: 6 hours : 3 Credits Course Description: This course combines LIN 101 and ESL 95. As a LIN 101 class, this course will introduce students to linguistics, the scientific study of language. Students will apply methods of scientific inquiry (including the scientific method) to linguistic systems (phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic) and language phenomena and events. Specifically, students will engage in observation of linguistic phenomena, collection of data, generation and testing of hypotheses, analysis of and interpretations of data, application and evaluation of theory, in order to form conclusions about linguistic phenomena. As an ESL 95 course, this is an intensive writing class that focuses on the basic components of effective writing, including essay organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, word choice, and content. Students read and respond to a variety of texts and use argumentation, narrative, and description as modes of developing ideas in writing. Moreover, the class is designed to develop the mind and help sharpen students’ ability to think clearly, logically, thoroughly, critically, and effectively. Students who passed this course have passed the equivalent of LIN 101 and have exempted from ESL. They may progress to ENG 101 if they are exempt in ACR. This is an appropriate co-requisite course that will allow students to accelerate their degree completion. Rationale: AIV.3 Department: Academic Literacy and Linguistics LIN 100.5 Pilot Course Course Number: Title: Language and Culture: ACR Prerequisites: None Co-requisites: None 6 hours Hours: Credits : 3 Course Description: This course combines LIN 100 and ACR 95. As a LIN 100 class, this course will introduce students to the study of language in multicultural urban settings. The course will introduce related topics, such as bilingual/bidialectal families and bilingual education, language and gender, literacy in a changing, technological society, child language acquisition, and different dialects and registers of English. The readings will draw on works in linguistics, literature and related fields. Students will work on critical reading and produce writing based on the readings in connection with their own experiences and backgrounds. As an ACR 95 course, this advanced level reading class is designed to help students master and apply a full range of college-level reading, and related skills, including critical comprehension, vocabulary, writing, flexible rates of reading, and study strategies. A variety of college-level materials is used. Students who passed this course have passed the equivalent of LIN 100/ANT 115 and have exempted from ACR. Rationale: This is an appropriate co-requisite course that will allow students to accelerate their degree completion. AIV.4 Department: Academic Literacy and Linguistics Course Number: LIN 100.6 Pilot Course

263 Title: Language and Culture: ESL None Prerequisites: Co-requisites: None 6 hours Hours: Credits : 3 Course Description: This course combines LIN 100 and ESL 95. As a LIN 100 course, this class will introduce students to the study of language in multicultural urban settings. The course will introduce related topics, such as bilingual/bidialectal families and bilingual education, language and gender, literacy in a changing, technological society, child language acquisition, and different dialects and registers of English. The readings will draw on works in linguistics, literature and related fields. Students will work on critical reading and produce writing based on the readings in connection with their own experiences and backgrounds. As an ESL 95 course, this is an intensive writing class that focuses on the basic components of effective writing, including essay organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, word choice, and content. Students read and respond to a variety of texts and use argumentation, narrative, and description as modes of developing ideas in writing. Moreover, the class is designed to develop the mind and help sharpen students’ ability to think clearly, logically, thoroughly, critically and effectively. Students who passed this course have passed the equivalent of LIN 100/ANT 115 and have exempted from ESL. They may progress to ENG 101 if they are exempt in ACR. Rationale: This is an appropriate co-requisite course that will allow students to accelerate their degree completion. AIV.5 Department: Computer Information Systems CIS 490 Course Number: Title: Introduction Data Science Prerequisites: CIS 395 or Departmental Approval Co-requisites: None Hours: 4 hours (2 lecture, 2 lab) Credits : 3 Course Description: This course introduces the fundamentals of managing large unstructured datasets that are in a variety of formats. The topics include the concept of big data, its characteristics (volume, velocity, variety, veracity); its data models (key value, graph etc.); its storage technologies (Hadoop); its processing tools (NoSQL, ETL, MapReduce) and its role in analytics. Rationale: This is an appropriate course equivalent to those offered at senior institutions, such as New York City College of Technology. Section V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES AV.1 BIO 230 Fundamentals of Microbiology

264 FROM: TO: BIO 220 Prerequisites: Prerequisites: BIO 220 and CHE 201 BIO 230 is a general Microbiology that Course Description: Course Description: This introductory course includes the study of structure, metabolism, environmental teaches students about microorganisms’ evolution, structure, significance and evolution of micro-organisms. The metabolism and genetics. The course also covers the essentials of microbial ecology, the interactions of laboratory will emphasize basic bacteriological techniques of identification and culture. microorganisms with other living organisms as well as how microorganisms can be used in different industries. The laboratory section will introduce students to several techniques for isolation, culture, differentiation and identification of microorganisms. Also, students will be exposed to current approaches to analyze DNA and proteins. More comprehensive description of course and students need a prerequisite of chemistry to better understand Rationale: some of the biological processes. AV.2 VAT 265 Media Arts and Technology TO: FROM: VAT 165 and MMP 100 Prerequisites: VAT 165 Prerequisites: Rationale: Students do not require knowledge from MMP 100 in order for students to do well in VAT 265. AV.3 HUM 101 Introduction to Human Services and Social Work FROM: TO: Requirement Designation: Regular Liberal Arts Elective Requirement Designation: Regular-non-Liberal Arts Elective The new designation more accurately describes the course. Rationale: AV.4 HUM 411 Social Welfare Programs and Policies TO: FROM: Regular-non-Liberal Arts Requirement Designation: Regular Liberal Arts Elective Requirement Designation: Elective This course will acquaint students with Course Description: Course Description: This course will acquaint students the social welfare system of the United States. An historical An with the social welfare system of the United States. perspective helps to illuminate the evolution of current historical perspective helps to illuminate the evolution policies, programs and practices. Poverty in the U.S. is of current policies, programs and practices. Poverty in analyzed as well as the specific programs which have been the U.S. is analyzed as well as the specific programs developed to alleviate it. Cross-cultural approaches to social which have been developed to alleviate it. Cross-cultural approaches to social welfare are also examined. welfare are also examined. This course meets the

265 requirements as a liberal arts elective in social science. Rationale: The new designation more accurately describes the course since its content is Liberal Arts in nature.

266 June 2018 Bronx Community College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters Section AII: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements AII.1: The following revisions are proposed to “Admission to Radiologic Technology” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: A change in admission requirements to the Radiologic Technology program regarding basic skill proficiency. To From 4.2.2 Admission to Radiologic Technology (RAD) 4.2.2 Admission to Radiologic Technology (RAD) a. To be eligible for admission to the Radiologic a. To be eligible for admission to the Radiologic Technology course work (RAD and CLE designated Technology course work (RAD and CLE designated courses) students must: courses) students must: i. Achieve a minimum grade of C+ in BIO 23 i. Achieve a minimum grade of C+ in BIO 23 and MTH 13 or MTH 30 by the conclusion of and MTH 13 or MTH 30 by the conclusion of spring semester prior to entry. The Radiologic spring semester prior to entry. The Radiologic Technology Program only admits students in Technology Program only admits students in the fall. the fall. ii. Complete all required remediation. ii. Complete all required remediation. iii. It is recommended that ENG110/111, HIS iii. It is recommended that ENG110/111, HIS 10/11, COMM 11, PSY11, BIO 24 and PEA be 10/11, COMM 11, PSY11, BIO 24 and PEA be completed prior to entry to the Radiologic completed prior to entry to the Radiologic Technology course work (RAD and CLE Technology course work (RAD and CLE designated courses). designated courses). iv. Pre-radiologic technology students are iv. Pre-radiologic technology students are allowed two attempts to achieve a C+ in BIO 23 allowed two attempts to achieve a C+ in BIO (Human Anatomy and Physiology) and MTH 13 23 (Human Anatomy and Physiology) and (Trigonometry and College Algebra/MTH 30 MTH 13 (Trigonometry and College (Pre-Calculus Mathematics). A grade of “W” will Algebra/MTH 30 (Pre-Calculus Mathematics). not count as an attempt in these two courses. A A grade of “W” will not count as an attempt in minimum grade of C+ is a requirement for these two courses. A minimum grade of C+ is admission into the Radiologic Technology a requirement for admission into the Program. The Radiologic Technology Radiologic Technology Program. The Program’s Committee on Admissions and Radiologic Technology Program’s Committee Waivers has the right to allow the student an on Admissions and Waivers has the right to additional attempt when there is evidence of allow the student an additional attempt when extenuating circumstances. Extenuating there is evidence of extenuating circumstances need to have legal and/or official circumstances. Extenuating circumstances documentation and must be presented to the need to have legal and/or official Committee on Admissions and Waivers before documentation and must be presented to the

267 Committee on Admissions and Waivers before a waiver will be granted. a waiver will be granted. b. Students eligible to enter the first radiologic technology course will be admitted as follows: b. Students eligible to enter the first radiologic technology course will be admitted as follows: A student must be exempt, have passed the i. placement tests, or have completed writing and A student who entered prior to Spring 06 i. would have to pass the reading ACT with a reading remediation. minimum score of 69 and from Spring 2006 to ii. A minimum GPA of 2.8 present the minimum score is 75. iii. Students will be ranked according to their ii. A minimum GPA of 2.8 pre-clinical sequence index iii. Students will be ranked according to their 1. All students who have a 3.5 to a 4.0 pre- pre-clinical sequence index clinical GPA will be admitted to the program first with no ranking based on credits on 1. All students who have a 3.5 to a 4.0 pre- campus. clinical GPA will be admitted to the program first with no ranking based on credits on 2. Students with a 3.01 to a 3.49 pre-clinical campus. GPA will be ranked according to their pre- sequence average. If two students have the 2. Students with a 3.01 to a 3.49 pre-clinical same average, a student who has completed GPA will be ranked according to their pre- more credits at BCC will be given preference. sequence average. If two students have the same average, a student who has completed 3. Students with a 2.8 to a 3.00 GPA will be more credits at BCC will be given preference. ranked according to the number of credits on campus. 3. Students with a 2.8 to a 3.00 GPA will be ranked according to the number of credits on iv. Students transferring from another college campus. must submit an official transcript. For Anatomy & Physiology I & II, students must transfer in a iv. Students transferring from another college complete course, i.e., the equivalent of BIO 23 must submit an official transcript. For Anatomy and BIO 24, or repeat the whole course at & Physiology I & II, students must transfer in a BCC. Any exceptions to this must be approved complete course, i.e., the equivalent of BIO 23 by the Biology department. and BIO 24, or repeat the whole course at BCC. Any exceptions to this must be approved c. Reinstatement into RAD courses: by the Biology department. i. The Nursing and Allied Health Sciences c. Reinstatement into RAD courses: Department will set up guidelines for the method of reinstating students into Radiologic i. The Nursing and Allied Health Sciences Technology, based upon criteria approved by Department will set up guidelines for the the CAS. method of reinstating students into Radiologic Technology, based upon criteria approved by 1. Note: Students who received grades of less the CAS. than C+ in more than one Radiologic Technology course or less than C+ in CLE 11 1. Note: Students who received grades of less through CLE 51 and a B+ in CLE 61 will not be than C+ in more than one Radiologic eligible for re-admission to this program Technology course or less than C+ in CLE 11 through CLE 51 and a B+ in CLE 61 will not be ii. Guidelines for re-admission shall be: eligible for re-admission to this program

268 1. Students with a W in a Radiologic ii. Guidelines for re-admission shall be: Technology course during the previous semester, who were earning a C+ or better in 1. Students with a W in a Radiologic the Radiologic Technology program but Technology course during the previous withdrew because of illness or personal semester, who were earning a C+ or better in reasons. The Committee on Admissions and the Radiologic Technology program but Waivers will look at any documentation withdrew because of illness or personal supplied by the student. reasons. The Committee on Admissions and Waivers will look at any documentation 2. Students returning after an absence of one supplied by the student. or more semesters from the Radiologic Technology Program with a C+ or better in 2. Students returning after an absence of one each Radiologic Technology course and C+ or or more semesters from the Radiologic better in CLE 11 through CLE 51 and a B+ in Technology Program with a C+ or better in CLE 61. each Radiologic Technology course and C+ or better in CLE 11 through CLE 51 and a B+ in 3. Students who did not achieve at least a C+ in CLE 61. any one Radiologic Technology course (or Nuclear Medicine Technology 84) will be placed 3. Students who did not achieve at least a C+ on a waiting list. Students will be able to re- in any one Radiologic Technology course (or register according to the following priorities: Nuclear Medicine Technology 84) will be placed on a waiting list. Students will be able a) Availability of space to re-register according to the following priorities: b) Written notification to the Committee on Admissions and Waivers at least 9 a) Availability of space months in advance stating their intention to return to the program. Students will be b) Written notification to the Committee readmitted based on when their letter is on Admissions and Waivers at least 9 received. months in advance stating their intention to return to the program. Students will be readmitted based on when their letter is received. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: The proposed change is prompted by the elimination of the ACT Reading test and other changes in reading placement and exit from remediation. The Nursing and Allied Health Sciences department determined that replacing the outdated reading standard with a reading/writing proficiency standard was the most effective way to ensure that students admitted to the radiologic technology program would have the language skills necessary to succeed. AII.2: The following revisions are proposed to “Time Limit for Academic Suspension” (retitled “Separation from College due to Academic Dismissal”) in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Clarifying that BCC students who are academically dismissed must wait out a semester before being eligible to return to BCC. Ensuring that this policy applies also to students academically dismissed from CUNY and nonCUNY community colleges, but exempting students academically dismissed from four-year colleges. From To

269 4.5.1 Time Limit for Academic Suspension (S1) 4.5.1 Separation from College due to Academic Dismissal A student under academic suspension (S1) from any College of the City University for Grade Point a. A BCC student who has been academically Average shall be separated from the University and dismissed must wait one traditional (fall/spring) shall not be admitted to Bronx Community College semester before being eligible to register for for one semester. (Summer sessions do not qualify courses at BCC. the student as being separated from the College for one-semester.) b. A student wishing to transfer to BCC who has been academically dismissed from his/her previous community college must wait one traditional (fall/spring) semester before being eligible for admission to BCC. This policy does not apply to students transferring from a 4-year college or university. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: The previous language focused only on students dismissed from CUNY colleges, but the policy should logically apply to students from nonCUNY colleges as well. Additionally, the new policy distinguishes between students dismissed from community colleges and those dismissed from senior colleges. This distinction is appropriate because students dismissed from senior colleges are often advised to go to a community college to improve grades and return—this is consistent with the access mission of community colleges. In contrast, students dismissed from another community college are likely better off waiting a semester before attempting to succeed at another community college (and in order to avoid using up financial aid). AII.3: The following revisions are proposed to “Waiver of Academic Dismissal” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Clarifying language regarding waiver of academic dismissal. From To 4.5.3. Waiver of Academic Dismissal 4.5.3. Waiver of Academic Dismissal a. A student may appeal to the Academic a. A student may appeal to the Academic Appeals Agent or his/her designee for a waiver Appeals Agent or his/her designee for a waiver under the following circumstances: under the following circumstances: i. The student has on his/her record FIN or FAB i. The student has on his/her record FIN or grades for which the student has been granted FAB grades for which the student has been extensions to finish. granted extensions to finish. ii. The student has on his/her record F grades ii. The student has on his/her record F grades that could be repeated and removed under the that could be repeated and removed under the F grade policy. F grade policy. In these cases, the Academic Appeals Agent or In these cases, the Academic Appeals Agent or designee must determine whether removing or designee must determine whether removing or repeating the grades would sufficiently raise the GPA repeating the grades would sufficiently raise the

270 GPA to make the student's graduation possible. to make the student's graduation possible. b. In two additional circumstances, a student b. In two additional circumstances, a student may appeal to the Committee on Academic may appeal to the Committee on Academic Standing (or the Executive Committee of the Standing (or the Executive Committee of the CAS if the CAS is not in session) for a waiver of CAS if the CAS is not in session) for a waiver of dismissal. The student must communicate dismissal. The student must communicate his or her appeal through the Academic Appeals his or her appeal through the Academic Agent. Appeals Agent. i. The student has on his or her record WU i. The student has on his or her record WU grades that could be changed to W grades, grades that could be changed to W grades, and and the conversion of these WU grades to W the conversion of these WU grades to W grades grades would move the student off dismissal. would move the student off dismissal. The The student must present legal and/or official student must present legal and/or official documentation to support the appeal. documentation to support the appeal. ii. The student provides legal and/or official ii. The student provides legal and/or official documentation of extenuating circumstances documentation of extenuating circumstances and has a record that shows it is feasible for and has a record that shows it is feasible for that student to move off probation within twelve that student to move off probation within twelve academic credits. academic credits. For each of these circumstances, CAS will vote For each of these circumstances, the CAS A on the appeal. Appeals Agent will make a recommendation to given a waiver student may be supporting of academic dismissal by providing the CAS who will vote on the appeal. If a student is documentation. given a waiver of academic suspension (S1) of by providing documentation c. A student readmitted under these extenuating circumstances, the CAS Appeals circumstances is limited to a program of seven agent or designee must provide the student academic and/or equated credits and must with a statement of the GPA required over the maintain a semester GPA of 2.0 or greater. next twelve credits to allow the student to move . off probation (see section 4.6.4.3) c. A student readmitted under these circumstances is limited to a program of seven academic and/or equated credits and must maintain a semester GPA of 2.0 or greater. Rationale: The current language made the academic dismissal waiver appear to be a necessary outcome of a student filing documentation of extenuating circumstances. The proposed language makes the granting of the waiver more uncertain, which is appropriate given that the documentation needs to be reviewed and found appropriate to support the waiver. AII.4: The following revisions are proposed to “Readmission to the College after Academic Dismissal” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Clarifying minimum semester GPA necessary to return from “dismissal” status and clarifying the consequences of failing to meet the minimum semester GPA. From To

271 4.5.4. Readmission to the College after Academic 4.5.4. Readmission to the College after Academic Dismissal Dismissal a. Application for re-admission following academic a. Application for re-admission following academic dismissal: A student under academic dismissal dismissal: A student under academic dismissal from from the College, and having been separated from the College, and having been separated from the the College or University for one semester, shall be College or University for one semester, shall be entitled to re-admission by applying to the Registrar's entitled to re-admission by applying to the Registrar's Office. Office. i. Academic standing of students who return after i. Academic standing of students who return after academic dismissal: A academic dismissal: A student who returns from student who returns from academic dismissal is placed on return from academic dismissal is placed on return from dismissal dismissal academic standing category and cannot academic standing category and cannot take more take more than seven academic and/or equated than seven academic and/or equated credits. credits. ii. Minimum GPA standards for students readmitted after academic dismissal: A student returning from ii. Minimum GPA standards for students readmitted academic dismissal will be given two semesters of after academic dismissal: A student returning from academic dismissal will be given two semesters of enrollment (or twelve credits if the student is taking less than six credits per semester) to move off enrollment (or twelve credits if the student is taking less than six credits per semester) to move off probationary status. probationary status. The student can return from dismissal status as long as they make progress (semester GPA of 2.0 or higher) towards their degree. Failure to do so will result in permanent dismissal. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: Many students with dismissal status will not be able to realistically bring their cumulative GPA to a 2.0 in one semester. But earning a minimum semester GPA of 2.0 shows good progress and will help bring the cumulative GPA closer to a 2.0. Creating a realistic goal also allows for clear consequences: In this case as proposed, permanent dismissal. AII.5: The following revisions are proposed to “Procedures for withdrawal” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Clarifying the process by which students can withdraw from a course. From To 7.1.2 Procedures for withdrawal 7.1.2 Procedures for withdrawal The procedures for withdrawal shall be determined by a. The student who chooses to withdraw from a the Registrar. To initiate an official withdrawal from a course should consult with the instructor, should course, students must receive written approval from speak to an academic advisor and should consult the instructor and from a counselor in the Department with Financial Aid prior to course withdrawal. of Student Development. The form used will contain copies for the instructor, chair of the department, student, registrar, VP of students, and financial aid. The VP of students will be responsible for distributing the copies to the appropriate departments with the exception of the instructor's copy. The instructor will

272 detach and retain his/her copy at the time of signing the form. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: The current procedure is outdated. The new procedure reflects current practice and is appropriate given that students can withdraw on their own in CUNY First. AII.6: The following revisions are proposed to “Grade improvement and repetition of courses” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Allowing students to repeat courses in which a passing grade was earned but the passing grade is lower than the minimum standard for the student’s intended major. From To 8.1.5 Grade improvement and repetition of courses 8.1.5 Grade improvement and repetition of courses Courses passed with grades of D- or higher may not a. Courses passed with grades of D- or higher may (For be repeated for purposes of grade improvement. not be repeated for purposes of grade regulations governing the Nursing curriculum see improvement. The only exceptions to this rule are below.) as follows: i. When a student is enrolled in a degree program Students may audit courses for increased facility with that requires a minimum grade in a specific course the subject. (e.g., see Nursing, Radiologic Technology, etc.). In this case, a student wishing to repeat a passed course may do so pursuant to the published rules of the program. ii. When a student is pursuing admission into a degree program with a minimum grade requirement in a specific course. In this case, a student wishing to repeat a passed course must receive the approval of the department chairperson offering the course. Students may audit courses for increased facility with the subject. Effective: Fall 2018 Current policy does not allow any student to repeat a course in which a passing grade is earned Rationale: unless the student is enrolled in a major that has specific minimum grades in certain courses (e.g., nursing). The difficulty the proposed policy change is designed to address is the following: Often students are enrolled in one major (e.g., a general liberal arts program) with the goal of admission to another major (e.g., nursing). While in the general liberal arts majors, students take courses (e.g., Anatomy and Physiology) with minimum grade requirements in the intended major. When a student passes the course but does not meet the minimum grade needed in the course for the intended major, current policy does not allow them to repeat the course at BCC even though a higher grade is necessary for the intended major. Students react to this in different ways: Sometimes they leave BCC to take the course at another institution. Or they attempt to find ways to enroll in the course at BCC, despite policy prohibiting this. Neither of these is a desirable outcome. The proposed new policy will allow for students in this situation to repeat a passed course, at BCC, under the

273 limited circumstanced described and with approval of the department chairperson. AII.7: The following revisions are proposed to “Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT) – minimum acceptable grade in MLT courses” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: A change in minimum cumulative GPA requirements for MLT courses. From To 8.2.3 Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT) – 8.2.3 Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT) – minimum acceptable grade in MLT courses minimum acceptable grade in MLT courses a. The minimum acceptable grade in the MLT a. The minimum acceptable grade in the MLT courses (BIO 28, BIO 44, BIO 81, BIO 82, BIO 83, courses (BIO 28, BIO 44, BIO 81, BIO 82, BIO 83, BIO 85, BIO 86, & BIO 87) each semester shall be BIO 85, BIO 86, & BIO 87) each semester shall be the grade of C (73-76.9). Grades of C- or lower must the grade of C (73-76.9). Grades of C- or lower must be repeated if the student wishes to receive a be repeated if the student wishes to receive a degree degree in MLT. Grades of C- or lower may be in MLT. Grades of C- or lower may be repeated repeated subject to the following conditions: subject to the following conditions: i. Students may attempt a given MLT course only i. Students may attempt a given MLT course only twice. An attempt is defined as having been twice. An attempt is defined as having been registered in the course and received any grade, registered in the course and received any grade, academic or administrative. academic or administrative. 1) BIO 81 is a pre-requisite for all MLT courses. BIO 1) BIO 81 is a pre-requisite for all MLT courses. BIO 82 is a pre-requisite for BIO 86. BIO 28 is a pre- 82 is a pre-requisite for BIO 86. BIO 28 is a pre- requisite for BIO 44. All MLT courses are a pre- requisite for BIO 44. All MLT courses are a pre- requisite for BIO 90. requisite for BIO 90. 2) BIO 11/12 or BIO 23/24 are pre-requisites for BIO 2) BIO 11/12 or BIO 23/24 are pre-requisites for BIO 28. CHM 17/18 or CHM 11/12 are pre-requisites for 28. CHM 17/18 or CHM 11/12 are pre-requisites for BIO 83. MTH 6 is a pre-requisite for MTH 13/30. BIO 83. MTH 6 is a pre-requisite for MTH 13/30. CHM CHM 02 is a pre-requisite for CHM 11/17. 02 is a pre-requisite for CHM 11/17. ii. The course must be completed with a C or higher ii. The course must be completed with a C or higher grade before the next higher level course may be grade before the next higher level course may be taken. taken. iii. Permission to repeat is subject to the availability iii. Permission to repeat is subject to the availability of of space and at the review of program faculty (see space and at the review of program faculty (see 4.2.3) 4.2.3) iv. Both grades received in the same course will be iv. Both grades received in the same course will be used to calculate the student's cumulative Grade used to calculate the student's cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) Point Average (GPA) v. The credit for a repeated course may be applied v. The credit for a repeated course may be applied only once toward graduation. only once toward graduation. vi. Any two failures (grade below a C) in any of the vi. Any two failures (grade below a C) in any of the required MLT courses will result in dismissal from required MLT courses will result in dismissal from the the MLT program. MLT program.

274 vii. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.0 vii. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.0 and and complete all a GPA of 2.3 in all MLT courses with a C or better MLT courses to enroll in BIO 90 to (Clinical Internship) and to graduate from BCC. enroll in BIO 90 (Clinical Internship) and to graduate from BCC. 1) The clinical internship (BIO 90) is unpaid and is 1) The clinical internship (BIO 90) is unpaid and is from 8am-4pm or 9am-5pm M-F excluding holidays for 15 weeks (500 hours) which totals a full semester. from 8am-4pm or 9am-5pm M-F excluding holidays for 15 weeks (500 hours) which totals a full viii. Note that repetition of courses passed may semester. negatively impact on financial aid eligibility viii. Note that repetition of courses passed may negatively impact on financial aid eligibility Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: The current policy of a 2.3 cumulative GPA in MLT courses is confusing and difficult to enforce given that C grades in all MLT courses would result in a 2.0 GPA and not a 2.3. Additionally, the original passage of a 2.3 minimum MLT course cumulative GPA was based on an error. This proposed change in policy corrects this error. AII.8: The following revisions are proposed to “R Grade Policy” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Recognizing noncourse based interventions as a route to achieve proficiency in the content of a course in which an “R” was earned. Eliminating guidelines no longer applicable. From To 8.4.1.a: R Grade Policy 8.4.1.a: R Grade Policy i. Issued only in remediation courses (equated credit i. Issued only in remediation courses (equated skill improvement course) to designate significant credit skill improvement course) to designate achievement on the part of the student. Achievement significant achievement on the part of the student. level falls short of the satisfactory minimum skill Achievement level falls short of the satisfactory standard considered necessary for performance in minimum skill standard considered necessary for degree-creditable courses requiring the particular skill performance in degree-creditable courses involved. requiring the particular skill involved. ii. Students receiving the grade of R are required to ii. Students receiving the grade of R are required repeat the course in the particular skill development to repeat the course or the department’s area. equivalent in the particular skill development area. iii. The grade of R may not be assigned more than once in a single course. iv. The grade of R should not be used to signify progress up to and beyond the minimum skill standard considered necessary for performance in degree- creditable courses requiring the particular skill involved. In such cases, the grades of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, or D- must be issued. The grade of F should be used to indicate lack of achievement or insignificant progress when evaluating student

275 performance Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: Workshops are commonly used to achieve proficiency in the content of a remedial course in which an “R” was earned. Therefore, “department’s equivalent” was added as a way for a student to address a grade of “R”. Additionally, policy/practice no longer active (e.g., limiting use of “R” to once per course) was deleted as it is no longer relevant/applicable. AII.9: The following revisions are proposed to “Terminal Transfer Limitation” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Increasing the number of credits that can be transferred to BCC in a “Reverse Transfer” scenario. From To 10.1.5 Terminal transfer limitation 10.1.5 Terminal transfer limitation a. Students leaving BCC to attend another institution prior to a. Students leaving BCC to attend another graduating from BCC may apply for a maximum of 10 institution prior to graduating from BCC may apply for a maximum of 15 credits to be applied to their work in their BCC curriculum. credits to be applied to their work in their BCC curriculum. These terminal credits are subject to the maximum credits These terminal credits are subject to the by exemption listed above. maximum credits by exemption listed above. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: Students sometimes transfer to senior colleges before achieving associate degrees. BCC has been proactive in the effort to grant these students an associate degree when the courses earned at the senior college could be transferred to BCC and complete degree requirements. Increasing the maximum “reverse” transfer credit to 15 from 10 will allow us to graduate more students who have met the academic requirements for their degree through BCC and nonBCC coursework. We propose 15 credits because it is the “typical” number of credits a student would earn in one semester. AII.10: The following revisions are proposed to “Specialization limitations on exemption” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Eliminating explicit limitations on the number of credits that can be transferred toward degree- specific courses at BCC. From To 10.1.6 Specialization limitations on exemption 10.1.6 Specialization limitations on exemption a. In general, one half of the career specialization a. In general, one half of the career specialization (exclusive of General Education courses), must be (exclusive of General Education courses), must be taken at Bronx Community College. Because of the taken at Bronx Community College. Because of the nature of the curriculum, no such regulation in the nature of the curriculum, no such regulation in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Curriculum is recommended. Liberal Arts and Sciences Curriculum is Curricula having limitations are: recommended. Curricula having limitations include Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Nuclear Medicine i. Engineering Science - 25 credits, excluding Technology. For other specialized programs with humanities credits limitations, check with those departments.

276 ii. Career Curriculum - one half of the credits of the Departmental Career Courses iii. Nursing - Only credits for Nursing courses allowed by the Nursing Department iv.Radiologic Technology - Only credits for CLE and RAD courses allowed by the Nursing Department Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: Existing policy is vague in places and problematic in general. For example, in some majors, it is difficult to define what the “career specialization” courses are. Given that, it is unclear how the policy would be enforced. The new proposed policy allows departments the flexibility to address transfer credit in the context of their degree programs. AII.11: The following revisions are proposed to “Equivalency determination for transfer credit” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Clarifying the locus of authority for transfer credit. Providing a timeline for transfer credit evaluation and completion. From To 10.2.1 Equivalency determination for transfer credit 10.2.1 Equivalency determination for transfer credit a. The equivalency status of courses offered by determined institutions other than BCC shall be by the a. The equivalency status of courses offered by assigned institutions other than BCC shall be Registrar. Such determination may occur prior or by subsequent to completion of the course by the student. the Registrar in consultation with the academic This evaluation may be accomplished before, during, or department . Such determination may occur prior or subsequent to completion of the course by the after the student's attendance at BCC. student. This evaluation should occur upon admission or readmission to BCC but it can be revised during attendance until graduation, when the record will be sealed. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: Existing policy makes it appear as if the registrar’s office determines course equivalency in terms of transfer credit. In reality though, this authority is located in the academic department. Proposed policy makes clear what already occurs in terms of practice. Additionally, the new proposed policy makes explicit the need to provide early transfer credit information to student, as well as when the transfer credit evaluation is sealed. AII.12: The following revisions are proposed to “Grade Requirements” for transfer credit in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Clarification of policy in regard to minimum grade for transfer credit. From To 10.2.4 Grade requirements 10.2.4 Grade requirements For transfer-of-credit purposes, all courses taken

277 from colleges or a. Grades in equivalent courses by students on permit following their admission to taken prior to admission to BCC shall be universities the College are considered in the same manner as considered as follows: if completed at BCC. Grades in equivalent courses from recognized – Degree ii. From a CUNY school – any passing grade taken prior to admission to BCC shall be colleges credit granted, not calculated in index. considered as follows: ii. From a regionally accredited or New York State Degree credit granted, not D or higher - * Board of Regents accredited non-CUNY school – C or calculated in index. better – Degree credit granted, not calculated in index. * F or equivalent - No degree credit granted; not calculated in index. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: Existing policy was unclear in places and did not distinguish between CUNY and nonCUNY transfer credit. The proposed policy makes this distinction explicit and is in accord with current practice as well as with the practices of peer CUNY community colleges. AII.13: The following revisions are proposed to “Exemption by departmental examination” (retitled “Exemptions by prior learning assessment”) in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Formalize and define prior learning assessment as an acceptable methodology of granting credit and provide examples of prior learning assessment. From To prior learning assessment 10.5 Exemptions by 10.7 Exemption by Departmental examination. Students may earn degree credit through a. Academic departments may choose to offer an exemption by departmental examinations in those opportunity for students to earn credit via prior departments offering examinations designed to verify learning assessment of learning of an academic knowledge or skills gained through work experience nature that has taken place outside the traditional at non-collegiate institutions, or through independent college classroom. This learning may have study. occurred in any variety of venues, including but not limited to the following: work or training experience (e.g., police academy, military), coursework completed at post-secondary institutions from which BCC does not accept transfer credit, and independent study. An academic department may evaluate this learning for possible college credit and course equivalency through an appropriate method, including but not limited to the following: syllabi/documentation review, industry certification review, departmental challenge exam, or portfolio review. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: BCC has, for years, granted credit based on prior learning assessment of different types, but this was not reflected clearly in our Academic Rules and Regulations. The proposed language describes the various forms and types of prior learning assessment, should a department choose to offer this option to students.

278 AII.14: The following new policy is proposed regarding awarding of certificate after completing an associate degree. If approved, this item will be added to the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Explicitly allowing the awarding of a certificate either before or after the earning of an associate degree. 11.6.7 Awarding of certificates after completing associate degree A student may apply for the awarding of a certificate either enroute to or after the awarding of an associate degree. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: Students sometimes earn a certificate and then go on to earn an associate degree in the same general content area. This is a relatively common practice and allows the student to leverage the certificate for employment purposes even while they’re going on to work on the associate degree. Less commonly, students will graduate with an associate degree and then later request the awarding of a certificate using the courses already completed for the associate degree. While this reverses the typical order of certificate first and then associate degree, the new language would explicitly allow for this. Allowing a certificate after earning an associate degree can be of benefit to our students, particularly when the name of the certificate indicates a different competency than the associate degree in which it is embedded (e.g., Certificate in Early Childhood Assistant vs. AAS in Education Associate). We have conferred with the relevant enrollment services departments at BCC and the university registrar regarding granting a certificate after an associate degree; there are no objections to this practice. AII.15: The following revisions are proposed to “Military Service: Requirements and Limitations” in the BCC Academic Rules and Regulations. Proposed: Increasing the elective credit maximum for military training to 6 credits and making explicit that students can be granted specific course credit for equivalent military training in addition to the 6 elective credits. From To 12.2.2 Requirements and limitations 12.2.2 Requirements and limitations a. Students who have been discharged from military a. Students who have been discharged from service under honorable conditions, may apply for a military service under honorable conditions, may maximum of four six apply for a maximum elective credits. These credits for elective credits, military service are in lieu of taking four dependent upon the electives allowed for each credits of free The actual number of electives in their curriculum. student’s program of study. These credits for six military service are in lieu of taking credits of credits permitted for military service shall depend upon free electives in their curriculum. In addition to 6 the number of free elective credits permitted in the . student's curriculum elective credits, students may receive course credit for military training if judged equivalent to a specific BCC course(s). See 10.5 Exemptions by Prior Learning Assessment. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: After researching, no clear rationale was found for limiting elective credit for military coursework to four credits. Six credits would allow for the equivalent of two courses. Additionally, we revised language to

279 make it clear that military training could be granted for equivalent coursework in addition to six elective credits. Section AIII: Changes in Degree Programs AIII.1 The following revisions are proposed for the Liberal Arts and Sciences Program Program: A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences Program Code: 378 Effective: Fall 2018 Proposed Changes: Modification of the Liberal Arts & Sciences A.S. Degree Option in Chemistry. From To Required Core Required Core A. English Composition 6 A. English Composition 6 B. Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning B. Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning 1 1 Pre-Calculus Mathematics OR OR Pre-Calculus Mathematics MTH 30 MTH 30 MTH 31 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 MTH 31 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 C. Life and Physical Sciences C. Life and Physical Sciences 1 1 General College Chemistry 4 General College Chemistry 4 CHM 11 CHM 11 Subtotal: 14 Subtotal: 14 Flexible Core Flexible Core No more than two courses in any discipline or interdisciplinary field. No more than two courses in any discipline or interdisciplinary field. A. World Cultures and Global Issues 3 A. World Cultures and Global Issues 3 B. U.S. Experience in Diversity 3 B. U.S. Experience in Diversity 3 3 C. Creative Expression C. Creative Expression 3 3 D. Individual and Society 3 D. Individual and Society E. Scientific World E. Scientific World 1 General College Chemistry II 4 CHM 12 1 General College Chemistry II 4 CHM 12 2 Select ONE course from Area A-E Restricted Elective 3 2 Restricted Elective Select ONE course from Area A-E 3 Subtotal: 19 Subtotal: 19

280 Major Requirements Major Requirements Free Electives 0-4 Free Electives 0-4 MTH 31 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 0-4 3 MTH 31 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 0-4 MTH 32 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 5 MTH 32 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 5 Chemistry Option Requirements Chemistry Option Requirements CHM 31 Organic Chemistry I 5 CHM 31 Organic Chemistry I 5 CHM 32 Organic Chemistry II 5 CHM 32 Organic Chemistry II 5 courses below: Choose two of three courses below: Choose two of five CHM 33 Quantitative Analysis AND/ OR CHM 33 Quantitative Analysis AND/ OR OR BIO 11 Introductory General Biology I AND/ OR BIO 11 Introductory General Biology I AND/ PHY 11 Physics I 8 PHY 11 Physics I AND/OR Subtotal: 27 OR CHM 21 Introduction to Chemical Processes AND/ Total credits: 60 8 BIO 34 /CHM 34 Biofuels and Bioproducts 1 This program has obtained a waiver to require STEM variant courses in Required Core Area B and Area C and Flexible Core Subtotal: 27 Area E. If students transferring into this program complete different Total credits: 60 courses in these areas, they will be certified as having completed the Common Core requirements, but it may not be possible for 1 This program has obtained a waiver to require STEM variant them to finish their degree within the regular number (60) of credit. courses in Required Core Area B and Area C and Flexible 2 Core Area E. If students transferring into this program Restricted Elective: must select one course from Flexible Core A- complete different courses in these areas, they will be certified E. No more than two courses in any discipline or interdisciplinary as having completed the Common Core requirements, but it field. may not be possible for them to finish their degree within the 3 regular number (60) of credit. Students in this major are required to take MTH 30 or MTH 31 to fulfill required Core Area B. Note that MTH 30 is a prerequisite to 2 Restricted Elective: must select one course from Flexible MTH 31, so students who take MTH 30 to fulfill Required Core B Core A-E. No more than two courses in any discipline or will not have free elective credits. interdisciplinary field. 3 Students in this major are required to take MTH 30 or MTH 31 to fulfill required Core Area B. Note that MTH 30 is a prerequisite to MTH 31, so students who take MTH 30 to fulfill Required Core B will not have free elective credits. Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: BCC was awarded a National Science Foundation ATE (Advanced Technological Education) grant (#1601635 – Chemical and Bioenergy Technology for Sustainability) which was to be used to develop materials that will provide our students with the skills necessary for a career in sustainable chemical

281 manufacturing. Based on the input from the grant’s Industrial Advisory Board, the Chemistry Department partnered with the Biological Sciences Department developed two new courses: CHM 21 and BIO 34 /CHM 34. The addition of the two new courses to the current Chemistry Option would expand the degree’s current offerings and provide the necessary background to either transfer into a Chemistry or Chemical Engineering Degree program or pursue a career in green chemical manufacturing. AIII.2 The following revisions are proposed for the Automotive Technology program Program: A.A.S. in Automotive Technology Program Code: 19075 Effective: Fall 2018 Proposed: ACS 50 be recognized as an approved substitute for MUS 10 or ART 10 for Automotive majors. To From Course Description Crs Course Description Crs Required Core Required Core A. English Composition A. English Composition ENG 10 Fundamentals of Composition and Rhetoric OR Fundamentals of Composition and Rhetoric OR ENG 10 ENG 11 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 ENG 11 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 ENG 12 Composition and Rhetoric II 3 ENG 12 Composition and Rhetoric II 3 C. Life and Physical Sciences C. Life and Physical Sciences CHM 11 General Chemistry I OR CHM 11 General Chemistry I OR CHM 17 Fundamentals of General Chemistry I 4 CHM 17 Fundamentals of General Chemistry I 4 Flexible Core Flexible Core A. World Cultures and Global Issues A. World Cultures and Global Issues HIS 10 History of the Modern World OR HIS 10 History of the Modern World OR HIS 11 Introduction to the Modern World 3 HIS 11 Introduction to the Modern World 3 B. US Experience in its Diversity or C. Creative B. US Experience in its Diversity or C. Creative Expression Expression 1 3 Humanities electives 1 3 Humanities electives D. Individual and Society D. Individual and Society COMM 11 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communications 3 COMM 11 Fundamentals of Interpersonal E. Scientific World Communications 3

282 PHY 11 College Physics I 4 E. Scientific World Subtotal 23 PHY 11 College Physics I 4 Major Requirements Subtotal 23 ACS 10 Introduction to Automotive Technology 1 Major Requirements ACS 11 Engine Repair 4 ACS 10 Introduction to Automotive Technology 1 ACS 12 Brake Systems 3 ACS 11 Engine Repair 4 ACS 22 Automatic Transmission and Transaxle OR ACS 12 Brake Systems 3 ACS 38 Advanced Vehicle Diagnostics 4 ACS 22 Automatic Transmission and Transaxle OR ACS 23 Heating and Air-Conditioning 3 ACS 38 Advanced Vehicle Diagnostics 4 ACS 24 Electrical Systems 3 ACS 23 Heating and Air-Conditioning 3 ACS 35 Alternate Fuel Systems OR ACS 24 Electrical Systems 3 ACS 36 Hybrid/Electric Vehicles 3 ACS 35 Alternate Fuel Systems OR MTH 13 Trigonometry and College Algebra 3 ACS 36 Hybrid/Electric Vehicles 3 PEA Physical Education activity course OR MTH 13 Trigonometry and College Algebra 3 WFA 10 Workplace First Aid 1 PEA Physical Education activity course OR ART 10 Art Survey OR WFA 10 Workplace First Aid 1 MUS 10 Music Survey OR ACS 50 Automotive Technology Internship 1 ART 10 Art Survey OR ELC 15 Computer Applications in Technology 2 MUS 10 Music Survey 1 Option I: Automotive Technology ELC 15 Computer Applications in Technology 2 ACS 13 Engine Performance 3 Option I: Automotive Technology ACS 14 Manual Drive Tran and Axles OR ACS 45 Diesel Technology 3 ACS 13 Engine Performance 3 ACS 21 Steering and Suspension Systems 3 ACS 14 Manual Drive Tran and Axles OR ACS 45 Diesel Technology 3 Option II: Diesel Technology ACS 21 Steering and Suspension Systems 3 ACS 45 Diesel Technology 3 Option II: Diesel Technology ACS 46 Diesel Engine Performance 3 ACS 45 Diesel Technology 3 ACS 47 Air Brakes and Suspension 3 ACS 46 Diesel Engine Performance 3 Subtotal 37 ACS 47 Air Brakes and Suspension 3 Total credits required 60

283 Subtotal 37 1 3 credits of Humanities Restricted Electives must be selected to fulfill Pathways Flexible Core Areas B or C. In order to get the broadest Total credits required 60 college experience, it is advised that the Humanities elective be chosen 1 from disciplines OTHER THAN COMM, MEST, or HIS. 3 credits of Humanities Restricted Electives must be selected to fulfill Pathways Flexible Core Areas B or C. In order to get the broadest college experience, it is advised that the Humanities elective be chosen from disciplines OTHER THAN COMM, MEST, or HIS. Rationale: This course will allow automotive students to benefit from practical, real world, hands-on experience in their chosen career in the automotive or transportation service industry. Automotive Technology will offer one internship course per semester with a cap of 20 students. AIII.3: The following revisions are proposed for the Radiologic Technology program Program: A.A.S. in Radiologic Technology Program Code: 91331 HEGIS Code: 5207 Effective: Fall 2018 Revisions: Elimination of the CLE/RAD program schedule in the footnote of the degree requirements From To Required Core Required Core A. English Composition A. English Composition ENG 10 Fundamentals of Composition and Rhetoric ENG 10 Fundamentals of Composition and OR Rhetoric OR ENG 11 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 ENG 11 Composition and Rhetoric I 3 C. Life and Physical Sciences C. Life and Physical Sciences BIO 23 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 BIO 23 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 Flexible Core Flexible Core A. World Cultures and Global Issues A. World Cultures and Global Issues HIS 10 History of the Modern World OR HIS 10 History of the Modern World OR HIS 11 Introduction to the Modern World 3 HIS 11 Introduction to the Modern World 3 Individual and Society D. D. Individual and Society COMM 11 Fundamentals of Interpersonal COMM 11 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication 3 Communication 3

284 E. Scientific World E. Scientific World BIO 24 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 BIO 24 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 Additional Flexible Core requirement – Area D. Additional Flexible Core requirement – Area D. PSY 11 Introduction to Psychology 3 PSY 11 Introduction to Psychology 3 Subtotal 20 Subtotal 20 Major Requirements Major Requirements * * Trigonometry & College Algebra 3 Trigonometry & College Algebra 3 MTH 13 MTH 13 PEA Physical Education Activity Course 1 PEA Physical Education Activity Course 1 RAD 11 Fundamentals of Radiologic Sciences and RAD 11 Fundamentals of Radiologic Sciences and Health Care 3.5 Health Care 3.5 RAD 12 Radiographic Exposure I 2.5 RAD 12 Radiographic Exposure I 2.5 RAD 13 Radiographic Procedures I 3 RAD 13 Radiographic Procedures I 3 RAD 15 Radiographic Anatomy I 2 RAD 15 Radiographic Anatomy I 2 RAD 16 Patient Care and Pharmacology in RAD 16 Patient Care and Pharmacology in Radiologic Radiologic Sciences 2.5 Sciences 2.5 CLE 11 Clinical Radiography Fundamentals .5 CLE 11 Clinical Radiography Fundamentals .5 CLE 15 Clinical Radiography I .5 CLE 15 Clinical Radiography I .5 RAD 22 Radiographic Exposure II 2.5 RAD 22 Radiographic Exposure II 2.5 RAD 23 Radiographic Procedures II 3 RAD 23 Radiographic Procedures II 3 RAD 24 Radiation Protection 2 RAD 24 Radiation Protection 2 RAD 25 Radiographic Anatomy II 1 RAD 25 Radiographic Anatomy II 1 CLE 21 Clinical Radiography II 1 CLE 21 Clinical Radiography II 1 CLE 31 Clinical Radiography III 1 CLE 31 Clinical Radiography III 1 RAD 32 Imaging Modalities 2 RAD 32 Imaging Modalities 2 RAD 33 Radiographic Procedures III & RAD 33 Radiographic Procedures III & Cross-Sectional Anatomy 2 Cross-Sectional Anatomy 2 RAD 34 Radiographic Pathology 2 RAD 34 Radiographic Pathology 2 CLE 41 Clinical Radiography IV 1.5 CLE 41 Clinical Radiography IV 1.5

285 CLE 45 Clinical Radiography V .5 CLE 45 Clinical Radiography V .5 RAD 42 Radiation Biology 2 RAD 42 Radiation Biology 2 RAD 43 Quality Assessment/Management 1 RAD 43 Quality Assessment/Management 1 RAD 71 Radiation Physics 2.5 RAD 71 Radiation Physics 2.5 CLE 51 Clinical Radiography VI 1.5 CLE 51 Clinical Radiography VI 1.5 CLE 61 Clinical Radiography VII/Senior Seminar 1 CLE 61 Clinical Radiography VII/Senior Seminar 1 Subtotal 45 Subtotal 45 Total credits 65 Total credits 65 *MTH 30 should be considered for transfer to a senior *MTH 30 should be considered for transfer to a senior college. college. †Note that the sequence of the academic and clinical curriculum of the program is scheduled Monday- Thursday between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. (the exception is CLE 11, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday). Rationale: The purpose of eliminating the footnote is to allow more flexibility in Radiologic Technology course offerings. The new Joint Review Commission on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) standards allow for evening and weekend courses to be offered, providing the students do not complete more than 40 hours a week of study (didactic and clinical). Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Chemical Technology Department(s) [ x ]Undergraduate [ ]Graduate Career [ x ] Regular [ ]Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ]Remedial Academic Level Biology, Chemistry Subject Area Course Prefix & BIO 34 / CHM 34 Number Course Title Biofuels and Bioproducts Catalogue This course covers the chemistry behind the production of sugars from plants, and the biology of converting these sugars into commodity molecules. Specific attention Description will be paid to biosynthetic pathways, plant cell wall architecture, microbial metabolism, biofuels, and valorization of by-product streams. A hands-on laboratory component for the course will introduce students to chemical and biological reactors to teach skill sets required for these transformations via microbial cell culture and modern analytical chemistry methods. Applications of biofuels and bioproducts will be examined within the context of their commercial success and viability. Prerequisites CHM 31

286 Co-Requisites 4 Credits Contact Hours 6 (2 hr lecture, 1 hr recitation, 3 hr lab) [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) Course Applicability X Major ____ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Effective Term FALL 2018 : This course will expand the range of topics in the revised Liberal Arts & Sciences, Chemistry Rationale Option AS Degree. Students will gain the understanding and skills necessary to operate bioreactors to produce chemical products using biological organisms. Students attending this course should gain insight into how a formal training in chemistry and biology can be leveraged into a scientific career and/or a career focused on sustainable chemical manufacturing. This course is being offered by both the Chemistry Department and the Department of Biological Sciences as it includes the following topics: biochemistry, metabolism, biohazard safety, sterile technique, culture techniques, and cell structure, function, and metabolism. AIV.2.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Chemistry & Chemical Technology Career [ x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Academic Level [ x] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ]Remedial Subject Area Chemistry Course Prefix & CHM 21 Number Introduction to Chemical Processes Course Title Catalogue This course will teach students how to solve problems and perform experiments related to chemical processes at the industrial scale. Students will learn how to measure common physical properties and Description how to analyze their data using Excel. Basic data processing skills will include graphing, error analysis and linear regression analysis. Students will learn these skills by performing common laboratory techniques such as basic reactor set-up, instrument calibration, solution preparation and dilution. Though most of the chemicals used in lab are non-toxic, a large emphasis will be placed on proper lab safety techniques. Students will also learn the basics of chemical processes calculations, including

287 how to write and solve heat and mass balance problems. Lastly, students will solve these problems in . the context of biotechnology and renewable energy Prerequisites MTH 6, CHM 11 Co-Requisites Credits 4 Contact Hours 6 (2 hr lecture, 1 hr recitation, 3 hr lab) [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) Course Applicability x _ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society _ Scientific World Effective Term FALL 2018 : The course will cover the basic principles involved in chemical processing. This course will also Rationale serve as a primer for students who are interested in transferring into Chemical Engineering programs at four- year colleges and for students aspiring to a career in the industrial chemical, biomass conversion, green chemistry, and energy technology fields. AIV.2.2 Experimental CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Chemistry and Chemical Technology [X ]Undergraduate [ ]Graduate Career [X] Regular [ ]Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ]Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Chemistry Course Prefix & CHM 16 Number Course Title Chemistry: A Forensic Perspective Catalogue This is a general chemistry course and has been designed for a student in a non- Description science major. The course will provide an introduction to general chemistry with connections to forensic science. In the laboratory, students will learn sample preparation techniques and chemical analysis related to the study of crime scene evidence such as identification and analysis of hair, fibers, organic accelerants and inorganic poisons, drug chemistry, fingerprints, and chemistry of explosives. Laboratory experiments emphasize physical and chemical identification of substances, bench and onsite wet chemical techniques, microscopy, and

288 applications of spectroscopy. Prerequisites RDL 2 and ENG 2, if required MTH 5 Co-Requisites Credits 3 credits; 2 lec; 2 lab 4 Contact Hours Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) __ Major Course Applicability ___Gen Ed Required __X_ Gen Ed - Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____Science ____Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society _ Scientific World __X Effective Term Fall 2018 Rationale : The Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, in conjunction with the Office for Academic Affairs (under a Title V Grant), has established a state-of-the-art crime lab with new instruments and equipment. This course will leverage these instruments and equipment to expose any interested BCC student to the science behind crime investigations. The course will be of particular interest to and value for BCC Criminal Justice majors, as it will help prepare them for future careers in law enforcement. This course has received approval for the Flexible E Scientific World area of the Pathways core as experimental only; full review will be needed if the course is proposed as permanent. AIV.3 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Engineering, Physics & Technology Career [ x ]Undergraduate [ ]Graduate Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ]Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ]Remedial Subject Area Automotive Technology Course Prefix & ACS 50 Number Course Title Automotive Technology Internship Program Catalogue This course is designed to allow qualifying students to apply the skills they have Description learned in the classroom by interning at a dealership service center or at a local repair shop in the community. The first three weeks of the course will take place on campus and will address shop safety, setting expectations for placement in

289 internship sites and scheduling. Students will then report to their host repair facilities to perform tasks typically done in a real automotive shop environment, which include, but are not limited to, interpreting and writing repair orders, use of service information systems, general automotive repairs and customer service. Periodic evaluations for student progress will take place on site by a designated faculty or staff member, and those evaluations will be factored into the mid-term and final evaluations of the course. This internship is considered to be an excellent practical experience for preparation for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) G1 exam. The internship will consist of 50 hours of in-shop work, spread over a 12 week period. (This one credit course can replace either the Music or Art requirement for the Automotive Program.) Prerequisites ACS 10, ACS11, ACS 12, ACS21, ACS24, Driver’s License None Co-Requisites 1 Credits Recitation: 7.5 hours, Internship: 50 hours (These are total semester hours); 3 Contact Hours contact hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) Course Applicability __x__ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Fall 2018 Effective Term This course will allow automotive students to benefit from practical, real world, hands-on experience in their chosen Rationale: career in the automotive or transportation service industry. Automotive Technology will offer one internship course per semester with a cap of 20 students. AIV.4 Department(s) Modern Languages Career [ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Japanese Course Number JPN 111 Course Title Beginning Japanese I Catalogue Description This introductory language course is for beginners of Japanese. This course aims to

290 develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in modern Japanese. The course also focuses on developing mastery of the Japanese writing system for basic reading and writing. The course will introduce the overall structure of Japanese, basic vocabulary, the two syllabaries of the phonetic system, and some characters (Kanji). Students will learn Japanese customs, traditions, and culture. None Pre/ Co Requisites 3 Credits Contact Hours 3 rec, 1 conf/rec Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.) ____ Not Applicable General Education Component ____ Required X Gen Ed - Flexible World Cultures ____ English Composition X ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression ____Individual and Society ____Scientific World Fall 2018 Effective Term Rationale: The increasing demand for and interest in Japanese has been expressed by our students in a recent department survey. The growing popularity of Anime, Manga, food and other cultural products may be reasons for this demand. Currently, our courses are predominantly from the Western European traditions. Globalizing course offerings to include Japanese will make our curricula more inclusive and reflective of the diversity within our city. Because Japan is the world’s third largest economy, study of Japanese is well suited for students who wish to engage in business. Finally, two sections of JPN 111 ran as non-pathways experimental courses in the fall 2017 semester with a total enrollment of 30 students. This course has been approved for inclusion in the World Cultures and Global Issues area of the Pathways flexible core. Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses AV:1.1 Changes to be offered in the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences TO FROM Communication Arts and Sciences Departments NC Departments Course MEDP 12 Course NC Credits 3 Credits NC Hours 3 Hours 2 lec 2 lab Prerequisite MEDP 10 Prerequisite NC Co-requisite Co-requisite Description Students will be introduced to the Description NC

291 theory and practice of an HD digital television studio, including camera operation, switching and other control systems, lighting and in-camera editing. Students will manage, operate and work in the customary roles in a digital television production studio. Requirement Requirement None NC Designation Designation [ ] Yes [x ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Liberal Arts None None Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc.) Intensive, etc.) General Education _x___ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable General Education Component Component ____ Required ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science __ Flexible __ Flexible __ World Cultures __ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Fall 2018 Effective Date Effective Date Rationale: An additional hour is being added to provide students with the appropriate in-studio class time required for this class. This change brings MEDP 12 line with the department’s other studio courses such as MEDP 14, MEDP 33, and MEDP 35. AV: 1.2 Changes to be offered in the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences FROM TO Departments Communication Arts and Sciences Departments NC Course MEDP 51 Course NC Credits 3 Credits NC Hours 1 lec and 90 internship Hours 2 lec 2 lab

292 hours (equivalent to 3 contact hours) Prerequisite NC Prerequisite: Minimum of 45 Prerequisite curriculum credits, including MEDP 23, MEDP 33 and departmental permission. Co-requisite Co-requisite The Media and Digital Film Internship is Description NC Description designed to give students on the job experience and a chance to network with professionals involved in Digital Media: television, film, web, gaming, public access, governmental agency or corporate. The Media and Digital Film Internship introduces students to the application of skills obtained in the program and prepares students for the professional expectations of the field. Note: The internship requires a commitment of 90 hours. Students are required to submit a resume one semester prior to the internship. None Requirement NC Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [x ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No None None Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc.) Intensive, etc.) General Education _x___ Not Applicable General Education __x__ Not Applicable Component Component ____ Required ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science __ Flexible __ Flexible __ World Cultures __ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Effective Date Effective Date Fall 2018

293 Rationale: This change corrects the historical anomaly for hours listed in the catalog for this internship course. AV: 2 Changes to be offered in the Education & Academic Literacy Department FROM TO Departments Education & Academic Literacy Departments Education & Academic Literacy Course EDU 40 Field Work Seminar Course EDU 40 Field Work Seminar Birth to Grade 6 Credits 3 Credits N/C 3 Hours N/C Hours EDU 10; EDU 12 or EDU 26 N/C Prerequisite Prerequisite Co-requisite All other education courses and Co-requisite permission of the department. Individual and small group teaching Description N/C Description experiences under professional supervision in an accredited school or agency. Periodic meetings with BCC faculty supervisor. Students must demonstrate competencies pertaining to general knowledge expected of those who completed the education sequence; and be able to plan educational activities for culturally diverse populations and children with special needs. Students’ dispositions and instructional strategies will be assessed. The use of technology is introduced as appropriate. Students will make contributions to their academic portfolio. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No [ ] Yes [X ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc.) Intensive, etc.) General Education __X__ Not Applicable __X__ Not Applicable General Education Component Component ____ Required ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science __ Flexible __ Flexible __ World Cultures __ World Cultures

294 ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Effective Date Fall 2018 Rationale: To broaden the course’s appeal to students interested in eventually becoming certified in middle and secondary education, i.e., 7-12 New York state certification. At present, BCC’s Department of Education & Academic Literacy is building its middle and secondary cohorts. By not restricting this course to the parameters of “Birth to Grade 6” the course will have a broader reach and therefore serve more students. AV: 3 Changes to be offered in the Department of Engineering, Physics and Technology TO FROM Engineering, Physics and Departments nc Departments Technology NMT 79 Course nc Phlebotomy Course Credits 2 Credits nc 3 (1 lecture/2 lab) Hours nc Hours BIO 24 and permission of the NMT Prerequisite nc Prerequisite Program Director, or BIO 21 and BIO 22 and permission of Medical Office Assistant Curriculum Coordinator Co-requisite Co-requisite nc Description Introduction to phlebotomy. Topics Introduction to phlebotomy. Description include: phlebotomy principles, Topics include: phlebotomy anatomy and physiology of the principles, anatomy and circulatory system, safety, physiology of the circulatory equipment and techniques. system, safety, equipment and Students completing this course techniques. qualify for the certification exam in phlebotomy. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc) Intensive, etc) General Education __X __ Not Applicable __Not Applicable General Education __X Component Component ____ Required ____ Required

295 ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics Science Science ___ _ __ __ Flexible __ Flexible __ World Cultures __ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Effective Fall 2018 Rationale: Students taking the NMT 79 course obtain introductory phlebotomy training and patient safety information. After completion of this course, students will have a general understanding of the basics of phlebotomy as well as training in universal precautions. In order to sit for the Phlebotomy Certification exam, students must have clinical experience and blood draws documented. Montefiore Hospital does not have an insurance agreement with Bronx Community College allowing students to perform the required amount of designated patient sticks. Instructors provide students information regarding outside programs in which they can obtain their clinical experience if they wish to sit for the certification exam. AV: 4.1.1 Changes to be offered in the English Department FROM TO Departments English Departments NC Course ENG 2: Developmental Writing II Course NC Credits 0 Credits NC Hours 4 rec NC Hours ENG 1 or 9 Prerequisite Prerequisite ENG 1, if required and or , if required. F for students with a combined score of students with a combined score of 48-55 on the CUNY 48-55 on the CUNY Assessment Assessment Test in Writing. Test in Writing. Co-requisite Co-requisite Description Extensive writing practice in Students are introduced to the Description response to readings, with writing process. Extensive emphasis on paragraph writing practice in response to . Students development and unity readings, with emphasis on paragraph development and learn to develop paragraphs unity through styles such as through styles such as narration, narration, illustration, illustration, comparison-contrast, comparison-contrast, process, process, cause and effect and cause and effect, argumentation. Helps the student and

296 to write effective paragraphs/ argumentation. Students learn essays in preparation for ENG how to incorporate textual 111. Includes review of grammar evidence into essays, are and usage. introduced to online research and MLA documentation, and learn how to write effective essays in preparation for ENG 111. Includes review of grammar and usage. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation [ ] Yes [X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc.) Intensive, etc.) ____ Not Applicable General Education ____ Not Applicable General Education Component Component ____ Required ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science __ Flexible __ Flexible __ World Cultures __ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Effective Date Effective Date Fall 2018 Rationale: The CUNY-wide policy shift toward multiple measures of assessment for exit from developmental courses will result, as of Spring 2018, in the end of the CATW exam as sole determinant of exit from this, our top-level developmental writing class. We see this change as a welcome opportunity to de-emphasize exam- preparation components of ENG 2 and thus free up time for more meaningful writing instruction. Consequently, in reconfiguring the course we have stressed those elements—composing on the essay level, as opposed to paragraph level; learning the writing process; and learning to write in response to sources and to incorporate and document those sources—that most directly prefigure the work to come in ENG 111, Rhetoric and Composition I. AV: 4.1.2 Changes to be offered in the English Department FROM TO

297 Departments English NC Departments ENG 110: Fundamentals of NC Course Course Composition and Rhetoric Credits 3 Credits NC Hours NC Hours 5 rec 1 conf/rec Passing score on CUNY Prerequisite A combined score of 48-55 on Prerequisite Assessment Test in Reading AND the CUNY Assessment Test in combined score of 48-55 on Writing and either a passing CUNY Assessment Test in score on the CUNY Writing , or with Chairperson’s Assessment Test in Reading . permission or successful completion of RDL 2, if required, or with Chairperson’s permission. Co-requisite Co-requisite Fundamental principles of Description Description Fundamental principles of expository organization , expository organization and grammar that emphasize , with an essay rhetoric, and grammar development, unity and clarity, essay emphasis on utilizing development, unity and clarity, ; various rhetorical styles and the use of various selected readings. Approximately . rhetorical styles nine Selected compositions required, eight including practice CATW and one readings. Approximately research paper with MLA compositions required, a including documentation using library research paper with resources. Students must pass the MLA documentation using library resources. This course CATW and complete the ENG 11 final exam. Students who pass is identical in academic content ENG 10 are permitted to enroll in and in assessment to ENG 111, but it adds 2 ENG 12 or above. Students who do not pass the CUNY developmental hours to allow Assessment Test in Writing cannot faculty to work with students to improve college composition pass the course. skills. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc.) Intensive, etc.) General Education ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable General Education Component Component ____ Required ____ Required __X_ English Composition __X_ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science

298 __ Flexible __ Flexible __ World Cultures __ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Effective Date Fall 2018 Effective Date Rationale: The CUNY-wide policy shift toward multiple measures of assessment for exit from developmental courses resulted in the removal of the CATW exam from “co-requisite” composition courses such as ENG 110, effective Fall 2017. For this reason, the language of the course description has been updated to more directly parallel that of ENG 111, with references to the CATW deleted. Further, the shift to the multiple-measures model for exit from developmental reading, which students can now accomplish either through passing the exam or through passing the top-level developmental course in reading (RDL 2), necessitated the change in prerequisite for ENG. AV: 4.1.3 Changes to be offered in the English Department TO FROM English Departments NC Departments Course ENG 111: Composition and Rhetoric Course NC I Credits 3 Credits NC Hours 3 rec 1 conf/rec NC Hours Passing scores on both the CUNY Prerequisite Either a passing score on Prerequisite Writing Skills Assessment Test and the CUNY Assessment Test the CUNY Reading Skills in Writing or successful Assessment Test. completion of ENG 2, if required, and either a passing score on the CUNY Assessment Test in Reading or successful completion of RDL 2, if required. Co-requisite Co-requisite Description NC Fundamental principles of Description organization and rhetoric; practice in expository writing; selected readings, mainly nonfiction; approximately eight papers required, including one research paper with MLA documentation using library resources.

299 Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No [ X ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc.) Intensive, etc.) General Education ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable General Education Component Component ____ Required ____ Required __X_ English Composition __X_ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science __ Flexible __ Flexible __ World Cultures __ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Effective Date Effective Date Fall 2018 Rationale: The CUNY-wide policy shift toward multiple measures of assessment for exit from developmental courses has resulted in a change to the process of exiting out of the top-level developmental reading course (RDL 2) and writing course (ENG 2). The CUNY Assessment Test in Reading is no longer the sole determinant for passing RDL 2, and an overall passing grade in that course now also satisfies the reading prerequisite for freshman composition. Similarly, the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing is no longer the sole determinant for passing ENG 2, and an overall passing grade in that course now also satisfies the writing prerequisite for freshman composition. The proposed new prerequisite conforms to current CUNY policy by accounting for students who have demonstrated proficiency in reading and writing either through the passing of the respective CUNY Assessment Tests or through the passing of the respective upper-level developmental courses, RDL 2 and ENG 2. AV: 5.1 Changes to be offered in the History Department FROM TO History Departments N/C Departments GEO 10 - World Regional Course Course N/C Geography Crosslisted Crosslisted Credits 3 Credits N/C

300 Hours Hours 3 N/C Prerequisite ENG 1 or ENG 9 and RDL 1, Prerequisite if required RDL 2 or ENG 2 if required Corequisite ENG 2 or ENG 110 or RDL 2, Corequisite if required N/C Description Description This course introduces geographical concepts and perspectives and builds basic map skills and locational knowledge of countries, cities, physical features and regions. Issues addressed include climate change, the global economy, natural resource use, culture and geopolitics. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation [ X] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc) Intensive, etc) ____ Not Applicable General ____ Not Applicable General Education Education ____ Required ____ Required Component Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science _x _ Flexible _ Flexible _x _ World Cultures _ World Cultures _x _x ___ US Experience in its __ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Effective Date Fall 2018 Rationale: This clarifies the English skill levels needed for the course and should help avoid inappropriate placement into the course. This is being addressed as part of a general review of our course requirements. AV: 5.2 Changes to be offered in the History Department FROM TO

301 Departments History N/C Departments PHL 11 – Introduction to N/C Course Course Philosophy Crosslisted Crosslisted Credits N/C Credits 3 Hours N/C 3 Hours Prerequisite ENG 1 or ENG 9 and RDL 1, if Prerequisite required Corequisite Corequisite ENG 2 or ENG 110 or RDL 2, RDL 2 or ENG 2 if required if required N/C Description Description Fundamental questions of human experience and basic problems of philosophy; survey of major philosophers (classical and modern). Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ X] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc) Intensive, etc) ____ Not Applicable General General Education ____ Not Applicable Education Component ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science _x _ Flexible _ Flexible _x __ World Cultures __ World Cultures __ US Experience in its __ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity __ Creative Expression __ Creative Expression _X_ Individual and Society _X_ Individual and Society __ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Date Fall 2018 Rationale: This clarifies the English skill levels needed for the course and should help avoid inappropriate placement into it. This is being addressed as part of a general review of our course requirements. AV: 6 Changes to be offered in the Department of Modern Languages

302 TO FROM Departments Departments Modern Languages Modern Languages Don Quijote and Other SPN 124 Course Course SPN 24 and Other Don Quijote Cervantes Masterpieces Cervantes Masterpieces Pre or co requisite SPN 13 OR SPN 17 or Prerequisite SPN 13 or SPN 113 or Placement Placement Test Test 3 rec Hours 3 rec Hours 3 Credits Credits 3 Reading, discussion, analysis and Description Reading, discussion, analysis Description written reports on selections from and written reports on Don Quijote . the original text of selections from the original text Selections from Cervantes’ Novelas . Selections from Don Quijote of . Course conducted in Ejemplares Novelas Ejemplares Cervantes’ . Spanish. Course conducted in Spanish. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Intensive, WAC, WAC, etc) etc) ____ Not Applicable General ____ Not Applicable General Education Education Component ____ Required ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Flexible _x_ Flexible ___ World Cultures __ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression _x_ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World Effective Not applicable Effective Fall 2018 Rationale: The Department of Modern Languages is offering a course on Cervantes in the Common Core, to give students more choice in the Flexible Core, Area C. The prerequisites have been changed to reflect the updated curriculum in the department. The course number has been changed from SPN 24 to SPN 124 in order to be in line with the other courses in the department that are in the Common Core, in order to avoid

303 confusion as to course levels. This course has been approved for inclusion in the Creative Expression area of the Pathways Flexible Core.

304 June 2018 Brooklyn College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters BROOKLYN COLLEGE – CHANCELLOR’S UNIVERSITY REPORT – June 2018 PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS Section A-I: Special Actions A-I: 1 Be it resolved that Brooklyn College be authorized to establish the Brooklyn College Center for Cancer Research, effective June 25, 2018, subject to financial ability. Explanation: Cancer research is a major area of scholarly focus at Brooklyn College. Many biology and chemistry faculty members at the College work with undergraduate and doctoral students in their laboratories and discoveries from their findings produce patents, models, new treatments, diagnostic tools and prevention methods that could be used clinically. Through the establishment of the Brooklyn College Center for Cancer Research, the College would greatly expand its fundamental cancer research by aligning our research activities with actual cancer treatment at local cancer centers and hospitals, transforming the findings of fundamental research into actual medical practice and treatment. The Center will significantly enhance the ability of the College to deliver premier educational opportunities to undergraduate and graduate students and help attract outstanding faculty and students to the College. The Center will positively impact the entire borough by contributing to the delivery of crucial services to cancer patients. It should be noted that the Brooklyn College Center for Cancer Research will be the first research center focusing on cancer at the City University of New st York. The Center received governance approval on March 21 , 2018. Two donors have already come forward to pledge substantial funding for the proposed Center. Supporting documentation for this proposal is available in the Office of Academic Affairs. SECTION A-II: CHANGES IN GENERAL EDUCATION [Item A-II: 1 removed by the academic reviewer] Item AII: 2 Addition of two courses to the Brooklyn College Flexible Common Core The following courses have received approval from CUNY’s CCCRC committee for addition to Brooklyn College Common Core offerings and they will qualify for the categories specified below: AFST 3135 Flexible Core World Cultures and Global Issues WGST 1001 Flexible Core US Experience in Its Diversity Effective date: Fall 2018

305 SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:1 Department of Chemistry B.A. degree program in chemistry HEGIS code 1905; SED program code 02082 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 59.5 credits) 51 - 53 ½ 49 Program requirements ( --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Chemistry 1100 or Chemistry 1050 and 2050. 3410 or 3415W, 3510 or both 3511 and 3512, 3520 or All of the following: Chemistry 2100, Chemistry 2110, both 3521 and 3522, 4600 or 4610. At least five credits chosen from the following: Chemistry 2700, 3420, 4530, 4550, 4570, 4571, 4572, 4580, 4581, 4620, 4640, 4720, 4760, 4761, either 4780 or 4790. One of the following physics sequences, a), or b), or c): a) Physics 1100 (or Physics 1111 and 1112) and 2100. b) Physics 1150 and 2150. c) Physics 1150 and 2100. The following mathematics sequence: Mathematics 1011 or both Mathematics 1021 and 1026 or assignment by the Department of Mathematics to Mathematics 1201. Mathematics 1201 and 1206 A minimum of 15 credits in advanced courses in chemistry must be completed at Brooklyn College with a grade of C- or higher in each course. Rationale : The change in the Mathematics requirements is undertaken to point out a hidden pre-requisite, in response to a recent directive from CUNY. This does not represent a change to the degree in practice. Chem 2110 is added to the list of required courses, as it is as a pre-requisite for Chem 3511. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:2

306 Department of Chemistry B.A. degree program in adolescence education: chemistry teacher HEGIS code 1905.01; SED program code 26813 The Department of Secondary Education and the Department of Chemistry jointly offer a program for students who plan to teach chemistry in grades 7 through 12. Additional information may be obtained from the Department of Secondary Education or the Department of Chemistry. Adolescence education (grades 7- 12) and special subject programs are writing intensive. Students should consult a counselor as early as possible to plan their program. This program is writing intensive. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Program requirements (73- 92.5 credits) 88.5 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- All of the following: Chemistry 1100 or both Chemistry 1050 and 2050. All of the following: Chemistry 2100, 3410 or 3415W, 3450 or 5450, 4600 or 4610, 5210, Earth and Environmental Sciences 1101 or 1201. One of the following organic chemistry sequences, a), or b), or c): a) Chemistry 2500 b) Chemistry 3510 and 3520 c) Chemistry 3511, 3512, 3521 and 3522 One of the following physics sequences, a) or b) or c): a) Physics 1100 (or Physics 1111 and 1112) and 2100. b) Physics 1150 and 2150. c) Physics 1150 and 2100. The following biology sequence: Biology 1001 and Biology 1002 The following mathematics sequence: Mathematics 1011 or both Mathematics 1021 and 1026 or assignment by the Department of Mathematics to Mathematics 1201. Mathematics 1201 and 1206 Additional chemistry requirements for a B.A. degree: A minimum of 15 credits in advanced courses in chemistry must be completed at Brooklyn College with a grade of C- or higher in each course. For the

307 purposes of the B.A. degree program in adolescence education: chemistry teacher only, Chemistry 2500 will be considered an advanced course in the Department of Chemistry. Students must complete 26 credits in the Department of Secondary Education as specified below. a) Secondary Education 2001, 2002, 3401, 3402 and 3456 courses may be started in the lower-sophomore term, or upper-sophomore term. b) Secondary Education 4480. This course may be taken in the junior year. c) Secondary Education 4481, 4482, 4483, and 4484 in the senior year. Students must have successfully completed Secondary Education 4480 before taking any of these courses The two student teaching field courses, Secondary Education 4482 and 4484, may be taken in the same semester. Secondary Education 4404 is course equivalent to all of Secondary Education 4480, 4481, and 4482. Secondary Education 4410 is course equivalent to all of Secondary Education 4480, 4483, and 4484. Degree programs in Secondary Education include a major in an appropriate department of the college. Completion of an adolescence education program as part of a major in one of the sciences qualifies students for New York State initial certification in adolescence education in that science content area for grades 7 through 12. Students qualifying for the initial certification in adolescence science education may obtain an extension to teach the sciences in grades 5 and 6 by taking Secondary Education 3454. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Admission requirements and academic standing --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Students must have a GPA of 2.70 or higher based on a minimum of 30 credits in liberal arts and sciences to take Secondary Education 2001 and 2002. Students must have a B- in both Secondary Education 2001 and 2002 and a GPA of 2.75 or higher based on a minimum of 30 credits in liberal arts and sciences to continue to Secondary Education 3401, and/or Secondary Education 3402, and/or Secondary Education 3456. Students who wish to register for student teaching seminar and field placement will need to file an application with the science education program head for permission. See program office for details. To take Secondary Education 4480, students must have an overall GPA of 2.75 or higher and the permission of the Secondary Education science education program head, department chair, or deputy; To take either Secondary Education 4481, 4482, 4483, and/or 4484, students must earn a B+ or higher in Secondary Education 4480, a GPA of 2.75 or higher in their major, and the permission of the Secondary Education science education program head, department chair, or deputy. A student who takes either Secondary Education 4481 and/or 4482 prior to Secondary Education 4483 and/or 4484 must earn a B or better grade in Secondary Education 4481 and/or 4482 before taking either

308 Secondary Education 4483 or 4484. A student who takes either Secondary Education 4483 and/or 4484 prior to Secondary Education 4481 and/or 4482 must earn a B or better grade in Secondary Education 4483 and/or 4484 before taking either Secondary Education 4481 or 4482. : Rationale This change is undertaken to point out a hidden pre-requisite, in response to a recent directive from CUNY. This does not represent a change to the degree in practice. Note that the revised curriculum does not exceed 120 credits as the following STEM variants are required: Math 1201 – fulfills Math and Quantitative Reasoning Phys 1100 or 1150 (students must take at least one) – both fulfill Scientific World Chem 2100 – fulfills Life and Physical Sciences Thus, the remaining General Education requirements consist of 23 credits, leaving students well under the 120-credit criterion for graduation. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:3 Department of Chemistry B.S. degree program in chemistry HEGIS code 1905; SED program code 02084 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 71-78.5 credits) Department requirements ( 69-72 ½ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Chemistry 1100 or both Chemistry 1050 and 2050. 3410 or 3415W, 3510 or both 3511 and 3512, 3520 or both 3521 2110, All of the following: Chemistry 2100, and 3522, 4610, 4620. At least nine credits chosen from the following: Chemistry 2700, 3420, 4530, 4550,4570, 4571, 4572,4580, 4581, 4640, 4720, 4760, 4761, either 4780 or4790. One of the following physics sequences a) or b) or c): a) Physics 1100 (or Physics 1111 and 1112) and 2100. b) Physics 1150 and 2150. c) Physics 1150 and 2100.

309 Mathematics 1011 or both Mathematics 1021 and 1026 or assignment by the Department of Mathematics to Mathematics 1201. One of the following mathematics sequences a) or b): a) Mathematics 1201 and 1206 and 2201. b) Mathematics 3.20 and 4.20 or 1211 and 2201. One of the following: 1115 a) Computer and Information Science 1110 b) Mathematics 1501 or Mathematics 2501 c) One of the following courses: Chemistry 2700, 3420, 4530, 4550,4570, 4571, 4572, 4580, 4581, 4640, 4720, 4760, 4761, 4780, 4790; if this option is chosen, this course cannot be used to satisfy any other requirements of the major listed above but can be used to satisfy the college-wide 24-credit minimum that is stated below. A college-wide minimum of 24 credits in advanced courses in chemistry must be completed at Brooklyn College with a grade of C- or higher in each course. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Additional requirements for a B.S. degree --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Candidates for a B.S. degree with a major in chemistry must complete at least 60 credits in science and mathematics; 24 of these 60 credits must be completed in advanced courses in the Chemistry Department. These 24 credits must be completed at Brooklyn College with a grade of C- or higher in each course. Specific course requirements for a B.S. degree are described above. The following courses may be applied toward the 60 credits in science and mathematics: A) All courses in the departments of biology, chemistry, computer and information science, earth and environmental sciences, mathematics, physics and psychology. B) Courses marked with a number sign (#) in the Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences. C) ---Anthropology and Archaeology 2200, 3199, 3230, 3240, 3250, 3260, 3265, 3266, 3425, 3440, 3470, 4665. ---Core Studies 5, 5.1, 5.2, 7.1, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2. ---Core Curriculum [1300 through 1399.] ---Math 1311, Biology 1010, Chemistry 1007, Physics 1331, Earth and Environmental Sciences 1010. ---Core Curriculum 3301 through 3399 ---Economics 3400, 4410, 3410, 4422.

310 ---Philosophy 3203, 3204, 3231, 3232, 3422, 3423, 3601, 3605, 3610. ---Kinesiology 3023, 3271, 3275, 3281, 3285, 4229, 4251. ---Sociology 2701. Rationale : The change from CIS 1110 to CIS 1115 simply updates the curriculum to reflect a change in the introductory level programming course offered by the CIS department (CIS 1110 is no longer offered). The change in the Mathematics requirements is undertaken to point out a hidden pre-requisite, in response to a recent directive from CUNY. This does not represent a change to the degree in practice. CHEM 2110 is added to the list of required courses, as it is as a pre-requisite for CHEM 3511. Fall 2019 Effective date: SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:4 Program in Communication B.A. degree program in communication HEGIS code 0601.00; SED program code 31603 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 38-41 credits) Program requirements ( 32-33 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Students must complete both A and B below: The program director, in consultation with the program’s advisory committee, may allow substitutions for up to two course requirements, consistent with the educational goals of our program. Special topics courses may, in addition, be used to fulfill program requirements. A. Tier One Communication Core (18 26-27 -credits) nine courses in the Communication Core must be completed with a grade of C or Each of the following six better: Communication 1001 (Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders1205) Introduction to Communication ; ; Communication 3000 (English Communication 1000; Television and Radio 1165; Communication 2000 3196); Communication 3100 (Psychology 3120); Communication 3150 W (TV/Radio 2222 ); Communication W 3200 (Philosophy 3315); Communication 3300 ( Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 3235 /Television and Radio 3535); Communication 4000 (9 or more field hours per week) or Communication 4100 (14 or more field hours per week) The internship course requirement may be waived for full-time employees in related fields with the permission of the program director; those students must take a substitute communication course elective. Internship credit cannot be earned retroactively.

311 B. Students must choose and complete one of the Specializations below, consisting of four courses, one from each area: (12 credits) Tier Two and then select four additional courses, one from each area: Students choose either Track A or Track B . Visual and Media Studies Track A Track Area 1 – Culture : Film 2131; Film 3122 Women in Film; Music Art 3167 Visual Culture Studies; Anthropology 3180; Film 2117; ; Philosophy 3702; Puerto Rican and Latino Studies 3335; Sociology 3802; Television and Radio 2517 3101 Television and Radio 3434 (Women’s and Gender Studies 3121). Television and Radio Advertising – Media Area 2 : Anthropology 2320; Film 2120; Film 2129; Television and Radio 2032; Television and Radio 2420 Television and Radio 2726 Journalism and Society . – History: Area 3 History 3462 (American Studies 3406) ; English 2402 4405 ; Film 2116; Television and Radio 2265. – Theory: Area 4 Art 3177; Film 3130; Philosophy 3501; Philosophy 3511 ; Sociology 2800; Television and Radio 4430 W . Interpersonal and Intercultural Communication Track Track B. – Culture Area 1 : Africana Studies 3230 (English 3158) ; American Studies 3406; Anthropology 3395 ; American Studies 3402 (English 3157) ; Anthropology 3301; Children Studies 3126; Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders ; Film 2117 Cultural Perspectives in Film; Film 2131; Puerto Rican and Latino Studies 3105; Sociology 1619 2200 . – Society: Area 2 Africana Studies 3228 (American Studies 3306); Anthropology 2215 ; Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 1608; ; Political Science 3106; Political Science 3160; Psychology 2100; Philosophy 3308 Psychology 3110; Sociology 1101; Sociology 2602; Sociology 53; Sociology 2604; Sociology 2601 (Africana Studies 3328); Sociology 2605; Sociology 3605 . : – Family Small Groups Area 3 Psychology 3140, Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders1608, Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 1618, Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 1619 Africana Studies 3320; Psychology 3270; Sociology 2400; Sociology 3609 (Women and Gender Studies 3318). Area 4 – Gender: Africana Studies 3362 (Women’s and Gender Studies 3488); Anthropology 3310; Business 3250 (Women’s and Gender Studies 3345); Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 4625; Philosophy 3726 (Women’s and Gender Studies 3137); Political Science 3153 (Women’s and Gender Studies 3353); Political Science

312 3155 (Women’s and Gender Studies 3330); Psychology 3360; School Psychology, Counseling and Leadership 3000; Sociology 2600 (Women’s and Gender Studies 3420); Women’s and Gender Studies 1001. Professional and Organizational Communication Area 1 – Organizational: Business 3210; Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 3733; Psychology 3171; Sociology 3607. Area 2 – Communication and Presentation Skills: Business 3010 (Television and Radio 2660); Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 1707; Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 2623; Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 2719. Area 3 – Groups and Teams: Business 3220; Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 1618; Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 4646; Psychology 3140. Area 4 – Specialization: Business 3160; Health and Nutrition 2183 (Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 4666); Psychology 3172 (Business 3240); Television and Radio 2517 (Business 3130); Television and Radio 2519; Television and Radio 2726W. Tier Three (2 or 3 credits) One of the following off-campus internship courses: Communication 4000(14 or more field hours per week) or Communication 4100 (21 or more field hours per week) Rationale : The interdisciplinary communication program was originally conceived in the late 1990s, and the majority of its courses were taken from existing courses and new cross-listed courses. Its original aim was set out in The March 9, 2004 Faculty Council Undergraduate Curriculum Document 304: “Students who complete the Interdisciplinary Communication Program will be communication specialists, equipped with knowledge of the foundational concepts of communication and with skills to pursue many types of careers that require a firm grasp of communication in its myriad forms within an interdependent global economy” (2). The Communication Program is now embarking on the first major curricular revision in its history. Brooklyn College is one of a small number of CUNY schools to offer a communication degree program, and it is one of the rare communication programs founded on the principles of interdisciplinarity. The major has proven to be a popular one, with continued growth throughout the years and currently numbering almost 200 majors in spring 2018. As the major has steadily increased over the years, it has become increasingly clear that the Communication program has outgrown its original structure and offerings. From the start, the major was designed to ensure “Communication majors have a grasp of the field that is both historically based and relevant to future needs. . . . In short, students will be well equipped with conceptual knowledge and with practical skills.” The following revised curriculum for the interdisciplinary

313 communication program is being proposed in order to better serve its students, to reflect national best practices in the field, to take advantage of changes in departmental offerings across the campus, to acknowledge changes in the field and communication media landscape, and thereby better prepare BC communication graduates for employment opportunities and advanced work in the field. To advance that goal, the Communication Program has updated its program learning outcomes. The program has decided to adopt the National Communication Association’s Learning Outcomes in Communication (LOC), which were developed over a two-year period by 30 demographically diverse faculty members from every stage of the academic career ladder and representing all types of colleges and universities from across the United States. A central assumption of these Learning Outcomes in Communication is that Communication constructs the social world and is relational, collaborative, strategic, symbolic, and adaptive. A graduate with a Communication BA degree from Brooklyn College should know, understand, and be able to • Describe the Communication discipline and its central questions • Employ Communication theories, perspectives, principles, and concepts • Engage in Communication inquiry • Create messages appropriate to the audience, purpose, and context • Critically analyze messages • Demonstrate the ability to accomplish communicative goals (self-efficacy) Apply ethical communication principles and practices • • Utilize communication to embrace difference Influence public discourse • This revised document reflects: A. The addition of a Professional and Organizational Communication Specialization The Communication major is looking to expand the options for their students by offering a specialization/concentration in Professional and Organizational Communication. The Communication program is expanding the major to include a third specialization in this area for a number of reasons: 1) As the Communication program has grown, there are increasing numbers of students who are interested in going into fields such as marketing, public relations, advertising, and community-based, non-profit, and governmental organizations. Increasing numbers of opportunities and employers in these fields are looking to hire Communication majors as evidenced by their job descriptions. 2) Across the country, communication programs offer this and related specialties. Among those CUNY colleges that offer a communication major, a few of them offer something similar (Baruch, City, CSI). We have been an outlier in not offering our students this track. Having Professional and Organizational Communication as an option for our students would help the students and the BC Communication program remain competitive and responsive to important trends and major subspecialties in the discipline.

314 3) Every year, the heads of for-profit and non-profit organizations across the U.S. are surveyed about the workplace skills that recent college graduates lack the most. Invariably, the number one concern expressed is college graduates' lack of ability to competently communicate in a professional and mature manner and work collaboratively, especially in teams. Specific areas and courses in the Professional and Organizational Communication track address these concerns through their disciplinary content. 4) Adding this specialization would not require additional resources. It can easily be created through existing courses and new ones that departments are developing. To help address all these concerns and update the major, the Communication Program seeks to add a third concentration entitled "Professional and Organizational Communication." This track would offer students an academically rigorous understanding of what constitutes appropriate communication in the workplace and within organizations while at the same time equipping them with the skills to engage in such communication in practice. More specifically, courses within this track will inculcate students with essential workplace knowledge and skills pertaining to team building, group decision-making, professional parlance, conflict management, intercultural awareness, interviewing, gender dynamics, and project collaboration. Courses within this track will undoubtedly prepare students to compete and succeed in the modern, diverse st organizational environments of the 21 century. B. Corrections, typos, editorial changes This document reflects a number of changes to reflect mistakes that occurred in the bulletin, omitted cross- listings, retired courses, changes in course numbering, indications of writing-intensive courses, etc. C. The updating of a curriculum that hasn’t been changed since the program was created (1997-2003) This revised curriculum will update and strengthen the Communication program at Brooklyn College. It now includes an important hidden prerequisite as a required course for all the majors. Revisions of the curriculum also contain changes that reflect national trends in the discipline, employment opportunities, and current curricula in communication programs in the Tristate region and throughout the US, as well as changes that allow the Communication program to take advantage of relevant new courses offered in many of the departments of the college since the program was created. Furthermore, this document reflects the program’s continuing commitment to an interdisciplinary approach to the discipline of communication and the power of such an approach for the students and faculty engaged in the program. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:5 Department of Finance B.B.A. degree program in finance HEGIS code 0506; SED program code 37634 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Department requirements (59-61 credits) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

315 A. Business Core (41-43 credits) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Students must complete all of the following: Accounting 2001 and Accounting 3011 and Accounting 3201, Computer and Information Science 1050 or Computer and Information Science 1110, Business 2100 or Economics 2100, Business 2200 or Economics 2200, Business 3400 or Economics 3400 or Mathematics 2501 or Mathematics 3501 or Psychology 3400, Business 3410 or Economics 3410 or Mathematics 1201, Business 3430 or Computer and Information Science 2531, Business 3100, Business 3200, Finance 3310 or [Business 3310], Philosophy 3314. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- B. Required Finance Courses (9 credits) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Students must complete all of the following: Finance 3330 or [Business 3330]; Finance 4300W or [Business 4300W]; and Finance 3311 or [Business 3311]. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- C. Electives (9 credits) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Students must complete any three of the following: Finance 3340 or Business 3340; Finance 3377 or Business 3377; Accounting 3021; Finance 5001; Finance ; Finance 5330 . 3350; Finance 3390; Finance 5102 Rationale : When the newly formed Department of Finance developed four new elective courses, we submitted an A-III and four A-IV documents to add the new courses to our curriculum. One of the new courses, FINC 5102, was not approved by the Faculty Council, but the course number erroneously stayed in the list of the new courses. We submit this document to correct this error. Effective date: Fall 2018 SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:6 Department of Accounting

316 M.S. degree program in accounting HEGIS code: 0502; SED program code: 88398 The master of science in accounting program is registered with the New York State Education Department as meeting the 150 semester-hour requirement for CPA candidates. Students who complete the program will be permitted to sit for the CPA examination. Course work emphasizes asset valuation and related problems of enterprise reporting, tax research and planning, comptrollership and managerial accounting, contemporary accounting topics, and accounting requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). This program requires extensive preparation in the areas of professional accounting and general business. Applicants who have completed the bachelor of science degree in accounting (public accounting) at Brooklyn College satisfy the undergraduate education requirements of this program. All other applicants must present coursework equivalent to the requirements for the B.S. in public accounting at Brooklyn College. Degree requirements Thirty credits are required for the degree. Students must complete the following courses: Accounting: All of the following: Accounting 7106X, 7107X, 7108X, and 7109X. Two of the following: Accounting 7110X, 7120X, 7130X, 7140X, 7141X, 7150X, 7190X. Economic analysis: One of the following: Economics 7000X, Economics 7205X or Business 7205X, or Business 7206X, or Economics 7010X. Students who have not taken Economics 7025X or a comparable undergraduate mathematics course are advised to take Economics 7205X or Business 7205X or Business 7206X. Finance: Economics 7215X or [Business 7215X] or Finance 7215X or [Business 7240X] or Finance 7240X or [Business 7216X] or Finance 7216X. Quantitative methods: Economics 7230X or Business 7230X. Business Electives/Econometrics: One course from the following: Accounting 7110X, 7120X, 7130X, 7140X, 7150X, 7190X; Business 7200X, 7202X, 7204X, 7208X, 7216X, 7220X, 7240X, 7250X, 7255X, 7260X; Business 7131X or Accounting 7131X; Economics 7020X, 7021X. With permission of the graduate deputy chairperson, up to 12 graduate credits may be accepted for work done at other institutions. Rationale: We add 7141X (International Tax) as one of seven optional accounting courses. International Tax is an area of growing interest at professional accounting firms. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS

317 A-III:7 Department of Chemistry M.A. degree program in education: chemistry teacher (7-12) The HEGIS code: 1905.01; SED program code: 26766 Students taking this program gain in-depth knowledge of some area of modern organic, inorganic, quantum chemistry, biochemistry or instrumental analysis. Seminar courses provide exposure to diverse subject matter in areas of current research interest within the department and beyond. Students also receive a detailed introduction to the use of the teaching laboratory in adolescent education. The School of Education component prepares students for teaching; the required courses vary depending on the entry qualifications of students. The profession of teacher education is licensed by the New York State Education Department. Therefore, program requirements are subject to change. All students should consult with the Head of the program in adolescence science education for the current requirements. Matriculation requirements Applicants must offer courses in chemistry as follows: one year of general chemistry; a comprehensive course in organic chemistry (may be one or two terms depending on curriculum) one term of physical chemistry; and one semester of analytical chemistry. Admitted students who have not completed a two semester sequence in organic chemistry or two semesters in physical chemistry may need to take additional undergraduate coursework to meet pre-requisites for some required courses. Students should consult with the department for advice on this issue. Applicants must also offer (a) or (b): (a) New York State Initial Certification in teaching chemistry grades 7-12; or courses in education or equivalent course work and teaching experience that meet the New York State standards for the pedagogical core. These courses include study of the following: history of education and philosophy of education or principles of education or educational sociology; educational psychology or developmental psychology or psychology of adolescence or adolescent development; classroom management; teaching students with special needs and English language learners; 6 credits in literacy and language acquisition; curriculum development and methods of assessing student learning; uses of technology in the classroom; methods of teaching chemistry in grades 7-12; 100 hours of fieldwork; 40 full days or 300 hours of student teaching chemistry in grades 7-12, or one year of full-time teaching of chemistry in grades 7-12; passage of the edTPA. (b) An undergraduate degree with a major in chemistry or appropriate course work in chemistry. Applicants must have a minimum undergraduate scholastic index of 3.00. A minimum average of 3.00 in graduate courses is required to maintain matriculation. International applicants for whom English is a second language are required to pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) before being considered for admission. For more updated and complete information on minimum passing scores see the section on additional admission requirements for students with international credentials in the Graduate Bulletin or the program web page. At the discretion of the program, additional English courses may be required as a condition for admission. Applicants who have not completed all the specific course requirements are given individual consideration

318 and may be admitted with conditions, with the approval of the Head of the program in adolescence science education in the School of Education and the chairperson of the Chemistry Department. Applicants should see the Head of the program in adolescence science education for advisement. General matriculation and admission requirements of the Division of Graduate Studies are in the section "Admission." Degree requirements A minimum of 30 credits are required for the degree. Students must complete at least 12 credits in Chemistry. This must include a t least one of the following courses: Chemistry 7761G, 7550G, 7571G, 7670G or 7640G. Students must also complete either Chemistry 7450G or 7950G. Six of the remaining 18 credits required for the degree may be taken in the Chemistry Department or in other science subjects directly related to chemistry. Students must also complete either Option A or B below. With the approval of the science education program head, students enroll in the appropriate Option A or Option B based upon teaching experience, previous course work, and the teaching certificates they hold. Option A (for in-service teachers): 30 credits This option is for students who possess a New York State Initial Certification in teaching chemistry grades 7- 12, or its equivalent. Students must complete 12 credits in courses in the Department of Secondary Education. Students take different education courses and sequences of courses depending on their previous course work, teaching experience, and the certificates they hold. Students who possess Initial Certification in teaching chemistry must complete all of the following: SEED 7502T or SEED 7324X, SEED 7500X or SEED 7315X, SEED 7340T or SEED 7320T, and SEED 7503X or SEED 7038X or SEED 7325X. Option B (for pre-service teachers):30-46 credits Students who do not possess Initial Certification in teaching chemistry or equivalent course work and teaching experience or who are teaching but do not possess Initial Certification in teaching chemistry must have the appropriate course work and credits in the subject area and must complete appropriate courses in (a), (b) and (c) below: (a) SEED 7500X or SEED 7315X, SEED 7501X or SEED 7314X, SEED 7502T or SEED 7324X, SEED 7503X or SEED 7325X, SEED 7340T or SEED 7320T. (b) SEED 7380T, SEED 7381T, SEED 7383T, SEED 7542T, SEED 7543T. (c) SEED 7671X. Students who wish to register for student teaching seminar and field placement in the science education program will need to file an application with the science education program head for permission. See

319 program office for details. Students must pass a comprehensive examination or submit a thesis acceptable to the Chemistry Department. Information about requirements for the comprehensive examination and the thesis is in the chapter "Academic Regulations and Procedures." The student teaching methods course (SEED 7380T) must precede the student teaching seminars (SEED 7381T and SEED 7383T) and field experience (SEED 7542T and SEED 7543T). Courses in the Chemistry Department or other science departments and the School of Education offered toward the degree must be 7000-level courses. The program of study must be approved early in the first semester by the chairperson or the deputy chairperson of the Chemistry Department and the Head of the program in adolescence science education. Rationale: This language is added to call attention to the fact that some Masters courses in Chemistry require two semesters of organic chemistry as a pre-requisite, and others require two semesters of physical chemistry. However, this requirement is often waived by instructors if there is evidence a student is adequately prepared for the course in question, and the specific choice of undergraduate course to make up the gap varies depending on the circumstances. Rather than attempting to add potential undergraduate credits to the Masters’ degree, the language simply points out the circumstances under which additional coursework would be necessary. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:8 Department of Childhood, Bilingual and Special Education M.S. in Education degree program: childhood and education teacher (grades 1-6) – bilingual education HEGIS code: 0802.00; SED program code: 26823 Degree Program Requirements : Option A (36 credits); Option B (54 credits) The program in bilingual childhood education prepares candidates to teach in bilingual settings where two languages are used as the mediums of instruction. This program provides candidates with a solid foundation in the theory and practice of bilingual education; courses include the following topics: bilingualism, research, methodology, biliteracy, content instruction in bilingual settings and multicultural education. Option A is designed for candidates who already hold certification in Childhood Education. Option B is designed for career changers and includes an additional 18 credits of education course work as well as one semester of student teaching in a bilingual setting. These courses of study includes include a 15-credit bilingual extension which can be taken as an advanced certificate (see Advanced Certificate in Bilingual Education). Students will enroll in the appropriate course of studies listed below (Option A or B) based upon teaching experience, previous course work, and the teaching certificates they hold. Option (A): 36 credits Matriculation requirements

320 This program applies to students who hold a New York State Initial Certificate in Childhood Education and wish to attain a Professional Certificate in Childhood Education with an Extension in Bilingual Education. This program also applies to students who have a Professional Certificate in Childhood Education and wish to pursue an Extension in Bilingual Education. All students who wish to enroll should speak to the Bilingual Program Adviser. Applicants must have a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.00. Applicants must demonstrate proficiency in both English and in a language other than English (the language in which they seek the extension.) Proficiency in the language other than English is determined by the Bilingual Education Assessment (BEA) which is offered by New York State. International applicants for whom English is a second language are required to pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a score of 550 on the paper-based test or 213 on the computer-based test or 79 on the internet-based test, before being considered for admission. Students should note additional requirements found at the beginning of this section as well as in the sections "Admission" and "Academic Regulations and Procedures" of the Brooklyn College Bulletin of Graduate Programs. Degree requirements: Thirty-six credits are required for the degree. Required courses are listed below; courses marked with an asterisk (*) are bilingual extension courses. CBSE 7200T paired with CBSE 7351T*. CBSE 7203T paired with Puerto Rican and Latino Studies 7145X*. CBSE 7204T paired with Mathematics 7141T or 7142T or 7143T or 7145T or CBSE 7405T. 7202T paired with any graduate level course in General Science or 7000-level course in Earth CBSE 7201T and Environmental Sciences. CBSE 7350T*; CBSE 7353T*; CBSE 7355T*. One elective course (approved by the Bilingual Program Adviser). During the first semester, students must file a program of study approved by the program adviser. All courses in the childhood education degree sequence and in childhood bilingual extension programs require departmental permission for registration. Option (B): 54 credits The following program applies to students who do not hold a New York State Initial Certificate in Early Childhood Education or Childhood Education or Special Subjects or equivalent course work and teaching experience, or who are teaching but do not hold initial certification. This program leads to both New York State Initial and Professional Certificates in Childhood Education (grades 1-6) and a bilingual extension. Matriculation requirements This program applies to students who do not hold a New York State Initial Certificate in Early Childhood

321 Education or Childhood Education and wish to attain a Professional Certificate in Childhood Education with an Extension in Bilingual Education. Applicants must have a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.00. Applicants must demonstrate proficiency in both English and in a language other than English (the language in which they seek the extension.) Proficiency in the language other than English is determined by the Bilingual Education Assessment (BEA) which is offered by New York State. International applicants for whom English is a second language are required to pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a score of 550 on the paper-based test or 213 on the computer-based test or 79 on the internet-based test, before being considered for admission. Students should note additional requirements found at the beginning of this section as well as in the sections "Admission" and "Academic Regulations and Procedures" of the Brooklyn College Bulletin of Graduate Programs. Degree requirements: Fifty-four credits are required for the degree. Required courses are listed below; courses marked with an asterisk (*) are bilingual extension courses. CBSE 7205T, 7216X, 7440T, 7213T, 7671X, 7885T and 7471T. CBSE 7200T paired with CBSE 7351T*. CBSE 7203T paired with Puerto Rican and Latino Studies 7145X*. CBSE 7204T paired with Mathematics 7141T or 7142T or 7143T or 7145T or CBSE 7405T. 7202T paired with any graduate level course in General Science or 7000-level course in Earth CBSE 7201T and Environmental Sciences. CBSE 7350T*; CBSE 7353T*; CBSE 7355T*. During the first semester, students must file a program of study approved by the program adviser. All courses in the childhood education degree sequence and in childhood bilingual extension programs require departmental permission for registration. Nonmatriculated students Students with a New York State Initial Certificate in Childhood Education and/or a New York State Professional Certificate in Childhood Education or their equivalents who wish to complete an Extension in Bilingual Education without completing a master's degree in Childhood Education, may do so as a nonmatriculated student. The bilingual extension can be applied to all New York State Certifications including Teachers of Students with Speech and Language Disabilities (TSSLD). Permission from the head of the Program in Bilingual Education is required. The Bilingual Extension in Childhood Education consists of 15 credits. Required courses, which may be taken in any order, are listed below. This option is applicable for candidates who hold initial certification, except TSSLD students. CBSE 7350T, 7351T, 7353T, and 7355T; and Puerto Rican and Latino Studies 7145X. TSSLD students must complete the following course sequence: CBSE 7350, CBSE 7351, CBSE 7353, CASD 7535/CBSE 7360,

322 and CASD 7536/CBSE 7359. All courses in childhood education and in childhood bilingual extension programs require departmental permission for registration. Rationale: The description was updated for accuracy: CBSE 7201T is no longer part of the CBSE graduate MA program. Rather CBSE 7202T is the research course that all MA students must take. Effective Date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:9 Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences M.S. degree program in nutrition HEGIS code: 1306; SED program code: 86173 The master of science degree in nutrition provides advanced-level study of nutritional science and clinical nutrition. The program addresses the academic interests of individuals who wish to become nutrition educators, administrators of programs that provide nutritional services, nutritionists in community centers or private practice, researchers, or interpreters of research for the public. The M.S. program by itself does not lead to the credentials of Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) or New York State Certified Dietitian/Nutritionist (CDN). Students interested in obtaining these credentials may use a number of the courses in the M.S. program, as well as the courses that are prerequisites to the program, toward meeting the requirements of an ACEND (Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics) accredited Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD). Admission to the Brooklyn College, graduate level Dietetic Internship is by separate application and is not guaranteed by acceptance to the M.S. program. Prerequisites for application to the M.S. program can be met by students whose baccalaureate degrees are in fields other than nutrition by taking specified courses. Please contact the graduate deputy chairperson for advisement on prerequisites for the MS M.S. program, and the DPD director for advisement concerning the DPD and Dietetic Internship. Matriculation requirements Applicants must offer undergraduate or graduate courses in general biology, physiology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, nutrition, biochemistry or nutritional chemistry, statistics, and medical nutrition therapy. General matriculation and admission requirements of the Division of Graduate Studies are in the section "Admission". Degree requirements Thirty to 33 Thirty-six credits are required for the degree. Students must complete the following required core courses: Health and Nutrition Sciences 7230X, 7210X, 7211X, 7213X, 7230X, 7241X, and 7931X. Students must

323 receive a minimum B in each of these courses or approval of the Graduate Deputy grade of at least Chairperson for Nutrition in order to qualify for the comprehensive examination or thesis; courses may be repeated if necessary. additional credits is required. Students may choose among the following courses: Health A minimum of 12 18 and Nutrition Sciences 7120X, 7183X, 7200X, 7201X, 7212X, 7221X, 7231X, 7232X, 7233X, 7234X, 7240X, ,7999X. Students who choose a thesis as the exit requirement must complete Health and Nutrition 7935X Sciences 7935X and 7999X as elective courses (6 elective credits). Only students accepted to the Dietetic Internship may use HNSC 7200X and 7201X as elective courses. Students interested in the Dietetic Internship (DI) accredited by ACEND the Academy of Nutrition and must take complete Health and Nutrition Sciences 7213X, 7240X, 7241X, and Dietetics one additional graduate course in nutrition before beginning applying to the DI. Dietetic Interns must register for the 7931X following courses: Health and Nutrition Sciences 7200X, 7201X, 7202X, and 7203X. The DI consists of HNSC 7202X and 7203X will not be applied as electives towards MS in Nutrition degree requirements. Separate applications must be made to the DI and to the M.S. program in nutrition. Students must pass a comprehensive examination or submit a thesis acceptable to the department. Students who choose to write a thesis must complete Health and Nutrition Sciences 7935X and 7999X as an elective course . Information about the requirements for the comprehensive examination and thesis is in the section "Academic Regulations and Procedures." Dietetic Internships (DI) The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics accredited Dietetic Internship (DI) at Brooklyn College is a ACEND two-semester program that provides the supervised practice experience required to sit for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) examination. Students must be enrolled in the M.S. in nutrition program to be for the DI eligible for the DI, and they must file a separate application through DICAS (Dietetic Internship Central Application System. Email [email protected] for details. The program enables students to apply theory and research to practice in clinical, community, and food service settings, thereby enriching their education and preparing them to make significant contributions to and rapid advancement in the profession. Rationale: The number of credits required for the M.S. Nutrition degree was increased from “30 to 33” to 36 credits to better align with other graduate nutrition programs. The program requires 18 credits (6 required courses) and it is proposed that 18 credits in electives (an additional 6 credits) will be required. The course HNSC 7931X was added as one of the required courses for application to the DI in order to provide students with the research skills needed for the independent practice portion of the internship. Other minor edits were made for clarification purposes. Effective Date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:10 Department of Secondary Education M.A. degree program in education: chemistry teacher (7-12) The HEGIS code: 1905.01; SED program code: 26766

324 Students taking this program gain in-depth knowledge of some area of modern organic, inorganic, quantum chemistry, biochemistry or instrumental analysis. Seminar courses provide exposure to diverse subject matter in areas of current research interest within the department and beyond. Students also receive a detailed introduction to the use of the teaching laboratory in adolescent education. The School of Education component prepares students for teaching; the required courses vary depending on the entry qualifications of students. The profession of teacher education is licensed by the New York State Education Department. Therefore, program requirements are subject to change. All students should consult with the Head of the program in adolescence science education for the current requirements. Matriculation requirements Applicants must offer courses in chemistry as follows: one year of general chemistry; a comprehensive course in organic chemistry (may be one or two terms depending on curriculum) one term of physical chemistry; and one semester of Admitted students who have not completed a two analytical chemistry. semester sequence in organic chemistry or two semesters in physical chemistry may need to take additional undergraduate coursework to meet pre-requisites for some required courses. Students should consult with the department for advice on this issue. Applicants must also offer (a) or (b): (a) New York State Initial Certification in teaching chemistry grades 7-12; or courses in education or equivalent course work and teaching experience that meet the New York State standards for the pedagogical core. These courses include study of the following: history of education and philosophy of education or principles of education or educational sociology; educational psychology or developmental psychology or psychology of adolescence or adolescent development; classroom management; teaching students with special needs and English language learners; 6 credits in literacy and language acquisition; curriculum development and methods of assessing student learning; uses of technology in the classroom; methods of teaching chemistry in grades 7-12; 100 hours of fieldwork; 40 full days or 300 hours of student teaching chemistry in grades 7-12, or one year of full-time teaching of chemistry in grades 7-12; passage of the edTPA. (b) An undergraduate degree with a major in chemistry or appropriate course work in chemistry. Applicants must have a minimum undergraduate scholastic index of 3.00. A minimum average of 3.00 in graduate courses is required to maintain matriculation. International applicants for whom English is a second language are required to pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) before being considered for admission. For more updated and complete information on minimum passing scores see the section on additional admission requirements for students with international credentials in the Graduate Bulletin or the program web page. At the discretion of the program, additional English courses may be required as a condition for admission. Applicants who have not completed all the specific course requirements are given individual consideration and may be admitted with conditions, with the approval of the Head of the program in adolescence science education in the School of Education and the chairperson of the Chemistry Department. Applicants should see the Head of the program in adolescence science education for advisement. General matriculation and admission requirements of the Division of Graduate Studies are in the section "Admission."

325 Degree requirements A minimum of 30 credits are required for the degree. t least one of the following Students must complete at least 12 credits in Chemistry. This must include a courses: Chemistry 7761G, 7550G, 7571G, 7670G or 7640G. Students must also complete either Chemistry 7450G or 7950G. Six of the remaining 18 credits required for the degree may be taken in the Chemistry Department or in other science subjects directly related to chemistry. Students must also complete either Option A or B below. With the approval of the science education program head, students enroll in the appropriate Option A or Option B based upon teaching experience, previous course work, and the teaching certificates they hold. Option A (for in-service teachers): 30 credits This option is for students who possess a New York State Initial Certification in teaching chemistry grades 7- 12, or its equivalent. Students must complete 12 credits in courses in the Department of Secondary Education. Students take different education courses and sequences of courses depending on their previous course work, teaching experience, and the certificates they hold. Students who possess Initial Certification in teaching chemistry must complete all of the following: SEED 7502T or SEED 7324X, SEED 7500X or SEED 7315X, SEED 7340T or SEED 7320T, and SEED 7503X or SEED 7038X or SEED 7325X. Option B (for pre-service teachers):30-46 credits Students who do not possess Initial Certification in teaching chemistry or equivalent course work and teaching experience or who are teaching but do not possess Initial Certification in teaching chemistry must have the appropriate course work and credits in the subject area and must complete appropriate courses in (a), (b) and (c) below: (a) SEED 7500X or SEED 7315X, SEED 7501X or SEED 7314X, SEED 7502T or SEED 7324X, SEED 7503X or SEED 7325X, SEED 7340T or SEED 7320T. (b) SEED 7380T, SEED 7381T, SEED 7383T, SEED 7542T, SEED 7543T. (c) SEED 7671X. Students who wish to register for student teaching seminar and field placement in the science education program will need to file an application with the science education program head for permission. See program office for details. Students must pass a comprehensive examination or submit a thesis acceptable to the Chemistry Department. Information about requirements for the comprehensive examination and the thesis is in the chapter "Academic Regulations and Procedures." The student teaching methods course (SEED 7380T) must precede the student teaching seminars (SEED 7381T and SEED 7383T) and field experience (SEED 7542T and SEED 7543T).

326 Courses in the Chemistry Department or other science departments and the School of Education offered toward the degree must be 7000-level courses. The program of study must be approved early in the first semester by the chairperson or the deputy chairperson of the Chemistry Department and the Head of the program in adolescence science education. This language is added to call attention to the fact that some Masters courses in Chemistry Rationale: require two semesters of organic chemistry as a pre-requisite, and others require two semesters of physical chemistry. However, this requirement is often waived by instructors if there is evidence a student is adequately prepared for the course in question, and the specific choice of undergraduate course to make up the gap varies depending on the circumstances. Rather than attempting to add potential undergraduate credits to the Masters’ degree, the language simply points out the circumstances under which additional coursework would be necessary. Fall 2019 Effective date: SECTION A-III: CHANGES IN DEGREE PROGRAMS A-III:11 Feirstein Graduate School of Cinema M.F.A. degree program in cinema arts HEGIS code 1010; SED program code 36817 The Barry R. Feirstein Graduate School of Cinema offers a master of fine arts degree in cinema arts with a concentration in one of the following areas: producing, directing, screenwriting, cinematography, post- production, or digital animation and visual effects. The three-year, 66-credit program prepares students for professional careers in their area of concentration through a combination of practical and theoretical courses. Matriculation Requirements Applicants who have completed a bachelor's degree satisfy the undergraduate requirements of this program. General matriculation and admission requirements of the Division of Graduate Studies are in the section "Admission." Degree Requirements: 66 credits are required for the degree. All students in the directing, cinematography, producing, screenwriting and post-production tracks must complete the following courses: , 7023G, 7801G, 7811G , 7942G, 7964G All of the following FILM 7013G, 7014G, 7015G In addition, students must complete requirements in one concentration as follows: Directing , 7141G , 7201G, 7202G, 7301G, 7821G, All of the following courses: FILM 7101G, 7111G, 7121G, 7131G 7831G, 7951G, 7961G

327 and Any three graduate film courses not required for the MFA in cinema arts and for this concentration. Cinematography , 7541G, All of the following courses: FILM 7201G, 7202G, 7211G, 7221G, 7231G, 7302G, 7522G, 7523G 7821G, 7831G, 7951G, 7961G and Any two graduate film courses not required for the MFA in cinema arts and for this concentration. Producing , , 7421G , 7422G , 7423G, 7431G, 7431G , 7432G 7412G All of the following courses: 7302G, 7401G, 7411G, 7433G , 7531G, 7831G, 7951G, 7961G , 7471G and one graduate film course s not required for the MFA in cinema arts and for this concentration. Any three Screenwriting , 7311G, 7312G, 7321G, 7322G, 7323G, 7331G, All of the following courses: FILM 7301G, 7302G, 7303G 7332G, 7952G, 7962G and Any three graduate film courses not required for the MFA in cinema arts and for this concentration. Post-Production , 7513G, 7515G, 7521G, 7522G, All of the following courses: FILM 7302G, 7501G, 7502G, 7511G, 7512G 7523G, 7524G , 7541G , 7811G , 7953G, 7963G , 7531G and not required for the MFA in cinema arts and for this concentration. one graduate film course s Any two Digital Animation and Visual Effects: , 7601G, 7611G, 7612G, 7613G, 7614G, 7621G, All of the following courses: Film 7005G, 7014G, 7015G 7622G, 7624G, 7631G, 7634G, 7943G, 7955G, 7965G, 7966G and Four Five elective courses* * Examples of Digital Animation & Visual Effects Advanced Discipline Electives: 3D Character Animation 1 3D Character Animation 2 Typography, Design, and Motion Graphics

328 Motion Capture Editing Screenwriting Directing Actors Sound Editing and Design Lighting Workshop 3D Computer Animation 4 Hybrid Animation Experimental Animation Theories of Animation & VFX Rationale: The changes included in this document are designed to better organize the curriculum and to rationalize the process of matriculation through the various programs. We have also made changes to course names to better reflect the content of these courses and added new courses to keep the program relevant to the dynamic changes occurring in film industry. Effective Date of the change: Fall 2018 SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV: 1 Department of Anthropology and Archaeology ANTH 3190 Anthropology of Media 3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory; 4 credits Anthropological approaches to production, reception, circulation, and distribution of various forms of media around the world; topics include public spheres, national communities, cultural imperialism, transnational circuits of production and consumption, virtual worlds, and mediated social movements. Includes lectures and independent ethnographic research on media production and consumption. This course is the same as Television and Radio 3190. Prerequisite : Anthropology *1000 or 2100 or 1100 or 1200 or 1300 or 1400 or Television and Radio 1165 or a Pathways required or flexible core course or permission of the chairperson. Rationale : This course is designed to broaden and enhance the department’s offerings in 3000-level courses and to draw on the strengths of a new faculty member. In the past fifteen years, the study of media has become a vibrant area of inquiry in anthropology. This course will introduce students to this new and expanding area of anthropology and communication studies. Studying media practices around the world directly challenges the notion that any group is isolated, timeless, bounded or separate. In this way, this course helps students develop an understanding our globally interconnected world, a central goal for student learning. The

329 proposed learning outcomes of this course directly extend the d mission to encourage students to take a global perspective; this course will introduce students to long term ethnographic studies of media practices around the world in ways that challenge the ethnocentrism of popular and some scholarly approaches to mass media, which tend to focus on North America and Western Europe. This course will introduce students to the theoretical and methodological tools used by anthropologists in studying media as a social and cultural practice. Students will engage in hands-on research, using ethnographic methods to explore local media practices. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV: 2 Department of Chemistry CHEM 2110 Principles of Chemical Reactivity 2 hours; 2 credits General background in basic and more advanced concepts of chemical reactivity, molecular geometry and electronic distribution in molecules. Topics include: Atomic theory, the periodic table, periodic trends and properties (with a focus on main group elements), bonding theories, Lewis structures and formal charges, valence bond theory, polar and non-polar molecules and bonds, resonance theory, molecular orbital theory: general principles; molecular orbitals for homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules, molecular orbital theory for organic molecules focusing on functional groups, principles of symmetry in molecules, chirality, isomerism, stereoisomerism, naming chiral centers; Newman, sawhorse and fisher projections, free- energy diagrams, reaction coordinates and transition states, reaction mechanisms: curved arrow symbolism, elementary steps. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1100; Prerequisite or co-requisite : Chemistry 2100 Rationale: A major part of the mission of the Department of Chemistry is to provide preparation to students seeking careers in science and medicine in other departments, as well as supporting those pursuing a degree in chemistry. The organic chemistry sequence (Chemistry 3511, 3512, 3521, and 3522) is central in these roles, both as a set of required courses for chemistry majors and as a requirement for biology majors as well as for students preparing for medicine and other health professions. Success in organic chemistry requires facility with spatial reasoning and insight into the nature of chemical bonding. While recent modifications to the general chemistry curriculum have attempted to reinforce these skills, the need to address student weakness in quantitative skills and other areas leaves little room in the curriculum to address these topics. Further, recent departmental outcomes assessment studies of the success of transfer students in organic chemistry make clear that those who take general chemistry at some of Brooklyn College’s main feeder schools enter the program unprepared to succeed in organic chemistry. While the exact deficiencies are difficult to document, significant gaps in transfer students’ understanding of atomic structure, bonding, and related topics are perceived by faculty to be major issues. The proposed course is designed to serve as a bridge between general and organic chemistry, giving greater depth to topics already introduced in general chemistry as well as providing insight on some topics not currently covered before organic chemistry. Students will therefore enter organic chemistry with the groundwork laid for spatial reasoning, making it far easier for students to understand discussions of reactivity that rely heavily on the topic.

330 The course is intended to be taken concurrently with General Chemistry 2, and so will not delay the progress of Brooklyn College’s students. Transfer students will need to take this course before registering for organic chemistry, but if the course increases student retention this represents a wise investment both for the college and for the students. Fall 2019 Effective date: SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV: 3 Program in Communication COMM 1000 Survey of Communication Studies 3 hours; 3 credits Introduction to the theory and practice of the discipline of communication. How people use messages to generate meanings within and across various contexts. How human communication influences and is influenced by the relationships we form, our institutions, society, organizations, and media. (Not open to students who took Communication 1001 or Speech/Communication Arts, Sciences and Disorders 1205.) Prerequisite: None. Rationale: The previous introductory course for the communication major, COMM 1001, was in reality a fusion of two courses: an introductory overview of the field of communication and a dedicated theory of communication course (i.e., Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 1205 Modern Communication Theories, with which it was cross-listed). Because that combined course was trying to accomplish these two sometimes-competing goals, students were not receiving a clear survey of the field, nor were they fully conversant in communication theory. This proved to be a disadvantage in the introduction course as well as in more advanced coursework. This situation did not reflect communication curricula around the country where most of the students are required to take a specific course in communication theory. Our local situation was becoming a larger issue because our program is an interdisciplinary major where students often need to make their own connections as they take various courses across the disciplines for the major. As a result, it was decided to modify the curriculum and create two separate courses: an introductory communication survey course and a dedicated communication theory course. This will create a more solid introduction to communication for all students taking the course, and, for the communication majors, will result in a better foundation with more robust support for advanced coursework. The original rationale for the Communication 1 Introduction to Communication course was as follows: “The new Communication major requires a foundations course to introduce students to the field, allowing them to compare communication processes at different levels, and expose then to the interdisciplinary nature of communication study. This course fulfills that requirement. It also apprises students of the potential opportunities for communication careers and for further study beyond the undergraduate degree.” The new proposed version of the course will better serve that original purpose and the current needs of the program and its students. This survey of communication studies provides an introduction to the terminology, concepts, and contexts of communication. It exposes students to the history, basic methods, and theoretical perspectives that are used to study human communication. It highlights many of the major areas of study in the discipline of communication: verbal and nonverbal, intrapersonal, interpersonal, intercultural, gender, health, conflict and negotiation, small group, organizational, political, rhetoric, mass media, and persuasive communication. The course provides a foundation for further study in the field.

331 Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV:4 Program in Communication COMM 2000 Communication Theory 3 hours; 3 credits A survey of the major models, theories and methodologies of communication and how theories are used to describe, analyze and explain a variety of communication phenomena in real-world situations. Prerequisite: Communications 1000, or permission of the program director. Rationale : The previous introductory course for the communication major, COMM 1001, was in reality a fusion of two courses: an introductory overview of the field of communication and a dedicated theory of communication course (i.e., Communication Arts, Sciences, and Disorders 1205 Modern Communication Theories, with which it was cross-listed). Because that combined course was trying to accomplish these two sometimes- competing goals, students were not receiving a clear survey of the field, nor were they fully conversant in communication theory. This proved to be a disadvantage in the introduction course as well as in more advanced coursework. This situation did not reflect communication curricula around the country where most of the students are required to take a specific course in communication theory. Our local situation was becoming a larger issue because our program is an interdisciplinary major where students often need to make their own connections as they take various courses across the disciplines for the major. As a result, it was decided to modify the curriculum and create two separate courses: an introductory communication survey course and a dedicated communication theory course. This will create a more solid introduction to communication for all students taking the course, and, for the communication majors, will result in a better foundation with more robust support for advanced coursework. For Communication 2000: This course will help communication majors understand the theoretical frameworks guiding communication research in a variety of areas. It will teach students how to apply their knowledge of communication theory to read academic scholarship and write for the discipline. This course will strengthen students’ competency in understanding scholarship and academic discourse in communication studies. The course will give students a firmer foundation for subsequent coursework in COMM 3100/PSYC 3120 Cultural Psychology and COMM 3150W/TVRA 2222W Communication Research, which are required for all majors. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV:5 Program in Communication COMM 3800 Special Topics in Communication 3 hours; 3 credits

332 A topic in the area of communication not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics vary from term to term and reflect the interests of students and faculty. Course description may be obtained in the department office before registering. Students may take this course for credit twice, but may not repeat topics. Prerequisite: Prerequisite for the special topic may vary with the topic offered. Rationale : Because Communication is a dynamic and fast-changing field, having a special topics course will allow the BC Communication program to offer courses that address a current or timely topic, that reflect critical and changing debates and inquiries in the discipline of Communication, that are in a “pilot” phase before being offered on an ongoing basis, or that are appropriate one-time offerings. Fall 2019 Effective date: SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV:6 Program in Communication COMM 4800 Independent Study Minimum of 9 hours conference and independent work; 3 credits Independent reading, study or project related to communication on an approved topic under the guidance of a full-time faculty member. Periodic conferences. Research paper, final exam, or substantial final project. Prerequisite: Communication 2000 and permission of the program director. Rationale : The goal of an independent study course is to allow a student, under the supervision of a faculty member, to examine in depth a communication studies topic that is not offered in a traditional course. An independent study may build upon a Communication Studies course the student has already taken. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV:7 Program in Communication COMM 4850 Independent Research Minimum of 9 hours conference and independent work; 3 credits Independent research project related to communication on an approved topic under the guidance of a full- time faculty member. Weekly conference. Research paper, report, presentation, project or a combination of these. Prerequisite: Communication 2000, Communication 3150W, and permission of the program director.

333 Rationale : The goal of an independent research course is give a student the opportunity to work on undergraduate research under the supervision of a faculty member. Fall 2019 Effective date: SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV:8 Department of Television and Radio TVRA 3190 Anthropology of Media 3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory; 4 credits Anthropological approaches to production, reception, circulation, and distribution of various forms of media around the world; topics include public spheres, national communities, cultural imperialism, transnational circuits of production and consumption, virtual worlds, and mediated social movements. Includes lectures and independent ethnographic research on media production and consumption. This course is the same as Anthropology and Archaeology 3190. Prerequisite : Anthropology *1000 or 2100 or 1100 or 1200 or 1300 or 1400 or Television and Radio 1165 or a Pathways required or flexible core course or permission of the chairperson. Rationale : This course is designed to broaden and enhance the department’s offerings in 3000-level courses. In the past fifteen years, the study of media has become a vibrant area of inquiry in anthropology. This course will introduce students to this new and expanding area of anthropology and communication studies. Studying media practices around the world directly challenges the notion that any group is isolated, timeless, bounded or separate. In this way, this course helps students develop an understanding our globally interconnected world, a central goal for student learning. The proposed learning outcomes of this course directly extend the mission to encourage students to take a global perspective; this course will introduce students to long term ethnographic studies of media practices around the world in ways that challenge the ethnocentrism of popular and some scholarly approaches to mass media, which tend to focus on North America and Western Europe. This course will introduce students to the theoretical and methodological tools used by media anthropologists in studying media as a social and cultural practice. Students will engage in hands-on research, using ethnographic methods to explore local media practices. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV:9 Department of Speech Communication Arts and Sciences CASD 7442X: Medical Speech-Language Pathology 30 hours; 2 credits Bulletin Description

334 Research and clinical practice; assessment and treatment of speech, language, cognitive, and swallowing disorders in health care or medical settings across the life span; inter-professional practice; culturally and linguistically appropriate clinical practice. Prerequisite: CASD 7128X Rationale: This course reflects current trends specific to the field of speech-language pathology in the medical setting that are not covered in required courses and/or involve particular topics that need expansion. Speech, language, communication and/or swallowing processes and/or disorders will be addressed across the lifespan. The introduction of this elective aligns with the current standards outlined by the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA). Fall 2019 Effective Date: SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV:10 Department of Speech Communication Arts and Sciences CASD 7443X: Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing Disorders 30 hours; 2 credits Bulletin Description Evidence-based research and clinical practice related to the identification, assessment and intervention of biological and sensory/behavioral feeding and swallowing disorders in young children birth to three years; application to home-based/natural environments; culturally appropriate family-centered practice. Prerequisite: CASD 7128X Effective Date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV:11 Department of History HIST 7140X Ancient Explorations 6 hours; 6 credits Bulletin Description: On-site learning and teaching. Topography and monuments of one or more major centers of ancient Mediterranean culture such as Athens, Rome, the Bay of Naples, or western Asia Minor. Emphasis on research methodologies and social contexts. Prerequisite : Permission of the chairperson. Rationale : The proposed course (along with 7141X) offers graduate credits to students enrolled in intensive

335 study programs in the ancient world that emphasize on-site learning and presentations, giving students hands-on experiential learning opportunities that enhance their understanding of one or more ancient cultures. The sample syllabus envisions one such program in Athens. Effective Date: Summer 2019 SECTION A-IV: NEW COURSES A-IV:12 Department of History HIST 7141X Ancient History and Culture On-Site 3 hours; 3 credits Bulletin Description: On-site learning and teaching. Intensive study of one or more aspects of the ancient history, culture, and development of ancient Mediterranean cultures such as Athens, Rome, or western Asia Minor. Emphasis on research methodologies and social contexts. Prerequisite : Permission of the chairperson. Rationale : The proposed course (along with 7141X) offers graduate credits to students enrolled in intensive study programs in the ancient world that emphasize on-site learning and presentations, giving students hands-on experiential learning opportunities that enhance their understanding of one or more ancient cultures. The sample syllabus envisions one such program in Athens, focused on the Athenian Acropolis and its role in the socio-political, religious, religious, economic, and cultural landscape of the ancient . polis Effective Date: Summer 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:1 Department of Biology Change in prerequisite FROM: BIOL 2002W Animal Form and Function Laboratory 5 hours; 3 credits Dissection and microscopic examination of the structure and development of animals. Introduction to major ideas of evolution and changes in animal body plans. Emphasis on current experimental techniques to measure animal behavior, including critical scientific literature review, field observations of animal behavior, multiple working-hypotheses generation, testing of mutually exclusive predictions using modern ethological techniques (ethogram construction and time-budget analysis), and simple statistical analysis of behavioral data. Emphasis is on how ecological variation and selection impacts animal behavior and on measuring and analyzing animal behavior in a rigorous way. Literature review, weekly writings, a field animal-behavior project, a group presentation and a major research paper will be required. Writing intensive course. (Not

336 open to students who have completed Biology 2002.) Prerequisite: English 1012, Biology 1001 and Biology 1002. TO: BIOL 2002W Animal Form and Function Laboratory 5 hours; 3 credits Dissection and microscopic examination of the structure and development of animals. Introduction to major ideas of evolution and changes in animal body plans. Emphasis on current experimental techniques to measure animal behavior, including critical scientific literature review, field observations of animal behavior, multiple working-hypotheses generation, testing of mutually exclusive predictions using modern ethological techniques (ethogram construction and time-budget analysis), and simple statistical analysis of behavioral data. Emphasis is on how ecological variation and selection impacts animal behavior and on measuring and analyzing animal behavior in a rigorous way. Literature review, weekly writings, a field animal-behavior project, a group presentation and a major research paper will be required. Writing intensive course. (Not open to students who have completed Biology 2002.) Prerequisite: English 1012, Biology 1001 and Biology 1002. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Biology 2001. Rationale: The required co-requisite of Biology 2001 was omitted in error and now updated to include the co- requisite. Effective date: Fall 2018 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:2 Department of Biology Change in prerequisite FROM: BIOL 4011 Molecular Biology of Development 3 hours; 3 credits Experimental and biochemical analysis of development of echinoderm, molluscan, and amphibian embryos. Biochemical analysis is primarily related to the replication, transcription, and translation of nucleic acids. Analysis of experimental design and interpretation of work in current literature with emphasis on experimental designs for future work. Prerequisite: Biology 1001, Biology 1002 and Chemistry 2500 or 3510. The chairperson may waive Chemistry 2500 or 3510 as a prerequisite of Biology 4011for students who received a grade of B or higher in Chemistry 2100. TO:

337 BIOL 4011 Molecular Biology of Development 3 hours; 3 credits Experimental and biochemical analysis of development of echinoderm, molluscan, and amphibian embryos. Biochemical analysis is primarily related to the replication, transcription, and translation of nucleic acids. Analysis of experimental design and interpretation of work in current literature with emphasis on experimental designs for future work. Prerequisite: Biology 1001, and Biology 1002. The course prerequisites are updated to remove a frequently waived prerequisite. Rationale: Fall 2018 Effective date: SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:3 Department of Biology Change in course title FROM: BIOL 5013 Independent Laboratory Research II Minimum of 9 hours conference and independent work; 3 credits each term. Independent laboratory research under the supervision of a Brooklyn College faculty member. Weekly conference. Thesis or report. Prerequisite of 5013: Biology 5012 and permission of the instructor and the chairperson. TO: BIOL 5013 Independent Laboratory Research IV Minimum of 9 hours conference and independent work; 3 credits each term. Independent laboratory research under the supervision of a Brooklyn College faculty member. Weekly conference. Thesis or report. Prerequisite of 5013: Biology 5012 and permission of the instructor and the chairperson Rationale: An error in the name of the course is fixed. Effective date: Fall 2018 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:4 Department of Chemistry

338 Change in prerequisite FROM: CHEM 3511 Organic Chemistry I Lecture 3 hours lecture, 1 recitation; 3 credits Structure and properties of fundamental classes of organic compounds. Emphasis on reactivity, reaction mechanisms, synthesis, stereochemistry, and applications to allied fields. First semester of a two-semester sequence intended for students interested in science and in health professional programs including medical, dental and pharmacy school. (Students who have taken Chemistry 2500 or 3510 will lose credit for Chemistry 2500 and 3510 upon successful completion of this course.) Prerequisite: Chemistry 2100. TO: CHEM 3511 Organic Chemistry I Lecture 3 hours lecture, 1 recitation; 3 credits Structure and properties of fundamental classes of organic compounds. Emphasis on reactivity, reaction mechanisms, synthesis, stereochemistry, and applications to allied fields. First semester of a two-semester sequence intended for students interested in science and in health professional programs including medical, dental and pharmacy school. (Students who have taken Chemistry 2500 or 3510 will lose credit for Chemistry 2500 and 3510 upon successful completion of this course.) . and Chemistry 2110 Prerequisite: Chemistry 2100 Rationale: This change is necessary to incorporate the proposed Chemistry 2110 into the curriculum. The date of implementation is set one semester after the implementation of Chem 2110, as students cannot be required to meet a prerequisite for a course that has not previously been offered. Effective date: Spring 2020 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES

339 A-V:5 Department of Classics Change in description FROM: CLAS 4040 Ancient Explorations 6 hours; 6 credits an ancient site abroad . Summer course which meets for four weeks on campus and for two weeks at Topography and monuments of a major center of ancient such as Athens, Rome, Greek or Roman civilization the Bay of Naples, or western Asia Minor. Detailed presentations in class and reports on site . Emphasis on research methodologies. Prerequisite: English 1012 [2] and at least sophomore standing; or permission of the chairperson. TO: CLAS 4040 Ancient Explorations 6 hours; 6 credits of ancient Topography and monuments of one or more major centers On-site learning and teaching. Mediterranean culture such as Athens, Rome, the Bay of Naples, or western Asia Minor. Emphasis on research methodologies and social contexts . Prerequisite: English 1012 [2] and at least sophomore standing; or permission of the chairperson. Rationale: The proposed bulletin change reflects the content and pedagogic approach of the course while removing the overly specific language about timing. It also acknowledges that any experience learning course must consider the wider historical and contemporary cultural contexts, and removes the language of ‘civilization’. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:6 Program in Communication Change in prerequisite FROM: COMM 3000 Orality, Literacy, and Computer Technology 3 hours; 3 credits The evolution from orality to writing, to print culture, to computer technology, and the relationship of each to

340 the cognitive process and human culture. (This course is the same as English 3196 [10.4].) Prerequisite: Communication and English 1010 [1]. 1001 [1] TO: COMM 3000 Orality, Literacy, and Computer Technology 3 hours; 3 credits The evolution from orality to writing, to print culture, to computer technology, and the relationship of each to the cognitive process and human culture. (This course is the same as English 3196 [10.4].) and English 1010 [1]. Prerequisite: Communication 1000 : Rationale The change to the prerequisite results from the new structure and curriculum for the Communication Program, as well as ensuring consistency between the cross-listed courses. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:7 Program in Communication Change in prerequisite FROM: COMM 3100 Cultural Psychology 3 hours; 3 credits An exploration of theory and research in the contemporary cultural variations of thought, language, and other social behavior, addressing the question of how culture is "involved" in these processes. An examination of research in perception, cognition, motivation, and development and communication; and a review of interpersonal, group, and organizational "differences" across cultures. Historical and theoretical alternatives for making sense of these variations will be considered, leading to the consideration of a "universal" human nature. (This course is the same as Psychology 3120 [17].) Prerequisite: Psychology 2100 or 2210 or 2200; or Communication 1001 and either Communication 3150W or 3200 . TO: COMM 3100 Cultural Psychology 3 hours; 3 credits An exploration of theory and research in the contemporary cultural variations of thought, language, and other

341 social behavior, addressing the question of how culture is "involved" in these processes. An examination of research in perception, cognition, motivation, and development and communication; and a review of interpersonal, group, and organizational "differences" across cultures. Historical and theoretical alternatives for making sense of these variations will be considered, leading to the consideration of a "universal" human nature. (This course is the same as Psychology 3120 [17].) Prerequisite: Psychology 2100 or 2210 or 2200; or Communication 2000 . Rationale : The change to the prerequisites results from the new structure and curriculum for the Communication Program. With the addition of a required communication theory course for all majors, communication students should be better prepared for the material covered in PSYC 3120/COMM 3100 with COMM 2000 as one of the prerequisites for COMM 3100. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:8 Program in Communication Change in prerequisite FROM: COMM 3150W Communication Research 3 hours; 3 credits Qualitative and quantitative methods in communication research. Includes the use of surveys, depth interviews, focus group research, statistics, computer data analysis, and report writing. Writing Intensive Course. (This course is the same as Television and Radio 2222W). Prerequisite: English 1012 and one of the following: Television and Radio 2265 ; or Core Studies 5; or both Core Studies 5.1 and 5.2; Communication 1001 . or Core Curriculum 1311 or 1312; or Mathematics 1311; or TO: COMM 3150W Communication Research 3 hours; 3 credits Qualitative and quantitative methods in communication research. Includes the use of surveys, depth interviews, focus group research, statistics, computer data analysis, and report writing. Writing Intensive Course. (This course is the same as Television and Radio 2222W). . Prerequisite: English 1012 and one of the following: Television and Radio 2265 or Communication 2000 Rationale : The change to the prerequisites results from the new structure and curriculum for the Communication

342 Program. With the addition of a required communication theory course for all majors, communication students will be better prepared for the research in the field with the theory course COMM 2000 as the prerequisite rather than the introductory course. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:9 Program in Communication Change in prerequisite FROM: COMM 3200 Communication Ethics 3 hours; 3 credits Critical examination of ethical issues related to communication, information, and the media. Freedoms and responsibilities. Consideration of such issues as: privacy, confidentiality, censorship, deception, propaganda, accuracy, fairness, intellectual property rights, conflicts of interest, obscenity and pornography, civility and offensive speech. Classical and contemporary philosophers. (This course is the same as Philosophy 3315 [14.2].) or one course in Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or Core Studies 10 or Core Curriculum 1210 [2.1]; communication, information, or the media, or permission of the Chairperson of the Philosophy department. TO: COMM 3200 Communication Ethics 3 hours; 3 credits Critical examination of ethical issues related to communication, information, and the media. Freedoms and responsibilities. Consideration of such issues as: privacy, confidentiality, censorship, deception, propaganda, accuracy, fairness, intellectual property rights, conflicts of interest, obscenity and pornography, civility and offensive speech. Classical and contemporary philosophers. (This course is the same as Philosophy 3315 [14.2].) Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or Communication 1000 or permission of the Chairperson of the Philosophy department. Rationale : The change to the prerequisites results from the new structure and curriculum for the Communication Program. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES

343 A-V:10 Program in Communication Change in description and prerequisite FROM: COMM 4000 Internship 9 hours per week independent work; 2 credits A minimum of one hundred twenty-six hours field experience during the fourteen week semester in a professional communications setting commensurate with student's area of interest within the program. Evaluative report required as part of the course. Prerequisite: senior standing in Communication Program and approval of Program advisor. TO: COMM 4000 Internship 9 hours per week independent work; 2 credits A minimum of one hundred twenty-six hours field experience during the fourteen week semester in a professional communications setting commensurate with student's area of interest within the program. repeated once , but the internship must have Evaluative report required as part of the course. May be different job duties and a different supervisor. Internship credit cannot be earned retroactively. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in Communication Program , and approval of Program advisor or instructor . Rationale : These changes reflect changes in experiential practice around the country and in communication majors for internships since the BC Communication Program was created over 15 years ago. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:11 Program in Communication Change in description and prerequisite FROM: COMM 4100 Internship 14 hours per week independent work; 3 credits

344 A minimum of one hundred ninety-six hours field experience during the fourteen week semester in a professional communications setting commensurate with student's area of interest within the program. Evaluative report required as part of the course. Prerequisite: senior standing in Communication Program and approval of Program advisor. TO: COMM 4100 Internship 14 hours per week independent work; 3 credits A minimum of one hundred ninety-six hours field experience during the fourteen week semester in a professional communications setting commensurate with student's area of interest within the program. May be repeated once , but the internship must have Evaluative report required as part of the course. different job duties and a different supervisor. Internship credit cannot be earned retroactively. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in Communication Program , and approval of Program advisor or instructor . Rationale : These changes reflect changes in experiential practice around the country and in communication majors for internships since the BC Communication Program was created over 15 years ago. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:12 Department of English Change in prerequisite FROM: ENGL 3524 Sociolinguistics 4 hours, 4 credits The study of language as it is used by various social groups. Language and gender, language and culture, Creole languages, black English, linguistic change. This course is the same as Anthropology and Archaeology 3390 [18] and Linguistics 3029. or permission of the Prerequisite: English 1010 [1] and either Anthropology 2300 [2.3] or Linguistics 2001 [1]; chairperson. TO: ENGL 3524 Sociolinguistics 4 hours, 4 credits

345 The study of language as it is used by various social groups. Language and gender, language and culture, Creole languages, black English, linguistic change. This course is the same as Anthropology and Archaeology 3390 [18] and Linguistics 3029. Prerequisite: English 1010 [1] or permission of the chairperson. Rationale: In recent practice, this course has been effectively taught in a way that does not require students to come prepared with a foundation in linguistics; students are introduced to core linguistics concepts as appropriate during the course. Since this course now fulfills a General Education requirement (International Cultural Competency in the College Option section for those students who are exempt from the foreign language requirement), the program committee would like to encourage students with diverse interests and backgrounds to take it. Fall 2019 Effective date: SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:13 Department of History Change in description FROM: HIST 3402: American Pluralism Since 1877 3 hours; 3 credits The history of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present, emphasizing the varying experiences and contributions of diverse populations living in the United States. “Diversity” in this course comprises race, ethnicity, class, religion, citizenship status, as well as the population diversity tied to region, economic and political culture, language, and more. TO: ENGL 3524 Sociolinguistics HIST 3402: American Pluralism Since 1877 3 hours; 3 credits The history of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present, emphasizing the varying experiences and contributions of diverse populations living in the United States. “Diversity” in this course comprises race, ethnicity, class, religion, citizenship status, as well as the population diversity tied to region, economic and political culture, language, and more. Satisfies Pathways Flexible Core US Experience in Its Diversity requirement. Course does not satisfy any distribution requirements for the B.A. degree programs or minors in history or adolescence education: social studies teacher . Rationale: This course is the second half of the two-semester US History survey. Because it is now part of the Pathways

346 Flexible Core US Experience in Its Diversity requirement, we are adding the language also outlined in HIST 3401 (the first half of the course already included in the Pathways Flexible Core). Fall 2019 Effective date: SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:14 Program in Linguistics Change in prerequisite FROM: LING 3029 Sociolinguistics 4 hours, 4 credits The study of language as it is used by various social groups. Language and gender, language and culture, Creole languages, black English, linguistic change. This course is the same as Anthropology and Archaeology 3390 [18] and English 3524 [24.8]. or permission of the Prerequisite: English 1010 [1] and either Anthropology 2300 [2.3] or Linguistics 2001 [1]; chairperson. TO: LING 3029 Sociolinguistics 4 hours, 4 credits The study of language as it is used by various social groups. Language and gender, language and culture, Creole languages, black English, linguistic change. This course is the same as Anthropology and Archaeology 3390 [18] and English 3524 [24.8]. Prerequisite: English 1010 [1] or permission of the chairperson. Rationale: In recent practice, this course has been effectively taught in a way that does not require students to come prepared with a foundation in linguistics; students are introduced to core linguistics concepts as appropriate during the course. Since this course now fulfills a General Education requirement (International Cultural Competency in the College Option section for those students who are exempt from the foreign language requirement), the program committee would like to encourage students with diverse interests and backgrounds to take it. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:15 Department of Philosophy

347 Change in prerequisite FROM: PHIL 3315 Communication Ethics 3 hours; 3 credits Critical examination of ethical issues related to communication, information, and the media. Freedoms and responsibilities. Consideration of such issues as: privacy, confidentiality, censorship, deception, propaganda, accuracy, fairness, intellectual property rights, conflicts of interest, obscenity and pornography, civility and offensive speech. Classical and contemporary philosophers. (This course is the same as Communication 3200 [23].) or Core Studies 10 or Core Curriculum 1210 [2.1]; or one course in Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of the Chairperson of the Philosophy department. communication, information, or the media, TO: PHIL 3315 Communication Ethics 3 hours; 3 credits Critical examination of ethical issues related to communication, information, and the media. Freedoms and responsibilities. Consideration of such issues as: privacy, confidentiality, censorship, deception, propaganda, accuracy, fairness, intellectual property rights, conflicts of interest, obscenity and pornography, civility and offensive speech. Classical and contemporary philosophers. (This course is the same as Communication 3200 [23].) Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or Communication 1000 or permission of the Chairperson of the Philosophy department. Rationale: The change to the prerequisites results from the new structure and curriculum for the Communication Program. Effective date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:16 Department of Kinesiology Change in title, content FROM: KINS 7110X Group Dynamics in Sport and Physical Education 45 hours; 3 credits

348 This course will acquaint students with theory and practice related to group behavior in sport, educational and community settings. Students in this course will be provided with a theoretical understanding of group processes and will understand group development stages, decision-making processes, and leadership, relevant to sport, physical education and community organizations. TO: Physical Education KINS 7110X Group Dynamics and Psychological Constructs in Sport and Activity Activity 45 hours; 3 credits This course will acquaint students with theory and practice related to group behavior in sport, educational and community settings. Students in this course will be provided with a theoretical understanding of group processes and will understand group development stages , decision-making processes , motivation for sport and performance , and leadership, relevant to sport, physical education activity and community organizations. Rationale: Content in this course (KINS7110X) has expanded better to match competencies across graduate programs within the Department of Kinesiology. Effective Date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:17 Department of Kinesiology Change in prerequisite FROM : KINS 7290X Practicum in Exercise Science and Rehabilitation 45 hours seminar; 3 credits Clinical skills for the Exercise Physiologist. Maximal exercise testing using various modes of exercise. Physical examination. Monitoring of physiologic variables and the electrocardiogram. Clinical decision making. Exercise prescription. Case studies. Prerequisite: Completion of PEES/KINS 7250X, PEES/KINS 7260X, and PEES/KINS 7262X. : TO KINS 7290X Practicum in Exercise Science and Rehabilitation 45 hours seminar; 3 credits Clinical skills for the Exercise Physiologist. Maximal exercise testing using various modes of exercise. Physical examination. Monitoring of physiologic variables and the electrocardiogram. Clinical decision making. Exercise prescription. Case studies. KINS 7262X and KINS Prerequisite: Completion of PEES/KINS 7250X, PEES/KINS 7260X, and PEES/

349 7267X. Rationale: For many years the prerequisites for KINS 7290X were KINS 7262X and KINS 7267X. Experience over the last few years has shown that these classes better prepare students for the Practicum than the newer prerequisites. Therefore we wish to change back to the original prerequisites. Given the time since the departmental name change, no students currently in the program would have the PEES designation for their courses. Effective Date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-V: CHANGES IN EXISTING COURSES A-V:18 Department of Kinesiology Change in title, content, prerequisite FROM: KINS 7370X Research Seminar in Sport Science 45 hours; 3 credits Students will review current research in the sport sciences through on-line and library-based sources. Class discussions and presentations will evolve from these activities. Prerequisite: completion of all required KINS courses - should be taken in the student's final semester of matriculation. TO: Science , Exercise, and Physical Activity Seminar on Ethical Issues in Sport Research KINS 7370X 45 hours; 3 credits Students will review current research in identify and analyze ethical dilemmas. This course the sport sciences will examine ethical decision-making in a variety of environments with an emphasis on sport, exercise, and physical activity. Real and hypothetical situations will be utilized. through on-line and library-based sources. Class discussions and presentations will evolve from these activities. Prerequisite: completion of all required KINS courses - should be taken in the student's final semester of matriculation. Rationale : Content in this course (KINS7370X) has expanded to better match competencies across graduate programs within the Department of Kinesiology. Effective Date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-VI: OTHER CHANGES A-VI:1 Department of English

350 New Creative Writing minor Minor in Creative Writing --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Department requirements (16 credits) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- At least four courses and 16 credits in advanced electives in Creative Writing with a grade of C or higher in each course, starting with English 2301 and then three courses from the following list: English 2302, 3301, 3302, 3303, 3304, 3305, 3306, 3307, and 4301. Creative Writing minors should check the bulletin to see which of these courses are sequenced together, and consult with department counselors for recommendations. The English department proposes to create a minor in Creative Writing in response to increasing Rationale: student demand, expressed to faculty in the Creative Writing program and advisors for the English department. The department now offers minors in each of its other degree programs: English literature, Comparative Literature, Journalism and Linguistics. The Creative Writing major is more credit-intensive than the other English degree programs (requiring 42-48 credits), and many students who are interested in pursuing a course of study in creative writing cannot (or do not wish to) make the credit-intensive commitment required for the major. Formation of a minor addresses this need. Effective Date: Fall 2019 SECTION A-VI: OTHER CHANGES A-VI:2 Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences Correction in Section A-V of CUCDR CD 391 incorporated into CUR January 2018 A typographical error was found on page 88 in CUCDR CD 391 of December 12, 2017 in the change in the existing course "EESC 5001 Presenting Research In Earth and Environmental Sciences," adding a second prerequisite field to that course description. The second prerequisite field should be removed. It follows: Prerequisite: Completion of an approved program of advanced Earth and Environmental Sciences Department courses with a GPA of 3.0 or higher, and permission of the instructor and chairperson. The corrected course listing reads: EESC 5001 Presenting Research In Earth and Environmental Sciences 1 hour lecture, 2 hour lab; 2 credits Principles and practices of presenting original scientific research at scientific meetings; concise technical writing; graphics (maps, graphs, photographs); Powerpoint presentation design; poster design.

351 Prerequisite: Earth and Environmental Sciences 5000, and permission of the instructor and chairperson. SECTION A-VI: OTHER CHANGES A-VI:3 Conservatory of Music MUSC 7810X Seminar in Language and Diction for Singers This “Other Change” reflects the fact that the Office of the Provost has corrected an error in CD244, which listed MUSC 7810X as 30 hours; 3 credits. The correction reads: 45 hours; 3 credits. SECTION A-VI: OTHER CHANGES A-VI:4 Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences Correction to CD 243, which was incorporated into CUR January 2018. A-III MA in earth and environmental sciences A-III MS in earth and environmental sciences The or 7522G. one course numbered 7521G In CD 243 the degree requirements for both programs state: correct verbiage is one course numbered 7521G to 7525G. Effective Date: Fall 2018 SECTION A-VI: OTHER CHANGES A-VI:5 Department of History Correction of undergraduate bulletin item HIST 3512 Modern Latin America has been listed in the bulletin as carrying 3 hours and 2 credits but students taking it have in fact correctly been granted 3 credits given that the course runs 3 hours. This item formally rectifies this mistake.

352 June 2018 City College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters AI. Effective July 1, 2018 City College will not accept new enrollment in the following minors: Area Studies: Puerto Rican Area Studies: Russian Communications Film German Greek Hebrew Oceanography Pre-Law Russian Teachers Of Special Education Urban Legal Studies AII. No Items AIII. 1.1 Program: B.S. in Physics (Applied Physics Concentration) Department: Physics HEGIS Code: 1902.00 Program Code: 02245, 60127 Effective: Fall 2018

353 From To Core requirements Cr Core requirements Cr Basic Courses for all Physics Majors 4 Basic Courses for all Physics Majors 4 PHYS 20700 University Physics I 4 PHYS 20700 University Physics I 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 PHYS 20900 University Physics III 3 PHYS 20900 University Physics III 3 PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism 2 PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism I 4 I 3 PHYS 36100 Math. Methods in Phys. 2 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 3 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 4 Mathematics 4 Mathematics 4 MATH 20100 Calculus I 3 MATH 20100 Calculus I 4 MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 MATH 20300 Calculus III 4 MATH 20300 Calculus III 3 MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. 4 MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. 4 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 Analysis Analysis 4 4 General Science General Science 4 4 BIO 10100 Biological Foundations BIO 10100 Biological Foundations 3 3 CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I 3 3 CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II 2 2 EAS 10600 Earth Systems Science -- cont. -- 4 4 -- cont. -- Applied Physics Concentration 3 3 Materials Science Concentration PHYS 35100 Mechanics 3 3 PHYS 35100 Mechanics PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism 3 3 PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism II II 3 3 PHYS 45200 Optics PHYS 45200 Optics 3 3 PHYS 47100 Advanced Physics Lab II PHYS 47100 Advanced Physics Lab 3 3 PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics II

354 3 3 PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics 3 3 1 elective from the following (3 cr) PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics 3 3 PHYS 31000 Ind. Study 1 elective from the following (3 cr) 4 3 PHYS 31500 Medical Physics PHYS 31000 Ind. Study 4 4 PHYS 42200 Biophysics PHYS 31500 Medical Physics 4 4 PHYS 42300 Biophysics Applications PHYS 42200 Biophysics 4 4 PHYS 55200 Quantum Physics II PHYS 42300 Biophysics Applications 4 4 PHYS 45300 Phys. Phot. I / Lasr. PHYS 55200 Quantum Physics II Opt. 4 4 PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy 74-76 4 PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics 4 76-78 PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of Matrls Matrls. 3 PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics 3 PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics 3 PHYS V1500 Electromag. Theory I PHYS V1500 Electromag Theory I 2 PHYS V1600 Electromag Theory II PHYS V1600 Electromag Theory II 4 PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I 3 PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II 3 Total credits Total Credits 3 Optics Concentration 3 PHYS 35100 Mechanics 3 PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism 3 II 3 PHYS 45200 Optics 3 PHYS 45300 Phys. Phot. I / Lasr. Opt. 4 PHYS 47100 Advanced Physics Lab 4 II 4 PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics 4

355 1 elective from the following (3 cr) 4 PHYS 31000 Ind. Study 4 PHYS 31500 Medical Physics 74-76 PHYS 42200 Biophysics PHYS 42300 Biophysics Applications PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of Matrls. PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics PHYS V1500 ElectroMag Theory I PHYS V1600 ElectroMag Theory II PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II Total credits Rationale: a) The Optics and Materials Science Concentrations have been reorganized into a single Applied Physics Concentration to avoid concentration “duplication” and have more students in the new concentration. b) The change in credits in the Physics majors was made to reflect the recent changes that the Mathematics Department made in the calculus sequence (in particular, MATH 20100 Calculus 1 and MATH 20200 Calculus 2). Consequently, the number of credits required has been changed for the major. There are no changes to the number of courses. c) The course Mathematical Methods in Physics PHYS 36100 has been added. To allow for this, EAS 10600 has been dropped. AIII. 1.2 CHANGE IN PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Program: B.S. in Physics (Biomedical Physics Concentration) Department: Physics

356 HEGIS Code: 1902.00 Program Code: 02245, 60127 Effective: Fall 2018 From To Core requirements Cr Core requirements Cr 4 Basic Courses for all Physics Majors Basic Courses for all Physics Majors 4 4 PHYS 20700 University Physics I PHYS 20700 University Physics I 4 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 3 PHYS 20900 University Physics III PHYS 20900 University Physics III 3 2 PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism I 4 I 3 PHYS 36100 Math. Methods in Phys. 2 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 3 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 4 Mathematics 4 Mathematics 4 MATH 20100 Calculus I 3 MATH 20100 Calculus I 4 MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 MATH 20300 Calculus III 4 MATH 20300 Calculus III 3 MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. 4 MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. 4 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 Analysis Analysis 4 4 General Science General Science 3 3 BIO 10100 Biological Foundations BIO 10100 Biological Foundations 3 3 CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I 3 3 CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II 4 4 EAS 10600 Earth Systems Science Comp. Science (1 from the following) 3 3 Comp. Science (1 from the following) MATH 32800 Meth. of Num. Analysis 3 3 MATH 32800 Meth. of Num. Analysis MATH 36600 Intro. Appl. Math. Comp. 3 3 MATH 36600 Intro. Appl. Math. CSC 10200 Intro. to Computing Comp. 4 4

357 CSC 10400 Discrete Math. Structures CSC 10200 Intro. to Computing 1 1 -- cont. -- CSC 10400 Discrete Math. Structures 3 3 Biomedical Physics Concentration -- cont. -- 3 3 PHYS 42200 Biophysics Biomedical Physics Concentration 4 4 CHEM 26300 Organic Chemistry II PHYS 42200 Biophysics 3 3 CHEM 32002 Biochemistry I CHEM 26300 Organic Chemistry II 3 3 PHYS 55100 Quantum Physics I CHEM 32002 Biochemistry I 3 3 PHYS 55600 Current Topics PHYS 55100 Quantum Physics I 3 3 and PHYS 55600 Current Topics 3 3 PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics, and 3 3 or with permission of major advisor: PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics, 3 3 Biophysics Applications PHYS 42300 or with permission of major advisor: 4 4 BIO 22900 Cell and Molecular Bio Biophysics Applications PHYS 42300 3 3 BIO 35400 Intro. to Neurobio. BIO 22900 Cell and Molecular Bio 3 3 CHEM 42500 Inorganic Chemistry BIO 35400 Intro. to Neurobio. 3 3 CHEM 43400 P.Ch & Chem Ins Lab II CHEM 42500 Inorganic Chemistry 3 3 CHEM 48005 Biochemistry II CHEM 43400 P.Ch & Chem Ins Lab II 3 3 1 elective from the following (3 cr) CHEM 48005 Biochemistry II 3 3 PHYS 31000 Ind. Study 1 elective from the following (3 cr) 3 3 PHYS 31100-32000 Sel. Topics PHYS 31000 Ind. Study 4 4 PHYS 31500 Medical Physics PHYS 31100-32000 Sel. Topics 4 4 PHYS 35100 Mechanics PHYS 31500 Medical Physics 4 4 PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism PHYS 35100 Mechanics 4 4 II PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism 4 4 PHYS 45200 Optics II 4 4 PHYS 45300 Phys. Phot. & Las. Op PHYS 45200 Optics 77-79 75-77 PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy PHYS 45300 Phys. Phot. & Las. Op PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy

358 PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of Matrls. PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of Matrls. PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics PHYS V1500 ElectroMag Theory I PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics PHYS V1600 ElectroMag Theory II PHYS V1500 ElectroMag Theory I PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I PHYS V1600 ElectroMag Theory II PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I Total credits PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II Total credits Rationale: a) The number of credits for MATH 20100 and MATH 20200 has been changed to reflect the number of lecture hours of the course. b) The course PHYS 36100 has been added, and to maintain same number of overall credits EAS 10600 has been dropped as a r AIII. 1.3 CHANGE IN PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Program: B.S. in Physics (Applied Physics Concentration) Department: Physics HEGIS Code: 1902.00 Program Code: 02245, 60127 Effective: Fall 2018 From To Cr Core requirements Cr Core requirements Basic Courses for all Physics Majors 4 Basic Courses for all Physics Majors 4 PHYS 20700 University Physics I 4 PHYS 20700 University Physics I 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 PHYS 20900 University Physics III 3 PHYS 20900 University Physics III 3

359 PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism I 2 4 I PHYS 36100 Math. Methods in Phys. 3 2 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 3 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 4 Mathematics 4 Mathematics 4 MATH 20100 Calculus I 3 4 MATH 20100 Calculus I MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 3 MATH 20200 Calculus II MATH 20300 Calculus III 4 3 MATH 20300 Calculus III MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. 4 4 MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 Analysis Analysis 4 4 General Science General Science 4 4 BIO 10100 Biological Foundations BIO 10100 Biological Foundations 3 3 CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I 3 3 CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II 2 2 EAS 10600 Earth Systems Science -- cont. -- 4 4 -- cont. -- Applied Physics Concentration 3 3 Materials Science Concentration PHYS 35100 Mechanics 3 3 PHYS 35100 Mechanics PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism 3 3 PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism II II 3 3 PHYS 45200 Optics PHYS 45200 Optics 3 3 PHYS 47100 Advanced Physics Lab II PHYS 47100 Advanced Physics Lab 3 3 PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics II 3 3 PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics 3 3 1 elective from the following (3 cr) PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics 3 3 PHYS 31000 Ind. Study 1 elective from the following (3 cr) 4 3 PHYS 31500 Medical Physics PHYS 31000 Ind. Study 4 4 PHYS 42200 Biophysics PHYS 31500 Medical Physics 4 4 PHYS 42300 Biophysics Applications PHYS 42200 Biophysics

360 4 4 PHYS 55200 Quantum Physics II PHYS 42300 Biophysics Applications 4 4 PHYS 45300 Phys. Phot. I / Lasr. PHYS 55200 Quantum Physics II Opt. 4 4 PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy 74-76 4 PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics 4 76-78 PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of Matrls Matrls. 3 PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics 3 PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics 3 PHYS V1500 Electromag. Theory I PHYS V1500 Electromag Theory I 2 PHYS V1600 Electromag Theory II PHYS V1600 Electromag Theory II 4 PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I 3 PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II 3 Total credits Total Credits 3 Optics Concentration 3 PHYS 35100 Mechanics 3 PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism 3 II 3 PHYS 45200 Optics 3 PHYS 45300 Phys. Phot. I / Lasr. Opt. 4 PHYS 47100 Advanced Physics Lab 4 II 4 PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics 4 1 elective from the following (3 cr) 4 PHYS 31000 Ind. Study 4 PHYS 31500 Medical Physics 74-76 PHYS 42200 Biophysics PHYS 42300 Biophysics Applications PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy

361 PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of Matrls. PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics PHYS V1500 ElectroMag Theory I PHYS V1600 ElectroMag Theory II PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II Total credits Rationale: a) The Optics and Materials Science Concentrations have been reorganized into a single Applied Physics Concentration to avoid concentration “duplication” and have more students in the new concentration. b) The change in credits in the Physics majors was made to reflect the recent changes that the Mathematics Department made in the calculus sequence (in particular, MATH 20100 Calculus 1 and MATH 20200 Calculus 2). Consequently, the number of credits required has been changed for the major. There are no changes to the number of courses. c) The course Mathematical Methods in Physics PHYS 36100 has been added. To allow for this, EAS 10600 has been dropped. AIII. 1.4 CHANGE IN PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Program: B.S. in Physics (Secondary Education Concentration) Department: Physics HEGIS Code: 1902.00 Program Code: 02245, 60127 Effective: Fall 2018 From To Core requirements Cr Core requirements Cr Basic Courses for all Physics Majors 4 Basic Courses for all Physics Majors 4

362 PHYS 20700 University Physics I 4 PHYS 20700 University Physics I 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 PHYS 20900 University Physics III 3 PHYS 20900 University Physics III 3 PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism 2 PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism I 4 I 3 PHYS 36100 Math. Methods in Phys. 2 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 3 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 4 Mathematics 4 Mathematics 4 MATH 20100 Calculus I 3 MATH 20100 Calculus I 4 MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 MATH 20300 Calculus III 4 MATH 20300 Calculus III 3 MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. 4 MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. 4 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 Analysis Analysis 4 4 General Science General Science 4 4 BIO 10100 Biological Foundations BIO 10100 Biological Foundations 3 3 CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I 6 6 CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II 65 67 EAS 10600 Earth Systems Science Secondary Education Concentration Secondary Education Concentration PHYS 35100 Mechanics PHYS 35100 Mechanics PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism II II Electives to be chosen in consultation Electives to be chosen in consultation with the advisor with the advisor Total credits Total credits Rationale: a) The number of credits for Math 20100 and 20200 has been changed to reflect the number of lecture hours of the course. Consequently, the number of credits required has been changed for the major. There are no changes to the number of courses.

363 b) The course PHYS 36100 has been added, and to maintain same number of overall credits EAS 10600 has been dropped as a requirement. AIII. 1.5 CHANGE IN PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Program: B.S. in Physics (Standard Concentration) Department: Physics HEGIS Code: 1902.00 Program Code: 02245, 60127 Effective: Fall 2018 From To Core requirements Cr Core requirements Cr Basic Courses for all Physics Majors Basic Courses for all Physics Majors 4 4 PHYS 20700 University Physics I PHYS 20700 University Physics I 4 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 4 PHYS 20900 University Physics III PHYS 20900 University Physics III 3 3 PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism I 2 4 I PHYS 36100 Math. Methods in Phys. 3 2 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 3 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 3 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 4 Mathematics 4 Mathematics 4 MATH 20100 Calculus I 3 MATH 20100 Calculus I 4 MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 MATH 20300 Calculus III 4 MATH 20300 Calculus III 3 MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eq. 4 MATH 39100 Meth. Of Diff. Eq. 4 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. 4 Analysis Analysis 4 4 General Science General Science 3 3 BIO 10100 Biological Foundations BIO 10100 Biological Foundations 3 3 CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I

364 3 3 CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II 4 4 EAS 10600 Earth Systems Science Comp. Science (1 from the following) 4 4 Comp. Science (1 from the following) MATH 32800 Meth. of Num. Analysis 3 3 MATH 32800 Meth. of Num. Analysis MATH 36600 Intro. Appl. Math. Comp. 2 2 MATH 36600 Intro. Appl. Math. CSC 10200 Intro. to Computing Comp. 4 4 CSC 10400 Discrete Math. Structures CSC 10200 Intro. to Computing 3 3 -- cont. -- CSC 10400 Discrete Math. Structures 1 1 Standard Physics Concentration -- cont. -- 3 3 PHYS 35100 Mechanics Standard Physics Concentration 3 3 PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism PHYS 35100 Mechanics 3 3 II PHYS 35400 Electricity & Magnetism 3 3 PHYS 47100 Advanced Physics Lab II II 3 3 PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics PHYS 47100 Advanced Physics Lab II 3 3 PHYS 55200 Quantum Physics II PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics 3 3 PHYS 55600 Current Topics PHYS 55200 Quantum Physics II 3 3 1 elective from the following PHYS 55600 Current Topics 4 4 PHYS 31000 Independent Study 1 elective from the following 4 4 PHYS 31500 Medical Physics PHYS 31000 Independent Study 4 4 PHYS 42200 Biophysics PHYS 31500 Medical Physics 4 4 PHYS 42300 Biophysics Applications PHYS 42200 Biophysics 4 4 PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy PHYS 42300 Biophysics Applications 4 4 PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics PHYS 45400 Descriptive Astronomy 77-79 75-77 PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of Matrls. PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics PHYS 55500 Phys. & Chem. of PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics Matrls. PHYS V1500 Electromag. Theory I PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics PHYS V1600 Electromag. Theory II PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics

365 PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I PHYS V1500 Electromag Theory I PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II PHYS V1600 Electromag Theory II Total credits PHYS V2500 Quantum Mechanics I PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II Total credits Rationale: a) The number of credits for Math 20100 and 20200 has been changed to reflect the number of lecture hours of the course. Consequently, the number of credits required has been changed for the major. There are no changes to the number of courses. b) The course PHYS 36100 has been added, and to maintain same number of overall credits EAS 10600 has been dropped as a requirement. AIII. 2 Program: BA, English (Secondary Education Concentration) Department: English Program Code: 02220/60110, 25920/60317 Effective: Fall 2019 From To Crs. Name Course Course Name Crs. Number Number Introduction to Literary Study Same 3 3 English 250 3 One additional course drawn Historical Approach to Literature 6 English from: 35000 or I or II or any Representative 35100 Writers course Engl 251-254 Hist Survey of Brit Lit; Engl 260-269 Studies in Genre; Engl 270-27010 Literatures of Diversity; or Engl 280 Introduction to Comparative Literature Specific courses required by the 9 Secondary Ed requirements 21 in YA literature; Media New York State Department of Literacy; and Linguistics Education

366 (these 3 requirements can be met with 3 English or Education electives as specified by the Education Program) Two English electives at 300- 6 level 6 Two English electives at 400- level 12 Electives Additional electives at 200-, 9 300-, or 400-level, but no more than 4 total electives at 200 level Total credits same 39 39 Rationale: In Fall 2014 The English Department implemented a more graduated sequence of courses designed to give majors wider exposure to literary traditions and critical approaches, with specific goals associated at every step of the way, and related writing and reading tasks assigned to students at the beginning, middle, and conclusion of their academic careers. This graduated curriculum was never fully articulated with Secondary Education program requirements, however, and our changes proposed above make it easier for Education concentration students to chart a path for themselves as English majors and fulfill requirements mandated by NY State agencies and accrediting boards. AIII. 3 Program: BS in Biology Department: Biology Program Code: 02128, 60099 HEGIS Code: 0401.00 Effective: Fall 2018 From To Course Crs Name Crs Course Number Name Number CHEM 10301 4 General Chemistry I Same CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II 4 Same CHEM 26100 3 Organic Chemistry I Same PHYS 20400 General Physics II 4 Same Calculus I 3 MATH 20100 Calculus I 4 MATH 20100 MATH 20200 Calculus II 3 MATH 20200 Calculus II 4 MATH 20300 4 Calculus III Same OR

367 Same MATH 20500 4 Elements of Calculus Same Elements of Calculus and Statistics 4 MATH 20900 Same OR Same MATH 20100 MATH 20100 Calculus I 4 Calculus I 3 Elements of Calculus and Statistics 4 MATH 20900 Same OR Same Calculus I 3 Calculus I 4 MATH 20100 MATH 20100 MATH 20200 Calculus II MATH 20200 Calculus II 4 3 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 4 MATH 17300 Same Subtotal: 26-29 Same MATH 20900: With permission of Math Department Same Biology Requirements Same Required Courses (Core Curriculum) 4 BIO 10100 Biological Foundations I Same Biological Foundations II 4 BIO 10200 Same Introduction to Genetics BIO 20600 4 Same BIO 20700 4 Organismic Biology Same BIO 22800 Ecology and Evolution 4 Same BIO 22900 Cell and Molecular Biology 4 Same Additional advanced electives 15 Same Same Subtotal: 26-29 Rationale: Biology majors typically take the Math sequence Math 20500/20900 (4 cr each) so are unaffected by the change in the number of credits in Math 20100 and 20200 from 3 to 4. Bio majors may also fulfill the Math requirement by taking either a) Math 201/209 OR b) Math 201/202/203 OR c) Math 201/202/173. For those students choosing these nonstandard Math options, they would now be taking a) 1 more credit than previously under option a (now same as standard Math option), or b),c) 2 more additional credits than previously under these options (now 4cr more than standard Math option for both options b,c). The specific course requirements for the BS degree remain unchanged. AIII. 4 Proposal to CHANGE the Name of Minor in Arabic Language and Cultures to Minor in Middle East and North Africa Studies Program: Arabic Language and Cultures

368 Department: Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures Effective: Fall 2018 From To Name: Middle East and North Africa Studies Name: Arabic Language and Cultures (MENA) Crs. Prerequisites for the Minor Crs. Prerequisites for the Minor Arabic The prerequisite for a minor in The prerequisite for a minor in Middle East and is Arabic 226 or its North Africa Studies Language and Cultures is Arabic 226 or its equivalent. Students must complete the equivalent. Students must complete the language language sequence at CCNY or score at the sequence at CCNY or score at the exempt level on the placement exam. exempt level on the placement exam. Arabic 12300 Introductory Arabic I Arabic 12300 Introductory Arabic I Arabic 12400 Introductory Arabic II Arabic 12400 Introductory Arabic II Arabic 22600 Intermediate Arabic Arabic 22600 Intermediate Arabic Requirements for the Minor Requirements for the Minor 3 ARABIC 30000: Advanced Intermediate Arabic ARABIC 30000: Advanced Intermediate 3 Arabic ARABIC 30100: Selected Topics in Arabic 3 ARABIC 30100: Selected Topics in Arabic 3 Literatures and Cultures. Literatures and Cultures. Subtotal Subtotal 6 6 In addition, students are required to take ONE 3 In addition, students are required to take ONE of the 3 following 3-credit classes: of the following 3-credit classes: ARABIC 40100: Modern Arabic Literatures. 3 ARABIC 40100: Modern Arabic Literatures. 3 ART 21052: Islamic Art 3 3 ART 21052: Islamic Art CL 31100-32000: Selected Topics in Comparative 3 3 CL 31100-32000: Selected Topics in Comparative Literature Literature FREN 40400: France in the World: Empire, 3 FREN 40400: France in the World: Empire, 3 Colonies, Post-colonialism Colonies, Post-colonialism 3 Subtotal Subtotal 3 Electives Electives Students must take TWO additional courses TWO additional courses (6 Students must take focusing on and/or North Middle Eastern credits) (6 credits) focusing on Near Eastern and/or North African cultures. Students have the African cultures. Students have the option to tailor their curriculum for the minor according to their option to tailor their curriculum for the minor chosen major field of study and interest by selecting according to their chosen major field of study and interest by selecting courses from courses from departments such as: departments such as: Classical and Modern Languages and Foreign Languages and Literatures , Literatures , Comparative Literature, Architecture, Art History, Architecture, Anthropology, History, Comparative Literature, Architecture, Art History, Architecture, Anthropology, History, Music, International Studies, Political Science, and Music, International Studies, Political Science, Sociology. and Sociology.

369 Specific suggested courses are listed below. Specific suggested courses are listed below Additional or special topic courses may be allowed Additional or special topic courses may be with the approval of advisor. Prior classes taken on the Middle East and North Africa may be counted allowed with the approval of advisor. Prior Near East classes taken on the toward the fulfillment of the minor with the approval may be counted toward the fulfillment of the minor with the of an adviser. approval of an adviser. ANTH 32300: Islamic Cultures and Issues 3 ANTH 32300: Islamic Cultures and Issues 3 ANTH 24600: Peoples of the Middle East 3 3 ANTH 24600: Peoples of the Middle East 3 ART 21012: Egyptian Art and Architecture 3 ART 27000: Projects in Ceramic Design 3 ART 21052: Islamic Art 3 ART 21052: Islamic Art CL 31100-32000: Selected Topics in CL 31100-32000: Selected Topics in Comparative 3 3 Comparative Literature Literature CL 41100-42000: Seminars in Comparative 3 CL 41100-42000: Seminars in Comparative 3 Literature Literature 3 3 FREN 40500: French and Francophone Cinema FREN 40500: French and Francophone Cinema HIST 42900: Minorities in Modern Europe 3 HIST 42900: Minorities in Modern Europe 3 HIST 34401: The Middle East Under Islam 3 HIST 34401: The Middle East Under Islam 3 HIST 48400: Modern Middle East HIST 48400: Modern Middle East HIST 48500: Women and Gender in the HIST 48500: Women and Gender in the Middle East 3 3 Middle East 3 3 HIST 48600: Arab-Israeli Conflict HIST 48600: Arab-Israeli Conflict HIST 48700: Islamic Political Movements 3 HIST 48700: Islamic Political Movements 3 3 JWST 21100: Contemporary Israel JWST 21100: Contemporary Israel 3 AES 23202: A Survey of Western Architecture 3 AES 23202: A Survey of Western Architecture 3 AES 24202: A Survey of Western Architecture 3 AES 24202: A Survey of Western Architecture II 3 II Subtotal for elective credits 6 Subtotal for elective credits 6 Total Credits Required for the 15 Total Credits Required for the Minor in Middle 15 Minor in Arabic Language and Cultures East and North Africa Studies Rationale: The name modification of the minor from “Arabic Language and Cultures” to “Middle East and North Africa Studies” is motivated by the need to reflect the interdisciplinary, comparative, and regional nature of the minor, which extends beyond Arabic language and cultures. Most of the classes required to fulfill the minor already express this interdisciplinary nature as well as the regional connection to, and exchanges with, many cultures, histories, religions, and languages. Modifying the name, then, would better represent the actual nature of the minor, since it will explicitly reflect the connection between the different programs and majors at CCNY and the minor, which will help in the promotion of the minor among students from different majors and disciplines. The name modification is a response to students’ academic interests and demands. Frequently, students in the minor ask to take classes whose purview goes beyond the scope of Arabic studies. In this manner, students could select from a wider variety of classes that examine the complex nature of Middle Eastern and North African culture and history, with connection with different regions and cultures, not limited to Arab culture or Islam.

370 Effect Outside Department: None 03/29/2018 : Date of Department Approval Date of Senate Approval: 05/3/ 2018 AIII. 5.1 CHANGE IN PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Program: BS in Biology Department: Biology Program Code: 02128/60099 Effective: Fall 2018 From To Cr Core requirements Cr Core requirements 4 4 4 4 SAME General Chemistry I CHEM 10301 SAME General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 3 4 SAME CHEM 26100 Organic Chemistry I 4 4 SAME General Physics PHYS 20300- 20400 3 4 MATH 20100 Calculus I 3 4 MATH 20100 Calculus II MATH 20200 Calculus I MATH 20300 Calculus III MATH 20200 Calculus II 4 4 OR OR MATH 20300 Calculus III 4 4 Elements of Calculus MATH 20500 OR OR 4 4 Elements of Calculus and MATH 20900 MATH 20500 Elements of Calculus Statistics MATH 20900 Elements of Calculus and Statistics 3 4 OR OR OR OR 4 MATH 20100 Calculus I MATH 20100 Calculus I MATH 20900 Elements of Calculus and Elements of Calculus and Statistics MATH 20900 3 Statistics OR OR 3 OR OR MATH 20100 Calculus I MATH 20100 Calculus I 4 MATH 20200 Calculus II Calculus II MATH 20200 MATH 17300 Introduction to Probability and 4 Introduction to Probability and MATH 17300 Statistics Statistics 4 Subtotal: 26- SAME 29 4

371 MATH 20900: With permission of Math Department 4 Biology Requirements 4 Required Courses (Core Curriculum) Same BIO 10100 Biological Foundations I 4 BIO 10200 Biological Foundations II 15 Introduction to Genetics BIO 20600 Organismic Biology BIO 20700 Same Ecology and Evolution BIO 22800 Cell and Molecular Biology BIO 22900 Additional advanced electives Additional Advanced electives Subtotal: 39 Rationale: Biology majors typically take the Math sequence Math 20500/20900 (4 cr each) so are unaffected by the change in the number of credits in Math 20100 and 20200 from 3 to 4. Bio majors may also fulfill the Math requirement by taking either a) Math 201/209 OR b) Math 201/202/203 OR c) Math 201/202/173. For those students choosing these nonstandard Math options, they would now be taking a) 1 more credit than previously under option a (now same as standard Math option), or b),c) 2 more additional credits than previously under these options (now 4cr more than standard Math option for both options b,c). The specific course requirements for the BS degree remain unchanged. AIII. 5.2 CHANGE IN PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Program: BS/MS in Biology Department: Biology Program Code: 33426/60099 Effective: Fall 2018 From To Core requirements Core requirements Cr Cr 4 4 4 4 SAME General Chemistry I CHEM 10301 SAME General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 3 4 SAME Organic Chemistry I CHEM 26100

372 4 4 SAME General Physics PHYS 20300- 20400 4 3 MATH 20100 Calculus I 3 4 Calculus I MATH 20100 MATH 20200 Calculus II MATH 20200 Calculus II MATH 20300 Calculus III 4 4 MATH 20300 Calculus III OR OR 4 4 OR OR Elements of Calculus MATH 20500 4 4 Elements of Calculus MATH 20500 Elements of Calculus and Statistics MATH 20900 Elements of Calculus and Statistics MATH 20900 OR OR 3 4 OR OR Calculus I MATH 20100 4 MATH 20100 Elements of Calculus and Statistics MATH 20900 Calculus I OR OR Elements of Calculus and Statistics MATH 20900 3 Calculus I MATH 20100 OR OR 3 Calculus II MATH 20200 MATH 20100 Calculus I 4 Introduction to Probability and MATH 17300 MATH 20200 Calculus II Statistics Introduction to Probability and MATH 17300 4 Statistics 4 SAME Subtotal: 26- 29 4 MATH 20900: With permission of Math Department 4 Biology Requirements 4 Required Courses (Core Curriculum) Biological Foundations I BIO 10100 4 Biological Foundations II BIO 10200 SAME 15 BIO 20600 Introduction to Genetics BIO 20700 Organismic Biology BIO 22800 Ecology and Evolution BIO 22900 Cell and Molecular Biology Additional advanced electives Subtotal: 39 Rationale: Biology BS/MS students typically take the Math sequence Math 20500/20900 (4 cr each) so are unaffected by the change in the number of credits in Math 20100 and 20200 from 3 to 4. Bio majors may also fulfill the Math requirement by taking either a) Math 201/209 OR b) Math 201/202/203 OR c) Math 201/202/173. For those students choosing these nonstandard Math options, they would now be taking a) 1 more credit than previously under option a (now same as standard Math option), or b),c) 2 more additional credits than previously under these options (now 4cr more than standard Math option for both options b,c). The specific course requirements for the BS degree remain

373 unchanged. AIII. 6.1 Program: Middle School Science Education Program Code: 27441 Hegis Code: 0804.04 Department: Secondary Education Proposed Curriculum Change: Courses leading to Initial/Professional Certification in Middle School Science Education Effective: Fall 2019 : Dates of Approval/Recommendation Secondary Education Department Curriculum Committee: February 1, 2018 Secondary Education Department: February 8, 2018 School of Education Curriculum: April 18, 2018 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 To From Course # Course Cr Course # Course Cr 2 Issues for Secondary School 2 Issues for Secondary School EDSE EDSE 7600A 7600A Teachers: Second Language Teachers: Second Language Acquisition and Literacy Acquisition and Literacy EDSE 1201E 4 EDSE 1201E Middle School Literacy Middle School Literacy 4 Teaching Science in Middle EDSE 3101E 4 EDSE 3101E Teaching Science in Middle Schools 4 Schools Adolescent Learning of Science 1 EDSE 3105E Adolescent Learning of Science EDSE 3105E 1 Education Education EDSE 3900I Curriculum and Instruction in 4 EDSE 3900I Curriculum and Instruction in 4 Science Education Science Education SPED Introduction to Inclusive 3 3 SPED 5000K Introduction to Inclusive Education Education 5000K 4 Student Teaching in Middle and Student Teaching in Middle and 4 EDSE EDSE 7600G Secondary Schools Secondary Schools 7600G EDSE 2 Seminar on Teaching in Seminar on Teaching in Secondary 2 EDSE 7603G Secondary Schools 7603G Schools EDSE 7202I Master’s Project in Science 3 3 EDSE 7202I Master’s Project in Science Education Education EDUC Workshop on Child Abuse Workshop on Child Abuse EDUC 1900G 0 0 Identification, School Violence 1900G Identification, School Violence

374 Prevention, DASA, and Other Prevention, DASA, and Other Professional Topics Professional Topics Physical Science for Middle SCIE 1403E 4 School Teachers 1 Physical Science for Middle SCIE 1404E 4 School Teachers 2 Life Science for Middle School 4 SCIE 4101E Teachers 1 SCIE 4102E Life Science for Middle School 4 Teachers 2 Three of the following four courses 12 SCIE 1403E Physical Science for Middle School Teachers 1 (4 credits) SCIE 1404E Physical Science for Middle School Teachers 2 (4 credits) SCIE 4101E Life Science for Middle School Teachers 1 (4 credits) SCIE 4102E Life Science for Middle School Teachers 2 (4 credits) Nature of Science 3 SCIE 4103E Nature of Science 3 SCIE 4103E Science electives 9 Science electives 6 Total credits 55 Total credits 48 Changes: Seven credits of science switched from requirement to prerequisite for program which could be made up if missing. Rationale : Reflects that many of our applicants now arrive with more science credits. AIII. 6.2 Program: Science Education: Chemistry Program Code: 25867 Hegis Code: 0834.00 Department: Secondary Education Proposed Curriculum Change: Required courses leading to Initial/Professional Certification in Science Education: Chemistry Effective: Fall 2019 Dates of Approval/Recommendation : Secondary Education Department Curriculum Committee: February 1, 2018 Secondary Education Department: February 8, 2018

375 School of Education Curriculum: April 18, 2018 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 To From Cr Course # Course Cr Course Course # Issues for Secondary School 2 EDSE 2 EDSE 7600A Issues for Secondary School Teachers: Second Language Teachers: Second Language 7600A Acquisition and Literacy Acquisition and Literacy Reading and Writing across the EDSE 1200E Reading and Writing across the 3 EDSE 3 Curriculum 1200E Curriculum 4 Teaching Science in Secondary 4 EDSE EDSE 3100E Teaching Science in Secondary Schools Schools 3100E 1 EDSE 3105E Adolescent Learning of Science 1 EDSE Adolescent Learning of Science 3105E Education Education Curriculum and Instruction in 4 4 EDSE 3901I Curriculum and Instruction in EDSE 3901I Science Education Science Education Introduction to Inclusive Education 3 SPED SPED 5000K Introduction to Inclusive 3 5000K Education EDSE 4 Student Teaching in Middle and Student Teaching in Middle and 4 EDSE 7600G Secondary Schools Secondary Schools 7600G 2 EDSE 7603G Seminar on Teaching in Secondary 2 Seminar on Teaching in Secondary EDSE 7603G Schools Schools 0 Workshop on Child Abuse Workshop on Child Abuse EDUC 1900G 0 EDUC Identification, School Violence Identification, School Violence 1900G Prevention, DASA, and Other Prevention, DASA, and Other Professional Topics Professional Topics EDSE 7202I 3 EDSE 7202I Master’s Project in Science 3 Master’s Project in Science Education Education Modern Concepts in Chemistry 1 3 CHEME 7100E 3 CHEME Modern Concepts in Chemistry 2 7200E SCIE 4105E Principles of Atomic Theory 3 SCIE 4104E Science in the Urban 3 Environment 6 Science electives 6 Science electives Total credits 38 Total credits 38 Changes: CHEME 7100E and CHEME 7200E replaced by SCIE 4104E and SCIE 4105E Rationale : Updates required science course in recognition of changes to state high school curricula. AIII. 6.3 Program: Middle School Science Education

376 Program Code: 27440 Hegis Code: 0804.04 Department: Secondary Education Proposed Curriculum Change: Courses leading to Professional Certification in Middle School Science Education Effective: Fall 2019 : Dates of Approval/Recommendation Secondary Education Department Curriculum Committee: February 1, 2018 Secondary Education Department: February 8, 2018 School of Education Curriculum: April 18, 2018 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 From To Cr Course # Course # Cr Course Course Teaching Science in Middle 4 EDSE EDSE 3101E Teaching Science in Middle 4 Schools Schools 3101E Curriculum and Instruction in EDSE 3900I 4 EDSE 3900I Curriculum and Instruction in 4 Science Education Science Education Introduction to Inclusive Education 3 SPED 5000K Master’s Project in Science 3 3 EDSE 7202I EDSE 7202I Master’s Project in Science Education Education Physical Science for Middle SCIE 1403E 4 School Teachers 1 SCIE 1404E Physical Science for Middle 4 School Teachers 2 SCIE 4101E Life Science for Middle School 4 Teachers 1 SCIE 4102E Life Science for Middle School 4 Teachers 2 3 SCIE 4103E SCIE 4103E Nature of Science Nature of Science 3 Science electives 9 Science electives 6 Three of the following four courses 12 SCIE Physical Science for Middle 1403E School Teachers 1 (4 credits) SCIE Physical Science for Middle School Teachers 2 (4 credits) 1404E SCIE Life Science for Middle School 4101E Teachers 1 (4 credits) SCIE Life Science for Middle School

377 4102E Teachers 2 (4 credits) Total credits Total credits 42 32 SPED 5000K switched from requirement to prerequisite for program, which could be made up if Changes: missing; seven credits of science switched from requirement to prerequisite for program, which could be made up if missing. : Reflects that most of our professional candidates now arrive having already taken SPED 5000K or Rationale equivalent. Reflects that many of our applicants now arrive with more science credits. AIII. 6.4 Programs: Science Education: Biology, Science Education: Chemistry, Science Education: Earth Science, and Science Education: Physics Program Codes: 25865, 25867, 25869, and 25871 Hegis Codes: 0834.00 Department: Secondary Education Proposed Curriculum Changes: Courses leading to Professional Certification in Science Education: Biology, Science Education: Chemistry, Science Education: Earth Science, and Science Education: Physics Effective: Fall 2019 : Dates of Approval/Recommendation Secondary Education Department Curriculum Committee: February 1, 2018 Secondary Education Department: February 8, 2018 School of Education Curriculum: April 18, 2018 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 From To Course Cr Course # Course Cr Course # Reading and Writing across EDSE 1200E 3 EDSE 1200E Reading and Writing across the 3 Curriculum the Curriculum EDSE 3100E Teaching Science in 4 EDSE 3100E Teaching Science in Secondary 4 Schools Secondary Schools Introduction to Inclusive 3 SPED 5000K Education EDSE 7202I Master’s Project in Science 3 3 EDSE 7202I Master’s Project in Science Education Education 6 6 Science electives Science electives Science education electives 9 Science education electives 9

378 Other electives in science or education 6 Other electives in science or education 6 34 31 Total credits Total credits SPED 5000K switched from requirement which could be waived to prerequisite for program which Changes: could be made up if missing. : Reflects that most of our professional candidates now arrive having already taken EDLS 5000K or Rationale equivalent. AIII. 6.5 Program: Spanish 7-12 for Init Certif Span Tchrs Program Code: 33970 Hegis Code: 1105.01 Department: Secondary Education Proposed Curriculum Change: Changing required courses Effective: Fall 2019 : Dates of Approval/Recommendation Secondary Education Department Curriculum Committee: March 22, 2018 Secondary Education Department: March 29, 2018 School of Education Curriculum Committee: April 18, 2018 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 : Candidates seeking Spanish 7-12 Professional Certification are expected to be knowledgeable about Rationale the teaching of literacy skills in Spanish and inclusive education. The proposed changes will allow them to choose from a variety of courses based on their prior experience, interests, and needs. FROM TO Course Number Course Name Credits Course Number Course Name Credits EDCE 2600C 3 Theories of Second Language Linguistics for Teachers EDCE 5800C 3 Acquisition OR OR EDCE 5800C Theories of Second Language Acquisition EDCE 2000C Language Minority Students First and Second Language 3 EDCE 5300C 3 in Urban Schools in the U.S. Literacy Acquisition OR OR OR OR

379 EDCE 5300C EDCE 5700C Education that is Multicultural Language Minority Students OR OR in Urban Schools in the U.S. OR EDCE 6400C EDCE 5700C OR Teaching Content (Math, OR Science, Social Studies) Using Education that is Multicultural Both English and a Native EDCE 6400C Language OR OR Teaching Content (Math, EDSE 2300E Science, Social Studies) Using Both English and a Native OR Language SPED 5300K OR Development of the Secondary School: Philosophy, Urban Issues, and Curriculum Development in Secondary Schools OR Positive Approaches for Challenging Behaviors EDSE 1204E The Teaching of Reading and First and Second Language 3 EDCE 2000C 3 Literacy Acquisition Writing across the Curriculum OR in Spanish in Secondary OR Schools EDCE 2700C Literacy for Struggling OR Readers and Writers EDSE 1200E OR OR Reading and Writing across the Curriculum EDSE 1204E OR The Teaching of Reading and Writing across the Curriculum in Spanish in Secondary Schools

380 EDSE 1304E 3 EDSE 1304E The Teaching of Spanish to The Teaching of Spanish to 3 Heritage Language Learners Heritage Language Learners in in Secondary Schools Secondary Schools EDSE 6804E 3 EDSE 6804E Spanish Grammar and its 3 Spanish Grammar and its Pedagogy Pedagogy Curriculum Development in EDSE 7304E 4 EDSE 7304E Curriculum Development in 4 Secondary School Spanish Secondary School Spanish Master’s Project 3 EDSE 7204I Master’s Project 3 EDSE 7204I Introduction to Inclusive 3 3 SPED 5000K* SPED 5000K Introduction to Inclusive Education* Education OR OR SPED 5300K Positive Approaches for Challenging Behaviors SPAN V0100 History of the Spanish 3 SPAN V0100 History of the Spanish 3 Language Language Spanish Morphology and 3 SPAN V0600 Spanish Morphology and 3 SPAN V0600 Syntax Syntax SPAN ----- (Spanish Literature) 3 SPAN ----- (Spanish Literature) 3 Total Credits: Total Credits: 34 34 *Candidates who took a similar course as a requirement for their initial certification may not take SPED 5000K. AIII. 6.6 Program: Tch Students w/Dis in Childhood Educ Program Code: 25896 Hegis Code: 0808.00 Department: Leadership & Special Education Proposed Curriculum Change: Changing required courses Effective: Fall 2019 : Dates of Approval/Recommendation Leadership & Special Education Curriculum Committee: March 22, 2018 Leadership & Special Education Department: March 29, 2018 School of Education Curriculum Committee: April 18, 2018

381 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 : Candidates seeking Student with Disabilities 1-6 Initial/Professional or Professional Rationale Certification are expected to complete a student-teaching or practicum (respectively) to observe and provide instruction in an inclusive setting. The proposed changes have not changed the experience, but instead increased the credit allocation so that it is aligned with the supports necessary for an effective experience. TO FROM Course Credits Course Credits Course Course Name Number Name Number 3 SPED 5300K SPED 5300K Positive Approaches for Challenging Positive Approaches for Challenging 3 Behaviors Behaviors SPED 3300K 3 SPED 3300K Building Community in Inclusive Contexts 3 Building Community in Inclusive Contexts SPED 3600K Reading and Writing Instruction for 3 SPED 3601K Reading and Writing Instruction for 3 Students with Disabilities in Childhood Students with Disabilities in Childhood Education I Education I Reading and Writing Instruction for SPED 3700K 3 SPED 3700K Reading and Writing Instruction for 3 Students with Disabilities in Childhood Students with Disabilities in Childhood Education II Education II SPED 3800K Differentiated Instruction and 3 Differentiated Instruction and SPED 3800K 3 Assessment for Students with Disabilities Assessment for Students with Disabilities in Childhood Education I in Childhood Education I SPED 3900K Differentiated Instruction and 3 SPED 3900K Differentiated Instruction and 3 Assessment for Students with Disabilities Assessment for Students with Disabilities in Childhood Education II in Childhood Education II EDCE 5400C Methods of Teaching English to Speakers 3 Methods of Teaching English to Speakers 3 EDCE 5400C of Other Languages of Other Languages 3 SPED 6100I Working with Families of Children with SPED 6100I 3 Working with Families of Children with Disabilities Disabilities 4 Internship in Special Education Internship in Special Education 3 SPED 7701G SPED 7701G OR OR OR OR OR OR 2 Practicum in Teaching Special Education SPED 5700G Practicum in Teaching Special Education SPED 5700G 3 Special Education Student Teaching 2 SPED 7702G Seminar 2 OR OR SPED 5701G Special Education Practicum Seminar SPED 2600I 2 Content Research Seminar in Special SPED 2600I Content Research Seminar in Special 2 Education Education AND 2 2 AND AND AND SPED 2900I SPED 2900I 2 2 Seminar in Educational Research Seminar in Educational Research 2 OR 2 OR

382 OR OR EDUC 7000I EDUC 7000I Introduction to Educational Research Introduction to Educational Research AND AND AND AND EDUC 7001I EDUC 7100I Seminar in Educational Research Seminar in Educational Research Total Credits: 32-34* Total Credits: 31 *Credit totals will vary depending on whether candidates take student teaching or practicum. AIII. 6.7 Program: Teaching SWD 7-12 Generalist Program Code: 34888 Hegis Code: 0808.00 Department: Leadership & Special Education Proposed Curriculum Change: Changing required courses Effective: Fall 2019 : Dates of Approval/Recommendation Leadership & Special Education Curriculum Committee: March 22, 2018 Leadership & Special Education Department: March 29, 2018 School of Education Curriculum Committee: April 18, 2018 May 10, 2018 School of Education Faculty: : Candidates seeking Student with Disabilities 7-12 Initial/Professional Certification are expected Rationale to complete student teaching or a practicum (respectively) to observe and provide instruction in an inclusive setting. The proposed changes have not changed the experience, but instead increased the credit allocation so that it is aligned with the supports necessary for an effective experience. FROM TO Credits Course Course Name Credits Course Course Name Number Number SPED 5300K 3 3 SPED 5300K Positive Approaches for Challenging Positive Approaches for Challenging Behaviors Behaviors SPED 3300K Building Community in Inclusive 3 3 SPED 3300K Building Community in Inclusive Contexts Contexts Reading and Writing Instruction for SPED 3601K 3 3 Reading and Writing Instruction for SPED 3601K Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Education I Education I

383 SPED 3701K Reading and Writing Instruction for Reading and Writing Instruction for 3 SPED 3701K 3 Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Education II Education II Differentiated Instruction and SPED 3801K 3 SPED 3801K Differentiated Instruction and 3 Assessment for Students with Assessment for Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Education I Disabilities in Adolescent Education I SPED 3901K Differentiated Instruction and 3 SPED 3901K Differentiated Instruction and 3 Assessment for Students with Assessment for Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Education II Disabilities in Adolescent Education II Methods of Teaching English to EDCE 6900C 3 EDCE 6900C Methods of Teaching English to 3 Speakers of Other Languages Speakers of Other Languages Working with Families of Children with 3 SPED 6100I Working with Families of Children with 3 SPED 6100I Disabilities Disabilities Internship in Special Education 4 3 SPED 7701G Internship in Special Education SPED 7701G OR OR OR OR OR OR Practicum in Teaching Special 2 SPED 5700G 3 Practicum in Teaching Special SPED 5700G Education Education 2 Special Education Student Teaching SPED 7702G Seminar 2 OR OR SPED 5701G Special Education Practicum Seminar 2 Content Research Seminar in Special SPED 2600I 2 Content Research Seminar in Special SPED 2600I Education Education 2 AND 2 AND AND AND 2 SPED 2900I 2 SPED 2900I Seminar in Educational Research Seminar in Educational Research 2 OR 2 OR OR OR EDUC 7000I EDUC 7000I Introduction to Educational Research Introduction to Educational Research AND AND AND AND EDUC 7001I EDUC 7100I Seminar in Educational Research Seminar in Educational Research Total Credits: 31 Total Credits: 32-34* * Credit totals will vary depending on whether candidates take student teaching or practicum. AIII. 6.8 Program: Teaching Students w/Disabilities 1-6 Program Code: 36700 Hegis Code: 0803.00

384 Department: Leadership & Special Education Proposed Curriculum Change: Changing required courses Effective: Fall 2019 TO FROM Course Course Credits Course Credits Course Name Name Number Number Pre-requisite course: Pre-requisite course: 3 Introduction to Inclusive Education Introduction to Inclusive Education 3 SPED 5000K SPED 5000K Required courses: Required courses: Positive Approaches for Challenging SPED 5300K 3 SPED 5300K Positive Approaches for Challenging 3 Behaviors Behaviors Reading and Writing Instruction for SPED 3700K 3 Reading and Writing Instruction for SPED 3701K 3 Students with Disabilities in Childhood Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Education II Education II Differentiated Instruction and SPED 3900K 3 SPED 3901K Differentiated Instruction and 3 Assessment for Students with Disabilities Assessment for Students with Disabilities in Childhood Education II in Adolescent Education II Working with the Parents of Children 3 SPED 6100I Working with the Parents of Children with SPED 6100I 3 Disabilities with Disabilities Practicum in Teaching Special Education 3 SPED 5700G Practicum in Teaching Special Education 2 SPED 5700G 2 SPED 5701G Special Education Practicum Seminar 15-18 Total Credits: 16-19 Total Credits: Rationale : Candidates seeking Student with Disabilities 1-6 Advanced Certificate are expected to complete a practicum to observe and provide instruction in an inclusive setting. The proposed changes have not changed the experience, but instead increased the credit allocation so that it is aligned with the supports necessary for an effective experience. Dates of Approval/Recommendation : Leadership & Special Education Curriculum Committee: March 22, 2018 Leadership & Special Education Department: March 29, 2018 School of Education Curriculum Committee: April 18, 2018. School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 AIII. 6.9 Program: Teaching Students w/Disabilities 7-12 Program Code: 36701

385 Hegis Code: 0804.00 Department: Leadership & Special Education Proposed Curriculum Change: Changing required courses Effective: Fall 2019 : Dates of Approval/Recommendation Leadership & Special Education Curriculum Committee: March 22, 2018 Leadership & Special Education Department: March 29, 2018 School of Education Curriculum Committee: April 18, 2018 May 10, 2018 School of Education Faculty: : Candidates seeking Student with Disabilities 7-12 Advanced Certificate are expected to complete Rationale a practicum to observe and provide instruction in an inclusive setting. The proposed changes have not changed the experience, but instead increased the credit allocation so that it is aligned with the supports necessary for an effective experience. FROM TO Credits Course Course Credits Course Course Number Name Number Name Pre-requisite course: Pre-requisite course: SPED 5000K Introduction to Inclusive Education SPED 5000K Introduction to Inclusive Education 3 3 Required courses: Required courses: SPED 5300K Positive Approaches for Challenging 3 3 SPED 5300K Positive Approaches for Challenging Behaviors Behaviors Reading and Writing Instruction for SPED 3701K 3 SPED 3701K Reading and Writing Instruction for 3 Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Education II Education II Differentiated Instruction and SPED 3901K 3 SPED 3901K Differentiated Instruction and 3 Assessment for Students with Disabilities Assessment for Students with Disabilities in Adolescent Education II in Adolescent Education II Practicum in Teaching Special Education 3 SPED 5700G Practicum in Teaching Special Education 2 SPED 5700G 2 SPED 5701G Special Education Practicum Seminar Total Credits: 12-15 Total Credits: 13-16 AIII. 6.10 Program: Alt Crt: Science Ed: Chemistry (Trans B) Program Code: 25876

386 Hegis Code: 0899.50 Department: Secondary Education Proposed Curriculum Change: Courses leading to Initial/Professional Certification in Secondary Chemistry Education, Transitional B Certificate Option Effective: Fall 2019 Dates of Approval/Recommendation : Secondary Education Department Curriculum Committee: February 1, 2018 Secondary Education Department: February 8, 2018 School of Education Curriculum: April 18, 2018 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 From To Cr Course # Course Course # Course Cr Issues for Secondary School EDSE 7600A 2 EDSE 7600A 2 Issues for Secondary School Teachers: Second Language Teachers: Second Language Acquisition and Literacy Acquisition and Literacy Reading and Writing across 3 3 EDSE 1200E EDSE 1200E Reading and Writing across the Curriculum the Curriculum Teaching Science in 4 EDSE 3100E Teaching Science in Secondary 4 EDSE 3100E Schools Secondary Schools Adolescent Learning of 1 1 EDSE 3105E Adolescent Learning of Science EDSE 3105E Education Science Education Curriculum and Instruction in 3 EDSE 3901I EDSE 3901I Curriculum and Instruction in 3 Science Education Science Education SPED 5000K Introduction to Inclusive 3 3 SPED 5000K Introduction to Inclusive Education Education Supervised Teaching at the 0 EDSE 7602G Supervised Teaching at the 0 EDSE 7602G Middle and Secondary Level Middle and Secondary Level Seminar on Teaching in 2 2 EDSE 7603G Seminar on Teaching in EDSE 7603G Secondary Schools Secondary Schools Master’s Project in Science 3 EDSE 7202I EDSE 7202I Master’s Project in Science 3 Education Education Modern Concepts in 3 CHEME Chemistry 1 7100E Modern Concepts in CHEME 3 7200E Chemistry 2 SCIE 4105E Principles of Atomic Theory 3 SCIE 4104E Science in the Urban 3 Environment

387 Science electives 6 Science electives 6 33 Total credits 33 Total credits CHEME 7100E and CHEME 7200E replaced by SCIE 4104E and SCIE 4105E Changes: Rationale : Updates required science course in recognition of changes to state high school curricula. AIII. 7 Program Name Change Program: M Arch II Program Code: 26613 HEGIS Code: 0202.00 Department: Architecture Effective: Fall 2018 From To Program Name Program Name Master of Science in Architecture Master of Architecture II FALL SAME ARCH 91102: Advanced Studio 6 ARCH 91202: Studio Seminar 1 3 ARCH 00000: - ELECTIVE 3 ARCH 00000: - ELECTIVE 3 ARCH 00000: - ELECTIVE 3 SPRING ARCH 92102: Advanced Studio (Thesis option by application) 6 ARCH 92202: Studio Seminar 2 3 ARCH 00000: - ELECTIVE 3 ARCH 00000: - ELECTIVE 3 ARCH 00000: - ELECTIVE 3 SUMMER

388 ARCH 93103: Advanced Studio 6 ARCH 00000: - ELECTIVE 3 ARCH 00000: - ELECTIVE 3 Total Credits: 48 Rationale According to NAAB's Procedures for Accreditation, Professional Degree Programs in Architecture, Condition II.2.2., Professional Degrees and Curriculum, the title Master of Architecture will be reserved for accredited programs. NAAB is requiring that all post-professional, non-accredited degree programs using the title Master of Architecture such as M. Arch. II, initiate the appropriate institutional processes for changing its title by June 30, 2018. The title Master of Science in Architecture has become the standard naming classification as M Arch II is phased out. This change will not impact currently enrolled students, and the curriculum will remain the same. AIII. 8 Program: BS in Biotechnology Department: Biology Program Code: 36008, 35441/39569 Effective: Spring 2018 From To Crs Name Crs Course Number Name Course Number Allowable Courses for Upper Level Biology Elective credit towards the Biology major. Math and Science Requirements Math and Science Requirements 4 General Chemistry I CHEM 10301 4 CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I General Chemistry II 4 CHEM 10401 4 General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 3 CHEM 26100 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 26100 3 Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2 CHEM 26200 2 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I CHEM 26200 I 3 Organic Chemistry II CHEM 26300 3 Organic Chemistry II CHEM 26300 3 CHEM 32002 Biochemistry I CHEM 32002 Biochemistry I 3 4 PHYS 20300- General Physics General Physics 4 PHYS 20300- 20400 20400 MATH 20500 Elements of Calculus 4

389 MATH 20500 4 Elements of Calculus 4 Elements of Calculus and MATH 20900 4 MATH 20900 Elements of Calculus and Statistics Statistics OR OR 3 MATH 20100 Calculus I MATH 20100 Calculus I 3 3 MATH 20200 Calculus II Calculus II MATH 20200 3 Introduction to Probability and 4 MATH 17300 MATH 17300 4 Introduction to Probability Statistics and Statistics OR OR 3 MATH 20100 Calculus I Calculus I 3 MATH 20100 Calculus II MATH 20200 3 Calculus II MATH 20200 3 Calculus III 4 MATH 20300 4 Calculus III MATH 20300 Subtotal: 34-37 Subtotal: 34-37 Biology and Major Elective Requirements for Biotechnology Biology and Major Elective Requirements for Biotechnology Required courses: Required courses: BIO 10100 Biological Foundations I 4 4 BIO 10200 Biological Foundations II 4 BIO 10100 Biological Foundations I Introduction to Genetics BIO 20600 4 4 Biological Foundations II BIO 10200 Cell and Molecular Biology BIO 22900 4 Introduction to Genetics BIO 20600 4 5 Laboratory in Biotechnology BIO 48300 Cell and Molecular Biology BIO 22900 4 BIO 48300 Laboratory in Biotechnology 5 Six credits of BIO 31000 1-3 Independent Study Six credits of OR BIO 30100- Honors I-III 3 1-3 Independent Study BIO 31000 30300 OR BIO 30100- Honors I-III 3 BIO 30100-30300: Research credits may be taken in 30300 Chemistry or Physics (CHEM/PHYS 3100X OR 30100- 302000-30300) BIO 30100-30300: Research credits may be taken in Chemistry or Physics (CHEM/PHYS 3100X OR 30100- Additional Advanced Electives (11 credits) 302000-30300) Electives may include Additional Advanced Electives (11 credits) SCI 28000 3 Bioinfo & Biomol Sys Electives may include BIO 35000 Advanced Microbiology 4 BIO 35500 Introduction to Analysis of 4 3 Bioinfo & Biomol Sys SCI 28000

390 Scientific Literature Using BIO 35000 4 Advanced Microbiology CREATE 4 Introduction to Analysis of BIO 35500 3 Developmental Biology BIO 37500 Scientific Literature Using 4 Eukaryotic Genetics BIO 38000 CREATE BIO 41000 3 Cell Development and Cellular BIO 37500 Developmental Biology 3 Senescence 4 Eukaryotic Genetics BIO 38000 4 Virology BIO 42000 3 Cell Development and Cellular BIO 41000 BIO 42500 Cancer Biology 3 Senescence 5 Physical Biochemistry CHEM 33500 4 Virology BIO 42000 CHEM 40600 3 Environmental Chemistry Cancer Biology BIO 42500 3 3 CHEM 48005 Biochemistry II CHEM 33500 Physical Biochemistry 5 PHYS 31500 3 Medical Physics Environmental Chemistry CHEM 40600 3 PHYS 42200 3 Biophysics Biochemistry II 3 CHEM 48005 PHYS 52200 Biomedical Physics 3 3 Medical Physics PHYS 31500 CHEM 48206 Journey to the Center of the 3 3 PHYS 42200 Biophysics Cell Biomedical Physics 3 PHYS 52200 Subtotal: 38 Subtotal: 38 Rationale: The proposed change allows an additional upper elective for our biology majors that is taught at the level of academic expectation we require. The course material has met the requirements of the department to count for biology credit. AIII. 9 AIII. 10 Program: BS in Math in Scientific and Industrial Applications HEGIS Code: 1703.00 Program Code: 86474, 60120 From To BS in Applied Mathematics BS in Math in Scientific and Industrial Applications Rationale: The major has changed considerably since the time the original name was chosen. At that time, applied mathematics was centered on scientific applications and our program focused on them. Based on the evolving interests of our students and trends in the discipline, our current applied major emphasizes finance and statistics. As such, the old title is no longer descriptive of the program. The desired new name is a general one more commonly in use in today’s world, and is not only appropriate to our current program, but will remain so into the future as our program continues to strive to remain relevant.

391 In addition, the name change is desired because everyone -- faculty, students, academic counselors, and administrators - refers to the program as the "applied math" major. The change of name will thus bring the formal name into conformance with universal current usage. No changes are being proposed to the requirements of the major itself. Rationale: This item is a correction to the Nov 2017 AIII. 1 Chancellor’s University Report. The Program code for the Macauley Honors College version of the degree was omitted. This item is including the previously omitted MHC program code. AIV. 1 Career [x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial PHYS 36100 Course Number Mathematical Methods in Physics Course Title Prerequisite Physics 20700 and 20800; Mathematics 39100 and 39200. Co-requisite None Hours 4 Credits 4 Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC) Survey of advanced mathematical methods in physics. Linear vector spaces and Catalog Description operators. Sturm-Liouville theory, series solutions and special functions. Classification of partial differential equations, separation of variables, Green’s functions. Complex variables. Integral transforms. Probability and statistics General Education [ x ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale At present, physics undergraduates receive inadequate training in applied mathematics needed in advanced physics. The physics department offers no such course. While the material is taught by the math department, students would have to take a number of existing math courses at different levels to cover the needed topics. In particular, PHYS

392 36100 will be a co-requisite for PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics I and pre-requisite for PHYS 55200 Quantum Mechanics II. AIV. 2 Effective: Fall 2018 Career [x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial PHYS 36100 Course Number Course Title Mathematical Methods in Physics Physics 20700 and 20800; Mathematics 39100 and 39200. Prerequisite None Co-requisite Hours 4 Credits 4 Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC) Survey of advanced mathematical methods in physics. Linear vector spaces and Catalog Description operators. Sturm-Liouville theory, series solutions and special functions. Classification of partial differential equations, separation of variables, Green’s functions. Complex variables. Integral transforms. Probability and statistics General Education [ x ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale At present, physics undergraduates receive inadequate training in applied mathematics needed in advanced physics. The physics department offers no such course. While the material is taught by the math department, students would have to take a number of existing math courses at different levels to cover the needed topics. In particular, PHYS 36100 will be a co-requisite for PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics I and pre-requisite for PHYS 55200 Quantum Mechanics II. AIV. 3.1

393 Effective: Fall 2018 Career [ ] Undergraduate [ x] Graduate [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level DSE I1020 Course Number Course Title Introduction to Data Science Prerequisite intro to programming CSc10200/10300 or equivalent, probability and statistics, calculus, linear algebra, discrete mathematics. None Corequisite Hours 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) This course will present a survey to Data Science and introduce some of the core data Catalog Description science tools. While some programming experience is required for the course, the course will include a rapid introduction to Data Science programming and the stack of tools needed to process, visualize and analyze data stack with a language such as R or Python. Students will be given a high-level survey of data engineering, visual analytics, applied statistics, machine learning, and big data. The course will illustrate this bringing them through real data sets and case studies. General Education [ ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale New Program AIV. 3.2 Effective: Fall 2018 Career [ ] Undergraduate [ x] Graduate

394 Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial DSE I1030 Course Number Applied Statistics Course Title Prerequisite intro to programming CSc10200/10300 or equivalent, probability and statistics, calculus, linear algebra, discrete mathematics. Corequisite None 3 Hours 3 Credits Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description This course will examine real data sets from a variety of domains, examine multiple models for these data sets, assess the validity of modeling assumptions, and determine the strength of conclusions that can be drawn. Topics to be covered include: 1) inferential statistics (such as hypothesis testing and estimation in parametric and nonparametric settings, conditional inference, resampling methods, cross-validation, and multiple hypothesis testing); 2) experimental design (analysis of variance) 3) Bayesian statistics (such as prior distributions, posterior and predictive inference, and Bayesian model comparison); 4) Regression and prediction (such as elements of linear and nonparametric regression, assessment of variable importance, introduction to causal inference). The course will include project-based learning and use a statistical programming language such as R or python. A strong emphasis will be placed on the critical analysis of modeling assumptions in real-world settings. General Education [ ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale New program. AIV. 3.3 Effective: Fall 2018

395 Career [] Undergraduate [x ] Graduate [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level DSE I2100 Course Number Course Title Applied Machine Learning and Data Mining Prerequisite DSE I1020, Intro to Data Science and DSE I1030, Applied Statistics, or equivalents. Corequisite None 3 Hours 3 Credits Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description Introduction to machine learning, data mining, and statistical pattern recognition. Topics include: 1) Supervised learning (parametric/non-parametric algorithms, support vector machines, kernels, neural networks, deep learning), 2) Unsupervised learning (clustering, non-parametric techniques, dimensionality reduction); 3) Best practices in machine learning (bias/variance theory, model selection and evaluation, resampling). In this class, you will learn about the most effective machine learning techniques, and gain practice implementing them and getting them to work for yourself. More importantly, you'll learn about not only the theoretical underpinnings of learning, but also gain the practical know- how needed to quickly and powerfully apply these techniques to new problems. [ ] Not Applicable General Education Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale New program AIV. 3.4 Effective: Fall 2018 Career [ ] Undergraduate [x ] Graduate Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

396 Course Number DSE I2400 Data Engineering: Infrastructure and Applications Course Title DSE I1020, Intro to Data Science and DSE I1030, Applied Statistics, or equivalents. Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description This course will train students in the handling of big data sources derived from various environments including traditional business activities, web-based transactions and social media. The course will also discuss the range of data formats, application types and emerging approaches in data integration. As part of this it will introduce the range of research topics and mentors participating in the Data Science and Engineering Program and offering capstone project opportunities. The course will begin with a discussion of high-end traditional database systems focusing on query processing, crash recovery, and transaction and concurrency control. This will be followed by a detailed look at object- relational databases, distributed and federated databases, and cloud-based data- warehousing. NoSql databases (e.g., Cassandra and Neo4) and parallel data analysis tools (e.g., Hadoop, Spark) will be introduced. The main emphasis of the course is hands-on training in state-of-the-art software development environments. Project based system development work will be an essential component of the course. General Education [ ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale New Program AIV. 3.5 Effective: Fall 2018 Career [] Undergraduate [ x] Graduate

397 Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial DSE I2700 Course Number Visual Analytics Course Title Prerequisite DSE I1020, Intro to Data Science and DSE 1030, Applied Statistics, or equivalents. The course also requires students have programming experience such as CSc 10200/10300 or equivalent. Corequisite None 3 Hours 3 Credits Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description This course will give an overview of visual analytics as well as the overlapping fields of information and scientific visualization. Students will learn to programmatically process and analyze data with Python libraries widely used in statistics, engineering, science and finance. We will cover the design of effective visualizations. Students will learn to build data visualizations directly using a variety of data visualization libraries such as matplotlib, seaborn, and bokeh (Python) and interactive web-based visual analytics using JavaScript and D3. Project groups of students will each propose, design and build a visualization of a data set. The goals of the course are for students to: (1) Recognize the appropriate applications and value of visualizations; (2) Critically evaluate visualizations and suggest improvements and refinements; (3) Apply a structured design process to create effective visualizations; (4) Use programmatic tools to scrape, clean, and process data; (5) Use principles of human perception and cognition in visual analytics design; (6) Use visual analytics and statistics tools to explore data; and (7) Create web-based interactive visualizations. General Education [ ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale New Program

398 AIV. 3.6 Effective: Fall 2018 [] Undergraduate [x ] Graduate Career [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number DSE I2450 Course Title Big Data and Scalable Computation Prerequisite DSE I1020, Intro to Data Science and DSE I1030, Applied Statistics, or equivalents. None Corequisite 3 Hours Credits 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description The course aims to provide a broad understanding of big data and current technologies in managing and processing them with a focus on the urban environment. With storage and networking getting significant cheaper and faster, big data sets could easily reach the hands of data enthusiasts with just a few mouse clicks. These enthusiasts could be policy makers, government employees or managers, who would like to draw insights and (business) value from big data. Thus, it is crucial for big data to be made available to the non-expert users in such a way that they can process the data without the need of a supercomputing expert. One such approach is to build big data programming frameworks that can deal with big data in as close a paradigm as the way it deals with “small data.” Also, such a framework should be as simple as possible, even if not as efficient as custom-designed parallel solutions. Users should expect that if their code works within these frameworks for small data, it will also work for big data. General topics of this course include: big data ecosystems, parallel and streaming programming model, MapReduce, Hadoop, Spark, Pig, and NoSQL solutions. Hands-on labs and exercises will be offered throughout to bolster the knowledge learned in each module. General Education [ ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society

399 [ ] Scientific World Rationale New program. AIV. 3.7 Effective: Fall 2018 [] Undergraduate [ x] Graduate Career Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Course Number DSE I9800 Capstone Project Course Title DSE I1020, Intro to Data Science and DSE I1030, Applied Statistics, DSE I1100, Machine Prerequisite Learning, DSE I2400, Data Engineering. Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description A capstone project is experimental project under the direction of a faculty advisor. All students will register and submit a project report after one semester to receive a grade. Students may work together on the same data sets and challenges but must establish separate subprojects, and submit individual reports/thesis. These independent study projects should involve an analysis of a data set in an application field using statistical learning/data mining techniques such as non-linear regression, supervised/unsupervised learning, dimension reduction, reinforcement learning, collaborative filtering or big-data methodology such as map-reduce/spark. General Education [ ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World

400 Rationale New program. AIV. 3.8 Effective: Fall 2018 Career [] Undergraduate [ x] Graduate Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial DSE I9900 Course Number Course Title Capstone Thesis DSE I1021, DSE I1031, Applied statistics, DSE I1100, Machine Learning, DSE I2400, Data Prerequisite Engineering, DSE 9800, Capstone Project Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 6 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description Students, with approval from their mentor, and the program, may register for a two- semester independent study (capstone thesis) with similar specifications to DSE I9800 Capstone Project but of substantially larger scope. Students will be required to submit a project report to the program at the end of the first semester in addition to the Thesis at the end of the course. General Education [ ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale New program AIV. 4 Effective: Spring 2019

401 Career [x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 10100 Course Title Professional Foundations Prerequisite NSS 100 Corequisite None 1 hour / week Hours Credits 0 [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Self-reflection, critical thinking, and writing intensive (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.) Catalog Description MED10100 is focused on individual student development. Students are challenged to enhance their self-esteem and personal development, enhance their intellectual potential, understand their moral and academic responsibilities, reinforce their wellness habits, and appreciate the need for diversity and inclusion in our CSOM community and society at large. Several self-reflective writings required. General Education [x ] Not Applicable Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale MED10100 will be the second course (NSS-100 being the first) of a 5-year longitudinal curriculum that will address a host of personal development issues including self-awareness and reflection skills, professionalism, successful learning strategies, self-care and wellness, diversity and inclusion, financial literacy, career development, leadership development, and advocacy. Currently, some of these issues are addressed at various ad hoc meetings over the course of various semesters, or as single topics integrated in ongoing courses, while others are not sufficiently addressed. Additionally, an External Advisory Panel invited to assess our strengths and challenges regarding issues involving diversity and inclusion (D&I) recommended that our students receive substantially more instruction in this area – and while several aspects of D&I are offered in some of our courses, greater self- reflective work in this area is needed. We are developing an integrated longitudinal course that will allow us to accommodate these topics which are currently introduced in differing points of our program. Other medical schools that have instituted somewhat similar longitudinal courses to both address students’ development needs and the requirements of the LCME (accrediting body) have reported successful results. This course will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. AIV. 5

402 Program Code: 0127 Effective: Spring 2019 [ ] Undergraduate [x ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial MATH B4500 Course Number Course Title Dynamical Systems 2 Prerequisite MATH A4500 or MATH 44500 or Departmental permission Co-requisite None Hours 4 4 Credits [ ] Yes [ x ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description Topics will be chosen from the areas of ergodic theory, topological dynamics, differentiable dynamics, complex dynamics and symbolic dynamics. [ x ] Not Applicable General Education Component [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale The department currently offers a first semester graduate introductory course in Dynamical Systems (Math A4500) which has been highly successful in attracting advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Students have voiced strong support to be able to study more advanced topics in this area. This course will broaden the range of B-level offerings which will provide more flexibility to fulfill the B-level program requirement. Dynamical Systems is a core mathematical area for our graduate program. AIV. 6.1 Effective: Fall, 2018 Undergraduate Graduate Career X Ph.D. Developmental Compensatory Regular X Academic Level Remedial Course Number PSY 7000J Course Title History of Psychology

403 Prerequisite None None Corequisite Hours 3 3 Credits Liberal Arts Yes No X Not Applicable General Education Flexible x Component College Option World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity Required Creative Expression English Composition Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World This course provides an overview of the history of psychology from ancient times to the Catalog Description present day. The aim of the course is to document the historical origins of the assumptions about science and psychology that shaped the development of twentieth century scientific psychology, and to identify conceptual continuities and discontinuities in the historical development of theories of human psychology and behavior. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was entitled PSYC 70000 AIV. 6.2 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate Graduate Career X Ph.D. Academic Level X Developmental Compensatory Remedial Regular PSY 7050J Course Number Statistical Methods in Psychology I Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 X No Yes Liberal Arts General Education Not Applicable X Flexible Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society

404 Scientific World Science Catalog Description Statistics I focuses primarily on learning the conditions under which one would employ different statistical analyses, how to select the relevant analysis and how to analyze the data under study. Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 70500 Rationale AIV. 6.3 Effective: Fall 2018 Graduate X Ph.D. Career Undergraduate Compensatory Academic Level X Remedial Regular Developmental PSY 7770J Course Number Course Title Practicum in Interviewing and Personality Appraisal I Prerequisite None Corequisite None 3 Hours 3 Credits Liberal Arts X Yes No Flexible X Not Applicable General Education Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression English Composition Individual and Society Mathematics Science Scientific World This course is designed to introduce clinical psychology doctoral graduate students to Catalog Description the psychodiagnostic and therapeutic skills of the practicing clinical psychologist. The focus will be on mastering the art of interviewing and the initial phases of clinical processes with an emphasis on the psychological evaluation and diagnosis of adult patients including an understanding of the multicultural context and social location of the patient. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 77700 AIV. 6.4 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate X Graduate Career Ph.D. Academic Level X Regular Compensatory Developmental Remedial

405 Course Number PSY 8410J Clinical Practicum I Course Title Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 Yes X Liberal Arts No Not Applicable Flexible General Education X Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science This course is designed to help students to develop their skills as psychotherapists. We Catalog Description will work on the ongoing challenge of diagnosing adult patients (and utilizing diagnosis in treating them), and we will discuss progress and how to handle lack of progress with treatment plans. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 84100 AIV. 6.5 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Graduate X Ph.D. Undergraduate X Developmental Academic Level Compensatory Remedial Regular PSY 7512J Course Number Course Title Biological Basis of Behavior Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts X Yes No Flexible X Not Applicable General Education Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity

406 Creative Expression English Composition Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science This course aims to provide an exposition of research and theory in the biological bases Catalog Description of normal and abnormal behavior. A survey of literature will span from nerve cells, the organization and functioning of the nervous system, to the neurobiological systems that underlie sensation, motor behavior, emotion, cognition, and self-other representation, and social behavior. Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 75102 Rationale AIV. 6.6 Effective: Fall 2018 Graduate Career Undergraduate Ph.D. X Compensatory Regular Developmental Academic Level Remedial X PSY 8392J Course Number Course Title Therapeutic interventions: cognitive behavioral approaches Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 X No Liberal Arts Yes General Education Not Applicable X Flexible Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World This course will introduce students to the assessment and cognitive-behavioral treatment Catalog Description of mood and anxiety disorders. Students will gain familiarity with the diagnostic criteria for mood and anxiety disorders using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fifth Edition (DSM-5) as well as semi-structured clinical interviews and self-report measures for these disorders. Students will learn about and gain skills in CBT case conceptualization, treatment planning and treatment implementation. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 83902 AIV. 6.7

407 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Graduate X Ph.D. Undergraduate X Developmental Compensatory Remedial Academic Level Regular Course Number PSY 7780J Course Title Practicum in Interviewing and Personality Appraisal II Prerequisite None Corequisite None 3 Hours 3 Credits Yes X No Liberal Arts X Not Applicable General Education Flexible Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Individual and Society Mathematics Science Scientific World The purpose of this course is to teach the essentials of child evaluation and assessment. Catalog Description These are real world skills that are critical in making decisions regarding treatment, school placement, testing, and medication, and involve developing your skills in parent interviewing, child play sessions, formulation, and diagnosis. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 77800 AIV. 6.8 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Regular Compensatory Developmental Academic Level Remedial X Course Number PSY 8420J Course Title Clinical Practicum II Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 X Yes Liberal Arts No

408 General Education Not Applicable Flexible X Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Individual and Society Mathematics Science Scientific World This is a practicum on working in therapy with children and adolescents Its aims are to: Catalog Description improve your ability to link diagnostic considerations to the process and content of your to better understand the meaning and nature of a child’s play, both in work with children; terms of its diagnostic meaning and in its link to developmental/cognitive considerations and to be better able to link work in the therapy room to work with parents and school personnel. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 84200 AIV. 6.9 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Graduate X Ph.D. Undergraduate Remedial Compensatory Academic Level Developmental X Regular Course Number PSY 7113J Cognitive/Affective Aspects of Behavior Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 3 3 Credits Liberal Arts X No Yes General Education X Not Applicable Flexible Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science The course is designed to provide clinical graduate students in psychology with an Catalog Description overview of the history, theory, and measurement of human cognition and affect from a basic science perspective. The focus of this course will be the basic sciences of human cognition and emotion, how these two domains of human functioning can mutually influence each other, and how they can be harnessed to inform us about

409 psychopathology. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 71103 AIV. 6.10 Effective: Fall 2018 Graduate X Ph.D. Career Undergraduate Compensatory Developmental X Remedial Academic Level Regular Course Number PSY 9000J Dissertation supervision Course Title Prerequisite All required courses None Corequisite 3 Hours Credits 3 Yes No Liberal Arts X General Education X Not Applicable Flexible Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science Upon attaining candidacy, students register for this course while completing their doctoral thesis Catalog Description Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 90000 AIV. 6.11 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate Graduate Career X Ph.D. Academic Level Regular Compensatory Developmental Remedial X Course Number PSY 8033J Course Title Doctoral dissertation seminar Prerequisite PSY 7800J Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3

410 Liberal Arts No Yes X General Education X Not Applicable Flexible Component College Option World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity Required English Composition Creative Expression Individual and Society Mathematics Science Scientific World This course is designed to support advanced graduate students in clinical psychology in the development of their Catalog Description dissertations. The course will review the research process, from defining a research population to disseminating findings. Additionally, the course will touch upon the key components of a research question, the fundamentals of research methodology, and research ethics. These skills are critical to becoming independent researchers. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 80303 AIV. 6.12 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Career Developmental Compensatory Academic Level X Regular Remedial Course Number PSY 8440J Diversity issues in clinical psychology Course Title Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3 3 Credits X Yes No Liberal Arts Flexible X Not Applicable General Education Component World Cultures College Option US Experience in its Diversity Required English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World This doctoral-level graduate course is designed to enhance the level at which clinical Catalog Description psychologists in training consider and discuss pertinent topics affecting the mental health of ethnic minority populations. Course material will focus largely on populations of African, Latino, and Asian descent, highlighting the variability that lies within these groups

411 Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 84400 AIV. 6.13 Effective: Fall 2018 Graduate X Ph.D. Career Undergraduate Remedial Developmental X Regular Academic Level Compensatory PSY 8500J Course Number Course Title Evidence based psychodynamic treatment None Prerequisite None Corequisite 3 Hours 3 Credits Liberal Arts X Yes No General Education X Not Applicable Flexible Component World Cultures College Option US Experience in its Diversity Required Creative Expression English Composition Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science This doctoral level clinical course will focus on psychodynamic evidence based Catalog Description treatments. Students will be exposed to current evidence based treatment and assessment models for personality disorders, affective disorders and panic disorder. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 85000 AIV. 6.14 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Career Regular X Developmental Academic Level Remedial Compensatory Course Number PSY 8293J Course Title Evidence based assessment/treatment of addictive disorders Prerequisite PSY 8500J Corequisite None Hours 3

412 Credits 3 X No Liberal Arts Yes General Education X Not Applicable Flexible Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World The aim of this doctoral course is to introduce clinical psychology graduate students to Catalog Description the basic concepts relevant to understanding the process of treatment for addictive behaviors. The course will review modern theoretical viewpoints of addictions including neurobiological, harm-reduction and stages of change models and contrast these with psychodynamic models of addiction. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 82903 AIV. 6.15 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Regular Compensatory Academic Level Remedial X Developmental PSY 8441J Course Number Course Title Health of lesbians/gays/bisexuals Prerequisite PSY 8440J Corequisite None 3 Hours 3 Credits Liberal Arts X Yes No Flexible X Not Applicable General Education Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals are a neglected segment of the population Catalog Description whose health has only recently been investigated systematically. The health of LGB

413 individuals requires attention, given reports of poor mental and physical health. This course will examine the mental and physical health of LGB individuals. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 84401 AIV. 6.16 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Compensatory Developmental X Remedial Academic Level Regular Course Number PSY 8020J Course Title Independent psychological research PSY 7800J Prerequisite None Corequisite 3 Hours Credits 3 Liberal Arts Yes No X X Not Applicable Flexible General Education Component College Option World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity Required Creative Expression English Composition Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science Independent study on a pre-dissertation research topic with core faculty member Catalog Description Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 80200 AIV. 6.17 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate Graduate Career X Ph.D. Academic Level Regular Compensatory Developmental Remedial X Course Number PSY 8297J Course Title Integrative foundations of psychotherapy Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3

414 Credits 3 Yes No Liberal Arts X Not Applicable General Education Flexible X Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression English Composition Individual and Society Mathematics Scientific World Science The overall aim of the course is to develop an understanding of the way the key Catalog Description approaches to psychotherapy in our field have evolved, to evaluate their often unstated assumptions, their basis in clinical observation and systematic research, and their compatibilities and incompatibilities. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 82907 AIV. 6.18 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Compensatory Academic Level X Developmental Regular Remedial Course Number PSY 7203J Lifespan Development Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts X Yes No X General Education Flexible Not Applicable Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World This course will focus on the development of the individual across the lifespan. Multiple Catalog Description strands come together across a range of developmental stages to create the individual, and thus, psychological development must always be seen in the context of an

415 individual’s biology, her unique relational environment, her cognitive capacities, her social world, her community, and her culture. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 72030 AIV. 6.19 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Compensatory Developmental X Remedial Academic Level Regular Course Number PSY 7611J Course Title Neuropsychological Assessment PSY 7661J, PSY 7600J Prerequisite None Corequisite 3 Hours Credits 3 Liberal Arts Yes No X X Not Applicable Flexible General Education Component College Option World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity Required Creative Expression English Composition Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science This doctoral level course is the third in the diagnostic sequence and provides a broad . Catalog Description overview of the assessment of the psychological and educational problems encountered by children with learning disabilities during their inevitably altered developmental trajectory. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 76101 AIV. 6.20 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Career Compensatory Academic Level X Developmental Regular Remedial Course Number PSY 7713J Course Title Ethical/Legal Issues for Psychologists Prerequisite None

416 Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 X Yes No Liberal Arts X General Education Flexible Not Applicable Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression English Composition Individual and Society Mathematics Science Scientific World The purpose of the course is to introduce students to a comprehensive range of ethical Catalog Description and legal issues in the field of clinical psychology. We shall discuss various ethical systems in the history of western philosophy; bioethics; and research, clinical and professional ethics, as represented by the APA code of ethics. Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 77103 Rationale AIV. 6.21 Effective: Fall 2018 X Graduate Career Ph.D. Undergraduate Academic Level Compensatory X Developmental Regular Remedial Course Number PSY 7410J Psychoanalytic theories Course Title Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3 3 Credits X Yes No Liberal Arts Flexible X Not Applicable General Education Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World

417 This doctoral level course serves as an in depth introduction to the work of Sigmund Catalog Description Freud, using primary source material as well as supplemental texts. It will trace the development of the tenets of Freudian theory (i.e. the centrality of instincts and the hegemony of internal as opposed to external determinants of experience, the discovery of the unconscious and varied modes of representation, the primacy of memory in our apprehension of the present) and examine how current research and practice approach these areas. Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 74100 Rationale AIV. 6.22 Effective: Fall 2018 Graduate X Ph.D. Career Undergraduate Compensatory Regular Developmental Academic Level Remedial X PSY 7661J Course Number Psychodiagnostics Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 X Yes No Liberal Arts X Not Applicable Flexible General Education Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World This is the first semester of a three-semester-long approach to the psychological Catalog Description understanding of adult and child patients through psychological testing. The methods of clinical inference and the purpose of synthesizing the inferences into a coherent portrait of someone will hopefully be of use throughout one’s professional career. It is certainly, both historically and heuristically, a hallmark of a clinical psychologist's training. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 76601 AIV. 6.23 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D.

418 Academic Level X Developmental Compensatory Remedial Regular PSY 7600J Course Number Course Title Psychometric Methods PSY 7661J Prerequisite Corequisite None 3 Hours Credits 3 Yes No Liberal Arts X X Not Applicable Flexible General Education Component College Option World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity Required English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World Standardized measures are used across all areas of psychological research, and Catalog Description provide a critical lens through which we can observe human nature—from diagnostic to characterological, neurocognitive to unconscious, intellectual, social and cultural. This second course in the testing sequence exposes doctoral-level clinical psychology students to methods by which psychologists strive to conceptualize human behavior and individual differences in terms such as skills, aptitudes, attitudes, values, personality, and intelligence. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 76000 AIV. 6.24 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Compensatory Academic Level X Developmental Regular Remedial Course Number PSY 7560J Course Title Psychopathology II Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts X Yes No

419 General Education Not Applicable Flexible X Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science This course in Child Psychopathology is organized against the backdrop of 1) Catalog Description developmental factors, including level of emotional and cognitive/language functioning, capacities for affect and self regulation, 2) risk factors, including biological, temperamental, neurodevelopmental, and genetic factors, as well as environmental factors such as parental psychopathology, family disruption, abuse, neglect, and other forms of trauma, 3) protective factors, and, finally, 4) cultural and other contextual factors. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 75600 AIV. 6.25 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Regular Compensatory Academic Level Remedial X Developmental PSY 7550J Course Number Course Title Psychopathology I None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 3 3 Credits X No Yes Liberal Arts X Not Applicable Flexible General Education Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World The aim of this doctoral course is to introduce clinical psychology graduate students to Catalog Description the basic concepts relevant to understanding psychopathology in adult patients. The course examines the clinical, research, and theoretical literature of a range of Axis I and Axis II disorders including personality disorders, affective disorders and psychotic

420 disorder. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 75500 AIV. 6.26 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Graduate X Ph.D. Undergraduate Regular Developmental X Remedial Academic Level Compensatory Course Number PSY 7800J Course Title Quantitative methods in psychology None Prerequisite None Corequisite 3 Hours Credits 3 Liberal Arts Yes No X X Not Applicable Flexible General Education Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science This doctoral course is designed to introduce graduate students in clinical psychology to Catalog Description the research process from the beginning to the end, while providing an overview of clinically relevant behavioral research method designs in psychology. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 78000 AIV. 6.27 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate Career Graduate X Ph.D. Remedial Compensatory Regular Developmental Academic Level X Course Number PSY 7339J Course Title Research Practicum in Clinical Psychology Prerequisite None Corequisite None

421 Hours 3 3 Credits Liberal Arts No Yes X General Education X Flexible Not Applicable Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression English Composition Individual and Society Mathematics Science Scientific World Catalog Description Advanced group supervision of research proposals with individual faculty Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 70339 AIV. 6.28 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Regular Compensatory Academic Level Remedial X Developmental PSY 8343J Course Number Course Title Sex and Gender PSY 8440J Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 3 3 Credits X No Yes Liberal Arts X Not Applicable Flexible General Education Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World This course aims to address the determinants, development, and implications for mental Catalog Description and physical health and for positive adaptation of sex and gender identities. By the end of the course, the student should appreciate and understand the biopsychosocial factors underlying sex and gender, as well as the relations of those factors to health.

422 Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 83403 AIV. 6.29 Effective: Fall 2018 Graduate X Ph.D. Career Undergraduate Remedial Developmental X Regular Academic Level Compensatory PSY 7460J Course Number Course Title Social Psychology None Prerequisite None Corequisite 3 Hours 3 Credits Liberal Arts X Yes No General Education X Not Applicable Flexible Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science This seminar provides a broad overview of social psychology, both classic and current. Catalog Description Social psychology has been described as “the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals” in the context of and shaped by “actual, imagined, or implied presence of others.” Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 74600 AIV. 6.30 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate Career Graduate X Ph.D. Academic Level Regular Compensatory Developmental Remedial X Course Number PSY 8013J Course Title Seminar in special topics Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3

423 Credits 3 X No Liberal Arts Yes General Education Flexible X Not Applicable Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Individual and Society Mathematics Science Scientific World This course number is reserved for the development and trial of new courses in the realm of Catalog Description clinical psychology and psychopathology Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 80103 Rationale AIV. 6.31 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Regular Compensatory Academic Level Remedial X Developmental PSY 7060J Course Number Course Title Statistical Methods in Psychology II PSY 7050J Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 3 3 Credits X No Yes Liberal Arts X Not Applicable Flexible General Education Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World Catalog Description Statistics II focuses on further development of statistical skills through advanced analyses of complex data sets. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 70600

424 AIV. 6.32 Effective: Fall 2018 X Ph.D. Career Graduate Undergraduate Compensatory Developmental X Remedial Academic Level Regular PSY 8548J Course Number Course Title Supervision and consultation Prerequisite None Corequisite None 3 Hours 3 Credits X Yes No Liberal Arts General Education Not Applicable X Flexible Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression English Composition Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World This course is designed to equip advanced doctoral students with the fundamental Catalog Description theories, research, and techniques of clinical and academic supervision and consultation. Many graduates of our doctoral program include supervising and consulting as part of their careers. In addition, most find that after several years of absorbing clinical theories and practices as a student, the process of mentoring and guiding others in clinical and academic work and organizational change results in a next level of consolidation in the integration of theory, research, and practice. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 85408 AIV. 6.33 Effective: Fall 2018 Undergraduate Career Graduate X Ph.D. Remedial Compensatory Regular Developmental Academic Level X Course Number PSY 8398J Course Title Advanced Topics in Psychotherapy (Winnicott) Prerequisite None Corequisite None

425 Hours 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts Yes No X Not Applicable Flexible General Education X Component College Option World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity Required Creative Expression English Composition Individual and Society Mathematics Scientific World Science I think that a respectful way to approach Winnicott's work is to think dynamically, in the Catalog Description literal sense of the word. That is, to see his ideas as a presentation of paradoxes, never fully resolvable by words alone, yet capable of stirring us to find greater and deeper meanings to even the simplest of gestures and symbols. This course investigates his work in that context. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 83908 AIV. 6.34 Effective: Fall 2018 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Ph.D. Academic Level Compensatory X Developmental Regular Remedial Course Number PSY 8980J Research/clinical supervision Course Title Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 3 3 Credits X Yes No Liberal Arts Flexible X Not Applicable General Education Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World An independent study course regarding advanced integration of clinical and research endeavors Catalog Description

426 with a core faculty member. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 89800 AIV. 6.35 Effective: Fall 2018 Graduate X Ph.D. Career Undergraduate Compensatory Developmental X Remedial Academic Level Regular Course Number PSY 7413J Transference and Countertransference Course Title Prerequisite None None Corequisite 3 Hours Credits 3 Yes No Liberal Arts X General Education X Not Applicable Flexible Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Individual and Society Mathematics Science Scientific World This doctoral level elective clinical/theoretical course will introduce advanced clinical Catalog Description psychology graduate students to the basic concepts relevant to understanding transference and countertransference processes in psychotherapy. The course offers a comprehensive introduction to these constructs, and an opportunity, within a case presentation format, to consider their impact within the context of ongoing clinical work. Rationale Transferred from the Graduate Center where it was numbered as PSYC 74103 AIV. 7.1 FOR SUBMISSION TO CUNY Effective: Fall 2019 Undergraduate X Graduate Career Academic Level Compensatory X Developmental Regular Remedial Course Number EDLS 42500 Course Title Developing Programs for Non-Profit Organizations

427 Prerequisite None None Corequisite Hours 3 3 Credits Liberal Arts Yes X No X Not Applicable Flexible General Education Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World Catalog Description This course supports students in designing a nonprofit program and services that are integrated with the organization's mission, strategic planning, goals and needs of clients. The subsequent program plan also serves as a foundation from which to write program proposals to funders, conduct program evaluations and budgets for program development. Includes 5 hours of fieldwork. Rationale This course supports students in the development of the skills and knowledge needed to help a nonprofit organization fulfill its mission. Participants will design a program to address a specific public need (s). The course serves students who are enrolled in the Science and Public Engagement Program who will benefit from knowledge and skills used to design programs This course is not limited to only those with a science background but anyone who is interested in learning how nonprofits and the societal interact. Students will also be exposed to strategies of selecting and working with community-based organizations and other stakeholders. AIV. 7.2 Effective: Fall 2019 Career X Undergraduate Graduate Regular X Developmental Academic Level Remedial Compensatory Course Number SCIE 33000 Course Title Science Engagement in Non-Formal Environments Prerequisite BIO 10200, CHEM 10401, EAS 10600, PHYS 20800, or ENGR 10100 Corequisite None Hours 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts Yes X No

428 X Flexible Not Applicable General Education Component College Option World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity Required English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science This Catalog Description course focuses on science and science learning and engagement in out-of-school settings such as museums, botanical gardens, zoos, parks, and after-school community organizations. Students will gain experience in evaluating scientific research and findings in the context of exhibits, after-school activities, social media, and science writing. Rationale Students will learn about a diversity of approaches to science and science learning in non-formal contexts and how these different approaches are utilized to build understanding and engagement with the natural world. This course will prepare students to be successful in their chosen science learning and engagement field. AIV. 7.3 Effective: Fall 2019 Career X Undergraduate Graduate Developmental Compensatory Academic Level X Regular Remedial Course Number SCIE 36000 Exploration of Non-Formal Learning Resources Course Title BIO 10200, CHEM 10401, EAS 10600, PHYS 20800, or ENGR 10100 Prerequisite Corequisite SCIE 33000 (NEW COURSE) Hours 1 Credits 1 Liberal Arts Yes X No X General Education Flexible Not Applicable Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World Catalog Description This course is an opportunity to visit and observe non-formal science learning institutions such as museums, zoos, botanical gardens, and community-based organizations.

429 Rationale Students will be introduced to a diversity of science learning centers to develop an understanding of how each institution engages its audience in learning about the natural world. This course will prepare students for varied and different types of science learning and engagement career opportunities. AIV. 7.4 Effective: Fall 2019 Career Undergraduate Graduate X Compensatory Developmental Regular Remedial Academic Level X Course Number SCIE 44000 Course Title Science Practice across Disciplines BIO 10200, CHEM 10401, EAS 10600, PHYS 20800, or ENGR 10100 Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 3 3 Credits Yes X No Liberal Arts X General Education Flexible Not Applicable Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World Catalog Description This course explores the nature of science in varied scientific disciplines. It begins with an overview of the philosophy of science and then uses case studies from the different domains of science to investigate the role of disciplinary context in science. Each class will include a component bringing the nature of science and scientific thinking to the learning of science. Rationale This undergraduate science course is intended for students majoring in the proposed Science Learning and Public Engagement major. A version of this course exists at the graduate level. This proposal is to make a version of this course available for undergraduates. AIV. 7.5 Effective: Fall 2019 X Undergraduate Career Graduate Academic Level X Regular Compensatory Developmental Remedial

430 Course Number SCIE 47000 Science Engagement Internship 1 Course Title SCIE 33000 (NEW COURSE); BIO 10200, CHEM 10401, EAS 10600, PHYS 20800, ENGR 10100, Prerequisite CHEM 10301, or PHYS 20700 Corequisite None Hours 1 1 Credits X No Liberal Arts Yes General Education Not Applicable X Flexible Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World Catalog Description This course is a chance to participate in a science learning and engagement opportunity in a non- formal setting. Sponsor organizations will have an onsite supervisor that gives assignments, evaluates work, and ensures that internship is a valuable educational experience. Permission from instructor required. Rationale This experiential learning opportunity will offer students the opportunity to link knowledge and practice to develop their potential to engage with a diverse audience of science learners. Qualified internships at museums, botanical gardens, zoos, community-based organizations, and other similar science engagement facilities will increase student readiness for a career in science learning and engagement. AIV. 7.6 Effective: Fall 2019 Career X Undergraduate Graduate Academic Level Compensatory X Developmental Regular Remedial Course Number SCIE 48000 Course Title Science Engagement Internship 2 Prerequisite SCIE 33000 (NEW COURSE); BIO 10200, CHEM 10401, EAS 10600, PHYS 20800, ENGR 10100, CHEM 10301, or PHYS 20700 Corequisite None Hours 2 Credits 2

431 Liberal Arts No Yes X General Education X Not Applicable Flexible Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression English Composition Mathematics Individual and Society Scientific World Science course is a chance to participate in a science learning and engagement opportunity in a non- This Catalog Description formal setting. Sponsor organizations will have an onsite supervisor that gives assignments, evaluates work, and ensures that internship is a valuable educational experience. Permission from instructor required. Rationale This experiential learning opportunity will offer students the opportunity to link knowledge and practice to develop their potential to engage with a diverse audience of science learners. Qualified internships at museums, botanical gardens, zoos, community-based organizations, and other similar science engagement facilities will increase student readiness for a career in science learning and engagement. AIV. 7.7 Effective: Fall 2019 Career X Undergraduate Graduate Academic Level Compensatory X Developmental Regular Remedial Course Number SCIE 49000 Science Engagement Internship 3 Course Title Prerequisite SCIE 33000 (NEW COURSE); BIO 10200, CHEM 10401, EAS 10600, PHYS 20800, ENGR 10100, CHEM 10301, or PHYS 20700 None Corequisite Hours 3 3 Credits Yes X No Liberal Arts Flexible X Not Applicable General Education Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society

432 Science Scientific World This Catalog Description course is a chance to participate in a science learning and engagement opportunity in a non- formal setting. Sponsor organizations will have an onsite supervisor that gives assignments, evaluates work, and ensures that internship is a valuable educational experience. Permission from instructor required. Rationale This experiential learning opportunity will offer students the opportunity to link knowledge and practice to develop their potential to engage with a diverse audience of science learners. Qualified internships at museums, botanical gardens, zoos, community-based organizations, and other similar science engagement facilities will increase student readiness for a career in science learning and engagement. AIV. 7.8 Effective: Fall 2019 Undergraduate X Graduate Career Compensatory Regular Developmental Academic Level Remedial X Course Number SPED 5701G Special Education Practicum Seminar Course Title Prerequisite Departmental Approval Corequisite SPED 5700G Hours 2 Credits 2 Liberal Arts X No Yes X Not Applicable General Education Flexible Component College Option World Cultures Required US Experience in its Diversity English Composition Creative Expression Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World Catalog Description This course includes observation of candidates within the classroom setting as well as candidate participation in a weekly seminar. The seminar provides both an opportunity for candidates to reflect with one another about their teaching practices and a forum for discussion of relevant issues in special education. Rationale This course will support candidates during their practicum. It provides a platform for current teachers to share ideas and problem solve in a collaborative manner. This will allow the practicum seminar to continue to focus on the practicum, while providing much needed guidance

433 on the tasks of planning instruction, engaging students, and analyzing the data of students with disabilities. The course will take into consideration the unique experiences of current teachers pursuing a certificate to be an educator of students with disabilities. AIV. 7.9 Effective: Fall 2019 Undergraduate X Graduate Career Regular Developmental X Remedial Academic Level Compensatory Course Number SPED 7702G Course Title Special Education Student Teaching Seminar Departmental Approval Prerequisite SPED 7701G and EDUC 1900G Corequisite 2 Hours Credits 2 Yes X Liberal Arts No General Education X Not Applicable Flexible Component World Cultures College Option Required US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression English Composition Mathematics Individual and Society Science Scientific World Catalog Description This course includes observation of candidates within the classroom setting as well as candidate participation in a weekly seminar. The seminar provides both an opportunity for candidates to reflect with one another about their teaching practices and a forum for discussion of relevant issues in special education. Rationale This course will support candidates during their student teaching experiences. It provides a platform for candidates to share ideas and problem solve in a collaborative manner. This will allow the student teaching seminar to continue to focus on the student teaching experience, while providing much needed guidance on the tasks of planning instruction, engaging students, and analyzing student learning. As Master’s degree candidates, students will continue to have the opportunity to engage in data collection and analysis. However, the course will take into consideration that they are student teachers who are pursuing their initial certification and thus have very different needs from those who are already certified and are the lead teachers in their classrooms. AV. 1

434 Effective: Fall 2019 From To ART 39580 Same Course Number Course Number Course Name Game Workshop Course Name Same Description This course teaches the Description Teaches the fundamentals of game play design. Students fundamentals of game play are introduced to a variety of design. Students are games and will work introduced to a variety of individually and games and work collaboratively to create new individually and online and app games, collaboratively to create emphasizing an iterative new board and card design process incorporating games. The class animation, 3D modeling and emphasizes an iterative programming. design process. Prerequisite Art 21000 or other 200-level Prerequisite Art 39528 2D Animation Principles OR writing course Art 39522 Programming for Artists OR Art 39470 3D Imaging 1 Co-requisite None Co-requisite Same Hours 3 Hours Same Credits Same 3 Credits Change in prerequisite from writing to core game design skills will connect the game Rationale workshop course more closely to our existing curriculum in animation, 3D modeling/animation and programming. This change would enable students who have taken one or more of these courses to develop online games or game apps resulting in stronger portfolio examples. The underlying conceptual content in how to structure games using game theory, behavioral psychology and probability and chance would continue to be central to the course. AV. 2 Department: Mechanical Engineering From To Course # Course # Same ME 54100 Course Title Course Title Advanced Stress Analysis Senior Design Project 1 Description Stress and strain. Principal axes. Description Same Hooke's Law. Constitutive equations

435 for elastic materials. Formulation of plane stress and plane strain in Cartesian and polar coordinates. Theories of failure. Thick tubes, rotating disks, shrink fits. Thermal stresses in rings, tubes, and disks. Loads, moments, and deflections in statically indeterminate systems. Castigliano's theorems and energy methods. Component design projects involving various failure theories. Same Prerequisite Prerequisite ME 24700, ME 37100 Pre/Corequisite Pre/Corequisite Hours Same 3 Hours 3 Credits Same Credits Correction to January 2017 CUR, Item AV. 25. There was a typo regarding the course title change. It Rationale shouldn’t have been altered. This item is correcting that error. AV. 3.1 Effective: Spring 2019 From To Course Number MUS 21600 Course # Same Music Production Course Name Course Name Music Production: MIDI & Audio MUS 10100, 13100, 16100 or Prerequisite MUS 13200, or permission of the Prerequisite department. permission of the department. MUS 10100, 13100, 16100, or Corequisite Corequisite None. permission of the department. Hours 2 Hours 3 Credits 2 Credits 3 Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Previously unspecified? Description Overview of contemporary music Overview of contemporary music Description production, recording, sound design production, recording, sound design concepts, and techniques, including a techniques, and notation software, hands-on lab component. including a hands-on lab component. Rationale The increased hours and credits reflect the need to include additional course content for students to gain a practical working knowledge of contemporary music production. The change in pre-/co- requisites brings the course in line with current BA curriculum.

436 Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Same Gen Ed Desig. AV. 3.2 Effective: Spring 2019 To From Course Number MUS 43400 Course # Same Course Name Same Audio and Music Industry Internships Course Name MUS 23100 or MUS 35700 Prerequisite Same Prerequisite None Corequisite Same Corequisite (varies, up to 8 hours) Hours Same Hours 2 Credits 1 Credits Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts Same Supervised internships at professional Description Same Description music and audio technology facilities. Students observe and interact with production and business practices in the professional marketplace. Requires a minimal commitment of eight-hour per week. May be taken twice. Rationale The revised credit value better reflects the time commitment and workload required by the students. One semester of the 2-credit internship now fulfills the total degree requirement, rather than taking it twice, which slowed students’ progress to degree because of the prolonged commitment over a full year. Note: it may still be repeated for credit as an elective. Gen Ed Desig. Gen Ed Desig. Same [ X ] Not applicable AV. 4.1 To From [ x ] Undergraduate [ x ] Graduate Career [ x ] Undergraduate [x ] Graduate Career Course Number ARCH 35402/ARCH 73401 Course Number Same Course Name Timber and Masonry Structures Course Name Structures 2 – Design of Structural Elements Prerequisite Prerequisite AES 24303/ARCH 62401 Elem. Structural Analysis and Behavior Structures 1 Corequisite None Corequisite Same Hours 3 Hours Same Credits 3 Credits Same Architecture [ x ] Yes [ ] No Architecture [ x ] Yes [ ] No

437 Course Attribute Technology Introduction to structural materials Introduction to design of timber and Description Description including steel, concrete, and wood. masonry buildings. Masonry units of clay, mortar, grout, Basic principles of analyses and design with respect to various reinforcing steel. materials. Behavior of timber and masonry structures and contemporary methods for their design and engineering The proposed new description offers more complete and more appropriate information regarding Rationale structural principles and practice using various materials commonly utilized in architecture. General Education [ x ] Not Applicable Designation [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 4.2 From To Career [ x ] Undergraduate [ x ] Graduate Career Same Course Number AES 24303/ARCH 62401 Same Course Number Elem. Structural Analysis and Behavior Structures 1 - Introduction to Course Name Course Name Structures PHYS 21900 Physics for Architects Prerequisite PHYS 21900 Physics for Architects Prerequisite MATH 19500 Precalculus MATH 20500 Elements of Calculus or department permission or department permission Corequisite None Corequisite Same Hours Hours Same 3 Credits 3 Credits Same Architecture [ x ] Yes [ ] No Architecture [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Technology

438 Description Statics of basic structural elements Basics of structures including Description such as: beams, columns, frames, Structural stability, statics of basic trusses structural elements such as beams, columns, frames, and trusses. Rules- Introduction to strength of material of-thumb for structural systems and Approximate analyses of indeterminate elements. structures Introduction to strength of materials The proposed new description offers more complete and more appropriate introduction to Rationale structures for students of architecture. General Education [ x ] Not Applicable Designation [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 4.3 From To Career [ x ] Undergraduate [ x ] Graduate Career Same Course Number ARCH 36402/ARCH 74401 Course Number Same Course Name Intro. to Steel and Concrete Structures Structures 3 – Behavior of Structural Course Name Systems Prerequisite Prerequisite AES 24303/ARCH 62401 Structures 2 Timber and Masonry Structures Corequisite Corequisite Same None Hours 3 Hours Same Credits 3 Credits Same Architecture Architecture [ x ] Yes [ ] No [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Technology Description Introduction to design of steel and Behavior of structural systems Description concrete buildings. Basic structural including gravity and lateral load analyses of steel concrete buildings paths in buildings; Seismic effects. Behavior of these systems.

439 Rationale The proposed new description offers more complete and more appropriate content for the students of architecture in the concluding course in the structures sequence General Education [ x ] Not Applicable Designation [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 5.1 From To [ X ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Same Career Career PHYS 32300 Course Number Course Number Same Course Name Quantum Mechanics for Engineers Course Name Same Prerequisite PHYS 20700 and PHYS 20800, MATH MATH Prerequisite PHYS 20700, PHYS 20800, MATH 39200 39100 and and MATH 34600 39100 Co-requisite Co-requisite 3 hr./wk. Hours Hours Same Credits 3 cr. Credits Same Liberal Arts?? [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Same Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Description Basic experiments, wave-particle Description Same duality, uncertainty. Wave functions and Schroedinger equation. 1-d problems, bound states, square well, harmonic oscillator, scattering from barriers, tunneling. QM formalism, Dirac notation, operators & eigenvalues, angular momentum. Hydrogen atom. Perturbation theory first order nondegenerate, level splitting. Time-dependent PT,

440 Golden rule, spin. Quantum communication, Bell’s theorem. Rationale General Education [ ] Not Applicable Designation [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 5.2 From To [X] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Career Same Career Course Number Course Number Same PHYS 35100 Mechanics Same Course Name Course Name PHYS 20800 & MATH 39100 Prerequisite Prerequisite Same Corequisite MATH 39200 Corequisite MATH 34600 Hours 4 hr./wk Hours Same Credits Same 4 cr. Credits Liberal Arts?? [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Same Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Newton's laws; Systems of particles; Description Newton's laws; Systems of particles; Description Small oscillations; Central forces and Small oscillations; Central forces and planetary motion; Rotations and planetary motion; Rotations and rotating coordinate system; rotating coordinate system; Introduction to rigid body motion; Introduction to rigid body motion; Lagrangian dynamics; Introduction to Lagrangian dynamics; Introduction to Hamiltonian dynamics. Prereq.: PHYS Hamiltonian dynamics. Prereq.: PHYS 20800 & MATH 39100; Co-req.; 20800 & MATH 39100; Co-req.; MATH MATH 39200. 4 hr./wk.; 4 cr. 34600, 4 hr./wk.; 4 cr. Rationale

441 General Education [ ] Not Applicable Designation [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 5.3 To From [ X ] Undergraduate [ ] Career Same Career Graduate PHYS 45200 Course Number Same Course Number Course Name Course Name Same Optics Prereq.: PHYS 35400, or Prerequisite Same Prerequisite similar engineering courses Corequisite Pre- or coreq.: MATH 39200 Corequisite Pre- or coreq: MATH 34600 Hours 3 hr./wk. Hours Same Credits Same Credits 3 cr. Liberal Arts?? [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Same Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Description Dispersion, reflection and Dispersion, reflection and Description refraction, interference, refraction, diffraction, coherence, interference, diffraction, geometrical optics, interaction coherence, of light with matter. Prereq.: PHYS 35400, or similar geometrical optics, interaction of engineering courses; pre- or light with matter. Prereq.: PHYS coreq.: MATH 39200 (required 35400, or similar engineering for all Physics majors, except courses; pre- or coreq.: MATH

442 those in the Biomedical (required for all 34600 Option). 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr. Physics majors in Applied Physics concentration). 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr. Rationale Rationale [ ] Not Applicable General Education [ ] Required [ ] Flexible Designation [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Approved by Physics Department Faculty on 5/3/2018 AV. 5.4 From To [ X ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [ X ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Career Career PHYS 55100 Course Number Course Number PHYS 55100 Course Name QUANTUM PHYSICS I Course Name QUANTUM PHYSICS I Prereq: MATH 39100 and MATH .: and Prerequisite Prereq Prerequisite MATH 39100, Math 34600 39200. PHYS 35100 Pre- or coreq: PHYS 35100, PHYS Pre- or coreq: PHYS 35400 and PHYS Corequisite Corequisite (required for Physics majors). 36100 35400 (required for Physics majors). 4 hr./wk. Hours 4 hr./wk.d Hours Credits 4 cr. Credits 4 cr. Liberal Arts?? [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Introductory material: 2-slit Introductory material: 2-slit experiment, Description Description experiment, matter waves and matter waves and addition of amplitudes– addition of amplitudes– superposition principle; Uncertainty superposition principle; principle, properties of matter waves: Uncertainty principle, properties of Boundary conditions and energy level

443 matter waves: Boundary conditions quantization and Schrödinger interpretation– and energy level quantization and wave equation, application to one Schrödinger interpretation–wave dimensional problems, barrier penetration, equation, application to one Bloch states in solids and how bands form in solids; The universality of the Harmonic dimensional problems, barrier potential–Simple Harmonic oscillator and penetration, Bloch states in solids applications; One electron atoms, spin, and how bands form in solids; The transition rates; Identical particles and universality of the Harmonic potential–Simple Harmonic quantum statistics; Beyond the Schrödinger oscillator and applications; One equation: Variational methods and WKB. electron atoms, spin, transition Prereq.: MATH 34600 and PHYSICS 35100 rates; Identical particles and PHYS . Pre- or coreq: PHYS 35400, quantum statistics; Beyond the (required for Physics majors). 4 36100 hr./wk.; 4 cr. Schrödinger equation: Variational methods and WKB. Prereq.: MATH 39100 and MATH 39200. Pre- or coreq.: PHYS 35100, PHYS 35400 (required for Physics majors). 4 hr./wk.; 4 cr. Rationale General [ ] Not Applicable Education [ ] Required [ ] Flexible Designation [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Approved by Physics Department Faculty on 5/3/2018 AV. 5.5 To From [ X ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Career Same Career Course Number PHYS 55200 Course Number Same Course Name QUANTUM PHYSICS II Course Name Same Prereq.: PHYS 55100 or equivalent Prereq: PHYS 55100 or equivalent and Prerequisite Prerequisite (required for Physics majors). MATH 39100, and MATH 39200 PHYS 36100 (required for Physics majors). Corequisite Corequisite Hours 3 hr./wk. Hours Same

444 Credits Same 3 cr. Credits Liberal Arts?? [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Same Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Formalism of quantum mechanics: Formalism of quantum mechanics: Description Description observables, operators; application to simple observables, operators; application to simple cases: two-level systems, cases: two-level systems, electron in a electron in a magnetic field, spin; magnetic field, spin; time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory with time-independent and time- dependent perturbation theory with applications; adiabatic processes; selected applications; adiabatic processes; topics in atomic, optical, solid-state, nuclear and particle physics; quantum entanglement, selected topics in atomic, optical, Bell's theorem and recent experiments.. solid-state, nuclear and particle Prereq.: PHYS 55100 or equivalent and physics; quantum entanglement, Bell's theorem and recent PHYS 36100 (required for Physics majors) 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr. experiments.. Prereq: PHYS 55100 or equivalent , and MATH 39100 (required for Physics MATH 39200 majors 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr. Rationale [ ] Not Applicable General Education [ ] Required [ ] Flexible Designation [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Approved by Physics Department Faculty on 5/3/2018 AV. 6.1 Effective: Fall 2019 From To Career Career Same [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Course Number EDCE 3100C Course Number Same Course Name Elementary Science & Engineering Course Name Science in a Program of Childhood Education Teaching Methods

445 Prerequisite None Prerequisite Same Corequisite None Same Corequisite Hours 3 hr./wk. Hours Same Credits Same Credits 3 Liberal Arts? [ ] Yes [ X ] No [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts? Course Attribute N/A (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Description Development of first-hand knowledge An elementary science and engineering Description teaching methods course, where of standards-based science content, students develop skills and knowledge materials, and methods appropriate to about science and engineering teaching the several growth levels of children in and learning by doing hands-on and the primary and intermediate programs of the elementary school. computer-based inquiry and design Written reviews of scholarly literature, activities that are aligned with city, maintenance of written journals, and state and national standards. Students fieldwork on the study of teaching in a use research-based teaching strategies, 3 read and analyze scholarly articles, and childhood education classroom. credits employ different assessment tasks to gather evidence of student learning and adjust instruction. Ten (10) hours of fieldwork are required, which includes doing actual teaching and investigating approaches used in informal education settings. 3 hr./wk. Rationale This title and course description change will be a more accurate indicator of the substance of the course, which now reflects the significant change in state and national standards where elementary science instruction addresses both scientific inquiry and engineering design practices, while addressing disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts. General [ X ] Not Applicable Education [ ] Required [ ] Flexible Designation [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World

446 AV. 6.2 Effective: Fall 2019 To From Career Career Same [ X ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Course Number Same Course Number EDCE 42000 Course Name Elementary Science & Engineering Science in a Program of Childhood Course Name Education Teaching Methods None Prerequisite Same Prerequisite None Same Corequisite Corequisite Hours 3 hr./wk. Hours Same 3 Credits Same Credits [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts? [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts? Course Attribute N/A (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) An introduction to learning science Description An elementary science and engineering Description at the elementary level. Emphasis on teaching methods course, where firsthand experiential learning of students develop skills and knowledge science through the design, conduct, about science and engineering teaching and communication of science and learning. Candidates learn by doing investigations that portray inquiry and design activities that are underlying elements of science hands-on and computer-based, and inquiry. Students relate learning aligned with city, state and national science standards. Students learn to use experiences to state and national standards in science research-based teaching strategies and . 3 credits. assessment techniques that provide Prerequisites: Departmental permission required. evidence of student learning for subsequent analysis and reflection. Ten (10) hours of fieldwork are required for this course. Departmental permission required. 3 hr./wk. Rationale This title and course description change more accurately reflects the substance of this undergraduate methods course, and address recent and significant change in state and national standards where elementary science instruction now gives equal weight to scientific inquiry and engineering design, while addressing relevant disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts. The pre- and co-requisites have been dropped from the description since elementary teaching methods

447 courses are now typically done before students enter into student teaching. General [ X ] Not Applicable Education [ ] Required [ ] Flexible Designation [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 6.3 Program: Secondary Science Education Department: Secondary Education Proposed Curriculum Change: EDSE 44300: Credit and fieldwork change Effective: Fall 2019 : Dates of Approval/Recommendation Secondary Education Department Curriculum Committee: February 1, 2018 Secondary Education Department: February 8, 2018 School of Education Curriculum: April 18, 2018 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 From To Career [X ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Career Same Course Number EDSE 44300 Course Number Same Course Name Methods of Teaching Science Same Course Name None Prerequisite Prerequisite Same Corequisite None Corequisite Same Hours 3 hr./week Hours Same Credits Credits Same 4 Liberal Arts? [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts? [ ] Yes [ X ] No N/A Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,

448 etc) Description Topics include: designing effective Description Topics include: designing effective learning experiences, cooperative learning experiences, cooperative learning, questioning, enrichment, learning, questioning, enrichment, motivation, assessment, problem motivation, assessment, problem solving, an overview of the middle and solving, an overview of the middle and secondary school curriculum in secondary school curriculum in science, science, the use of technology in the the use of technology in the teaching teaching and learning of science, and learning of science, teaching teaching methodology for students methodology for students with disabilities and students learning English with disabilities and students as an additional language. learning English as an additional Includes 35 hours of fieldwork in a variety of language. Includes 30 hours of fieldwork in a variety of educational educational settings. settings. The proposed change is a correction to a mistake in the bulletin and reflects actual fieldwork Rationale experience of class. [ X ] Not Applicable General Education Designation [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 6.4 Effective: Fall 2019 Dates of Approval/Recommendation : Secondary Education Department Curriculum Committee: February 1, 2018 Secondary Education Department: February 8, 2018 School of Education Curriculum: April 18, 2018 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 From To Career [X ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Career Same

449 Course Number EDSE 45103 Course Number Same Same Curriculum and Instruction in Science Course Name Course Name Education Prerequisite Same Prerequisite None Corequisite Same Corequisite None Hours 3 hr./week Hours Same 4 Credits Same Credits [ ] Yes [ X ] No [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts? Liberal Arts? N/A Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Description The history, philosophy and role of The history, philosophy and role of Description science education in formal and science education in formal and informal settings; the evolution of the informal settings; the evolution of the science curriculum; instructional science curriculum; instructional planning and strategies for teaching planning and strategies for teaching within the full range of abilities; within the full range of abilities; adapting the curriculum for students adapting the curriculum for students with disabilities and emergent with disabilities and emergent bilinguals; literacy development; and bilinguals; literacy development; and the use of technology in the the use of technology in the curriculum. curriculum. Includes 30 hours of Includes 35 hours of fieldwork in a variety of educational settings. fieldwork in a variety of educational settings. Rationale The proposed change is a correction to a mistake in the bulletin and reflects actual fieldwork experience of class. General [ X ] Not Applicable Education [ ] Required [ ] Flexible Designation [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 6.5

450 Effective: Fall 2019 From To [ ] Undergraduate Same Career Career [ X ] Graduate Course Number PHYSE 1402E Course Number Same Course Name Development in Knowledge Physics 2 Course Name Same PHYSE 1401E Prerequisite None Prerequisite Corequisite Corequisite Same None 3 hr./week Hours Same Hours Credits 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts? [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts? [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute N/A (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Description Selected topics in physics with emphasis on Same Description gaining a depth of understanding of the subject matter and an awareness of the development of skills essential to the scientific process. Background for teaching science in secondary schools or introductory college level. Integrated laboratory/ discussion format. Rationale PHYSE 1401E and PHYSE 1402E teach different topics and could be taken in either order. General Education [ X ] Not Applicable Designation [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 6.6 Effective: Fall 2019

451 Dates of Approval/Recommendation : Special Education Program: March 15, 2018 Leadership & Special Education: March 29, 2018 School of Education Curriculum: April 18, 2018 School of Education Faculty: May 10, 2018 From To Career Same Career [ ] Undergraduate [X] Graduate Course Number Same SPED 5700G Course Number Practicum in Teaching Special Course Name Course Name Same Education None Same Prerequisite Prerequisite Corequisite SPED 5701G Corequisite None Hours Hours 60 hours per semester 3 hr./wk. Credits 3 Credits 2 Liberal Arts? [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts? [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute N/A (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Description An advanced course to assess and An advanced course to assess and Description develop teaching skills in various develop teaching skills in various special education settings under special education settings under supervision in the field and in an supervision in the field. Individual integrative seminar. Individual conferences to review teaching conferences to review teaching strategies, materials, and techniques. strategies, materials, and Department permission required. 2 techniques. Department CR . permission required. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR. Rationale This required course was modified to align with the level of support required for the Practicum because it only requires one visit from the college supervisor. Additionally, the credit allocation is in line with most programs within the School of Education at CCNY. Finally, separating the Practicum from the seminar denotes the uniqueness of each experience. General Education [ X ] Not Applicable Designation [ ] Required [ ] Flexible

452 [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World AV. 6.6 Effective: Fall 2019 From To Career Same Career [ ] Undergraduate [X] Graduate Course Number Same SPED 7701G Course Number Internship in Special Education Course Name Same Course Name Prerequisite Prerequisite Same None Corequisite SPED 7702G None Corequisite EDUC 1900G Hours 3 hr./wk. Hours 300 hours per semester Credits 3 Credits 4 Liberal Arts? [ ] Yes [ X ] No [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts? N/A Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Candidates will be assigned a full Description Students will be assigned to a Description time supervised student teaching school and spend half a semester in experience in a special education or a special education or inclusion inclusion setting in accordance with classroom, grades 1-3, and half a his/her certification grade level semester in a special education or (e.g., 1-6, 7-12) for a minimum of inclusion classroom, grade 4-6. Minimum of 15 hours per week, 3 300 hours. Accompanying weekly credits equivalent to 12 semester seminar integrates the teaching experience with course work. hours for 240 hour (40 day) minimum. Required for those in the initial certification program. To be completed at the end of the program sequence. 4 credits. Rationale This required course was modified to align with the level of support required for the student-

453 teaching experience. Additionally, the credit allocation is in line with most programs within the School of Education at CCNY. Furthermore, this course meets the state requirements regarding students with disabilities and contributes to candidates’ understanding of diversity in a multicultural society. Finally, separating the student-teaching experience from the seminar denotes the uniqueness of each experience. General Education [ X ] Not Applicable Designation [ ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World

454 June 2018 CUNY School of Medicine / City College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters AVI.1 Program: M.D. degree Department: CUNY School of Medicine / CCNY HEGIS Code: 1206.00 Program Code: 38261 OURSES W ITHDRAWN C MED 50909 – Selectives in Population Health Research, part 1 MED 51009 – Selectives in Population Health Research, part 2 Rationale: The above courses represented the second year of a prior 2-year course sequence. The curriculum was consolidated and changed to a 1-year course, previously approved. No Report

455 June 2018 CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters June 2018 Section AIII: Changes in Degree Programs AIII.1: Discontinuation of the MSW/MPH (Social Work/Public Health) Program: Social Work/Public Health Award: MSW/MPH HEGIS Code: 2104.00/1214.00 Program Code: 36887/36886 Effective: Fall 2018 Rationale: There are currently no students enrolled in the dual-degree MSW/MPH program. The program will be discontinued, effective September 1, 2018. AIII.2: Discontinuation of the MPH-Public Health Geographic Information Sciences Concentration Program: Public Health Geographic Information Sciences Award: MPH HEGIS Code: 1214.00 Program Code: 02432 Effective: Spring 2021 Rationale: This concentration is not accepting new applications; the remaining two students are expected to graduate within the next academic year. The concentration will be discontinued, effective February 1, 2021. AIII.3: Discontinuation of the MS/MPH Community/Public Health Nursing and Urban Public Health dual- degree Program: Community/Public Health Nursing and Urban Public Health Award: MS/MPH HEGIS Code: 1203.10/1214.00 Program Code: 92082 Effective: Spring 2022 Rationale: This dual-degree program is not accepting new applications; the remaining seven students are

456 expected to graduate within their five years maximum time to graduation. The program will be discontinued, effective February 1, 2022. AIII.4: Discontinuation of the Doctor of Public Health degree program Program: Doctor of Public Health Award: DPH HEGIS Code: 1214.00 Program Code: 31581 Effective: Fall 2026 Rationale: The Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy has proposed a change to the degree award granted upon completion of this program (from a DPH to a PhD). Students currently enrolled in the program will have the maximum time allowed to graduate, per School policy (eight years, concluding September 1, 2026), at which point the DPH degree award will be discontinued. Students will also have the option to transfer to the new degree award, the PhD. AIII.5: Addition of Foundational Public Health Knowledge learning objectives as requirement for all Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy degrees (the Master of Public Health degree, the Master of Science degree, and the Doctor of Public Health degree). Programs: MPH-Community Health; MPH-Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences; MPH- Epidemiology and Biostatistics; MPH-Health Policy and Management; MPH-Public Health Nutrition; MS- Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences; DPH-Community, Society, and Health; DPH- Environmental and Occupational Health; DPH-Epidemiology; DPH-Health Policy and Management Award: MPH; MS; DPH HEGIS Code: 1214.00 Program Codes: 37792; 02438; 31581 Rationale: The School’s professional accrediting body, the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), recently prescribed a set of twelve foundational public health knowledge learning objectives, which all degree-seeking students must achieve by program completion. Students who have not achieved these leaning objectives through other means, prior to entering their program, will complete PUBH 601 (Foundations of Public Health Knowledge), a 0-hour, 0-credit online course. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1 Course Number: PUBH 601 Title: Foundations of Public Health Knowledge Hours: 0 Credits: 0

457 Prerequisites or Co-requisite: None Course Description: This course covers the foundational knowledge of the profession and science of public health and factors related to human health. Students must pass this course by the end of their first semester. Rationale: The School’s professional accrediting body, the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), has prescribed twelve foundational public health knowledge objectives that students must achieve. This 0- credit course comprises twelve online modules that all degree-seeking students must pass within their first semester of matriculation. AIV.2 Course Number: PUBH 803 Title: Public Health Perspectives on Science Hours: 3 Credits: 3 Prerequisites or Co-requisites: None Course Description: This course will compare and contrast different traditions concerning the nature of science; examine how these theories relate to the history and development of public health. The course discussions will emphasize the implications of the application of different scientific perspectives to public health practice today in the context of urban, social, health equity, cultural, economic and political influences on public health policies and actions, as well as the school’s mission and values. Rationale: This course will be offered as one of five core courses in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in all concentrations will be required to complete this course. AIV.3 Course Number: EOHS 822 Title: Biology and Pathophysiological Applications in Public Health Hours: 3 Credits: 3 Prerequisites or Co-requisites: None Course Description: This course provides the fundamentals of biological causes and the pathophysiology of diseases in the context of public health practice. Students will apply biochemical and mechanistic models to explain their impact on significant public health problems. Students will integrate physiological and pathophysiological concepts in the development of strategies for public health disease prevention and control. Students will learn to develop models to test health effects of potential interventions. Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Environmental and Planetary Health Sciences concentration will be required to complete this course. AIV.4

458 Course Number: EOHS 823 Title: Systems Science in Planetary Health Hours: 3 Credits: 3 Prerequisites or Co-requisites: None Course Description: This course teaches the application of systems science techniques to identifying, explaining and mitigating health risks to humans and the planet. This course will enable students to analyze dynamic interactions between complex environmental, economic, and social systems. Students will be required to model systems and analyze the effects of potential interventions. Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Environmental and Planetary Health Sciences concentration will be required to complete this course. AIV.5 Course Number: BIOS 823 Title: Applied Biostatistics IV Hours: 3 Credits: 3 Prerequisites: BIOS 822 and EPID 822 Course Description: Topics include missing data imputation methods and advanced methods such as structural nested model and marginal structural models. Focus on practical applications in public health research setting, utilizing statistical software. Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Epidemiology concentration will be required to complete this course. AIV.6 Course Number: EPID 824 Title: Epidemiological Methods V Hours: 3 Credits: 3 Prerequisites: EPID 822 and BIOS 821 Course Description: A seminar course that provides an in-depth understanding of current advanced epidemiological techniques for data analysis and promotes lifelong learning via student-led applications and discussions of these methods.

459 Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Epidemiology concentration will be required to complete this course. AIV.7 Course Number: FNPH 821 Title: Nutrient Metabolism and Applications in Public Health Hours: 3 Credits: 3 Prerequisites: Two undergraduate level courses in chemistry and math. These requirements can be waived with departmental permission for students who bring other relevant experience to the course. Course Description: This course builds on basic concepts of biochemistry to explore the structure, function, and metabolism of nutrients in the human body. Topics include energy metabolism, function and regulation of enzymes and coenzymes, and the cellular environment as it relates to systems science, metabolism of the energy-yielding nutrients and the regulation of these pathways by enzymes, coenzymes, and cofactors. Rationale: This course will be offered as a selective course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Environmental and Planetary Health Sciences concentration will be required to take two selective courses. AIV.8 Course Number: EOHS 824 Title: Advanced Exposure Assessment and Policy Applications Hours: 3 Credits: 3 Prerequisites or Co-requisites: None Course Description: This course presents an overview of exposure assessment methods for different media (e.g., air, water, food, soil) in the context of the major exposure pathways (e.g., ingestion, inhalation, absorption, injection). It explains optimal study design for exposure assessment and relates findings to policy. Rationale: This course will be offered as a selective course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Environmental and Planetary Health Sciences concentration will be required to take two selective courses. Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses AV.1 TO: FROM: Number PUBH 801 Number EPID 820 Title Epidemiologic Methods I Title Epidemiologic al Methods I

460 Prerequisites EPID 620 or EPID 621 or equivalent Prerequisites None Rationale: This course will be offered as one of five core courses in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in all concentrations will be required to complete this course. AV.2 TO: FROM: Number BIOS 820 Number PUBH 802 Title Applied Biostatistics I Title Applied Biostatistics I (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) or equivalent Prerequisites Prerequisites None Rationale: This course will be offered as one of five core courses in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in all concentrations will be required to complete this course. AV.3 FROM: TO: PUBH 813 Number PUBH 804 Number Qualitative Research Methods with Title Qualitative Research Methods with Title Applications to Urban Health Applications to Urban Health Description This course will introduce students to Description This course will introduce students to intermediate level approaches and approaches in designing and conducting qualitative research in applications in conducting quantitative research in urban public health. It topics of relevance to public health. It is intended to provide doctoral follows introductory biostatistics and students with a foundation in the epidemiology courses. Course objectives include understanding the various qualitative data collection and analysis methods, focusing on their assumptions, application, and application to public health practice interpretation of generalized linear and research. It will cover elements of regression models, including linear, qualitative research design, data logistic, and probit models; collection, analysis, and writing for understanding standard methods for publication. This will be integrated making inferences on model with the main assignment in which parameters, and being able to students develop a proposal for a diagnose the appropriateness of models. Particular attention will be paid qualitative research project tailored to address a specific public health to choosing and defining the right outcome(s), given specific research research question. questions and available data; defining appropriate comparison groups; and understanding the assumptions of each model in order to make appropriate choices and analytic decisions for different types of data and research questions common to urban health research. Prerequisites None Prerequisites None

461 Rationale: This course will be offered as one of five core courses in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in all concentrations will be required to complete this course. AV.4 FROM: TO: PUBH 810 Number Number CHSS 810 and Health Title Cities and Health Title Cities, Society, This course presents an ecological, Description Description This course analyzes recent changes multilevel approach to the study of in major US and global cities that influence population health and health urban health and brings together public health and social science inequities. Using a case study approach, students examine how disciplines to examine the impact of public health is addressing social and city living on population health. environmental influences on health in cities such as New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, London, Cape Town, Sao Paulo and Shanghai. Students use theories and conceptual frameworks from a variety of public health and social science disciplines to examine the causes and consequences of these changes and their implications for public health practice and social justice. None Prerequisites None Prerequisites Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Community Health and Health Policy concentration will be required to complete this course. AV.5 FROM: TO: Number HPAM 820 Number HPAM 820 Title and Seminar in Health Policy Title Seminar in Health Policy Management Prerequisites HPAM 820 Prerequisites None Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Community Health and Health Policy concentration will be required to complete this course. AV.6 FROM: TO:

462 Number EOHS 821 Number EOHS 821 Title Environmental and Occupational Title Environmental and Occupational , Health Risk Assessment and Hazard Health Risk Assessment Management, and Communication in Urban Settings Description This course will cover the Description This course examines the development, principals and use of development and use of environmental and occupational health Environmental and Occupational Health risk assessment and its policy risk assessment, risk communication and the policy implications. Risk implications as applied to urban settings. Approaches to assessing, assessment and risk management communicating about and managing procedures will be evaluated in context of public participation, sustainable urban Environmental and development, occupational and Occupational Health risks are critically analyzed within their political, environmental justice, and natural vs. human vs. technological hazards. economic, social and cultural contexts. Strengths and weaknesses of Risk assessment and risk management procedures are alternative approaches to quantitative risk assessment will also be covered. evaluated in light of several themes including public participation, sustainable development, environmental justice, and natural and technological hazards. Students conduct risk assessments on real world environmental and occupational health problems, develop effective written and verbal approaches to communicating the results of risk assessments, and critically review case studies in which Environmental and Occupational Health risk assessments have been used in setting public policy. Prerequisites Prerequisites None None Rationale: This course will be offered as a selective course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Environmental and Planetary Health Sciences concentration will be required to take two selective courses. AV.7 FROM: TO: Number EPID 821 Number EPID 821 Title Title Epidemiologic al Epidemiologic Methods II Methods II Prerequisites EPID 6210 or EPID 621 or equivalent Prerequisites (PUBH 801 or EPID 820) and (PUBH 802 or BIOS 820), or equivalent Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in

463 Public Health degree. Students in the Epidemiology concentration will be required to complete this course. AV.8 TO: FROM: Number EPID 822 Number EPID 822 Title al Epidemiologic Methods III Title Epidemiologic Methods III BIOS 821 and EPID 821. Some SAS Prerequisites Prerequisites EPID 821 and BIOS 821 proficiency is assumed. Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Epidemiology concentration will be required to complete this course. AV.9 FROM: TO: EPID 823 EPID 823 Number Number Epidemiologic Methods IV Title Epidemiologic Title al Methods IV Prerequisites EPID 822 Prerequisites BIOS 821 and EPID 822 Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Epidemiology concentration will be required to complete this course. AV.10 FROM: TO: EPID 623 Number EPID 825 Number Clinical Trials and Experimental Experimental Design Title Title Design Prerequisites (BIOS 620 or BIOS 621) and (EPID Prerequisites (PUBH 801 or EPID 820) and (PUBH 620 or EPID 621), or equivalent 802 or BIOS 820), or equivalent Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Epidemiology concentration will be required to complete this course. AV.11 FROM: TO: Number BIOS 821 Number BIOS 821 Title Applied Biostatistics II Title Applied Biostatistics II Prerequisites EPID 820 and BIOS 820 Prerequisites (PUBH 801 or EPID 820) and (PUBH 802 or BIOS 820), or equivalent Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Epidemiology concentration will be required to complete this course.

464 AV.12 FROM: TO: BIOS 840 Number Number BIOS 822 Title Applied Biostatistics III Title Applied Biostatistics III Prerequisites BIOS 821 and EPID 821 Prerequisites BIOS 821 and EPID 821 Rationale: This course will be offered as a concentration course in the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. Students in the Epidemiology concentration will be required to complete this course. AV.13 FROM: TO: Number PUBH 650 Number PUBH 650 Title Qualitative Research Methods in Title Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health Public Health (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID Prerequisites Prerequisites PUBH 614 OR (BIOS 610 or BIOS 610 or EPID 611) or departmental 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) permission Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.14 FROM: TO: Number PUBH 696 Number PUBH 696 Title Supervised Fieldwork Title Supervised Fieldwork Description Students carry out 180 hours of Description Students carry out 180 hours of supervised field work that is intended supervised field work that is intended to bridge academic preparation and to bridge academic preparation and public health practice. Knowledge and public health practice. Knowledge and skills from the core MPH and skills from the core MPH and concentration specialization courses are applied in a courses are applied in a public health agency, community public health agency, community organization or other setting relevant organization or other setting relevant to the student’s academic background, to the student’s academic background, specialization and career expectations. specialization and career expectations. This is accomplished under the This is accomplished under the supervision and guidance of an supervision and guidance of an experienced preceptor. Field-based experienced preceptor. Field-based hours are implemented with classroom hours are implemented with classroom and individual meetings along with and individual meetings along with online communication. Aside from online communication. Aside from deliverables required by the preceptor, deliverables required by the preceptor, the student develops a reflection the student develops a reflection paper, a self-evaluation and a paper, a self-evaluation and a capstone proposal. capstone proposal.

465 Completion of at least 18 credits of Prerequisites Prerequisites Completion of at least 18 MPH or MS credits, including biostatistics core coursework toward the MPH or MS and two degree, including PUBH 614, and course, epidemiology core course, courses in the student’s area of two courses in the student’s area of concentration concentration; and departmental ; and departmental permission permission Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.15 TO: FROM: PUBH 698 Number PUBH 698 Number Capstone Project Title Capstone Project Title Completion of at least 36 credits of Prerequisites Completion of at least 33 credits of Prerequisites coursework toward the MPH or MS coursework toward the MPH or MS degree, which must include degree, which must include Supervised Fieldwork, and at least one Supervised Fieldwork (MPH students course in each of the 5 core areas of only), all core coursework required for public health (biostatistics, the degree, and at least 3 epidemiology, social and behavioral concentration courses; and sciences, public health policy, and departmental permission environmental health and safety), and at least 3 specialization courses; and departmental permission Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.16 FROM: TO: PUBH 900 Number Number PUBH 900 Title Dissertation Supervision Title Dissertation Supervision Prerequisites Prerequisite: All coursework and Prerequisites Prerequisite: All coursework and exams and departmental permission ; exams and departmental permission Co-requisite: PUBH 898 Rationale: This revision reflects the requirements for the proposed Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health degree. AV.17 FROM: TO: Number BIOS 620 Number BIOS 620 Title Applied Biostatistics I Title Applied Biostatistics I Prerequisites (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) & (EPID 610 Prerequisites PUBH 614 OR (BIOS 610 or BIOS

466 or EPID 611) 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.18 FROM: TO: Number Number BIOS 624 BIOS 624 Design and Analysis of Complex Title Title Design and Analysis of Complex Surveys Surveys BIOS 620 Prerequisites BIOS 620 and EPID 620 Prerequisites Rationale: This added requirement will allow for better sequencing of course material. AV.19 TO: FROM: BIOS 626 Number BIOS 626 Number Data Analysis Data Analysis Title Title BIOS 620 Prerequisites BIOS 620 and EPID 620 Prerequisites Rationale: This added requirement will allow for better sequencing of course material. AV.20 FROM: TO: Number BIOS 696 Number BIOS 696 Title Supervised Fieldwork in Biostatistics Title Supervised Fieldwork in Biostatistics Description Students carry out 180 hours of Description Students carry out 180 hours of supervised field work that is intended supervised field work that is intended to bridge academic preparation and to bridge academic preparation and public health practice. Knowledge and public health practice. Knowledge and skills from the core MPH and skills from the core MPH and concentration specialization courses are applied in a courses are applied in a public health agency, community public health agency, community organization or other setting relevant organization or other setting relevant to the student’s academic background, to the student’s academic background, specialization and career expectations. specialization and career expectations. This is accomplished under the This is accomplished under the supervision and guidance of an supervision and guidance of an experienced preceptor. Field-based experienced preceptor. Field-based hours are implemented with classroom hours are implemented with classroom and individual meetings along with and individual meetings along with online communication. Aside from online communication. Aside from deliverables required by the preceptor, deliverables required by the preceptor, the student develops a reflection the student develops a reflection paper, a self-evaluation and a paper, a self-evaluation and a

467 capstone proposal. capstone proposal. Prerequisites Completion of at least 18 MPH credits, Completion of at least 18 MPH credits, Prerequisites including PUBH 614, EPID 620, and including PUBH 614, two courses in and departmental the student's area of concentration; BIOS 620; permission and departmental permission Rationale: This added requirement will allow for better sequencing of course material. AV.21 FROM: TO: BIOS 698 Number BIOS 698 Number Capstone Project in Biostatistics Title Capstone Project in Biostatistics Title Completion of at least 36 credits of Prerequisites Completion of five MPH core courses, Prerequisites BIOS 696, EPID 621, BIOS 621; coursework toward the MPH degree, and departmental permission which must include Supervised Fieldwork, all five MPH core courses, at least 3 concentration courses; and departmental permission Rationale: This added requirement will allow for better sequencing of course material. AV.22 FROM: TO: Number EPID 620 EPID 620 Number Epidemiological Methods I Epidemiological Methods I Title Title (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) & (EPID 610 PUBH 614 OR Prerequisites Prerequisites (BIOS 610 or BIOS or EPID 611) 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.23 FROM: TO: Number EPID 624 Number EPID 624 Title Title Social Epidemiology Social Epidemiology Prerequisites (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) & (EPID 610 Prerequisites PUBH 614 OR (BIOS 610 or BIOS or EPID 611) 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.24 FROM: TO: Number EPID 625 Number EPID 625

468 Title Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases Title (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) & (EPID 610 PUBH 614 OR (BIOS 610 or BIOS Prerequisites Prerequisites or EPID 611) 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.25 FROM: TO: Number EPID 626 Number EPID 626 Title Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases Title (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) & (EPID 610 Prerequisites Prerequisites PUBH 614 OR (BIOS 610 or BIOS or EPID 611) 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.26 FROM: TO: EPID 627 Number Number EPID 627 Title Reproductive and Perinatal Title Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology Epidemiology Prerequisites (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) & (EPID 610 PUBH 614 OR Prerequisites (BIOS 610 or BIOS or EPID 611) 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.27 FROM: TO: EPID 629 Number Number EPID 629 Title Environmental and Occupational Title Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology Epidemiology Prerequisites (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) & (EPID 610 PUBH 614 OR Prerequisites (BIOS 610 or BIOS or EPID 611) 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.28 FROM: TO: Number EPID 642 Number EPID 642 Title Psychiatric and Mental Health Psychiatric and Mental Health Title Epidemiology Epidemiology Prerequisites (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) & (EPID 610 Prerequisites PUBH 614 OR (BIOS 610 or BIOS

469 or EPID 611) 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.29 TO: FROM: EPID 643 Number Number EPID 643 Title Title Public Health Surveillance Public Health Surveillance Prerequisites Prerequisites PUBH 614 OR (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) & (EPID 610 (BIOS 610 or BIOS or EPID 611) 611) & (EPID 610 or EPID 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.30 FROM: TO: EPID 696 Number EPID 696 Number Supervised Fieldwork in Epidemiology Title Supervised Fieldwork in Epidemiology Title Students carry out 180 hours of Description Students carry out 180 hours of Description supervised field work that is intended supervised field work that is intended to bridge academic preparation and to bridge academic preparation and public health practice. Knowledge and public health practice. Knowledge and skills from the core MPH and skills from the core MPH and concentration specialization courses are applied in a courses are applied in a public health agency, community public health agency, community organization or other setting relevant organization or other setting relevant to the student’s academic background, to the student’s academic background, specialization and career expectations. specialization and career expectations. This is accomplished under the This is accomplished under the supervision and guidance of an supervision and guidance of an experienced preceptor. Field-based experienced preceptor. Field-based hours are implemented with classroom hours are implemented with classroom and individual meetings along with and individual meetings along with online communication. Aside from online communication. Aside from deliverables required by the preceptor, deliverables required by the preceptor, the student develops a reflection the student develops a reflection paper, a self-evaluation and a paper, a self-evaluation and a capstone proposal. capstone proposal. Prerequisites Completion of at least 18 MPH credits, Completion of at least 18 MPH credits, Prerequisites two courses in including PUBH 614, EPID 620, and including PUBH 614, the student's area of concentration; and departmental BIOS 620; permission and departmental permission Rationale: This added requirement will allow for better sequencing of course material. AV.31

470 FROM: TO: EPID 698 EPID 698 Number Number Title Capstone Project in Epidemiology Title Capstone Project in Epidemiology Prerequisites Completion of at least 36 credits of Completion of five MPH core courses, Prerequisites BIOS 696, EPID 621, BIOS 621; and coursework toward the MPH degree, departmental permission which must include Supervised Fieldwork, all five MPH core courses, at least 3 concentration courses; and departmental permission Rationale: This added requirement will allow for better sequencing of course material. AV.32 TO: FROM: HPAM 621 Number HPAM 621 Number Health Economics Title Health Economics Title Prerequisites CHSS 610 and HPAM 610 Prerequisites PUBH 613 or BIOS 610 or BIOS 611 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.33 FROM: TO: HPAM 640 HPAM 640 Number Number Introduction to Health Survey and Introduction to Health Survey and Title Title Methodology Methodology Prerequisites BIOS 610 or BIOS 611 Prerequisites PUBH 614 or BIOS 610 or BIOS 611 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.34 FROM: TO: Number Number HPAM 620 HPAM 620 Title Public Health Management Title Public Health Management Prerequisites CHSS 610 and HPAM 610 Prerequisites None Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.35 FROM: TO: Number HPAM 622 Number HPAM 622

471 Title Public Health and Health Care Law Public Health and Health Care Law Title (CHSS 610 or HPAM 610) or with Prerequisites Prerequisites None departmental permission for those with at least one year of health care experience Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.36 TO: FROM: Number HPAM 623 Number HPAM 623 Comparative Analyses of Urban Title Title Comparative Analyses of Urban Health Care Systems Health Care Systems CHSS 610 and HPAM 610 Prerequisites None Prerequisites Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.37 FROM: TO: Number HPAM 624 Number HPAM 624 Title Public Health Advocacy Title Public Health Advocacy Prerequisites CHSS 610 and HPAM 610 None Prerequisites Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.38 FROM: TO: HPAM 625 Number Number HPAM 625 Title Public Health Policy Analysis Title Public Health Policy Analysis Prerequisites CHSS 610 and HPAM 610 Prerequisites None Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.39 FROM: TO: Number CHSS 620 Number CHSS 620 Title Community Health Assessment Title Community Health Assessment Prerequisites CHSS 610 Prerequisites None Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses.

472 AV.40 FROM: TO: CHSS 621 Number Number CHSS 621 Title Community Health Interventions Community Health Interventions Title Prerequisites Prerequisite: CHSS 620 or Co- None Prerequisites requisite: CHSS 623 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.41 TO: FROM: CHSS 625 Number CHSS 625 Number Advanced Seminar on Intersectoral Title Advanced Seminar on Intersectoral Title Partnerships Partnerships Prerequisites None Prerequisites CHSS 622, CHSS 623, CHSS 624 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.42 FROM: TO: EOHS 640 EOHS 640 Number Number Biohazards and Emergency Response Title Biohazards and Emergency Response Title EOHS 620 or departmental permission Prerequisites Prerequisites EOHS 620 or EOHS 633 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.43 FROM: TO: Number Number EOHS 621 EOHS 621 Title Environmental Chemistry Title Environmental Chemistry Prerequisites Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EOHS Prerequisites None 610 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.44 FROM: TO:

473 Number EOHS 622 EOHS 622 Number Environmental and Occupational Environmental and Occupational Title Title Toxicology Toxicology Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EOHS Prerequisites Prerequisites EOHS 633 for MPH students; MS and 610 Industrial Hygiene Certificate students are waived Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.45 TO: FROM: EOHS 623 Number EOHS 623 Number Principles of Industrial Hygiene Principles of Industrial Hygiene Title Title EOHS 620 Prerequisites Prerequisites None Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.46 FROM: TO: Number EOHS 624 Number EOHS 624 Title Environmental Audits and Title Environmental Audits and Remediation Remediation EOHS 620 Prerequisites None Prerequisites Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.47 FROM: TO: Number EOHS 625 Number EOHS 625 Title Title Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Evaluation and Instrumentation Instrumentation Prerequisites (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611), EOHS 620, Prerequisites (PUBH 614 or BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) EOHS 621 and (EOHS 633 or EOHS 620) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.48 FROM:

474 Number EOHS 626 Number EOHS 626 Industrial Ventilation and Indoor Air Industrial Ventilation and Indoor Air Title Title Quality Quality Prerequisites Prerequisite: EOHS 620 or Co- Prerequisites None requisite: EOHS 620 with departmental permission Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.49 FROM: EOHS 627 Number EOHS 627 Number Noise and Radiation Hazards and Title Noise and Radiation Hazards and Title Controls Controls Prerequisites Prerequisite: EOHS 620; Prerequisite Prerequisites None or Co-requisite: EOHS 623 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.50 FROM: Number EOHS 629 EOHS 629 Number Environmental Health GISc Lab Environmental Health GISc Lab Title Title Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EOHS Prerequisites None Prerequisites 610 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses. AV.51 FROM: Number EOHS 631 Number EOHS 631 Title Title Spatial Analysis and Environmental Spatial Analysis and Environmental Modeling for Public Health Modeling for Public Health Credits 4 Credits 3 Hours 4 Hours 3 Rationale: This course was previously a concentration requirement for a program that has been discontinued. It will continue to be offered as a 3-credit elective. AV.52

475 FROM: Number EOHS 641 EOHS 641 Number Title Environmental and Occupational Title Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology Epidemiology Prerequisites Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EOHS Prerequisites EOHS 633 or EOHS 620 620 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.53 FROM: EOHS 642 EOHS 642 Number Number Title Hazardous Waste Management Title Hazardous Waste Management Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EOHS Prerequisites Prerequisites None 610 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.54 FROM: Number EOHS 643 EOHS 643 Number Industrial Safety and Management Industrial Safety and Management Title Title EOHS 620 Prerequisites Prerequisites None Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.55 FROM: Number EOHS 644 Number EOHS 644 Title Title Introduction to Quantitative Methods of Introduction to Quantitative Methods of Geography Geography Prerequisites EOHS 630 Prerequisites PUBH 614 Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. AV.56 FROM:

476 Number FNPH 624 FNPH 624 Number Nutritional Epidemiology Nutritional Epidemiology Title Title Prerequisites PUBH 613 and PUBH 614 PUBH 614 OR (EPID 610 or EPID Prerequisites 611) and (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) Rationale: This revision reflects the new master’s degree public health core courses and subsequent changes to concentration requirements. Section AVI: Courses Withdrawn AVI.1 Course Number: PUBH 620 Title: Applications of Research Methods in Public Health AVI.2 Course Number: PUBH 660 Title: Research Seminar AVI.3 Course Number: PUBH 661 Title: Research Seminar II AVI.4 Course Number: PUBH 662 Title: Research Seminar III AVI.5 Course Number: PUBH 663 Title: Thesis Research AVI.6 Course Number: EPID 641 Title: Modeling and Making the Most of your Data with R AVI.7 Course Number: HPAM 660 Title: Conducting Community Needs and Strengths Assessments AVI.8

477 Course Number: HPAM 663 Title: Health Policy and Administration in Public Health AVI.9 Course Number: HPAM 664 Title: Health Services Development and Implementation in Community and Public Health AVI.10 Course Number: HPAM 665 Title: Health Service Strategies to Improve Population Health AVI.11 Course Number: HPAM 666 Title: Program Evaluation in Community Health AVI.12 Course Number: EOHS 660 Title: Advanced Methods in Industrial Hygiene AVI.13 Course Number: EOHS 661 Title: Environmental Research & Writing AVI.14 Course Number: EOHS 662 Title: Workshop in GISc Research for Public Health

478 June 2018 Graduate School & University Center Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters June 2018 AII.1 The following Bulletin Changes are proposed for the Program: Ph.D. Biochemistry Program Code: Ph.D. 02306, M.Phil. 78746 Effective: Immediately upon approval FROM TO 60 credits of graduate work are Course of Study Course of Study 60 credits of graduate work are required for the Ph.D. degree in biochemistry, of required for the Ph.D. degree in biochemistry, of which which 30 credits are in required core courses taken 30 credits are in required core courses taken in the first within the first three semesters of study. These year of study. These include courses- lecture and include courses- lecture and laboratory- in physical laboratory- in physical biochemistry, bioorganic biochemistry, bioorganic chemistry, and general chemistry, and general biochemistry, as well as two biochemistry, as well as two seminars in seminars in biochemistry. Of the remaining 30 credits, biochemistry. Of the remaining 30 credits, 3 credits 3 must be in a relevant science course, 3 must be in must be in Biochemistry seminars, and 3 or 4 biochemistry seminars, and 3 must be in an advanced credits must be in an advanced biochemistry biochemistry course. The remainder are either elective course or courses. The remainder are either or thesis research credits . elective or thesis research credits. Rationale: The required 3-credit “relevant science” course is no longer necessary; students instead seek special topics courses in their second year as electives, often in other doctoral programs and at other universities. Thus, the new BICM curriculum will allow for more research focus and better alignment with other university programs in terms of total course load, and allows for more flexibility in curricular choices beyond the requirements. AII.2 The following Bulletin Changes are proposed for the Program: American Studies Certificate Program Program Code: 19656 Effective: Fall 2018 FROM TO The Certificate in American Studies is available to all The Certificate in American Studies is available to all doctoral students matriculated in Ph.D students matriculated in . programs at the programs at the Graduate Center. Students do not necessarily have to Graduate Center. Students do not necessarily have

479 be working toward the certificate to take courses to be working toward the certificate to take courses offered by the American Studies Certificate offered by the American Studies Certificate Program. Program. The American Studies Certificate Program at the Graduate Center prepares to teach and Americanists The American Studies Certificate Program at the Graduate Center prepares students direct to teach and American Studies programs by providing a research history, theory, and method of the in American Studies by providing grounding in the genealogies, key questions, and grounding in the discipline . The Certificate Program also gives research practices comprising the field . Because Americanists enrolled in CUNY Ph.D. programs the opportunity to study American culture in American American Studies is a thoroughly interdisciplinary field, students in the certificate program gain Studies seminars that carry students outside experience and training in interdisciplinary methods. conventional disciplinary and chronological Students and faculty from the Graduate Center’s boundaries. Participating Ph.D. programs, include Art History, English, History, Music, Philosophy, Political Ph.D. programs participate in the certificate and Science, Sociology, Theatre. Upon graduation, Anthropology, Art program, including those from students who have fulfilled all program English, History, Earth and Environmental Science, requirements receive the Ph.D. from their academic program and History, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, a Urban Education. Sociology, Theatre, and certificate in American Studies from the American Students Studies Certificate Program. enrolled in any of the Graduate Center’s doctoral programs are eligible for enrollment in the certificate Resources for Research and Training from their doctoral Upon graduation program. programs , students who have fulfilled the In New York City students of American culture find requirements receive a certificate in American themselves at the center of the nation’s Studies from the American Studies Certificate communications industry and in one of the world’s Program. richest concentrations of cultural, civic, and economic institutions. Among the research resources at their Resources for Research and Training disposal are the New York Public Library, the Mina American Studies Certificate Program students have Rees Library of the Graduate Center, the libraries of access to the rich and diverse resources available in the CUNY college campuses, as well as dozens of New York City. These include not only the New York major research museums and libraries. Students have Public Library, with its archival collections and access to a graduate faculty drawn from all CUNY dedicated branches like the Schomburg Center for institutions, offering an unmatched breadth and depth Research in Black Culture, but also the Morgan of specializations in all fields of American Studies. Library and Museum in near proximity, as well as Required Courses access to the numerous major museums comprising New York City. Faculty members teaching both at An approved sequence of four seminars is required, the Graduate Center and across the CUNY system including also serve as vital resources for American Studies students, representing as they do the enormous ASCP 81000 Introduction to American Studies: breadth and diversity of work unfolding within Histories and Methods; ASCP 81500 Themes in American Studies. Students also have opportunity to American Culture; ASCP 82000 American Culture: engage scholars from both within and outside of the Major Periods; and a fourth course approved by the CUNY system through lectures, seminars, and other Coordinator, in a subject and discipline chosen by the events regularly organized by the program. student. Special Requirements for the Certificate in American Examination Studies A section on American Studies, incorporated into the Required Courses Second Examination. Successful completion of four courses is required of

480 Dissertation : certificate students, including Participation by a member of the American Studies ASCP 81000: Introduction to American Studies program faculty on the dissertation committee and a Genealogies and Methods; ASCP 81500: Key dissertation topic approved by the program Questions in American Studies; ASCP 82000: Research in American Studies ; and, a fourth course Recent Representative Courses that addresses American studies, broadly construed, chosen by the student and approved by the program 19th-Century American Women Writers coordinator. 20th-Century Black Intellectual Thought Research Statement American Culture: Major Periods (ASCP 82000) In the semester in which they anticipate completion of their degrees and certificate program American Fiction and Society, 1919–40 requirements, students are required to submit to the American Intellectual History, 1877–Present coordinator a maximum 500 word statement reflecting on the relationship of their research to American Popular Song American Studies, broadly construed. American Slave Narratives Recent Representative Courses American Women Artists: From the Armory Show to 19th-Century American Women Writers the Dinner Party 20th-Century Black Intellectual Thought Art in America Between the Wars American Aesthetics The Body in American Visual Culture 1750–1950 Art in America Between the Wars Cyborgs and the Cinematic Imagination The Black Pacific Ethnology and Ethnography of the U.S.A The Body in American Visual Culture 1750–1950 Federal Period: Architecture and Material Culture Cyborgs and the Cinematic Imagination Film Noir in Context Ethnology and Ethnography of the U.S.A History of American Theatre Federal Period: Architecture and Material Culture History of Women and Families: U.S., 1820–Present Film Noir in Context Integration and Its Discontents History of American Theatre Jazz and American Writing History of Women and Families: U.S., 1820–Present Material and Visual Culture of the U.S. Integration and Its Discontents Minstrelsy from the Civil War to the Present Jazz and American Writing Modern American History, 1945–90 Material and Visual Culture of the U.S. Painting and Sculpture in the Gilded Age Minstrelsy from the Civil War to the Present Realism and Naturalism in Film and Literature Modern American History, 1945–90

481 Religion in Early American Republic 1797–1844 Painting and Sculpture in the Gilded Age Social History of the Roots of Mass Culture Racial Capitalism Spaces and Cultures of the American Empire Realism and Naturalism in Film and Literature The U.S. as a Welfare State in Comparative Perspective Religion in Early American Republic 1797–1844 U.S. Public Policy Social History of the Roots of Mass Culture Wallace Stevens: Rude Aesthetic Spaces and Cultures of the American Empire The U.S. as a Welfare State in Comparative Perspective U.S. Public Policy FROM TO Course Description Course Description ASCP 81000: Introduction to American Studies ASCP 81000: Introduction to American Studies: Histories and Methods Genealogies and Methods ASCP 81500: Key Questions in American Studies ASCP 81500: Themes in American Culture ASCP 82000: American Culture: Major Periods ASCP 82000: Research in American Studies Research Statement Examination In the semester in which they anticipate completion A section on American Studies, incorporated into the of their degrees and certificate program Second Examination. requirements, students are required to submit to the Dissertation coordinator a maximum 500 word statement reflecting on the relationship of their research to Participation by a member of the American Studies American Studies, broadly construed. program faculty on the dissertation committee and a dissertation topic approved by the program Rationale: The changes to the courses and requirements of the American Studies Certificate Program intend to reflect better the current state of American Studies and accordingly provide more appropriate preparation for students. The deletion of the examination and dissertation requirements also better capture how the program has operated for at least the past decade. Substantively, the advisory board has identified the aspects of graduate training as key to enabling students to garner critical conversancy as scholars and teachers of American Studies, aspects which are reflected by the proposed changes. With the revised curriculum, students would move through genealogies and methods (81000), key questions (81500), and research practices (82000), with a fourth course to be selected by the student and approved by the program coordinator. This sequence of courses would allow students substantive familiarity with the wide range of intellectual genealogies and corollary methods comprising American Studies today, while emphasizing the importance of questions and research practices as ways of understanding not only field formation, but also how they might formulate their own research.

482 The deletion of the examination and dissertation requirements is prompted in part by their impracticality given the differences among degree requirements across the Graduate Center’s doctoral programs – that is, it is not as a practical matter possible for the certificate program to require an exam section on American Studies because doctoral program requirements must take precedence, and likewise, mandating participation by an American Studies faculty member on a dissertation committee does not consistently and neatly align with doctoral program policies on dissertation committees. The addition of the research statement allows students the opportunity to reflect on their research and explain its connection to American Studies, in effect asking them to articulate their work to genealogies, methods, questions, and/or practices, i.e., the arc of the work the certificate program intends to accomplish. MACAULAY HONORS COLLEGE – 4 proposed courses for Fall 2018 Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Macaulay Honors College Career [ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [ x] Honors [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Science / Interdisciplinary Course Prefix MHC Course Number 255 Course Title Seminar 3 – Science Forward (Cross Campus) Catalogue Description Science Forward is a skills-based course that focuses on scientific thinking in the context of a variety of different fields of science. We will focus on the specific skills that allow one to have good Science Sense. These skills fall into broad categories: Number Sense, Data Sense, and Knowledge Sense. Pre/ Co Requisites N/A Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) Course Applicability [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society

483 [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 : NOTE: At least one Title and IRP code of a program to which the new course is applicable, as per Rationale SED regulation. All new courses must have a course description, a rationale, learning goals and outcomes, and the method of assessment. Course Description : Science Forward is a skills-based course that focuses on scientific thinking in the context of a variety of different fields of science. We will focus on the specific skills that allow one to have good Science Sense. These skills fall into broad categories: Number Sense, Data Sense, and Knowledge Science Sense is...being able to distinguish science from non-science; the ability to recognize how Sense. people collect and process facts into knowledge; the ability to recognize how a collection of facts becomes knowledge; being able to question and evaluate information that is presented as scientific; being an informed consumer, evaluator, and practitioner of science. Rationale : Science Forward consists of three units roughly ordered by levels of scale (Environmental and Beyond, Society, Individual). These topics will serve as the context in which we will hone our Science Sense. This course requires students to read/watch the required science content outside of the classroom and to be prepared to use that content during discussions and activities inside the classroom. It is very important to complete the required videos and readings before coming to class and think about the parts you find most fascinating or most difficult. If you are prepared for class in this way, then we can use class time to address the most difficult aspects of the material and work together to apply the knowledge you have gained. Learning Goals/Outcomes : Students will hone their Science Sense during this course, specifically: acquire a proper sense of scale and be able to make order of magnitude estimates with reasonable assumptions. Students will understand and get experience with measurement and data collection through activities in the field (including a BioBlitz common event) and be able to create and communicate their results using graphs and basic statistics. Students will become familiar with proper experimental design and the practice of scientific inquiry and will understand that science makes progress and changes through time based upon newly available evidence. Students will practice their critical thinking skills and employ reasonable skepticism and learn how to communicate science to different audiences (through two projects). Students will leave this course with an appreciation for the similar set of skills employed by scientists in seemingly disparate fields of scientific inquiry and will recognize that these skills are not only applicable to their coursework, but also to their daily lives. Assessment : Research Project (30%), participation (30%), video project (20%), news essay (10%), small writing assignments (10%). Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Macaulay Honors College Career [ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Academic Level [ x] Honors [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Science Fiction Course Prefix MHC

484 Course Number 333 Visions and Universes – Science Fiction Course Title Catalogue Description This course examines the literary and cultural genre of science fiction. Science fiction’s role as a cultural and counter-cultural force, the impact of fandom and fans, as well as its history and reception will be seen through the lens of standard science fiction tropes and themes including: time travel; alien invasion/contact; biological/genetic manipulation; cyberpunk; alternative history; space opera/future war; post-apocalypse; utopia/dystopia. The course will also use science fiction as an example and testing ground for exploring separations between “literary” and “popular” (or “high” and “low”) culture. Pre/ Co Requisites N/A Credits 3 3 Contact Hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) Course Applicability [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Rationale : NOTE: At least one Title and IRP code of a program to which the new course is applicable, as per SED regulation. All new courses must have a course description, a rationale, learning goals and outcomes, and the method of assessment. Course Description This course examines the literary and cultural genre of science fiction. Science fiction’s : role as a cultural and counter-cultural force, the impact of fandom and fans, as well as its history and reception will be seen through the lens of standard science fiction tropes and themes including: time travel; alien invasion/contact; biological/genetic manipulation; cyberpunk; alternative history; space opera/future war; post-apocalypse; utopia/dystopia. The course will also use science fiction as an example and testing ground for exploring separations between “literary” and “popular” (or “high” and “low”) culture. Rationale : Expansion of Macaulay’s upper level literary seminars. : To make students aware of the history and diversity of science fiction; to Learning Goals/Outcomes

485 examine the ways in which science fiction uniquely deals with vital literary and cultural themes; to examine the reasons for nature of the separation between “literary” and “popular” fiction; to improve students’ skills in literary and cultural analysis. Assessment : Grades on papers and the final project will be averaged together for 33.33%; combined reading responses will be 33.33%; participation in class discussions will be 33.33% of the grade. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Macaulay Honors College Department(s) Career [ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [ x] Honors [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Science & Technology Studies / Gender and Feminist Studies / Ethics / Upper Subject Area Level Seminar Course Prefix MHC Course Number 336 The Ethics of Reproductive Technology Course Title Catalogue Description Should people be able to sell reproductive materials like sperm and eggs? Should female students who go to Harvard get paid $100,000 or more for their eggs while those who go to CUNY receive $8000? Should prenatal sex selection be encouraged? Should there be laws regarding pre-implantation genetic diagnosis? If some parents are able to avoid having a baby with certain disabilities or diseases, should others be allowed to select for certain disabilities? Is it wrong to have a child if there are known genetic risk factors? Is surrogate motherhood exploitative or empowering for women? How might the growth of surrogacy in developing nations change our understanding of reproductive technology? This interdisciplinary seminar will explore the medical, legal, ethical, and gendered implications of assisted reproductive technologies. Topics will include egg and sperm donation, traditional and gestational surrogacy, transgender pregnancy, “designer” babies, the ethics of sex selection, disability and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, control and disposition of cryopreserved embryos, post- menopausal pregnancy, the ethics of reproductive globalization, and the use of reproductive technology in same-sex unions and non-traditional families. Drawing on science and technology studies, feminist theory, and medical ethics, the class will focus on the dilemmas posed by various forms of conceptive technologies as they intersect with the personal and political meanings of creating human life. Pre/ Co Requisites N/A Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g.

486 Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ ] Major Course Applicability [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Fall 2018 Effective Term NOTE: At least one Title and IRP code of a program to which the new course is applicable, as per SED regulation. Rationale: All new courses must have a course description, a rationale, learning goals and outcomes, and the method of assessment. Course Description : This interdisciplinary seminar will explore the medical, legal, ethical, and gendered implications of assisted reproductive technologies. Topics will include egg and sperm donation, traditional and gestational surrogacy, transgender pregnancy, “designer” babies, the ethics of sex selection, disability and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, control and disposition of cryopreserved embryos, post-menopausal pregnancy, the ethics of reproductive globalization, and the use of reproductive technology in same-sex unions and non-traditional families. A final paper will integrate the themes of the course by exploring the ethics of assisted reproductive technologies in further depth. : Drawing on science and technology studies, feminist theory, and medical ethics, the class will Rationale focus on the dilemmas posed by various forms of conceptive technologies as they intersect with the personal and political meanings of creating human life. : There will be weekly discussions during class and assigned readings. Each Learning Goals/Outcomes reading will produce a ‘journal’ response from each student. Class participation and discussions will be covering material that may challenge your beliefs and values. While you may not agree with everything said, you owe it to each other to listen carefully and respectfully to other people’s views. Assessment : This class will require active and sustained class participation, with open and honest discussion. Absences (as well as arriving late/leaving early) will negatively affect the final grade. Weekly readings with journal submissions (50%), final project (30%), and class participation/attendance (20%), make up the grading percentage for this class. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Macaulay Honors College

487 Career [ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [ x] Honors [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Interdisciplinary / Upper Level Seminar / Year-Long, Two Course Sequence Course Prefix MHC Course Number 355 Macaulay Springboard Course Title Catalogue Description Rather than requiring seniors to demonstrate what they have learned in a final thesis or capstone project, Macaulay offers an opportunity to create a springboard —an open-ended project that builds on knowledge acquired and opens possibilities for ongoing learning. Pre/ Co Requisites N/A Credits 6 Year-Long, Two Course Sequence Contact Hours 6 Year-Long, Two Course Sequence [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Rationale : NOTE: At least one Title and IRP code of a program to which the new course is applicable, as per SED regulation. All new courses must have a course description, a rationale, learning goals and outcomes, and the method of assessment. Course Description : For seniors who are interested in fulfilling their capstone project requirement in a new way, this course will be offered to all graduating students as a six-credit, two-semester, year-long guided workshop in preparing springboard projects, an alternative to the traditional capstone or honors thesis. Students will design and create springboard projects, which will be launched at graduation (and eligible for Capstone Reimagined Awards). Rationale : Springboard projects are presented publicly, at a national conference, to expand our students’ academic networks and encourage two-way communication with a wide audience.

488 Learning Goals/Outcomes : Project(s) that build on knowledge acquired and opens possibilities for ongoing learning. Builds on a student’s earlier work and displays and reflects that work; proposes new directions, asks unanswered questions, poses unresolved dilemmas. In response to these challenges, the Springboard Project proposes specific research and learning pathways, providing a plan with clear goals and defined next steps. Assessment : Students will get a more comprehensive and successful thesis or project of whatever kind their major requires. A springboard project focuses on process, not product. Section AIV: New Courses Ph.D. Program in Economics AIV.1 CUNYfirst Course ID PhD Program in Economics Department(s) [ ] Undergraduate [ x ] Graduate Career [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Economics Course Prefix ECON Course Number 89500 Course Title Dissertation Seminar Catalogue Description This seminar gives participants the opportunity to develop and complete their dissertation proposal and/or draft dissertation chapters. It will be conducted as a workshop centered around student presentations of their research to their peers, their advisor(s) and the seminar instructor, with seminar participants reading and commenting on one another’s work under the guidance of the seminar instructor. The discussion will involve both the substance of the students’ research and the practical issues of writing and revision, research and research methods, documentation, presentation, dissemination, and more. Completion of all parts of the Second Examination of the PhD Program in Pre/ Co Requisites Economics Credits 0 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) Course Applicability [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity

489 [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Rationale A dissertation seminar gives students a forum to discuss research ideas, to receive feedback, to practice the presentation of their research, and indeed to demonstrate progress. Research is not an activity conducted in isolation. Rather, new research builds on previous research achievements, both of self and of others. It benefits from interactive conversations, both through insightful suggestions and constructive criticism. Furthermore, by becoming involved in one another’s research, students broaden their skillset and avoid narrow specialization. A dissertation seminar is a forum for students, not for faculty. On the day that a student is presenting, the student’s dissertation advisor is encouraged to attend; other than that, the primary discussion is among students. Learning goals and outcomes Students will learn how to turn raw ideas into practical dissertation topics. Students will learn how to solicit, receive, and process insightful suggestions and constructive criticism on their research. Students will build more effective research skills by learning how to define the scope of a research project, how to search for new approaches, and how to identify dead ends. Students will improve their presentation skills. Students will build a more effective presentation of their job market paper. Assessment Every student participant makes at least one presentation during a given semester. In advance of their presentation, the presenting student makes materials available that help fellow seminar participants prepare for the seminar, in the form of written drafts, presentation slides, background papers, etc. Seminar participants demonstrate active participation in the seminar of the day. Section AIV: New Courses Ph.D. Program in Computer Science AIV.2.1 CSc86110: Pattern Matching

490 Department(s) Computer Science [ ] Undergraduate [x ] Graduate Career [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Course Number CSc 86110 Course Title Pattern Matching Pattern Matching is a branch of theoretical computer science whose ideas are used in Catalogue Description practice daily in many different data-driven areas, including (but not limited to) word processors, web search engines, biological sequence alignments, intrusion detection systems, data compression, database retrieval, and music analysis. This course gives a student training in the process of developing and analyzing efficient algorithms through the study of pattern matching algorithms that are used for searching and indexing large textual data. Pre/ Co Requisites n/a Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) General Education ____ Not Applicable Component ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Rationale : The advent of the worldwide web, next generation sequencing, and increased use of satellite imaging have all contributed to the current information explosion. One of the most basic tasks common to many applications is the discovery of patterns in the available data. To render the searching of big-data feasible, it is imperative that the underlying algorithms be efficient, both in terms of time and space. Pattern Matching is a branch of theoretical computer science whose ideas are used in practice daily in many different data-driven areas, including (but not limited to) word processors, web search engines, biological sequence alignments, intrusion detection systems, data compression, database retrieval, and music analysis. This course gives a student training in the process of developing and analyzing efficient algorithms through the study of pattern matching algorithms that are used for searching and indexing large textual data. Course Description: Pattern Matching is one of the fundamental problems in Computer Science. In its classical form, the problem

491 consists of one-dimensional string matching. Given a string (or text) T and a shorter string (or pattern) P, find all occurrences of P in T. Over the last four decades, research in Pattern Matching has developed the field into a rich area of algorithms. This course covers several variants of the pattern-matching problem. Emphasis is placed on the algorithmic techniques used to speed up naive solutions, and on the time complexity analysis of the algorithms. Learning Goals/Outcomes: The student must be able to demonstrate knowledge of how to apply and analyze the following algorithmic tools: • Finite Automata • Dynamic Programming • Suffix Trees • Naming • Convolutions • Dueling : Assessment Two written exams, one midterm and one final will be used to assess students' knowledge of the subject. The questions on the exams will address problems related to those that were discussed in class, and the student will have to demonstrate the ability to apply techniques learned to new problems. For example, after learning dynamic programming for edit distance with unit cost, a student will have to answer a question related to weighted edit distance. AIV.2.2 CSc86015: Massively Parallel Programming Department(s) Computer Science Career [ ] Undergraduate [x ] Graduate Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Course Number CSc 86015 Course Title Massively Parallel Programming Catalogue Description This course will explore the approaches to massively parallel computer applications with emphasis on using graphical programming units (GPUs) and the CUDA extensions to the C/C++ programming languages. Comparisons between multicore CPUs and multi-processor GPUs will be given. Issues such as organization of large data sets, memory usage, and communication concerns will be addressed. Different levels of concurrency will also be discussed with most the focus on thread level-concurrency. Also multiple data streams on a single GPU and multiple GPUs will be covered with quick reviews of OpenMP and OpenMPI usage. Pre/ Co Requisites

492 Credits 3 3 Contact Hours [ ] Yes [ x ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) ____ Not Applicable General Education Component ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Rationale: Massively Parallel Computing usually refer to the process of using multiple processors to work on different parts of a piece of computer program, with each processor using its own operating system and memory. With the drastically increasing Data contents of various formats being produced every day, the computer program to be used to process such large volume of data needs to be robust and efficient as well. Massively Parallel Computing addresses the challenge of processing large amount of data from the system and programing perspective, therefore is a crucial component for Data Science. The subject is lacking in our curriculum. Course Description: This course will explore the approaches to massively parallel computer applications with emphasis on using graphical programming units (GPUs) and the CUDA extensions to the C/C++ programming languages. Comparisons between multicore CPUs and multi-processor GPUs will be given. Issues such as organization of large data sets, memory usage, and communication concerns will be addressed. Different levels of concurrency will also be discussed with most of the focus on thread level-concurrency. Also multiple data streams on a single GPU and multiple GPUs will be covered with quick reviews of OpenMP and OpenMPI usage. Assessment: At least five weekly or biweekly assignments 25% Each student will be expected to carry out a project transforming an existing serial code or writing a new parallel code to use CUDA on a GPU. The student will write a paper in a research format describing their project 25% One midterm exam 25% A final presentation of the project in class 25% AIV.2.3

493 CSc86060: Text Mining Department(s) Computer Science [ ] Undergraduate [x ] Graduate Career [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Course Number CSc 86060 Course Title Text Mining Catalogue This course will include the study of different representations of textual data and the Description algorithms used to glean new information from the data. It encompasses ideas from many other areas in computer science including artificial intelligence, machine learning, databases, information retrieval, and natural language processing. This class will primarily focus on the statistical methods for text mining, including machine learning techniques that are used to facilitate decision making. Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) General Education ____ Not Applicable Component ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Rationale: Text mining is highly relevant to Data Science, and thus an essential component for our curriculum. Course Description: Text mining can be defined as the process of finding or learning patterns from textual data to aid in decision making. This course will include the study of different representations of textual data and the algorithms used to glean new information from the data. It encompasses ideas from many other areas in computer science including artificial intelligence, machine learning, databases, information retrieval, and natural language processing. This class will primarily focus on the statistical methods for text mining, including machine learning techniques that are used to facilitate decision making. Learning Goals/Outcomes:

494 Students should be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of the algorithms that were taught in class. Use current text mining software with practical, real-world data sets in a way that aids decision making. Assessment: Assessment will be based on three main components: homework sets, a final exam and a final course project. Throughout the semester, 4-5 homework sets will be assigned with regard to related topics. An in- class final exam will be used to assess students’ knowledge on the theoretical components of this course. The final course project will be a good tool to assess students’ hands-on skills. There will be final project presentations at the end of the semester as well, with additional feedback, final project report submissions will be slightly after the presentation. The above components will be weighted as follows: Homework sets: 25% Participation/attendance: 5% In Class Final exam: 25% Final project presentation: 15% Final project paper: 30% AV.1.1 Changes to be offered in the Biochemistry Department CUNYFirst Course ID 77000 77000/77001 Mini-courses FROM TO Department(s) Department(s) Biochemistry PhD Program-no change Course Physical Biochemistry Course Physical Biochemistry Pre or co Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Undergraduate Physical Prerequisite Chemistry requisite 2:45 classroom for 15 weeks; 6 Hours 3-credit version Hours 2-credit version: 2:45 hrs out of class classroom + 4.5 out unchanged of class hrs for 7 weeks Credits 3 Credits 2-3 2-credit version: Description 3-credit version Description Statistical thermodynamics, unchanged thermodynamics, equilibria, ligand binding, equilibria, ligand quantum chemistry, experimental binding, quantum approaches chemistry in fall; experimental approaches in spring

495 Requirement Core Curriculum requires 2-mini Required Core Curriculum Requirement courses in sequence Designation Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X] No [ ] Yes [ X ] No Regular course or mini-course Course Regular course Course Attribute Attribute (e.g. (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Intensive, Honors, etc Honors, etc [ X] Major Course Course [ X] Major Applicability Applicability [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures [ ] US Experience in its [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Diversity [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option College Option Detail______________________ Detail______________________ Effective Term Fall 2018 Fall 2018 creating an optional 2-credit/7-week version of the Physical Biochemistry course allows flexibility Rationale: in scheduling. The 3-credit version is always team taught by two instructors and the learning goals are divided into those for the thermodynamics, equilibria, ligand binding and quantum chemistry component taught by instructor A and an experimental approaches component taught by instructor B. When the 2-credit course is scheduled by the program, students will be required to register for the 7-week course in both fall and spring semesters during their first year such that all subject matter is covered during the academic year as follows: thermodynamics, equilibria, ligand binding, quantum chemistry in fall, experimental approaches in spring. Decisions about which course to offer will depend on the size of the first-year cohort. AV.1.2 Changes to be offered in the Biochemistry Department CUNYFirst

496 Course ID FROM TO 75000/75001 Mini-courses 75000 Biochemistry PhD Program-no Department(s) Department(s) change Bioorganic Chemistry Bioorganic Chemistry Course Course Pre or co Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Prerequisite Undergraduate Organic Chemistry requisite 2-credit version: 2:45 3-credit 2:45 classroom for 15 weeks; 6 Hours Hours classroom + 4.5 out of version hrs out of class class hrs for 7 weeks unchanged 3 Credits 2-3 Credits 2-credit version: 3-credit Description Description Structure and mechanism of structure and version bioorganic reactions and drug mechanism in fall; unchanged design and synthesis drug design and synthesis in spring Requirement Core Curriculum requires 2 mini- Core Curriculum Requirement Designation Designation courses in sequence Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X] No Course Attribute Required Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, Intensive, Honors, etc Honors, etc Course [ X] Major [ X] Major Course Applicability Applicability [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures [ ] US Experience in its [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Diversity [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option College Option

497 Detail______________________ Detail______________________ Fall 2018 Effective Term Fall 2018 creating an optional 2-credit/7-week version of the Bioorganic Chemistry course allows flexibility in Rationale: scheduling. The 3-credit version is always team taught and the learning goals are divided into those for the structure and mechanism component taught by instructor A and the drug design and synthesis component taught by instructor B. When the 2-credit course is scheduled by the program, students will be required to register for the 7-week course in both fall and spring semesters during their first year such that all subject matter is covered over the academic year. Decisions about which course to offer will depend on the size of the first-year cohort. AV.2.1 Changes to be offered in the American Studies Certificate Program CUNYFirst Course ID Introduction to American Studies: FROM TO Introduction to American Studies Genealogies and Methods Histories and Methods Department(s) Department(s) Course ASCP 81000 Course ASCP 81000 Prerequisite Pre or co requisite Hours Hours Credits 3 Credits 3 Description Description Requirement Required Requirement Required Designation Designation [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Course Attribute (e.g. Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Intensive, Honors, etc Honors, etc Course [ ] Major Course [ ] Major Applicability Applicability [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures

498 [ ] US Experience in its [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Diversity [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option Detail______________________ College Option Detail______________________ Effective Term : This update to the course title better reflects its aims and the current state of American studies. Rationale That is, the proposed change indicates this course’s aims to provide familiarity with the multiple intellectual genealogies and attendant methods comprising the field today. AV. 2.2 Changes to be offered in the American Studies Certificate Program CUNYFirst Course ID FROM TO Key Questions in American Themes in American Culture Studies Department(s) Department(s) Course ASCP 81500 Course ASCP 81500 Prerequisite Pre or co requisite Hours Hours Credits 3 3 Credits Description Description Required Requirement required Requirement Designation Designation [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Intensive, etc Honors, etc Course [ ] Major Course [ ] Major Applicability Applicability [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics

499 [ ] Science [ ] Science [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures [ ] US Experience in its [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Diversity [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option College Option Detail______________________ Detail______________________ Effective Term : This update to the course title shifts its emphasis from topic to inquiry, and reflects the program’s Rationale aims of preparing students to identify the issues and debates that have shaped American studies, as well as hone their abilities to formulate research questions that address those formative to the field. AV. 2.3 Changes to be offered in the American Studies Certificate Program CUNYFirst Course ID American Culture: Major Periods TO FROM Research in American Studies Department(s) Department(s) Course ASCP 82000 Course ASCP 82000 Pre or co requisite Prerequisite Hours Hours Credits 3 Credits 3 Description Description Requirement Required Requirement Required Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, Intensive, Honors, Honors, etc etc Course [ ] Major [ ] Major Course Applicability Applicability [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required

500 [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures [ ] US Experience in its [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Diversity [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option College Option Detail______________________ Detail______________________ Effective Term : This update to the course title reflects the program’s aims of familiarizing students with the broad Rationale and interdisciplinary range of research practices characterizing American studies. Moreover, the field no longer takes as given “American culture” nor is it organized around periodization as the current title of the course suggests. Section AV.1 Courses Withdrawn Ph.D. Program in Computer Science CSc83060 Media Processing Rationale: Not going to be offered in future. CSc86010 Scientific Computing and Numerical Math Rationale: Not going to be offered in future.

501 June 2018 Guttman Community College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters Part A: Academic Matters, Section III: Changes in Degree Programs The following revisions are proposed for the A.A. in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Science and Math track. Program: A.A. in Liberal Arts and Sciences Program Code: 34974 Effective: Fall 2018 FROM TO Course Description Crs Course Description Crs General Education Requirements sub-total [32 cr.] N/C World Cultures and Global Issues LASC 101 City Seminar I (3 cr.) U.S. Experience in Its Diversity LASC 102 City Seminar II (3 cr.) Creative Expression LASC 200 Arts in New York City (3 cr.) Individual and Society SOSC 111 Ethnographies of Work I (3 cr.) SOSC 113 Ethnographies of Work II (3 cr.) Scientific World & Life and Physical Sciences (STEM Variants) Biology 211 General Biology I (4 cr.) CHEM 211 General Chemistry I (4 cr.) English Composition ENGL 103 Composition I (3 cr.) ENGL 203 Composition II (3 cr.) Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning Math 103 (3 cr.)

502 OR MATH 103A/B Statistics (3 cr.) Requirements for the Science & Math track sub-total [21 N/C cr.] BIOL 221 General Biology II (4 cr.) CHEM 221 General Chemistry II (4 cr.) BIOL 251 Genetics (4 cr.) OR BIOL 231 Microbiology (4 cr.) OR CHEM 241 Analytical Chemistry (4 cr.) MATH 120 College Algebra and Trigonometry (3 cr.) MATH 201 Pre-Calculus (3 cr.) LASC 254: Capstone Seminar in the Liberal Arts & Sciences (3 cr.) Science & Math Track Electives sub-total [7 cr.] Science & Math Track Electives sub-total [7 cr.] BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology (3cr.) BIOL 251 Genetics (4 cr.) BIOL 231 Microbiology (4 cr.) BIOL 231 Microbiology (4 cr.) BIOL 251 Genetics (4 cr.) CHEM 241 Analytical Chemistry (4 cr.) MATH 210 Calculus (4 cr.) CHEM 110 Introduction to Chemistry (3 cr.) LASC 298: Independent Study (1-3 cr.) CHEM 120 Introduction to Biological Chemistry (3 cr.) INFT 102: Hardware & Software (3 cr.) CHEM 241 Analytical Chemistry (4 cr.) MATH 210 Calculus (4 cr.) LASC 215 Science and Society (3 cr.) LASC 295 Issues in Global Learning (3 cr.) LASC 298: Independent Study (1-3 cr.) INFT 102: Hardware & Software (3 cr.) Total cr. required for the A.A. 60 N/C Rationale: The proposed changes will maintain the same number of credits and hours as in the existing curriculum. There are no changes to the liberal arts and sciences courses. This program revision incorporated newly approved courses as electives in the Math and Science Track. It also facilitates the transfer into the Track by students in the Social Science and Humanities Track, by recognizing more LASC-SSHU courses as electives in LASC-SCIM. Part A: Academic Matters, Section IV: New Courses AIV.1 ANTH 101

503 CUNYFirst Course ID TBD NCC Academics Department ANTH Subject Area Course Title Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Course Number 101 Pre requisite/Co requisite None 3 Hours 3 Credits This course is an introduction to the field of cultural Description anthropology. Anthropology is the study of humanity, past and present, but it is also a set of tools and a way of knowing that helps us make sense of the world. Cultivating an anthropological perspective means developing a sense of curiosity about how cultures came to be, what the meaning, benefits and consequences of particular cultural beliefs and practices are, and what alternative sexist. Studying anthropology helps us begin to see that there is no one way to be human and that one of the great strengths of humanity is our ability to adapt. LA Requirement Designation Liberal Arts [X] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) General Education Component __X__ Not Applicable ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Effective Term: Fall 2018 Rationale: In the Liberal Arts & Sciences Program of Study, Social Science and Humanities Concentration, we want to offer a broader foundation of social science courses that are aligned with continued study and transfer in the liberal arts. Currently, no introductory courses in anthropology exist. This course will fill that void. AIV.2 CHEM 120

504 CUNYFirst Course ID TBD NCC Academics Department Subject Area CHEM Introduction to Biological Chemistry Course Title Course Number 120 Prerequisite(s):MATH 103 or both MATH 103A and Pre requisite/Co requisite MATH 103B; ENGL 103 Pre-/Co-requisite(s): ENGL 203 Hours 2 lecture/2 lab Credits 3 Introduction to Biological Chemistry is a one semester Description course with lecture, recitation and laboratory components designed for non-science and science majors. This course covers the fundamental concepts of general chemistry integrated with the essential features of organic and biochemistry. Topics covered include matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, energy, molecular and intermolecular bonding, chemical reactions, the structure, properties and behavior of simple organic molecules, polymers, food, household chemicals, the molecular features of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. The relationship between molecular structure and macroscopic properties is emphasized. Radioactivity, its effects and uses in biological systems are briefly introduced. Requirement Designation LA Liberal Arts [X] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) General Education Component __X__ Not Applicable ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Effective Term: Fall 2018 Rationale: This course provides a 3-credit elective for students in the LASC Science and Math Concentration, so that they can fulfill the final 7 elective credits with a broader choice of electives. It also aligns well for transfer.

505 Part A: Academic Matters, Section V: Changes in Existing Courses AV.1 Revision of BIOL 221 CUNYFirst Course ID 117761 FROM TO Department N/C Department NCC Academics Subject Area N/C Subject Area BIOL Course Title General Biology II Course Title N/C 221 Course Number N/C Course Number Pre requisite MATH 120 and a ‘C’ grade Pre requisite MATH 120 or higher in BIOL 211 Co requisite Co requisite Hours N/C 6 Hours 4 Credits N/C Credits The course will introduce Description N/C Description students to topics in cellular and molecular biology. Students will learn about the structure and function of the life-essential macromolecules, the structure and physiology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, with a focus on the mechanisms of DNA replication, transcription and translation. Genetics will be explored, including the relationship between DNA sequences and the way organisms look and function. The course has a laboratory component. Requirement Designation Requirement Designation LLA Liberal Arts [X] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts N/C Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) etc) General Education N/C __X__ Not Applicable General Education Component Component ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics

506 ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Fall 2018 Effective Term Rationale: Transfer colleges require C or better for successful transfer of these courses into science and health science programs. AV.2 Revision of BIOL 231 CUNYFirst Course ID 135631 TO FROM NCC Academics Department(s) Department(s) N/C Career [ X ] Undergraduate [ ] Career N/C Graduate N/C [ x ] Regular [ ] Academic Level Academic Level Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area BIOL Subject Area N/C Course Number 231 Course Number N/C Course Title N/C Microbiology Course Title This course is for students in Catalogue Description N/C Catalogue Description the LASC Science & Math Track. It introduces students to basic concepts specific to microbial structure/function, metabolism, regulation and growth. In Microbiology, students will explore the structure, function, and taxonomy of microbes, including bacteria and viruses, and their relationships to health and disease. The format of this course includes both lecture and laboratory work. Pre/ Co Requisites Pre-requisites: BIOL 211, Pre/ Co Requisites Pre-requisites: a ‘C’ grade or higher in BIOL 211, and CHEM 211; Co-requisite: a ‘C’ grade or higher in BIOL 221 CHEM 211; Co-requisite: BIOL 221 Credits 4 Credits N/C

507 Contact Hours 3 lecture/3 lab N/C Contact Hours Requirement Designation Requirement Designation LLA Liberal Arts [ ] No [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) etc) N/C General Education General Education __X__ Not Applicable Component Component ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Rationale: This was omitted from the original course proposal. AV.3 Revision of BIOL 251 CUNYFirst Course ID 135632 FROM FROM NCC Academics N/C Department(s) [ X ] Undergraduate [ ] Career N/C Graduate Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] N/C Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area BIOL N/C Course Number N/C 251 Course Title Genetics N/C N/C This course is recommended Catalogue Description for students who wish to pursue a degree in the biological sciences and/or professional school (ie. medical school, pharmacy

508 school). Students who take this course will gain an understanding of the principles of heredity, including gene transmission, mutation, recombination and function. The course will use current issues in genetics research to explore ethical issues related to the use of genetics in modern medicine. Pre-requisites: a ‘C’ grade Pre/ Co Requisites Pre-requisites: BIOL 211, or higher in CHEM 211 BIOL 211, and a ‘C’ grade or higher in CHEM 211 4 N/C Credits Requirement Designation Requirement Designation LLA Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Contact Hours 3 lecture / 3 lab N/C Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) N/C __X__ Not Applicable General Education Component ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Fall 2018 Effective Term Rationale: This was omitted from the original course proposal. AV.4 Revision of CHEM 221 CUNYFirst Course ID 117777 FROM TO Department NCC Academics Department N/C

509 Subject Area CHEM Subject Area N/C Course Title General Chemistry II N/C Course Title Course Number 221 Course Number N/C Pre or co requisite MATH 120 Prerequisite: MATH 120, Pre requisite and a ‘C’ grade or higher in Co requisite CHEM 211 Pre- or Co-requisite: MATH 201 7: Lecture (3hr), Lab (3hr), Hours Hours N/C Recitation (1hr) Credits Credits N/C 4 An in-depth introduction to N/C Description Description chemical equilibrium, aqueous solution chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and kinetics. This course focuses on developing the fundamental principles of thermodynamics and chemical equilibria and the applications of these principles to aqueous solution chemistry. Requirement Designation LLA Requirement Designation [ ] Yes [ x ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) etc) N/C __X__ Not Applicable Course Applicability General Education Component ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018

510 Rationale: Co-requisites and pre- requisites were unclear in the original course submission. With this we seek to make these explicit. Revision of LASC 201 AV.45 CUNYFirst Course ID 119564 TO FROM Department NCC Academics Department N/C Subject Area PHIL LASC Subject Area Environmental Ethics Course Title N/C Course Title Course Number Course Number N/C 221 Pre or co requisite Pre requisite MATH 120 Prerequisite: MATH 120, and a ‘C’ grade or higher in Co requisite CHEM 211 Pre- or Co-requisite: MATH 201 3 Hours N/C Hours Credits 3 Credits N/C Description Environmental degradation N/C Description and harm are among the most formidable challenges facing humanity in the 21st century. Students will critically engage classical, modern, and contemporary discourses on the relationship of humans to the natural environment. This class will evaluate a range of philosophic, economic, and scientific perspectives on environmental sustainability, giving attention to the environmental challenges specific to New York City. Requirement Designation LA Requirement Designation N/C Liberal Arts [X] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts N/C Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) etc) N/C Course Applicability __X__ Not Applicable General Education Component ____ Required ___ Flexible ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures

511 ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Science ____ Creative Expression _____Individual and Society _____Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Rationale: This course is a Philosophy course but has not transferred smoothly due to its subject designation. This change in subject appropriately positions it after PHIL 103: Introduction to Philosophical and Humanistic Thinking, where it continues a discipline specific mode of inquiry through a philosophical lens and context. Part A: Academic Matters, Section VI: Courses Withdrawn AVI.1 Courses associated with Energy Services Management A.A.S. HEGIS 5099 Program Code 34969 AVI.1.1 ACCT 201: Introduction to Managerial Accounting AVI.1.2 BUSI 154: Business Communications AVI.1.3 BUSI 202: Fundamentals of Management AVI.1.4 BUSI 203: Analyzing Business Sustainability AVI.1.5 BUSI 205: Principles of Marketing AVI.1.1 ECON 213: Energy Economics AVI.1.6 ENMG 102: Energy Technology & Sustainability AVI.1.7 ENMG 201: Sustainable Buildings AVI.1.8 PHYS 201: Physics of Renewable Energy Rationale for course withdrawals: As per CUR November 2015, AI.1.2, the associated program was de-registered, effective December 2015. AVI.2 Courses associated with Environmental Science A.S. HEGIS 5619 Program Code 34970 AVI.2.1 EVSC 211: Environmental Science II: Urban Ecosystem Management AVI.2.2 EVSC 221: Environmental Impact Assessment AVI.2.3 EVSC 222: Internship in Environmental Science AVI.2.4 EVSC 253: Special Topics in Environmental Science Rationale for course withdrawals: As per CUR November 2015, AI.1.2, the associated program was de-registered, effective December 2015. AVI.3 Courses associated with Health Information Technology A.A.S. HEGIS 5201 Program Code 34971 AVI.3.1 BIOL 213: Human Anatomy & Physiology I

512 AVI.3.2 BIOL 222: Pathophysiology Care AVI.3.3 BIOL 223: Human Anatomy & Physiology II AVI.3.4 HEIT 214: Quality Assessment & Performance Improvement AVI.3.5 HEIT 222: Computer Applications in Health Care & Data Security AVI.3.6 HEIT 223: Professional Practice Experience II AVI.3.7 HEIT 224: Health Care Statistics & Research AVI.3.8 HEIT 224: Legal & Ethnical Aspects of Health AVI.3.9 HEIT 225: Professional Practice Experience III AVI.3.10 HEIT 231: Introduction to CPT/HCPCS Coding AVI.3.11 HEIT 311: Organizational Resources & Management AVI.3.12 HEIT 312: Principles of Health Care Reimbursement Rationale for course withdrawals: As per CUR November 2015, AI.1.2, the associated program was de-registered, effective December 2015.

513 June 2018 CUNY School of Professional Studies Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS SECTION AI: SPECIAL ACTIONS AI.1 Change in the Grade and Progression Criteria for the B.S. in Nursing (program code: 36149) RESOLVED, that the grading and progression criteria for all required courses in the Nursing major be amended to include the second paragraph below. A minimum grade of “C” is required in all Nursing Program courses. A student may not progress to the next course in the sequence without having attained a “C” in the previous course. Students may repeat only one nursing course, one time only. This includes students who withdrew from a course for any reason and students who completed the course with a grade below C. Students earning less than a C grade in a Nursing Program course may repeat the course one time and must attain a grade of C or better. A second earned grade of less than C in any Nursing Program Course will result in dismissal from the program. EXPLANATION: The BS in Nursing program requires students to complete the program within five (5) calendar years after admission, or students will need to re-apply to the program. This change is being requested to help support achievement of this program requirement by promoting timely progression towards completion. SECTION AI: SPECIAL ACTIONS AI.2 Change in the Admission Criteria for the Certificate in Community Leadership (program code: 38444) RESOLVED, that admission criteria for the Certificate in Community Leadership be changed as follows: Current: Candidates must have earned at least 24 credits at an accredited college or university; maintained an overall GPA of at least 2.0; and have demonstrated basic proficiency in reading, writing, and mathematics. Applicants are required to write a personal statement and upload a resume Change: Candidates must have completed a high school diploma or High School Equivalency diploma from New York State and are required to write a personal statement. EXPLANATION: For prospective students, the match of admission criteria to other Murphy Institute undergraduate certificate programs will better facilitate student eligibility for the Certificate in Community Leadership. SECTION AI: SPECIAL ACTIONS

514 AI.3 Articulation Agreement for the B.S. in Business (program code: 31791) that an articulation agreement has been entered into between the Borough of Manhattan RESOLVED, Community College’s A.A.S. in Business Management and the CUNY School of Professional Studies’ (CUNY SPS) B.S. in Business EXPLANATION: A formal articulation agreement between the two institutions will enable students to seamlessly transfer credits from the A.A.S. in Business to the B.S. in Business ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SENIOR COLLEGE PROGRAM Graduates of the BMCC associate’s degree program in Business Management will qualify for admission into the CUNY SPS Bachelor of Science degree in Business if they have maintained a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and are in good standing at BMCC. Applicants will follow the standard admissions process, which includes completing a transfer application and a personal essay that will help CUNY SPS understand the student’s educational goals and readiness for baccalaureate study. BMCC Business Management graduates will be awarded 60 transfer credits toward the bachelor’s degree based on the Business Management curriculum effective spring 2018. Should that curriculum change, it will be necessary to reevaluate the transfer credit process. Courses in Mathematics and English require a grade of C or better for transfer in accordance with current University policy. Upon matriculation into the B.S. program in Business, students will be required to fulfill elective and major requirements specified on the following pages. Total transfer credits granted toward the baccalaureate degree: 60 Total additional credits required at the senior college to complete baccalaureate degree: 60 Total credits required for the B.S. in Business: 120 COURSE TO COURSE EQUIVALENCIES AND/OR TRANSFER CREDITS AWARDED BMCC graduates who complete the A.A.S. in Business Management will receive 60 credits toward the B.S in Business at CUNY SPS. Common Core – 17 credits Required Common Core English Composition – 6 credits Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning – 4 credits Life & Physical Sciences – 4 credits Total Required Common Core - 14 credits Flexible Core Creative Expression – SPE 100 - Fundamentals of Speech – 3 credits Total Flexible Core – 3 credits Business Management Curriculum Requirements – 43 Credits

515 ACC 122 - Accounting Principles I – 3 credits BUS 104 - Introduction to Business – 3 credits BUS 110 - Business Law – 3 credits BUS 150 - Business Communication – 3 credits BUS 210 - Business Methods – 3 credits BUS 220 - Managerial Decision Making – 3 credits CED 361 - Business Management Internship I – 2 credits CIS 100 - Introduction to Computer Applications OR CIS 200 - Introduction Systems and Technologies – 3 credits ECO 201 - Macroeconomics OR ECO 202 – Microeconomics – 3 credits FNB 100 - Introduction to Finance – 3 credits MAR 100 - Introduction to Marketing – 3 credits Business Concentration Electives – 9 credits General Electives – 2 credits Total Curriculum Credits - 60 SUMMARY OF TRANSFER CREDITS FROM BMCC AND CREDITS TO BE COMPLETED AT CUNY SPS To fulfill the Business Concentration Electives at BMCC students select from four areas. Those who opt for the General Management Concentration will have a different transfer credit configuration than those in the Finance and Banking, Marketing, and Hotel, Travel and Tourism Concentrations, as outlined below. General Management Transfer Credits from Credits to be Completed Total Credits for B.S. BMCC at SPS General Education 21 36 15* Requirements Major Core 15-18 21-24 39 3 Capstone 3 0 Major Electives** 18 12-15 3-6 Free Electives 24 15* 9 Total 60 60 120 Finance and Banking, Marketing, and Hotel, Travel and Tourism Total Credits for B.S. Transfer Credits from Credits to be Completed BMCC at SPS General Education 36 15* 21

516 Requirements Major Core 12-15 24-27 39 3 3 Capstone 0 Major Electives** 18 6-9 9-12 24 24* 0 Free Electives Total 120 60 60 *Two credits from Required Core will be transferred as Free Elective credit. **A.A.S. major requirement includes ECO 201 OR ECO 202. Students who take ECO 201 at BMCC will satisfy ECO 202 at SPS, which is a required course. Students who take ECO 202 at BMCC will satisfy ECO 201 at SPS, which is a Business Elective course. COURSE EQUIVALENCIES BMCC CUNY SPS ACC 122 – Accounting Principles I BUS 305 - Accounting Fundamentals BUS 104 - Introduction to Business BUS 200 - Introduction to Business BUS 110 - Business Law BUS 330 - Business Law I BUS 320 - Principles of Management BUS 200 – Business Organization and Management BUS 321 - Human Resource Management BUS 311 – Human Resource Management CIS 200 - Introduction Systems and Technologies CIS 101 - Computer Fundamentals and Applications ECO 202 - Macroeconomics ECO 201 - Macroeconomics ECO 202 – Microeconomics ECO 201 - Microeconomics MAR 100 - Introduction to Marketing BUS 315 - Principles of Marketing SBE 100 – Product & Service Creation BUS 340 - Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship SENIOR COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREE Students will be required to take the following courses at CUNY SPS after completing the A.A.S. in Business Management at BMCC. General Management Concentration General Education Requirements Flexible Core – 15 credits World Cultures and Global Issues - 3 credits U.S. Experience in Its Diversity - 3 credits Individual and Society - 3 credits Scientific World - 3 credits Three credits in any of the above categories - 3 credits College Option – 6 credits

517 Required Major Requirements Core – 21 - 24 credits BUS 210 - Business Math - 3 credits BUS 301 - Managerial Economics - 3 credits BUS 305 - Accounting Fundamentals (fulfilled at BMCC) BUS 310 - Foundations of Business Statistics - 3 credits BUS 315 - Principles of Marketing (fulfilled at BMCC) BUS 320 - Principles of Management (fulfilled at BMCC) BUS 325 - Principles of Management Information Systems - 3 credits BUS 330 - Business Law I (fulfilled at BMCC) BUS 333 - Corporate Finance - 3 credits BUS 335 - Operations Management - 3 credits BUS 410 - Research Methods for Business Decision-Making - 3 credits CIS 101 - Computer Fundamentals and Applications (fulfilled at BMCC) ECO 202 – Macroeconomics 3 credits (unless fulfilled at BMCC) Capstone Experience – 3 credits BUS 440 – Internship BUS 470 - Strategic Management BUS 460 - Virtual Enterprise BUS 480 – Thesis Business Electives: 3 – 6 credits (18 credits required. 12 to 15 will be satisfied with BMCC courses.) BUS 200 - Introduction to Business BUS 340 - Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship BUS 306 - Managerial Accounting BUS 345 - Strategic Electronic Marketing BUS 321 - Human Resource Management BUS 346 - Investments

518 BUS 331 - Global Business BUS 348 - Real Estate Finance BUS 332 - Electronic Commerce BUS 350 - Business Law II BUS 334 - Great Ideas in Business BUS 415 - Essentials of Market Research BUS 336 - Special Topics in Business BUS 338 - International Trade BUS 339 - Sustainability and Green Business ECO 201 - Microeconomics ORGD 341 - Organizational Change and Leadership PROM 210 - Project Management Free Electives: 9 credits (24 credits required. 15 credits from BMCC's will be transferred as free electives. In addition, t wo credits from Required Core will be transferred as Free Elective credit. Total Number of Credits to be Completed at CUNY SPS 60 Total Credits Transferred from BMCC 60 Total Credits Required for the Baccalaureate Degree 120 Finance and Banking, Marketing, and Hotel, Travel and Tourism Concentrations General Education Requirements Flexible Core – 15 credits World Cultures and Global Issues - 3 credits U.S. Experience in Its Diversity - 3 credits Individual and Society - 3 credits Scientific World - 3 credits Three credits in any of the above categories - 3 credits College Option – 6 credits Required Major Requirements Core – 24 - 27 credits BUS 210 - Business Math - 3 credits

519 BUS 301 - Managerial Economics - 3 credits BUS 305 - Accounting Fundamentals (fulfilled at BMCC) BUS 310 - Foundations of Business Statistics - 3 credits BUS 315 - Principles of Marketing (fulfilled at BMCC) BUS 320 - Principles of Management - 3 credits BUS 325 - Principles of Management Information Systems - 3 credits BUS 330 - Business Law I (fulfilled at BMCC) BUS 333 - Corporate Finance - 3 credits BUS 335 - Operations Management - 3 credits BUS 410 - Research Methods for Business Decision-Making - 3 credits CIS 101 - Computer Fundamentals and Applications (fulfilled at BMCC) ECO 202 – Macroeconomics 3 credits (unless fulfilled at BMCC) Capstone Experience – 3 credits BUS 440 – Internship BUS 470 - Strategic Management BUS 460 - Virtual Enterprise BUS 480 – Thesis Business Electives: 9– 12 credits (18 credits required. Six to nine will be satisfied with BMCC courses.) BUS 200 - Introduction to Business BUS 340 - Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship BUS 306 - Managerial Accounting BUS 345 - Strategic Electronic Marketing BUS 321 - Human Resource Management BUS 346 - Investments BUS 331 - Global Business BUS 348 - Real Estate Finance BUS 332 - Electronic Commerce

520 BUS 350 - Business Law II BUS 334 - Great Ideas in Business BUS 415 - Essentials of Market Research BUS 336 - Special Topics in Business BUS 338 - International Trade BUS 339 - Sustainability and Green Business ECO 201 - Microeconomics ORGD 341 - Organizational Change and Leadership PROM 210 - Project Management Free Electives: 24 credits required. 24 credits from BMCC's will be transferred as free electives, including t wo credits from Required Core that will be transferred as Free Elective credit. Total Number of Credits to be Completed at CUNY SPS 60 Total Credits Transferred from BMCC 60 Total Credits Required for the Baccalaureate Degree 120 AIII.1 Revisions for the B.S. in Health Services Administration CUNY School of Professional Studies Program: BS in Health Services Administration Program Code: 39181 Effective: Fall 2018 From From Course/Description/Credits Course/Description/Credits General Education – 36 - 42 credits General Education – 36 - 42 credits Health Services Administration Requirements – 54 Health Services Administration Requirements – 54 credits credits BIO 200 - Human Biology BIO 200 - Human Biology BUS 305 - Accounting Fundamentals BUS 305 - Accounting Fundamentals CIS 101 - Computer Fundamentals and CIS 101 - Computer Fundamentals and Applications Applications COM 210 - Writing at Work COM 210 - Writing at Work HESA 369 - Health Information Technology HESA 369 - Health Information Technology

521 HESA 450 - Compliance, Regulatory, and Legal HESA 450 - Compliance, Regulatory, and Issues in Health Care Legal Issues in Health Care HESA 499 - Health Services Administration HESA 499 - Health Services Administration Capstone Capstone HIM 200 - Medical Terminology HIM 200 - Medical Terminology HIM 205 - Healthcare Delivery Systems HIM 205 - Healthcare Delivery Systems HIM 332 - Quality Management and HIM 332 - Quality Management and Performance Improvement Performance Improvement HIM 360 - Privacy and Security of Health HIM 360 - Privacy and Security of Health Information Information HIM 365 - Management in Health Care HIM 365 - Management in Health Care HIM 370 - Organizational Development and HIM 370 - Organizational Development and Planning in Health Care Planning in Health Care MATH 215 - Introduction to Statistics MATH 215 - Introduction to Statistics PHE 200 - Introduction to Public Health PHE 200 - Introduction to Public Health PHIL 201 - Bioethics for Health Professions PHIL 201 - Bioethics for Health Professions PROM 210 - Project Management PROM 210 - Project Management RM 201 - Introduction to Research Methods RM 201 - Introduction to Research Methods Health Services Administration Electives – 15 credits Health Services Administration Electives – 15 credits BIO 310 - Pathophysiology and Pharmacology BIO 310 - Pathophysiology and Pharmacology BUS 200 - Introduction to Business BUS 200 - Introduction to Business BUS 306 - Managerial Accounting BUS 306 - Managerial Accounting BUS 325 - Principles of Management BUS 325 - Principles of Management Information Systems Information Systems CM 333 - Corporate Communication CM 333 - Corporate Communication ECO 201 - Microeconomics ECO 201 - Microeconomics ECO 202 - Macroeconomics ECO 202 - Macroeconomics HCA 300 - Urban Health Services and HCA 300 - Urban Health Services and Institutions Institutions HCA 301 - Urban Health Issues and Public HCA 301 - Urban Health Issues and Public Policy Policy

522 HESA 350 - Special Topics in Health Services HESA 350 - Special Topics in Health Services Administration Administration SPAN 110 - Spanish for Health Professions SPAN 110 - Spanish for Health Professions Free Electives – 9 - 15 credits Free Electives – 9 - 15 credits TOTAL – 120 credits TOTAL – 120 credits Rationale: The two courses being removed belong to programs that will be moved to the new CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, which will begin its first semester in Fall 2018. Removal of these courses will not impact students as they are both options within the Health Services Administration elective options. Students will still have nine courses to choose from to satisfy the required 15 credits. AIII.2 Revisions for the Certificate in Community Leadership CUNY School of Professional Studies Program: Certificate in Community Leadership 38444 Program Code: Effective: Fall 2018 From From Course/Description/Credits Course/Description/Credits Required Courses – 12 Credits Required Courses – 12 Credits URB 321 - Community Organizing and URB 321 - Community Organizing and Community Organizations (4 Credits) Community Organizations (4 Credits) URB 339 - Urban and Community Studies Field URB 339 - Urban and Community Studies Work (4 Credits) Field Work (4 Credits) LPOL 301 - Work, Culture, and Politics in New LPOL 301 - Work, Culture, and Politics in New York City (4 Credits) York City (4 Credits) Free Electives – 3-4 credits Free Electives – 4 credits URB 323 - Community Development (4 Credits) URB 323 - Community Development (4 Credits) URB 324 - Introduction to Nonprofit Leadership (4 Credits) URB 324 - Introduction to Nonprofit Leadership (4 Credits) URB 451 - Urban and Community Studies Special Topics (4 Credits) URB 451 - Urban and Community Studies Special Topics (4 Credits) CM 203 - Introduction to Communication and Media (3 Credits) CM 203 - Introduction to Communication and Media (3 Credits) POL 201 - Politics and Government of New POL 201 - Politics and Government of New York City (3 Credits) York City (3 Credits) TOTAL – 15 - 16 credits

523 TOTAL – 16 credits Rationale: The two courses belong to programs that will not be moved to the new CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies. Student will therefore no longer have access to them except via ePermit. Revisions for the B.A. in Disability Studies AIII.3 CUNY School of Professional Studies Program: B.A. in Disability Studies Program Code: 35334 Effective: Fall 2018 From From Course/Description/Credits Course/Description/Credits General Education – 36 - 42 credits General Education – 36 - 42 credits Level I: Introductory – 6 credits Level I: Introductory – 6 credits DSAB 200 - Disability and Society DSAB 200 - Disability and Society DSAB 201 - Disability and Embodiment DSAB 201 - Disability and Embodiment Level II: Core – 12 credits Level II: Core – 12 credits DSAB 207 - Law, Policy and Disability DSAB 207 - Law, Policy and Disability DSAB 208 - Disability in History DSAB 208 - Disability in History DSAB 209 - Disability Narratives DSAB 209 - Disability Narratives RM 201 - Introduction to Research Methods RM 201 - Introduction to Research Methods Level III: Concentration Level III: Concentration Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Students must complete six credits in the Students must complete six credits in the following: following: DSAB 311 - Elements of Person Centered DSAB 311 - Elements of Person Centered Planning Planning DSAB 312 - Supporting Children and Adults DSAB 312 - Supporting Children and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities with Intellectual Disabilities Students must also complete six credits from Students must also complete six credits from the following courses: the following courses: DSAB 211 - Aging and Disability DSAB 211 - Aging and Disability DSAB 212 - Introduction to Residential Services DSAB 212 - Introduction to Residential Services

524 DSAB 213 - Transition and Adulthood DSAB 213 - Transition and Adulthood DSAB 214 - Traumatic Brain Injury: Causes and Systems of Care DSAB 214 - Traumatic Brain Injury: Causes and Systems of Care DSAB 251 - Disability and Families DSAB 251 - Disability and Families DSAB 252 - Vocational Mentoring Disability DSAB 252 - Vocational Mentoring DSAB 342 - Representations of Disability in and Employment Film and Literature DSAB 342 - Representations of Disability in NURS 314 - Case Management in Health and Film and Literature Human Services NURS 314 - Case Management in Health and Autism Spectrum Disorders Human Services Students must complete six credits in the Autism Spectrum Disorders following: Students must complete six credits in the DSAB 321 - Using Assessments for following: Intervention, Planning and Placement DSAB 321 - Using Assessments for DSAB 322 - Teaching Strategies and Intervention, Planning and Placement Behavioral Supports DSAB 322 - Teaching Strategies and Students must also complete six credits from Behavioral Supports the following courses: Students must also complete six credits from DSAB 221 - Asperger Syndrome Across the Life the following courses: Cycle DSAB 221 - Asperger Syndrome Across the DSAB 222 - Autism Narratives Life Cycle DSAB 223 - Autism Spectrum Disorder in DSAB 222 - Autism Narratives Young People DSAB 223 - Autism Spectrum Disorder in DSAB 224 - Inclusion: Principles in Practice Young People DSAB 225 - Speech and Communication Issues DSAB 224 - Inclusion: Principles in Practice in Autism Spectrum Disorder DSAB 225 - Speech and Communication DSAB 251 - Disability and Families Issues in Autism Spectrum Disorder DSAB 252 - Vocational Mentoring DSAB 251 - Disability and Families DSAB 358 - Selected Topics in Disability DSAB 252 - Vocational Mentoring Studies DSAB 311 - Elements of Person Centered DSAB 359 - Independent Study in Disability Planning Studies DSAB 358 - Selected Topics in Disability DSAB 449 - Internship in Disability Studies Studies

525 NURS 314 - Case Management in Health and DSAB 359 - Independent Study in Disability Human Services Studies Mental/Behavioral Health DSAB 449 - Internship in Disability Studies Students must complete six credits in the NURS 314 - Case Management in Health and following: Human Services DSAB 331 - Introduction to Mental, Behavioral Mental/Behavioral Health and Developmental Disorders Students must complete six credits in the DSAB 332 - Introduction to Crisis-Intervention following: and Safety DSAB 331 - Introduction to Mental, Behavioral Students must also complete six credits from and Developmental Disorders the following courses: DSAB 332 - Introduction to Crisis-Intervention DSAB 231 - Community Mental Health and Safety DSAB 232 - Dual Diagnosis Students must also complete six credits from the following courses: DSAB 233 - Elements of Behavioral Health Counseling DSAB 231 - Community Mental Health DSAB 234 - Mad People's History DSAB 232 - Dual Diagnosis DSAB 235 - Peer Wellness and Recovery DSAB 233 - Elements of Behavioral Health Counseling DSAB 251 - Disability and Families DSAB 234 - Mad People's History DSAB 252 - Vocational Mentoring DSAB 235 - Peer Wellness and Recovery DSAB 358 - Selected Topics in Disability Wellness and Recovery Model Studies DSAB 251 - Disability and Families DSAB 359 - Independent Study in Disability Studies DSAB 252 - Vocational Mentoring NURS 314 - Case Management in Health and DSAB 311 - Elements of Person Centered Human Services Planning Disability Studies DSAB 358 - Selected Topics in Disability Studies Students must complete six credits in the following: DSAB 359 - Independent Study in Disability Studies DSAB 341 - Disability, Evolution, Eugenics and Genomics NURS 314 - Case Management in Health and Human Services DSAB 342 - Representations of Disability in Film and Literature Disability Studies Students must also complete six credits in the Students must complete six credits in the following courses: following:

526 DSAB 244 - Diversity and Disability DSAB 341 - Disability, Evolution, Eugenics and Genomics DSAB 245 - Universal Design and Assistive Technology PHIL 201 - Bioethics for Health Professions DSAB 251 - Disability and Families DSAB 342 - Representations of Disability in Film and Literature DSAB 246 - War, Veterans, and Disability Students must also complete six credits in the DSAB 242 - Disability and Mass Media following courses: DSAB 243 - Disability, Music and The Arts DSAB 244 - Diversity and Disability DSAB 241 - Disability and Comparative Religion DSAB 245 - Universal Design and Assistive Technology DSAB 358 - Selected Topics in Disability Studies DSAB 251 - Disability and Families DSAB 359 - Independent Study in Disability DSAB 246 - War, Veterans, and Disability Studies DSAB 242 - Disability and Mass Media Level IV: Integration – 3 credits DSAB 243 - Disability, Music and The Arts DSAB 499 - Capstone: Senior Research Project DSAB 241 - Disability and Comparative DSAB 449 - Internship in Disability Studies Religion Free Electives – 45-51 credits DSAB 358 - Selected Topics in Disability Studies TOTAL – 120 credits DSAB 359 - Independent Study in Disability Studies Level IV: Integration – 3 credits DSAB 499 - Capstone: Senior Research Project DSAB 449 - Internship in Disability Studies Free Electives – 45-51 credits TOTAL – 120 credits Rationale: Add DSAB 311 “Person Centered Planning” to the Autism Spectrum Disorder and Mental/Behavioral Health concentrations. Person Centered Planning has become more important in the mental/behavioral health fields and is also a feature of planning for children and adults on the autism spectrum so should be included in these concentrations. Add PHIL 201 “Bioethics for Health Professions” to the Interdisciplinary Disability Studies concentration. DSAB 341 is essentially the same course as PHIL 201. With a small number of students in the concentration, it is only offered infrequently and classes are very small. It makes sense to give students more frequent access to the course material and a larger group of students to interact with in class by changing the course to PHIL 201.

527 As the following courses have never been offered, removing them from the program will make choices clearer to the students. DSAB 341 “Disability, Evolution, Eugenics and Genomics” from the Interdisciplinary Disability Studies concentration DSAB 221 “Asperger Syndrome Across the Life Cycle” from the Autism Spectrum Disorder concentration DSAB 225 “Speech and Communication Issues in Autism Spectrum Disorder” from the Autism Spectrum Disorder concentration DSAB 243 “Disability Music and the Arts” from the Interdisciplinary Disability Studies concentration DSAB 241 “Disability and Comparative Religion” from the Interdisciplinary Disability Studies concentration AIII.4 Revisions for the M.A. in Disability Studies CUNY School of Professional Studies M.A. in Disability Studies Program: Program Code: 32353 Effective: Fall 2018 From From Course/Description/Credits Course/Description/Credits Required Courses – 18 credits Required Courses – 18 credits DSAB 601 - Psychosocial, Cultural and Political DSAB 601 - Psychosocial, Cultural and Aspects of Disability Political Aspects of Disability DSAB 602 - Embodiment and Disability DSAB 602 - Embodiment and Disability DSAB 605 - Disability and Diversity DSAB 605 - Disability and Diversity Qualitative DSAB 611 - Research Methods DSAB 611 - Research Methods Research Methods DSAB 626 - Disability Law and Policy DSAB 626 - Disability Law and Policy DSAB 699 - Capstone Course DSAB 699 - Capstone Course Disability Studies Electives – 12 credits Disability Studies Electives – 12 credits DSAB 603 - Disability and the Family Life Cycle DSAB 603 - Disability and the Family Life DSAB 620 - Disability History Cycle DSAB 621 - Disability Studies and the DSAB 620 - Disability History Humanities DSAB 621 - Disability Studies and the DSAB 622 - Disability in Mass Media Humanities

528 DSAB 623 - Disability Studies and the Health DSAB 622 - Disability in Mass Media Professions DSAB 623 - Disability Studies and the Health DSAB 624 - Disability Services Administration Professions DSAB 627 - Disability and Narrative DSAB 624 - Disability Services Administration Leadership in Disability Service Agencies DSAB 628 - Disability Studies in Education DSAB 627 - Disability and Narrative DSAB 629 - Students with Disabilities in Higher Education DSAB 628 - Disability Studies in Education DSAB 630 - Aging and Disability: Multiple DSAB 629 - Students with Disabilities in Higher Perspectives and Emerging Issues Education DSAB 639 - Fieldwork in Disability Studies DSAB 630 - Aging and Disability: Multiple Perspectives and Emerging Issues DSAB 649 - Independent Study DSAB 639 - Fieldwork in Disability Studies DSAB 651 - Special Topics Course DSAB 649 - Independent Study TOTAL – 30 credits DSAB 651 - Special Topics Course DSAB 655 - Reel to Real: Psychiatry at the Cinema TOTAL – 30 credits Rationale: Add a new course to the program, ‘Psychiatry at the Cinema”. This will be a new option within the required Disability Studies Electives. “Real to Reel: Psychiatry at the Cinema” has been offered as a Special Topics course, both in-person and online, which has been well received by the students as it represents a different lens on disability. Formally adding this to the program will help balance the curriculum’s offering in the arts. The course has been developed by Neil Harbus, a Consortial Faculty member and adjunct lecturer in the Disability Studies programs. Withdraw DSAB 639 “Fieldwork in Disability Studies” from the program. DSAB 639 has only been offered once in the nine years the program has existed. Students who wish to do fieldwork have the option of DSAB 649, Independent Study, which can be structured as an independent study experience or an internship. Revisions for the Advanced Certificate in Disability Studies AIII.5 CUNY School of Professional Studies Program: Advanced Certificate. in Disability Studies Program Code: 29124 Effective: Fall 2018 From From Course/Description/Credits Course/Description/Credits

529 Required Courses – 6 credits Required Courses – 6 credits DSAB 601 - Psychosocial, Cultural and Political DSAB 601 - Psychosocial, Cultural and Aspects of Disability Political Aspects of Disability DSAB 602 - Embodiment and Disability DSAB 602 - Embodiment and Disability Disability Studies Electives – 6 credits Disability Studies Electives – 6 credits DSAB 603 - Disability and the Family Life DSAB 605 - Disability and Diversity Cycle DSAB 611 - Research Methods DSAB 605 - Disability and Diversity DSAB 626 - Disability Law and Policy Qualitative DSAB 611 - Research Methods DSAB 699 - Capstone Course Research Methods DSAB 603 - Disability and the Family Life Cycle DSAB 620 - Disability History DSAB 620 - Disability History DSAB 621 - Disability Studies and the Humanities DSAB 621 - Disability Studies and the Humanities DSAB 622 - Disability in Mass Media DSAB 622 - Disability in Mass Media DSAB 623 - Disability Studies and the Health Professions DSAB 623 - Disability Studies and the Health Professions DSAB 624 - Disability Services Administration Leadership in Disability Service Agencies DSAB 624 - Disability Services Administration DSAB 626 - Disability Law and Policy DSAB 626 - Disability Law and Policy DSAB 627 - Disability and Narrative DSAB 627 - Disability and Narrative DSAB 628 - Disability Studies in Education DSAB 628 - Disability Studies in Education DSAB 629 - Students with Disabilities in Higher DSAB 629 - Students with Disabilities in Higher Education Education DSAB 630 - Aging and Disability: Multiple DSAB 630 - Aging and Disability: Multiple Perspectives and Emerging Issues Perspectives and Emerging Issues DSAB 639 - Fieldwork in Disability Studies DSAB 639 - Fieldwork in Disability Studies DSAB 651 - Special Topics Course DSAB 649 - Independent Study DSAB 655 - Reel to Real: Psychiatry at the DSAB 651 - Special Topics Course Cinema TOTAL – 12 credits TOTAL – 30 credits Rationale: Add a new course to the program, ‘Psychiatry at the Cinema”. This will be a new option within the required Disability Studies Electives. “Real to Reel: Psychiatry at the Cinema” has been offered as a Special Topics course, both in-person and

530 online, which has been well received by the students as it represents a different lens on disability. Formally adding this to the program will help balance the curriculum’s offering in the arts. The course has been developed by Neil Harbus, a Consortial Faculty member and adjunct lecturer in the Disability Studies programs. Withdraw DSAB 639 “Fieldwork in Disability Studies” from the program. DSAB 639 has only been offered once in the nine years the program has existed. Students who wish to do fieldwork have the option of DSAB 649, Independent Study, which can be structured as an independent study experience or an internship. AIII.6 Revisions for the MS in Business Management and Leadership CUNY School of Professional Studies Program: MS in Business Management and Leadership Program Code: 32999 Effective: Fall 2018 From From Course/Description/Credits Course/Description/Credits Required Courses – 21 credits Required Courses – 21 credits BUS 600 - Organizational Behavior and BUS 600 - Organizational Behavior and Leadership Leadership BUS 630 - Business Law and Ethics in the BUS 630 - Business Law and Ethics in the Digital Age Digital Age BUS 640 - Accounting for Business Decisions BUS 640 - Accounting for Business Decisions BUS 650 - Knowledge and Information Systems BUS 650 - Knowledge and Information Systems BUS 660 - Corporate and International Finance BUS 660 - Corporate and International Finance BUS 670 - Quantitative Decision-Making BUS 670 - Quantitative Decision-Making BUS 680 - Economics for Business Decisions BUS 680 - Economics for Business Decisions Capstone – 3 credits Capstone – 3 credits BUS 696 - Global Virtual Enterprise BUS 696 - Global Virtual Enterprise BUS 697 - Global Strategic Management BUS 697 - Global Strategic Management BUS 698 - Applied Business Research BUS 698 - Applied Business Research BUS 699 - Thesis BUS 699 - Thesis Business Electives – 6 credits Business Electives – 6 credits BUS 605 - Leadership Development BUS 605 - Leadership Development BUS 606 - Leading Groups and Teams

531 BUS 606 - Leading Groups and Teams BUS 608 - Negotiation and Conflict Resolution BUS 608 - Negotiation and Conflict Resolution BUS 610 - Strategic Marketing and Socially Responsible Practices BUS 610 - Strategic Marketing and Socially Responsible Practices BUS 617 - Workplace Values and Happiness BUS 617 - Workplace Values and Happiness BUS 620 - Entrepreneurship in a Global Environment BUS 620 - Entrepreneurship in a Global Environment BUS 626 - Current Issues in Global Business BUS 626 - Current Issues in Global Business BUS 633 - Managing Diversity in a Global Economy BUS 633 - Managing Diversity in a Global Economy BUS 644 - Audit Controls and Accounting Failures BUS 644 - Audit Controls and Accounting Failures BUS 655 - New Media and Electronic Commerce BUS 655 - New Media and Electronic Commerce BUS 685 - Risk Management BUS 685 - Risk Management PROM 600 - Fundamentals of Project Management MGMT 680 - Human Resource Management TOTAL – 30 credits PROM 600 - Fundamentals of Project Management TOTAL – 30 credits Rationale: Human talent recruitment and development is one of the most central components of an organization’s ability to accomplish its mission. It is an essential responsibility of the organization’s leadership team. This change would allow students an option to learn about this essential organizational leader’s responsibility AIII.7 Revisions for the B.S. in Health Information Management CUNY School of Professional Studies BS in Health Information Management Program: Program Code: 34442 Effective: Fall 2018 From From Course/Description/Credits Course/Description/Credits General Education – 36 - 42 credits General Education – 36 - 42 credits Health Information Management Requirements – 66 Health Information Management Requirements – 66 credits credits

532 BIO 200 - Human Biology BIO 200 - Human Biology BIO 310 - Pathophysiology and Pharmacology BIO 310 - Pathophysiology and Pharmacology CIS 101 - Computer Fundamentals and CIS 101 - Computer Fundamentals and Applications Applications HIM 200 - Medical Terminology HIM 200 - Medical Terminology HIM 202 - Introduction to Health Information HIM 202 - Introduction to Health Information Management Management HIM 205 - Healthcare Delivery Systems HIM 205 - Healthcare Delivery Systems HIM 250 - Health Statistics and Research HIM 250 - Health Statistics and Research HIM 300 - Survey of Clinical Classification HIM 300 - Survey of Clinical Classification Systems Systems HIM 331 - Legal and Ethical Aspects of HIM 331 - Legal and Ethical Aspects of Healthcare Healthcare HIM 332 - Quality Management and HIM 332 - Quality Management and Performance Improvement Performance Improvement HIM 350 - Health Information Management HIM 350 - Health Information Management Applications Applications HIM 351 - Professional Practice Experience 1 HIM 351 - Professional Practice Experience 1 HIM 360 - Privacy and Security of Health HIM 360 - Privacy and Security of Health Information Information HIM 361 - Introduction to Database Design HIM 361 - Introduction to Database Design HIM 362 - Healthcare Data Analysis HIM 362 - Healthcare Data Analysis HIM 365 - Management in Health Care HIM 365 - Management in Health Care HIM 370 - Organizational Development and HIM 370 - Organizational Development and Planning in Health Care Planning in Health Care HIM 380 - Reimbursement Methodologies HIM 380 - Reimbursement Methodologies HIM 451 - Professional Practice Experience 2 HIM 451 - Professional Practice Experience 2 HIM 465 - Electronic Health Records HIM 465 - Electronic Health Records MATH 215 - Introduction to Statistics MATH 215 - Introduction to Statistics PROM 210 - Project Management PROM 210 - Project Management Health Information Management Electives – 9 credits Health Information Management Electives – 9 credits

533 BUS 200 - Introduction to Business BUS 200 - Introduction to Business BUS 305 - Accounting Fundamentals BUS 305 - Accounting Fundamentals HIM 340 - Diagnosis Coding using the HIM 340 - Diagnosis Coding using the International Classification of Diseases International Classification of Diseases HIM 341 - Procedural Coding HIM 341 - Procedural Coding HIM 391 - Independent Study (1-3 Credits) HIM 391 - Independent Study (1-3 Credits) HIM 436 - Advanced Topics in Health HIM 436 - Advanced Topics in Health Information Management Information Management HIM 440 - Advanced Coding HIM 440 - Advanced Coding HIM 455 - Health Information Management HIM 455 - Health Information Management Applications in Non-traditional Settings Applications in Non-traditional Settings IS 200 - Foundations of Information Systems IS 200 - Foundations of Information Systems PHE 200 - Introduction to Public Health PHE 200 - Introduction to Public Health PHIL 201 - Bioethics for Health Professions PHIL 201 - Bioethics for Health Professions RM 201 - Introduction to Research Methods RM 201 - Introduction to Research Methods SPAN 110 - Spanish for Health Professions SPAN 110 - Spanish for Health Professions Free Electives – 3 - 9 credits Free Electives – 12 - 18 credits TOTAL – 120 credits TOTAL – 120 credits Rationale: To meet the accreditation standards of the Commission on Accreditation of Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM), the BS in Health Information Management has 66 credits of required coursework. Together with General Education and HIM elective requirements, students have at most nine credits of free electives available to either complete at SPS or transfer in courses taken elsewhere. As a result, students are at risk of having to complete more than 120 credits to earn the BS in HIM. By eliminating the HIM elective requirement, which does not contribute to meeting learning outcomes required by accreditation standards, students will have more flexibility to transfer in credits that do not otherwise satisfy major or General Education requirements. AIV: NEW COURSES AIV.1 Department(s) General Education Career [X] Undergraduate [] Graduate Academic Level [x] Regular [] Compensatory [] Developmental [] Remedial Subject Area Anthropology Course Number ANTH 101

534 Course Title Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Introduction to Cultural Anthropology explores fundamental questions about what it Catalogue Description means to be human through a comparative study of different cultures. Anthropology seeks to understand how culture both shapes societies, from the smallest island in the South Pacific to the largest Asian metropolis, and affects the way institutions work, from scientific laboratories to Christian mega-churches. It provides a framework for analyzing diverse facets of human experience such as gender, ethnicity, language, politics, economics, and art. Pre/ Co Requisites None 3 Credits 3 Contact Hours [X] Yes [] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) General Education ____ Not Applicable Component ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Science __X_ Flexible _X__ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World AIV.2 Department(s) Disability Studies Career [] Undergraduate [X] Graduate Academic Level [x] Regular [] Compensatory [] Developmental [] Remedial Subject Area Disability Studies Course Number DSAB 655 Course Title Real to Reel: Psychiatry at the Cinema Catalogue Through the use of film, this course will demonstrate how those with psychiatric Description disabilities, psychiatric practitioners, and psychiatric institutions have been portrayed through the years. How these portrayals have led to further marginalization and

535 stigma or provided education and greater understanding of those with psychiatric disabilities will be explored. Particular attention will be paid to the power psychiatry has been granted in our society, focusing on the disease/medical model, reliance on psychiatric medications, coercive practices and an ever shrinking definition of “normality.” Discussions will focus on film analysis, and alternative approaches to portrayals emphasizing values, collaboration, and strengths that promote personal recovery. Pre/ Co Requisites None Credits 3 3 Contact Hours Liberal Arts [] Yes [x] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) General Education __x__ Not Applicable Component ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Science ___ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World AV: 1 Changes to be offered in Bachelor of Arts, Disability Studies [35334] TO FROM Departments Disability Studies No change Departments DSAB 235 - Peer Wellness and Course Course DSAB 235 - Wellness and the Recovery Model Recovery Pre or co No changes None Prerequisite requisite 45 Hours No changes Hours Credits 3 Credits No changes Description Nationally, the emphasis on Description This course focuses on developing developing skills to support peer skills to support peer counseling,

536 counseling, wellness and recovery wellness and recovery. The have become more important in structure and dynamics of peer recent years. Individuals with wellness and recovery programs, behavioral and mental health including self-advocacy, will be explored. Students will learn to issues live, on average, 25 years less than other adults in the same develop a peer wellness curriculum and identify the strengths and age group. This course will focus on understanding the dynamics of weaknesses in this approach to behavioral health. peer wellness and recovery programs, including self-advocacy. Information about health conditions, co-occurring conditions, modifiable risk factors, and coaching and communication strategies to support lifestyle changes will be included. Students will learn to develop a peer wellness curriculum and identify strengths and weaknesses in this approach to behavioral health. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc) etc) X_Not Applicable General X_Not Applicable General Education Education ____Required ____Required Component Component ____English Composition ____English Composition ____Mathematics ____Mathematics ____Science ____Science ___Flexible ___Flexible ___World Cultures ___World Cultures ___US Experience in its ___US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Individual and Society ___Scientific World ___Scientific World Effective January 2013 Effective Fall 2018

537 AV: 2 Changes to be offered in the Bachelor of Arts in Disability Studies [35334] FROM TO Departments Departments No change Disability Studies DSAB 252 - Disability and Course Course DSAB 252 - Vocational Mentoring Employment Pre or co None Prerequisite No change requisite Hours No change Hours 45 3 Credits No change Credits Description This course is an introduction to This course will prepare the Description vocational, educational and practitioner to assess the employment assessment through a vocational and work readiness of strengths-based perspective. those with physical, mental and Students will learn techniques to developmental disabilities. An promote employment, as well as introduction to vocational, learning about community educational and employment resources, funding sources, and assessment through a strengths- requirements for accommodations based perspective is explored. in the workplace. A variety of job Basic skills of empathy, active placement strategies and business listening, setting career/skill goals, options will be explored. monitoring performance, guidance, supportive feedback and monitoring are presented. Techniques to promote positive professional actions as well as aiding the consumer with problem solving competencies are demonstrated. Community resources, including ACESS-VR, legislative guidelines for accommodation and universal design, as well as readiness of job placement and transitional labor settings are explored. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation [] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc) etc) X_Not Applicable ___ ___X_Not Applicable General General Education Education ____Required ____Required Component Component ____English Composition ____English Composition

538 ____Mathematics ____Mathematics ____Science ____Science ___Flexible ___Flexible ___World Cultures ___World Cultures ___US Experience in its ___US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Individual and Society ___Scientific World ___Scientific World Spring 2013 Effective Fall 2018 Effective The course title was confusing to students and is being changed to make the course Rationale: clearer. Similarly the current course description is wordy so is being shortened to better represent course content. Changes were approved by consortial faculty. AV: 3 Changes to be offered in the Master of Arts in Disability Studies [32353, 29124] FROM TO Disability Studies Departments No change Departments Course DSAB 611 - Research Methods Course DSAB 611 - Qualitative Research Methods Pre or co No change None Prerequisite requisite No change Hours 45 Hours Credits 3 Credits No change This course will provide an overview Description This course will provide an Description of qualitative research methods, overview of research methods, including participant observation, in- including participant observation, depth interviews, use of personal in-depth interviews, use of narratives and other personal personal narratives and other documents and participatory action personal documents and research. Both Research theory and participatory action research. the practice of research will be Students will be introduced to data covered, as students develop a analysis in disability research. The research proposal. Particular course will feature theoretical attention will be paid to approaches and practical considerations of research with and techniques. The application of by individuals with disabilities. these research methodologies to people with disabilities will be illustrated. The book for the course will be the classic disability

539 research text Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods by Stephen Taylor and Robert Bogdan; additional readings will be utilized as well to complement the text. Students who complete the course will be able to: discuss the ethics of studying people and the special protections required when studying vulnerable populations; describe situations where approval is needed from the Institutional Review Board and the steps to secure IRB approval; contrast and compare quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and describe research scenarios where each would be appropriate; discuss various methodologies utilized to conduct qualitative research and describe the attributes of each; describe his or her experience in practicing various qualitative research methods and what he or she learned; participate in participant observation and write field notes describing it; describe the benefits of reflexive journaling while conducting research and issues around the biases we bring to research; conduct interviews with individuals and code them for content; analyze the results of participant observation and interviews research; develop a structured questionnaire; describe issues related to writing about research; contrast and compare several qualitative research studies; describe an area of investigation and develop a research question which addresses it; conduct a literature review and identify gaps in research; formulate a research proposal and present it to peers. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No

540 Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc) etc) ___X_Not Applicable General ___X_Not Applicable General Education Education ____Required ____Required Component Component ____English Composition ____English Composition ____Mathematics ____Mathematics ____Science ____Science ___Flexible ___Flexible ___World Cultures ___World Cultures ___US Experience in its ___US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Individual and Society __Scientific World ___Scientific World Effective Spring 2009 Effective Fall 2018 Rationale: DSAB 611 focuses on qualitative research, which is what is most frequently used in Disability Studies, and it would be clearer to include this in the title. In addition, when the original course was developed almost a decade ago, the course description included the name of the text that the course developer envisioned using. As there are now more recent texts that better convey the information needed by students, we are removing the named textbook from the description. AV: 4 Changes to be offered in Master of Arts in Disability Studies [32353, 29124] FROM TO Disability Studies Departments No change Departments DSAB 624 - Disability Services Course DSAB 624 - Leadership in Disability Course Administration Services Agencies Pre or co None Prerequisite No change requisite Hours Hours No change 45 Credits 3 Credits No change This course emphasizes a Disability Description Description This course looks at the role that Studies approach to leadership and Disability Studies is playing in the management in the delivery of formulation of public policies to services and supports to people insure the delivery of quality

541 services and supports to people with disabilities. It focuses on organizational factors involved in with disabilities. The course analyzes the costs of these the management of public and private agencies to deliver and services and the economics of the emphasizes the active participation disability industry. It focuses also on organizational factors involved of disabled people and their family in the management of public and members in service design, delivery private agencies that deliver and evaluation. services to people with disabilities. The active participation of people with disabilities and family members in the design, delivery and evaluation of community- based services is emphasized. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No [] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc) etc) ___X_Not Applicable General ___X_Not Applicable General Education Education ____Required ____Required Component Component ____English Composition ____English Composition ____Mathematics ____Mathematics ____Science ____Science ___Flexible ___Flexible ___World Cultures ___World Cultures ___US Experience in its ___US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Individual and Society __Scientific World ___Scientific World Effective Spring 2009 Effective Fall 2018 Rationale: There is a course in the MS in Disability Services in Higher Education with a very similar title to the current title of DSAB 624, which is causing unnecessary confusion for the students. The name more accurately reflects current terminology in the field. AV: 5 Changes to be offered Master of Nursing Programs [38466, 38460, 38465, 38459, 38464, 38458]

542 TO FROM Departments Nursing Departments No change Course NURS 630 - Measurement and Course No change Evaluation in Nursing Education Pre or co Prerequisite NURS 625 PSY 625 requisite Hours 45 Hours No change 3 Credits No change Credits Description No change This course provides an analysis Description of theories of measurement and evaluation as they relate to nursing education in schools of nursing and healthcare agencies. Measurement and evaluation techniques appropriate for classroom and clinical nursing are studied; their strengths and limitations are assessed. Total program evaluation relevant for accreditation and ethical, legal and social issues are analyzed. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc) etc) ___X_Not Applicable General ___X_Not Applicable General Education Education ____Required ____Required Component Component ____English Composition ____English Composition ____Mathematics ____Mathematics ____Science ____Science ___Flexible ___Flexible ___World Cultures ___World Cultures ___US Experience in its ___US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Individual and Society

543 __Scientific World ___Scientific World Effective Fall 2018 Effective Spring 2009 Rationale: PSY 625 was replaced with NURS 625 earlier in the year. This change request is to change the prerequisite to the proper course. AV: 6 Changes to be offered in the BA in Human Relations, program code 36664 TO FROM Departments No change Departments HRL Course No change Course HRL 499 - Human Relations Capstone HRL 320 Pre or co Prerequisite HRL 320 and Permission of the Director requisite 45 Hours No change Hours Credits 3 credits Credits No change No change Description Description All students will complete a capstone project under the direction of a faculty mentor. This senior project will build upon work done in previous courses, allowing students to apply methods of scholarly and/or applied research to issues related to human relations and work settings. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No Liberal Arts [] Yes [X] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, Intensive, WAC, etc) etc) __X__Not Applicable General __X__Not Applicable General Education Education ____Required ____Required Component Component ____English Composition ____English Composition ____Mathematics ____Mathematics ____Science ____Science ___Flexible ___Flexible ___World Cultures ___World Cultures ___US Experience in its ___US Experience in its Diversity Diversity

544 ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Individual and Society ___Scientific World ___Scientific World Spring 2019 Effective Effective Rationale: This change is to reinstate "Permission of the Director" (in addition to HRL 320) as the prerequisite. AV: 6 Changes to be offered in the General Education FROM TO Departments No change General Education Departments Course GEOG 301 - International Migration Course No change Pre or co None Prerequisite No change requisite 3 Hours No change Hours Credits 3 Credits No change Description An inquiry into current and historical Description This course is a quantitative and immigration trends with a qualitative examination of historic geographic focus on the United and contemporary international States, including research and migration patterns. Emphasis is on evaluation of legal frameworks and spatial demographic impacts of theories of why people migrate. immigration policy in the United Students who complete this course States with special attention to will have the ability to critically major urban centers. A comparative analyze and contribute to current analysis of ethnic and racial conversations about immigration minorities in the United States will and will acquire marketable skills also be offered related to empirical data analysis and visualization. US Experience Requirement No change Requirement Designation Designation [X]Yes[] No Liberal Arts [x] Yes [] No Liberal Arts Course Course Attribute (e.g. Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Intensive, WAC, etc) WAC, etc) ____Not Applicable General ____Not Applicable General Education Education ____Required ____Required Component Component ____English Composition ____English Composition ____Mathematics ____Mathematics

545 ____Science ____Science ___Flexible ___Flexible ___World Cultures ___World Cultures US Experience in its ___US Experience in its __x_ Diversity Diversity ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Individual and Society ___Scientific World ___Scientific World Effective Effective Rationale: Redesigning course as Open Educational Resource. Shift in focus to current debates surrounding immigration and development of data analysis/visualization skills. SECTION AVI Courses Withdrawn DSAB 221 - Asperger Syndrome Across the Life Cycle Rationale: The content of this course is covered in other required courses in the BA in Disability Studies program. This course is therefore not necessary. DSAB 225 - Speech and Communication Issues in Autism Spectrum Disorder Rationale: The content of this course is covered in DSAB 223 - Autism Spectrum Disorder in Young People making this course duplicative. DSAB 341 - Disability, Evolution, Eugenics and Genomics Rationale: This course is being replaced with PHIL 201 - Bioethics for Health Professions. DSAB 243 - Disability, Music and The Arts There has not been demand for this course and therefore has not run with sufficient Rationale: enrollment. As this is not a required course, removing it will have little to no impact on students. DSAB 241 - Disability and Comparative Religion Rationale: There has not been demand for this course and therefore has not run with sufficient enrollment. As this is not a required course, removing it will have little to no impact on students. DSAB 639 - Fieldwork in Disability Studies Rationale: DSAB 639 has only been offered once in the nine years the program has existed. Students who wish to do fieldwork have the option of DSAB 649, Independent Study, which can be structured as an independent study experience or an internship. HIM 391 - Independent Study Rationale: Course is no longer needed in the Health Information Management curriculum. HIM 436 - Advanced Topics in Health Information Management Rationale: Course is no longer needed in the Health Information Management curriculum.

546 June 2018 Hostos Community College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1 A.A. Liberal Arts and Science Program Title Program Code 00906 Department Education Course Title Nutrition Education and Number HLT 225 HLT 215 Prerequisite Co-requisite Hours 3 3 Credits Description: This course presents information on the fundamentals of nutrition education including traditional models and theories of learning as well as emerging education models for promoting healthy eating and an active lifestyle. Students will learn the application of nutrition education by linking research, theory, and practice. Students will study a stepwise procedure for designing a nutrition education program. Students will have the opportunity to reflect more about how people learn, the dynamics of teaching and how to enhance their communication skills to provide accurate and current research information to the consumer. In addition, students will learn to view nutrition education from different perspectives and increase their awareness of individual and social factors influencing nutrition. AIV.2 Program Title A.A. Liberal Arts and Science Program Code 00906 Department Mathematics Course Title Discrete Mathematics and Number CSC 205 Prerequisite MAT 160 Pre-Calculus Pre/Co-requisite ENG 93/ESL 91/ESL 93 or equivalent/higher Hours 3 Credits 3 Description: The course introduces fundamental ideas in discrete structures, serving as a basis for subsequent courses required for students in Computer Science: Sets, relations, and functions; propositional calculus, Boolean algebras, and combinatorial circuits, counting methods; proof techniques; analysis of algorithms; graphs and trees, puzzles; finite machines, sequential circuits, and

547 recognizers and coding theory. A.A. Liberal Arts and Science Program Title AIV.3 Program Code 00906 Department Mathematics Course Title Data Structures and Number CSC 300 CSC 205 and CSC 215 Prerequisite Pre/Co-requisite ENG 93/ESL 91/ESL 93 or equivalent/higher 3 Hours Credits 3 Description: Abstract characterizations of data structures, such as arrays, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs, will be studied along with algorithms that make use of such structures, including algorithms for sorting, searching, and memory management. Implementation issues will be considered, and students will write programs that embody these structures and algorithms. Program Title A.A. Liberal Arts and Science AIV.4 Program Code 00906 Department Natural Sciences Course Title Human Biology I Lecture and Number BIO 140 MAT 10 or higher & ESL 91/93 or ENG 91/93 or higher & for Spanish Section Prerequisite SPA 121 or higher Co-requisite BIO 141 Hours 3 Credits 3 Description: This course is the first of two parts of the Human Biology course. This course is for non-STEM major students. The course provides a survey of human anatomy and physiology, exploring the molecules of life in the formation of cells, tissues and the body systems, with emphasis on both the physiological mechanisms in health and disease, as well as concepts and current issues in human biology. Offered in Spanish and English. AIV.5 Program Title A.A. Liberal Arts and Science Program Code 00906 Department Natural Sciences Course Title Human Biology I Laboratory and Number BIO 141 Prerequisite MAT 10 or higher & ESL 91/93 or ENG 91/93 or higher & for Spanish Section SPA 121 or higher.

548 Co-requisite BIO 140 Hours 2 1 Credits Description: This course is the first of two parts of the Human Biology course. This course is for non-STEM major students. The course provides a survey of human anatomy and physiology, exploring the molecules of life in the formation of cells, tissues and the body systems, with emphasis on both the physiological mechanisms in health and disease, as well as concepts and current issues in human biology. The laboratory illustrates the concepts discussed in the lecture. Offered in Spanish and English. AIV.6 Program Title A.A. Liberal Arts and Science Program Code 00906 Department Natural Sciences Course Title Human Biology II Lecture and Number BIO 150 BIO 140 (Human Biology I Lecture) & BIO 141 (Human Biology I Laboratory) Prerequisite Co-requisite BIO 151 (Human Biology II Laboratory) Hours 3 Credits 3 Description: This course is the second of two parts of the Human Biology course. This course is for non-STEM major students. Using a topics approach, the course focuses on the biological principles of nutrition, mechanism of the body’s defense, genetics, cellular interactions that comprise our current understanding of the human organism and environmental issues. AIV.7 Program Title A.A. Liberal Arts and Science Program Code 00906 Department Natural Sciences Course Title Human Biology II Laboratory and Number BIO 151 Prerequisite BIO 140 (Human Biology I Lecture) & BIO 141 (Human Biology I Laboratory) BIO 150 (Human Biology II Lecture) Co-requisite Hours 3 Credits 1 Description: This course is the second of two parts of the Human Biology course. This course is for non-STEM major students. Using a topics approach, the course focuses on the biological principles of nutrition, mechanism of the body’s defense, genetics, cellular interactions that comp rise our current understanding of the human organism and environmental issues. The laboratory illustrates the concepts discussed in the lecture. Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses

549 Changes to be offered in the Behavioral and Social Sciences Department AV.1 CJ 250 CJ Workshop To: From: Criminal Justice Policy and Course Title Course Title CJ Workshop Management This course is designed for Description: This is a course regarding the Description: conceptualization and administration students who are interested in the of the criminal justice system in the potential for research in criminal US. It is designed for students who are justice management. Students will interested in criminal justice reform explore idealistic principles that issues especially from a research have served to define for both and/or public policy perspective. criminal justice practitioners and the public, social roles and Students will explore the theoretical expectations in the criminal justice principles and practices that have field. Moreover, students will defined social roles and expectations in the criminal justice field for both the examine why these principles are criminal justice practitioners and the often difficult to apply in the administration of justice. public. Students will also examine how these principles and practices have been implemented historically as well as the sociopolitical conditions that have facilitated or challenged their application within the context of our democratic constitutional framework. Rationale: The proposed revisions reflect the course’s restructuring as a comprehensive capstone assignment course. The proposed course description will more accurately reflect the substance and perspective of the course. The modification will facilitate the designation of the course as an alternative choice to the CJ 201 in the CJ concentration. Effective: Spring 2019 Effective: Spring 2019 AV.2 Changes to be offered in the Natural Sciences Department ENV110 Environmental Science I From: To: Prerequisite If taught in English, ENG91 or ESL MAT10, ENG91/93 or higher, or ESL Prerequisite 91/93 or higher (if taught in English), 91. If taught in Spanish, SPA121, MAT10 SPA121 (if taught in Spanish) Description: Our planet is facing environmental Description: The student will analyze data and challenges, from oil spills to global explain concepts related to the classification of matter, basic climate change. Adverse impacts to principles of atomic structure and our environment affect the well-being bonding, energy sources, and the of humans and other living organisms. health-related environmental effects In this course, the students will get acquainted with ideas and concepts and the social implications and control of major air and water about living systems and their pollutants. Offered in English and environments. They will develop an

550 Spanish. understanding of ecological principles and learn about the environmental problems of our times, such as water use, air pollution, solid waste management, global warming, and energy use. Intended for non-science majors, this course will engage students in learning approaches and methods of inquiry that complement any major, whether in the natural sciences, social sciences, or humanities. To be offered in English and Spanish. Rationale: The course description was changed to provide better description of the course content. The syllabus shows the new book adoption and new course sequence. Spring 2019 Spring 2019 Effective: Effective: AV.3 ENV120 Environmental Science II To: From: Description: The student will classify organic This course uses general scientific Description: compounds according to functional principles of biology, ecology, earth groups and explain the health and science, and physical science in describing the environment, and how environmental effects of pesticides, social problems related to adequate human activities affect the environment. Students will explore the diet and malnutrition, availability of interactions between organisms and food, food preservation, new food sources, food additives and their their environments, and impact from regulation, and drugs. humans. Specific topics will include biodiversity; forests, wildlife, and urban habitats; food and agriculture; public health; conservation and sustainability. This course is intended for non-science majors, and is the second semester of a two-course sequence. Rationale: The course description was changed to provide better description of the course content. The syllabus shows the new book adoption and new course sequence. Effective: Summer 2019 Effective: Summer 2019

551 June 2018 Hunter College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters Action taken by the Hunter College Senate on January 31, 2018; February 14, 2018; February 28, 2018; March 14, 2018; March 28; 2018; May 9, 2018; and May 16, 2018. Part A: Academic Matters Section AII: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements Individual and Society: Humanities Art and Art History: ARTH 11100 Introduction to the History of Art Asian American Studies: ASIAN 21000 Asians in the U.S. Classical and Oriental Studies: Chinese: CHIN 25100W Modern Chinese Fiction in English Translation Classics: CLA 25000W Greek and Roman Tragedy CLA 25100W Classical and Oriental Studies CLA 25300W Homer and Vergil Hebrew: HEBR 21100W Masterpieces of Medieval Hebrew Literature HEBR 29200 Hebrew Prophets in English Italian: ITAL 28000 The Italian Renaissance: An Introduction Japanese: JPN 25100 Japanese Culture Before 1600 Film and Media Studies: MEDIA 18000 Introduction to Media Studies Philosophy: HUM 11000W Map of Knowledge PHILO 10100 Introduction to Philosophy PHILO 10400 Introduction to Ethics PHILO 20400 Great Philosophers Religion: REL 11000W Nature of Religion REL 11100W Approaches to Religion REL 20400W Religious Experience REL 20500W Faith and Disbelief REL 20600W Ideas of God in Contemporary Western Thought REL 20700W Religious Sources for Morality REL 20800W Religious Ideas of Social Justice REL 20900 Religion and Human Rights REL 25500W Religions of Two Gods

552 REL 27000W Religion and Psychology Russian: RUSS 15600 Culture of Imperial Russia: the Age of Empresses RUSS 15800 Contemporary Russian Culture RUSS 25000W 19th Century Russian Literature in English Translation RUSS 25100 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky in English Translation RUSS 25200W Modern Russian Literature in English Translation RUSS 25400W The Silver Age of Russian Literature in English Translation RUSS 26000 Russian Women Writers in English Translation RUSS 27000W Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema and Society RUSS 29700 The Russian Urban Novel in Comparative Context Individual and Society: Social Science Anthropology: ANTHC 10100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Africana and Puerto Rican/Latino Studies: AFPRL 10000 Introduction to Black Politics AFPRL 10300 Conquest And Resistance: Puerto Rican Experience in Comparative Perspective AFPRL 18100 Language and Ethnic Identity AFPRL 20500 African American Politics and Social Change AFPRL 26000 Latinos and US Citizenship Asian American Studies Program: ASIAN 230.02 Asian American Communities & Mental Health Economics: ECO 10000 Introduction to Economics ECO 20100 Principles of Macroeconomics Geography: GEOG 10100 People and Their Environment Macaulay Honors Program: MHC 15000W The Peopling of New York City Philosophy: PHILO 10600 Philosophy, Politics and Society Political Science: POLSC 20000W Interpreting Politics: An Introduction to Political Ideas Sociology:

553 SOC 10100 Introduction to Sociology Urban Affairs & Planning: URBS 10100W Urban Life: Personal and Observational View URBS 10200W Structure of the Urban Region Women and Gender Studies: WGS 10000 Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies WGS 12100 Public Speaking in Gender Studies WGSA 29000 Special Topics in Gender, Literature and the Arts WGSC 29000 Special Topics in Women and Gender Across Cultures WGSL 29000 Special Topics in Labor, Migration, and Globalization WGSS 29000 Special Topics in Sexualities WGSP 29000 Special Topics in Gender and Public Policy WGST 29000 Special Topics in Feminist Thought and Theory WGSS 29300 Bathroom Politics World Cultures and Global Issues Classical and Oriental Studies: Arabic: ARB 25200 Literatures from the Islamic World (W) Hebrew: HEBR 25900 Old Testament Religion HEBR 29500 Ancient Hebrew Law Religion: REL 21100 The Sacred Sky: Astrology in World Religions (W) REL 25700 Religions of Ancient Central and South America (W) REL 25800 Religions of Ancient Europe (W) Writing Intensive History: HIST 14100 Contemporary Issues in Historical Perspective HIST 25000 Historical Issues HIST 27650 Middle Eastern History From the Beginning of Islam to 1800 HIST 27651 History of the Modern Middle East from 1800 to the Present HIST 27700 East Asia To 1600 HIST 27800 East Asia 1600 to the Present HIST 28900 Africa in the 19th and 20th Centuries HIST 34100 Topics in History Sociology: SOC 22300 Contemporary Sociological Theory Section AIII: Changes in Degree Programs AIII.1 CHANGE TO GRE FOR ADMISSIONS

554 This memo serves as official notification that the School of Education no longer must require the GRE for admissions to certain programs offered by Hunter College. The NYS legislature passed and had signed into law by the Governor in 2017, an adjustment to the requirement that schools of education set "rigorous selection criteria” for applicants for Master's degree programs leading to teacher and school leader certification. The adjustment exempted teachers who already possess teacher or administrator certification and a graduate degree from the GRE admission requirement. The following programs should have their admissions requirements updated to remove the requirement that was inserted due to the law: FROM: TO: “#. Submission of scores on the Graduate Record Examination.” “#. Submission of scores on the Graduate Record Examination.” Advanced Certificates: Blind & Visually Impaired TBVI-AC TESOL-AC TESOL Program 2 (for currently certified teachers) SDL-AC ECEB2-AC ECSEB2-AC Child Sp Ed 1-6 ADV CERT CSPE-AC ASE712-AC Adol Sp Ed 7-12 ADV CERT SPEDSMD- AC The following programs should have their admissions requirements updated to add the following restrictive clause to the requirement that was inserted due to the law: FROM: TO: “#. Submission of scores on the Graduate Record Examination.” “#. Submission of scores on the Graduate Record Examination, except applicants who are certified teacher or school administrators and hold a graduate degree.” Advanced Certificates: BIEXT-AC Bilingual Extension for Teachers Bilingual Extension for Teachers BEITI-AC TESFESL- TESOL Program 1 (for non-certified holders of advanced degrees in Linguistics AC and related fields) TESOLCP- TESOL Supp CR-ITI ACB AC Master’s degrees: AG712-MSED Adolescent Special Education AL512-MSED Adolescent Literacy Grades 5-12 BVI-MSED Blind Visually Impaired Long CEBIL-MSED Bilingual Childhood Ed CEMSC-MSED Childhood Ed STEM CHED-MSED Childhood Ed 1-6 CSED-MSED Childhood SpEd Sev/MultDis Long CSEDD-MSED Childhood SpEd Severe/Multiple Short CSPE-MSED Childhood SpEd 1-6 Long

555 CSPED-MSED Childhood SpEd Short Deaf and Hard of Hearing Long DEAFN-MSED DEAFW-MSED Deaf and Hard of Hearing Short Bilingual Early Childhood ECBB2-MSED Education Early Childhood Ed ECEB2-MSED ECSB2-MSED Early Childhood SpEd Severe/Multiple EMTSP-MSED Elementary Mathematics Specialist LTYB6-MSED Literacy Birth-Grade 6 SEAPR-MSED Advanced Preparation in SpEd SENB2-MSED Early Childhood SpEd Long SEWB2-MSED Early Childhood SpEd Short Blind or Visually Impaired Short TCHBL-MSED Alt Cert Childhood Ed CEDAC-MSED CSEAC-MSED Alt Cert Childhood SpEd Alt Cert Adolescent SpEd SE712-MSED ECSE-MSED Alt Cert Early Childhood SpEd BILCE-MSED Alt Crt: Biligual Childhood Ed TESOLAC-MA Alt Cert TESOL TESOL-MA TESOL and programs offered jointly by the School of Education and the School of Arts & Sciences Advanced Certificates: BIOAE- Biology AC Chemistry CHEAE- AC Earth ESCAE- AC Science ENGAE- English AC FREAE- French AC ITAAE-AC Italian LATAE- Latin AC MATAE- Mathematics AC PHYAE- Physics AC SSTAE- Social Studies AC Spanish SPAAE- AC Master’s of Arts degrees: BIOAE-MA Biology CHEAE-MA Chemistry

556 CHINAE-MA Chinese Dance Education DANCED- MA ENGAE-MA English ESCAE-MA Earth Science FRENAE-MA French ITALAE-MA Italian Latin LATINAE- MA Math MATAE-MA MATHAE-MA Professional Math MUSPK12- Music Education MA PHYAE-MA Physics SOCSTAE- Social Studies MA SPANAE-MA Spanish Theater Education THEAED-MA Theater Education w/ prior THEDPC-MA cert VAEDPC-MA Visual Arts Ed w/ prior cert VSARTED- Visual Arts Education MA BIOAEAC- Alt Cert Biology MA CHEAEAC- Alt Cert Chemistry MA Alt Cert Earth Science ESCAEAC- MA Alt Cert English ENGAC- MSED MATAEAC- Alt Cert Math MA PHYAEAC- Alt Cert Physics MA Alt Cert Spanish SPAAEAC- MA MUAGAC- Alt Cert Music MA DANED-MA Alt Cert Dance THEDAC-MA Alt Cert Theater VAEDAC-MA Alt Cert Visual Arts AIII.2 THE FOLLOWING IS A CHANGE IN THE GSC-MSED School Counseling, GSC-MSED Department of Educational Foundations HEGIS # 826.01 NY State Program Code #02364 Effective Term: Fall 2018

557 Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) 2. History and Objectives Currently, students in all three of the specializations within the Counseling Program (School Counseling, Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling, and Mental Health Counseling) enroll in the same COCO 712 Career Counseling, Assessment, and Placement course. As a result of former President Obama’s Reach Higher initiative to promote completing education past high school (whether at a professional training program, a community college, or a four-year college or university), CUNY provided funding to its master’s (MSEd) programs in school counseling at Brooklyn College, Hunter College, Lehman College and Queens College to develop a stand-alone, graduate course on quality college advising. The content of the current COCO 712 does not sufficiently address the areas identified by the CUNY initiative. As a result, the proposed change will restrict enrollment in COCO 712 to students in the Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling and Mental Health Counseling programs and a new COCO 713: Career Counseling course will be developed for students in the School Counseling program that provides preparation in career readiness and college access counseling in K-12 school settings. 3. FROM TO List of Courses (Prefixes, Numbers, Names) Crs. List of Courses (Prefixes, Numbers, Names) Crs. Requirements for the Concentration: Requirements for the Concentration: COCO 70000 - Life Stage Development (3cr.) COCO 70000 - Life Stage Development (3cr.) COCO 70100 - Counseling Skills and Interviewing COCO 70100 - Counseling Skills and Interviewing Techniques (3cr.) Techniques (3cr.) COCO 70200 - Theories of Counseling (3cr.) COCO 70200 - Theories of Counseling (3cr.) COCO 70300 - Psychosocial, Cultural, and COCO 70300 - Psychosocial, Cultural, and Political Aspects of Disability: Rehabilitation and Political Aspects of Disability: Rehabilitation and Special Education (3cr.) Special Education (3cr.) COCO 70600 - Group Counseling (3cr.) COCO 70600 - Group Counseling (3cr.) COCO 70700 - Multicultural Aspects of COCO 70700 - Multicultural Aspects of Counseling (3cr.) Counseling (3cr.) COCO 70800 - Measurement and Appraisal (3cr.) COCO 70800 - Measurement and Appraisal (3cr.) COCO 70900 - Research Methods in Counseling COCO 70900 - Research Methods in Counseling (3cr.) (3cr.) COCO 71100 - Supervision and Administration in COCO 71100 - Supervision and Administration in Counseling (3cr.) Counseling (3cr.) COCO 71200 - Career Counseling, Assessment COCO 71300 - Career Counseling and College and Placement (4cr.) Readiness (4cr.) COCO 71500 - Family Systems and Counseling COCO 71500 - Family Systems and Counseling Issues (3cr.) Issues (3cr.) COCO 71800 - Practicum in Counseling (3cr.) COCO 71800 - Practicum in Counseling (3cr.) COCO 71900 - Individual Supervision (3cr.) COCO 71900 - Individual Supervision (3cr.) COCO 72500 - Internship in Counseling I (4cr.) COCO 72500 - Internship in Counseling I (4cr.) COCO 72600 - Internship in Counseling II (4cr.) COCO 72600 - Internship in Counseling II (4cr.) COUNS 71700 - Foundations of School COUNS 71700 - Foundations of School Counseling (3cr.) Counseling (3cr.) COUNS 72000 - Culminating Seminar in School COUNS 72000 - Culminating Seminar in School Counseling (3cr.) Counseling (3cr.)

558 COUNS 72100 - Counseling Interventions for COUNS 72100 - Counseling Interventions for Children and Adolescents (3cr.) Children and Adolescents (3cr.) COUNS 72200 - School Based Consultation (3cr.) COUNS 72200 - School Based Consultation (3cr.) what is to be changed. the changes. **strikethrough **underline Total credits required: 60 Total credits required: 60 4. Rationale: The proposed changes will better prepare students in the School Counseling program to provide career readiness and college access counseling in K-12 school settings. 5. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ X ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Does this affect the Library? [ X ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES For new courses or programs, please consult. AIII.3 THE FOLLOWING ARE CHANGES IN THE SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS Hunter College School of Education Department of Special Education Substantive Change in Programs – Change in Course Requirements Effective Term: Fall 2018 1. Follow the format for the heading as specified in the example provided below: Childhood Special Education: Severe/Multiple Disabilities – MSEd (HEGIS: 808 | NYSED: 25652/25645) Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing – MSEd (HEGIS: 812 | NYSED: 25642/25658) Blind and Visually Impaired – MSED (HEGIS: 814 | NYSED: 35639/25655) Visual Impairment: Rehabilitation Teaching (and Combined Rehabilitation with Orientation and Mobility Sequence)* Effective Term : Fall 2018 Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) 2. Revision : This is a proposal to revise the course of study for special education programs to include a course SPED 700.50 – Social, Historical, and Philosophical Foundations of General and Special Education that is specifically designed to address the intersectional identities of students from diverse backgrounds. In order to accommodate the new courses, CEDF 706.50 is being removed from the course of study for the programs listed above. HISTORY AND OBJECTIVES. The Hunter College programs in Special Education prepares teachers for New York City public schools. Our programs have been nationally recognized by the National Council for Teacher Quality (NCTQ) and have an ongoing, longtime relationship with New York City schools in providing a large number of teachers to work within diverse students. We continually revisit our programs in order to respond to the multiple demands placed upon teacher candidates by the New York State Education Department, the schools that hire them, and the communities they serve. Over the past several years, the Department of Special Education has increased its focus on goals that support teacher

559 candidates in becoming effective educators while also attending to justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion for their students. Several programs in the department have already undergone significant revisions that include adding courses to support these goals. This proposal brings other programs in the department in line with the overarching goals. 3a. Use this table for program changes: state the precise language that is recommended for use in the catalog: Childhood Education Severe & Multiple To From SPED 70000 - Issues and Practices in SPED 700.50 - Social, Historical, Educating Students with Disabilities (3) Philosophical Foundations of General and Special Education (3) SPED 70250 - Classroom Management in SPED 70250 - Classroom Management in Special Education and Inclusive Settings (3) Special Education and Inclusive Settings (3) SPED 70650 - Strategies and Curriculum SPED 70650 - Strategies and Curriculum Adaptations for Learners with Severe/Multiple Adaptations for Learners with Severe/Multiple Disabilities (3) Disabilities (3) SPED 70700 - Research Seminar: Issues in SPED 70700 - Research Seminar: Issues in Special Education (3) Special Education (3) SPED 74600 - Educational Implications of SPED 74600 - Educational Implications of Learners Who Are Deafblind (3) Learners Who Are Deafblind (3) SPED 78150 - Reading and Writing for SPED 78150 - Reading and Writing for Students with Learning Disabilities: Methods I Students with Learning Disabilities: Methods I (for those not in LD Specialization) (for those not in LD Specialization) (3) SPED 78350 - Math, Organizational and Social SPED 78350 - Math, Organizational and Social Strategies for Students with Learning Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities (3) Disabilities (3) SPED 79000 - Foundations and Educational SPED 79000 - Foundations and Educational Implications of Severe/Multiple Disabilities (3) Implications of Severe/Multiple Disabilities (3) SPED 79100 - Alternative Assessment for SPED 79100 - Alternative Assessment for Learners with Low Incidence Disabilities: Visual Learners with Low Incidence Disabilities: Visual Impairment, Deaf Blindness, and Severe Impairment, Deaf Blindness, and Severe Disabilities (3) Disabilities (3) SPED 79200 - Language Development and SPED 79200 - Language Development and Alternative Communication Systems for Alternative Communication Systems for Learners with Low Incidence Disabilities: Learners with Low Incidence Disabilities: Severe Disabilities including Deafblindness (3) Severe Disabilities including Deafblindness (3) SPED 79300 - Total Communication for SPED 79300 - Total Communication for Learners with Severe/Multiple Disabilities (2) Learners with Severe/Multiple Disabilities (2) SPED 79400 - Functional Language and - Take two of the following (must include two Culture of Learners with Low Incidence different grade levels): Disabilities (1)

560 - Take two of the following (must include two SPED 79550 - Student Teaching: different grade levels): Severe/Multiple Disabilities Including SPED 79550 - Student Teaching: Deafblindness, Grades 1–3 (2) Severe/Multiple Disabilities Including Deafblindness, Grades 1–3 (2) SPED 79551 - Student Teaching: Severe/Multiple Disabilities Including Deafblindness, Grades 4–6 (2) SPED 79551 - Student Teaching: Severe/Multiple Disabilities Including Deafblindness, Grades 4–6 (2) SPED 79552 - Supervised Practicum: Severe/Multiple Disabilities, Including Deafblindness, Grades 1–3 (2) SPED 79552 - Supervised Practicum: Severe/Multiple Disabilities, Including Deafblindness, Grades 1–3 (2) SPED 79553 - Supervised Practicum: Severe/Multiple Disabilities, Including SPED 79553 - Supervised Practicum: Deafblindness, Grades 4–6 (2) Severe/Multiple Disabilities, Including Additional Courses for Program 1 Deafblindness, Grades 4–6 (2) Additional Courses for Program 1 CEDF 70900 - Child Development Grades 1-9 CEDF 70650 - Social, Historical, Philosophical (3) Foundations of Education: The American School (3) CEDC 70350 - Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) CEDF 70900 - Child Development Grades 1-9 CEDC 70450 - Teaching Developmental (3) Reading (3) CEDC 70350 - Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) CEDC 70550 - Mathematics Curriculum and Methods (3) CEDC 70450 - Teaching Developmental Reading (3) CEDC 72250 - Social Studies Curriculum and Instruction: Integrating Literature, the Arts, and Technology (2) CEDC 70550 - Mathematics Curriculum and Methods (3) CEDC 72900 - Fieldwork in Childhood Education for Special Educators (1) CEDC 72250 - Social Studies Curriculum and Instruction: Integrating Literature, the Arts, and HED 71500 - Health Education for Special Technology (2) Educators (1) CEDC 72900 - Fieldwork in Childhood Total: 31-53 cr Education for Special Educators (1) HED 71500 - Health Education for Special Educators (1) Total: 34-53 cr Deaf and Hard of Hearing From To SPED 70000 - Issues and Practices in SPED 700.50 - Social, Historical, Educating Students with Disabilities (3) Philosophical Foundations of General and Special Education (3) SPED 70100 - Assessment of Students with SPED 70100 - Assessment of Students with Disabilities (3) Disabilities (3) SPED 70200 - Classroom Management in SPED 70200 - Classroom Management in

561 Special Education and Inclusive Settings (3) Special Education and Inclusive Settings (3) SPED 70700 - Research Seminar: Issues in SPED 70700 - Research Seminar: Issues in Special Education (3) Special Education (3) SPED 72000 - American Sign Language I (3) SPED 72000 - American Sign Language I (3) SPED 72100 - American Sign Language II (3) SPED 72100 - American Sign Language II (3) SPED 72200 - The Study of ASL Educational Linguistics (2) SPED 72200 - The Study of ASL Educational Linguistics (2) SPED 73000 - Education of Students Who Are Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (3) SPED 73000 - Education of Students Who Are Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (3) SPED 73100 - Reading and Writing Development for Students Who Are Deaf and SPED 73100 - Reading and Writing Hard-of Hearing: Methods 1 (3) Development for Students Who Are Deaf and Hard-of Hearing: Methods 1 (3) SPED 73300 - Math and Across-the Curriculum Adaptations for Students who are Deaf and SPED 73300 - Math and Across-the Curriculum Hard-of Hearing: Methods 2 (3) Adaptations for Students who are Deaf and Hard-of Hearing: Methods 2 (3) SPED 73500 - Speech Development and Remediation of Students who are Deaf and SPED 73500 - Speech Development and Hard-of-Hearing (3) Remediation of Students who are Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (3) SPED 73600 - Aural Rehabilitation of Students who are Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (3) SPED 73600 - Aural Rehabilitation of Students who are Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (3) - Take either - SPED 73700 - Student Teaching: Deaf and - Take either - Hard-of- Hearing, Preschool–Grade 12 (4) SPED 73700 - Student Teaching: Deaf and - Or two of the following (must include two Hard-of- Hearing, Preschool–Grade 12 (4) different grade levels) - - Or two of the following (must include two different grade levels) - SPED 73750 - Student Teaching: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, Preschool–Grade 6 (2) SPED 73750 - Student Teaching: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, Preschool–Grade 6 (2) SPED 73751 - Student Teaching: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, Grades 7–12 (2) SPED 73751 - Student Teaching: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, Grades 7–12 (2) SPED 73760 - Supervised Practicum: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, Preschool–2nd Grade (2) SPED 73760 - Supervised Practicum: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, Preschool–2nd Grade (2) SPED 73761 - Supervised Practicum: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, Grades 1-6 (2) SPED 73761 - Supervised Practicum: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, Grades 1-6 (2) SPED 73762 - Supervised Practicum: Deaf SPED 73762 - Supervised Practicum: Deaf and Hard-of- Hearing, Grades 5-9 (2) and Hard-of- Hearing, Grades 5-9 (2) SPED 73763 - Supervised Practicum: Deaf and Hard-of- Hearing, Grade 7–12 (2)

562 SPED 73763 - Supervised Practicum: Deaf and Additional Courses for Program 1 Hard-of- Hearing, Grade 7–12 (2) Additional Courses for Program 1 CEDF 70900 - Child Development Grades 1-6 CEDF 70650 - Social, Historical, Philosophical (3) Foundations of Education: The American School (3) CEDC 70350 - Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) CEDF 70900 - Child Development Grades 1-6 (3) CEDC 70450 - Teaching Developmental Reading (3) CEDC 70350 - Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) CEDC 70550 - Mathematics Curriculum and Methods (3) CEDC 70450 - Teaching Developmental Reading (3) CEDC 72250 - Social Studies Curriculum and Instruction: Integrating Literature, the Arts, and CEDC 70550 - Mathematics Curriculum and Technology (2) Methods (3) CEDC 72900 - Fieldwork in Childhood CEDC 72250 - Social Studies Curriculum and Education for Special Educators (1) Instruction: Integrating Literature, the Arts, and Technology (2) HED 71500 - Health Education for Special Educators (1) CEDC 72900 - Fieldwork in Childhood Total: 36-58 cr Education for Special Educators (1) HED 71500 - Health Education for Special Educators (1) Total: 39-58 cr Blind and Visually Impaired From To SPED 70000 - Issues and Practices in SPED 700.50 - Social, Historical, Educating Students with Disabilities (3) Philosophical Foundations of General and Special Education (3) SPED 70250 - Classroom Management in Special Education and Inclusive Settings (3) SPED 70250 - Classroom Management in Special Education and Inclusive Settings (3) SPED 70650 - Strategies and Curriculum Adaptations for Learners with Severe/Multiple SPED 70650 - Strategies and Curriculum Disabilities (3) Adaptations for Learners with Severe/Multiple Disabilities (3) SPED 70700 - Research Seminar: Issues in SPED 70700 - Research Seminar: Issues in Special Education (3) Special Education (3) SPED 74000 - Medical Aspects and SPED 74000 - Medical Aspects and Educational Implications of Visual Impairments Educational Implications of Visual Impairments (3) (3)

563 SPED 74100 - Education and Rehabilitation of SPED 74100 - Education and Rehabilitation of Individuals with Visual Impairments (3) Individuals with Visual Impairments (3) SPED 79100 - Alternative Assessment for SPED 79100 - Alternative Assessment for Learners with Low Incidence Disabilities: Visual Learners with Low Incidence Disabilities: Visual Impairment, Deafblindness, and Severe Impairment, Deafblindness, and Severe Disabilities (3) Disabilities (3) SPED 74200 - Curriculum and Instructional SPED 74200 - Curriculum and Instructional Strategies for Learners with Visual Impairments Strategies for Learners with Visual Impairments (3) (3) SPED 74300 - Braille Literacy and SPED 74300 - Braille Literacy and Communication Skills for Learners with Visual Communication Skills for Learners with Visual Impairments (3) Impairments (3) SPED 74400 - Assistive Technology for SPED 74400 - Assistive Technology for Learners with Visual Impairments (3) Learners with Visual Impairments (3) SPED 74500 - Mathematical Literacy and SPED 74500 - Mathematical Literacy and Nemeth Code for Learners with Visual Nemeth Code for Learners with Visual Impairments (1) Impairments (1) SPED 74600 - Educational Implications of SPED 74600 - Educational Implications of Learners Who Are Deafblind (3) Learners Who Are Deafblind (3) SPED 74700 - Principles and Practices in SPED 74700 - Principles and Practices in Orientation and Mobility for Teachers of Orientation and Mobility for Teachers of Learners with Visual Impairments (3) Learners with Visual Impairments (3) - Take either - - Take either - SPED 74800 - Student Teaching: Blindness SPED 74800 - Student Teaching: Blindness and Visual Impairment, Preschool–Grade 12 (4) and Visual Impairment, Preschool–Grade 12 (4) - Or one of the following - - Or one of the following - SPED 74850 - Student Teaching: Blindness SPED 74850 - Student Teaching: Blindness and Visual Impairment, Preschool–Grade 6 (2) and Visual Impairment, Preschool–Grade 6 (2) SPED 74851 - Student Teaching: Blindness SPED 74851 - Student Teaching: Blindness and Visual Impairment, Grades 7–12 (2) and Visual Impairment, Grades 7–12 (2) SPED 74852 - Supervised Practicum: SPED 74852 - Supervised Practicum: Blindness and Visual Impairment, Preschool– Blindness and Visual Impairment, Preschool– Grade 6 (2) Grade 6 (2) SPED 74853 - Supervised Practicum: SPED 74853 - Supervised Practicum: Blindness and Visual Impairment, Grades 7–12 Blindness and Visual Impairment, Grades 7–12 (2) (2) - Plus one of the following - - Plus one of the following - SPED 74854 - Student Teaching 2: Blindness SPED 74854 - Student Teaching 2: Blindness and Visual Impairment, Preschool–Grade 6 (2) and Visual Impairment, Preschool–Grade 6 (2)

564 SPED 74855 - Student Teaching 2: Blindness SPED 74855 - Student Teaching 2: Blindness and Visual Impairment, Grade 7–12 (2) and Visual Impairment, Grade 7–12 (2) SPED 74856 - Supervised Practicum 2: Blind SPED 74856 - Supervised Practicum 2: Blind and Visual Impairment Preschool–Grade 6 (2) and Visual Impairment Preschool–Grade 6 (2) SPED 74857 - Supervised Practicum 2: Blind SPED 74857 - Supervised Practicum 2: Blind and Visual Impairment, Grades 7–12 (2) and Visual Impairment, Grades 7–12 (2) Additional Courses for Program 1 Additional Courses for Program 1 CEDF 70650 - Social, Historical, Philosophical CEDF 70900 - Child Development Grades 1-6 Foundations of Education: The American (3) School (3) CEDC 70350 - Teaching Science in the CEDF 70900 - Child Development Grades 1-6 Elementary School (3) (3) CEDC 70450 - Teaching Developmental Reading (3) CEDC 70350 - Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) CEDC 70550 - Mathematics Curriculum and CEDC 70450 - Teaching Developmental Methods (3) Reading (3) CEDC 72250 - Social Studies Curriculum and CEDC 70550 - Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction: Integrating Literature, the Arts, and Methods (3) Technology (2) CEDC 72250 - Social Studies Curriculum and CEDC 72900 - Fieldwork in Childhood Instruction: Integrating Literature, the Arts, and Education for Special Educators (1) Technology (2) HED 71500 - Health Education for Special CEDC 72900 - Fieldwork in Childhood Educators (1) Education for Special Educators (1) Total: 41-57 HED 71500 - Health Education for Special Educators (1) Total: 41-60 Visual Impairment: Rehabilitation Teaching and orientation Mobility- MSEd From To SPED 70000 - Issues and Practices in SPED 700.50 - Social, Historical, Educating Students with Disabilities (3) Philosophical Foundations of General and Special Education (3) SPED 74000 - Medical Aspects and Educational Implications of Visual Impairments SPED 74000 - Medical Aspects and (3) Educational Implications of Visual Impairments (3) SPED 74100 - Education and Rehabilitation of Individuals with Visual Impairments (3) SPED 74100 - Education and Rehabilitation of Individuals with Visual Impairments (3) SPED 74300 - Braille Literacy and

565 SPED 74300 - Braille Literacy and Communication Skills for Learners with Visual Communication Skills for Learners with Visual Impairments (3) Impairments (3) SPED 74400 - Assistive Technology for Learners with Visual Impairments (3) SPED 74400 - Assistive Technology for Learners with Visual Impairments (3) SPED 74700 - Principles and Practices in Orientation and Mobility for Teachers of SPED 74700 - Principles and Practices in Learners with Visual Impairments (3) Orientation and Mobility for Teachers of Learners with Visual Impairments (3) SPED 76000 - Skills and Techniques for Rehabilitation Teaching I (3) SPED 76000 - Skills and Techniques for Rehabilitation Teaching I (3) SPED 76100 - Skills and Techniques for Rehabilitation Teaching II (3) SPED 76100 - Skills and Techniques for Rehabilitation Teaching II (3) SPED 76200 - Principles of Vocational Rehabilitation and Independent Living SPED 76200 - Principles of Vocational Rehabilitation for Adults with Visual Rehabilitation and Independent Living Impairments (3) Rehabilitation for Adults with Visual Impairments (3) SPED 76300 - Internship I: Rehabilitation Teaching for Individuals with Visual SPED 76300 - Internship I: Rehabilitation Impairments (2) Teaching for Individuals with Visual Impairments (2) SPED 76400 - Internship II: Rehabilitation Teaching for Individuals with Visual SPED 76400 - Internship II: Rehabilitation Impairments (2) Teaching for Individuals with Visual Impairments (2) SPED 76500 - Intermediate Orientation and Mobility (3) SPED 76500 - Intermediate Orientation and Mobility (3) SPED 76600 - Advanced Orientation and Mobility (3) SPED 76600 - Advanced Orientation and Mobility (3) SPED 76700 - Orientation and Mobility: Internship/Seminar (2) SPED 76700 - Orientation and Mobility: Internship/Seminar (2) SPED 76800 - Intermediate Orientation and Mobility: Lab and Seminar (3) SPED 76800 - Intermediate Orientation and Mobility: Lab and Seminar (3) SPED 76900 - Advanced Orientation and Mobility Lab and Seminar (3) SPED 76900 - Advanced Orientation and Mobility Lab and Seminar (3) COUNR 72000 - Medical Aspects of Disability (3) COUNR 72000 - Medical Aspects of Disability (3) COUNR 73000 - Counseling with the Aging (3) COUNR 73000 - Counseling with the Aging (3) COCO 70100 - Counseling Skills and Interviewing Techniques (3) COCO 70100 - Counseling Skills and

566 Interviewing Techniques (3) Total: 54 Total: 54 4. Rationale: A single paragraph of justification. Because the department now offers courses that are specifically designed to better serve culturally and linguistically diverse learners with special needs and that contextualize the need for teachers to support their students needs more holistically, these changes effectively update the current course of study for students in the following programs: Childhood Education Severe & Multiple (Including Deaf-Blindness), Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Blind & Visually Impaired, and Visual Impairment: Rehabilitation Teaching (and Combined Rehabilitation with Orientation and Mobility Sequence)* 5. Consultation Statement: c) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [ X ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Education Foundations Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ X ] YES d) Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [ ] YES X Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ X ] YES For new courses or programs, please consult. AIII.4 PROPOSED CHANGES IN THE MINOR IN COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Silberman School of Social Work Hunter College, CUNY The following is the revised curriculum for Minor in Community Organizing. Program Name and Degree Awarded: Minor in Community Organizing HEGIS Code: NY State Program Code: MHC Code HEGIS Code (when applicable): Effective term: Spring 2018 Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) 1) We are changing the way selected course credits are assigned 2) We are adding additional electives named by the participating departments as shown in the “TO” section 3) We are adding a Department to our Advisory Committee. History and Objectives Silberman School of Social Work has created a 15 credit minor which includes 9 core credits and two 3 credit electives beginning in Fall 2018. FROM (strikethrough what will be (underline the changes) TO changed) Requirements for the Degree Program: Requirements for the Minor: Community Organizing (CO) Minor in Community Organizing (CO) Minor in Students are required to take the following courses in sequence: Students are required to take the following courses in sequence:

567 SW 36000 –Introduction to SW 36000 –Introduction to Community Organizing -3 credits Community Organizing -3 credits SW 37000 (formerly SOSCI 397) – Internship and Field Seminar in Community Organizing -100 hours-3 credits(SW 36000 is co-or pre-requiste.) SW 46000 – Spring Year One- Advanced Community Organizing -SW 46000 –Advanced Community Organizing Theory & Practice -3 credits. (SW Theory & Practice -3 credits 36000 is pre-requisite) Fall or Spring Year One-SW 37000 Sub-total = 9 credits (formerly SOSCI 397) – Internship and Field Seminar in Community Students are required to select two 3 credit electives from a menu of 3 credit elective Organizing -100 hours-3 credits courses approved by 12 Departments and Programs: Africana & Latino/Puerto Rican Studies; Anthropology; Community Health; Film & Media Studies; History; Political Sub-total = 9 credits Science; Public Policy; Psychology; Sociology; Urban Studies; Women & Gender Studies; Asian-American Studies Students are required to select two 3 credit electives from a menu of 3 Courses applied by the student for his/her major may not be used to meet this credit elective courses approved by minor’s 6 credit elective requirement. 12 Departments and Programs: Africana & Latino/Puerto Rican Sub-Total= 6 credits Studies; Anthropology; Community Health; Film & Media Studies; History; Total Credit for the Minor = 15 credits Political Science; Public Policy; Psychology; Sociology; Urban ) indicates a course that counts for either the CUNY Please note that check ( Studies; Women & Gender Studies; Common Core Requirment (CCCR) or Pluralism and Diversity Requirements (P&D A- D). No courses in the student’s major department or program may be [Additional Courses added are underlined as follows]: applied to meet this minor’s 6 credit elective requirement. Film And Media Studies FILM 32700 - Representations of Race and Sub-Total= 6 credits Ethnicity in U.S. Media Total Credit for the Minor = 15 credits FILM 32800 - Images of Resistance in the Developing World ) indicates a Please note that check ( MEDIA 37000 - The Press and the Public course that counts for either the Common Core (CC) or Pluralism and MEDIA 38100 - Propaganda and the Mass Diversity Requirements (P&D A-D). Media MEDIA 38400 - Women and Media [The list of original courses remain as is] MEDPL 37700 - Neighborhood News Film And Media Studies Women & Gender Studies FILM 32700 - Representations of WGS 24400 TRANSNATIONAL FEMINISM Race and Ethnicity in U.S. Media (P&DA) FILM 32800 - Images of WGSS 15000 INTRODUCTION TO LGBTQI Resistance in the Developing World STUDIES MEDIA 37000 - The Press and the WGSS 26600 OUR BODIES, OUR Public POLITICS MEDIA 38100 - Propaganda and the Mass Media WGSS 30002 REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS IN (P&DC) MEDIA 38400 - Women and THE UNITED STATES Media WGSL 20004 GENDER AND HUMAN RIGHTS Women & Gender Studies WGS 24400 TRANSNATIONAL WGSL 20010 SEXUALITY, RACE AND FEMINISM ECONOMICS WGSS 15000 INTRODUCTION TO WGSL 30600 GENDER AND MIGRATION LGBTQI STUDIES WGSC 20001 WRITINGS FROM WGSS 26600 OUR BODIES, OUR DETENTION: REPRESSION, GENDER &

568 POLITICS POLITICS WGSS 30002 REPRODUCTIVE WGSC 20003 PRISON WRITING MEMOIRS RIGHTS IN THE UNITED STATES WGSP 20010 GENDER, SEXUALITIES & WGSL 200.04 GENDER AND INDIGENOUS RIGHTS HUMAN RIGHTS WGSP 20011 SEX EDUCATION AND WGSL 20010 SEXUALITY, RACE PUBLIC POLICY AND ECONOMICS WGSP 20051 GENDER, DISABILITY & WGSL 30600 GENDER AND EMBODIMENT MIGRATION WGSP 20057 GENDER & HEALTH POLICY WGSC 20001 WRITINGS FROM WGSP 20070 PRISON, HUMAN RIGHTS & DETENTION: REPRESSION, GENDER GENDER & POLITICS WGSP 39800 COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP WGSC 20003 PRISON WRITING SEMINAR MEMOIRS WGSP 20010 GENDER, ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES SEXUALITIES & INDIGENOUS RIGHTS ASIAN 23002 ASIAN AMERICAN COMMUNITIES AND MENTAL HEALTH WGSP 20011 SEX EDUCATION ASIAN 39002 ASIAN AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS AND LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY WGSP 20051 GENDER, DISABILITY & EMBODIMENT WGSP 20057 GENDER & HEALTH POLICY WGSP 20070 PRISON, HUMAN RIGHTS & GENDER Community Health: COMHE 30600 - Social Disparities in Health COMHE 32500 - Environmental Public Health COMHE 41100 - Community Health Assessment Urban Studies: URBS 10100 - Urban Life: Personal and Observational View (W) URBS 20100 - Urban Plans and Policies URBS 31000 - Methods of Urban Research and Policy Analysis Sociology: SOC 21700 - Race and Ethnicity SOC 23500 - Community Organization and Action

569 SOC 23700 - Social Welfare Policy SOC 23900 - Child Welfare (W) SOC 25300 - Deviance and Social Control SOC 25700 - Sex and Gender Roles SOC 25900 - Mass Media, Communication and Public Opinion (W) SOC 30700 - Migration SOC 30900 - Social Movements and Social Change (W) SOC 31700 - Class, Status, and Power SOC 31900 - Criminology SOC 32000 - Law, Society and Civil Rights Africana & Puerto Rican/Latino Studies: AFPRL 18200 - Culture and Ethnic Identity AFPRL 20500 - African American Politics of Social Change AFPRL 30400 - Leaders and Movements of Black Urban Communities (W) AFPRL 32100 - Caribbean Migration and New York City (W) AFPRL 38400 - Poverty in Society (W) AFPRL 38700 - Puerto Rican/Latino Politics in the United States (W) Anthropology: ANTHC 21800 - The Anthropology of the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S. ANTHC 30100 - Gender in Anthropological Perspective ANTHC 32076 - Language, Sex and Gender Psychology: PSYCH 19000 - Development of Gender Roles PSYCH 23000 - Social Psychology

570 PSYCH 23500 - The Psychology of Women (D/S) PSYCH 33400 - Cultural Psychology Public Policy: PUPOL 10000 - Introduction to Public Policy SOC 21800 - Social Inequality History: HIST 31700 - History of the American City HIST 31800 - History of the American Working Class (W) HIST 3411J - Terror and the Constitution: Free Speech in the U.S. Since 1886 * HIST 38225 - LGBT Living in the Global 20th Century * HIST 34100 - Race & Racism in U.S. History * HIST 34120 - Women and Gender in Islam * HIST 38224 - Black Women’s History: From Mum Bett to Michelle Obama and Beyond * Political Science: POLSC 20900 - Women and Gender in Western Political Thought (W) POLSC 21200 - Urban Politics (W) POLSC 21500 - Public Opinion and Political Participation (W) POLSC 21800 - Women and Politics (W) POLSC 22100 - U.S. Immigration Policy (W) POLSC 22800 - Protest Movements in American Politics (W) POLSC 32000 - Ethnic Politics (W) POLSC 30500 - Democratic Theory (W) POLSC 30900 - Feminist Political Theory (W) POLSC 27225 Comparative LGBT Politics *

571 Note : The proposal should show the complete text of existing requirements and of proposed requirements. The State Education ALL department requires that all program changes include a complete listing of required courses. Please make sure to list courses required prior to the major. 4. Rationale : This was done to clarify the components of the Community Organizing Minor and to assure that it had its own content and structure separate from the student’s Major. As a new interdisciplinary program, the CO Minor is adding additional relevant and acceptable electives as recommended by the participating undergraduate department. If the student has taken additional courses in his/her major that exceed the required number of major credits, that course(s) may be counted toward the CO Minor. The words “Year One” were removed from the Requirements so that a student may take SW 37000 during any semester after taking SW 36000. SW 37000 may also be taken concurrently with SW 36000 or SW 46000. Consultation Statement: a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? – If yes, list department/program: Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X ] YES Anthropology; Africana & Latino/Puerto Rican Studies; Film & Media Studies; History; Political Science; Psychology; Public Policy; Sociology; Urban Studies; Women & Gender Studies; Community Health. [Added- Asian-American Studies] Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ X ] YES b. Does this affect the Library? [X] NO Have you consulted the subject liaison? [X ] YES AIII.5 THE FOLLOWING IS THE REVISED CURRICULUM FOR ACCOUNTING LEADING TO THE B.S. DEGREE. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS/B.S. PROGRAM IN ACCOUNTING Hunter College, CUNY Proposed Changes in a Degree Program Program Name and Degree Awarded: B.S. Program in Accounting HEGIS Code: 0502.00 NY State Program Code: 02351 MHC Code HEGIS Code 60289 (when applicable): ) Note: Codes can be found in the State's Inventory of Registered Programs at http://www.nysed.gov/heds/irpsl1.html Effective term: Fall 2018 Program Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the Hunter College B.S. program in Accounting, students will be able to: 1. Apply accounting analysis to problems in real world situations; understand current accounting events; and evaluate specific accounting policy proposals ( Critical thinking ) 2. Use "Generally Accepted Accounting Principles" to prepare and analyze financial statements and related qualitative Quantitative reasoning ) information ( 3. Demonstrate an ability to apply authoritative accounting and auditing standards to solve real-world accounting and auditing problems ( Problem solving ) 4. Demonstrate mastery of the relevant topics and ethical judgment and consideration needed for licensure and success in the Public Accounting profession ( Specialized knowledge ) 5. Explain accounting issues effectively in written and oral form using correct accounting logic, stating relevant accounting

572 principles and rules ( Communication ) Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) Four Revisions: Revision A: Starting Fall 2017, CUNY has asked all programs to eliminate the “Allied Required Courses” and “Foundational In this proposal, the B.S. Program in Accounting and the Department of Requirements” (courses required prior to the major). Economics propose to eliminate both categories. We create a new category called, “Non-professional Studies,” that includes all the Math Requirements that used to be included either in Allied or Foundational Requirements. Also, ECO 20100, which used to be classified as Allied, has been added to the “Business Core” requirement of the “Professional Studies” Requirements, since this is where it has always belonged. Revision B: We The Math Department has recently added a course, MATH 15200 – Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences. are adding this course as an allowed substitution for the requirement of MATH 15000 in the “Non-professional Studies” requirement. Revision C: The B.S. program in Accounting and the Department of Economics propose to restrict the usage of the CR/NC option to one use among the 36 credits of the “Other Professional Studies” requirement. The B.S. program in Accounting and the Department of Economics propose to explicitly exclude ECO 49800 – Revision D: – as partially satisfying the “Business Elective” requirements of the “Other Professional Internship in Economics and Accounting Studies” requirements. We have also added language to this requirement to make it clear to students that no ACCP or ECO classes may be used to satisfy the Business Elective requirement that are also used to satisfy other requirements of the Accounting major. History and Objectives In recent years, the Accounting program and Economics Department have been concerned about the quality of our accounting graduates. Hunter College Accounting students had performed poorly on the CPA examination; in fact, Hunter’s scores had been lowest among CUNY schools for several years. Thus, we’ve historically had a difficult time placing our graduates in good professional accounting positions upon completion of the program, exacerbated by the fact that we have not had recruiting relationships with any of the major CPA firms. In the past three years, we’ve made various curricular changes that have started to improve the quality of our students’ performance. As a result of these changes, Hunter has begun to improve our recruiting relationships with several major CPA firms. We believe that the proposals below will continue to make the program more rigorous and improve the overall quality of our graduates. Revision C addresses program rigor. This proposal also seeks to clarify items in the program description to make them more easily understandable to students. Thus several proposed changes are merely changes in wording and classification. Revisions A and D address textual clarity. Revision A is a response to the elimination of “Allied” and “Foundational” requirements. Revision D clarifies what has always been the rule, but has never been explicitly stated – that the one-credit Internship course, does not count towards major requirements. Revision B adds an alternative Accounting majors may use for the Calculus requirement in the Non-professional Studies requirement. (strikethrough FROM what will be changed) TO (underline the changes) List of Course List of Course Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Name Crs. Crs. and Name Requirements for the Degree Program: Requirements for the Degree Program: The degree of bachelor of science The degree of bachelor of science (accounting) offered at Hunter College fulfills (accounting) offered at Hunter College fulfills educational requirements for the CPA educational requirements for the CPA examination in New York State. Candidates examination in New York State. Candidates pursuing licensure in New York State will pursuing licensure in New York State will need to complete 150 college credits need to complete 150 college credits including ACC 49000 - Accounting & including ACC 49000 - Accounting & Auditing Research. An appropriate masters Auditing Research. An appropriate masters degree, while not required, is another path to degree, while not required, is another path to licensure. For information on the MS in licensure. For information on the MS in Accounting at Hunter College, see the Accounting at Hunter College, see the Hunter College Graduate Catalog. Hunter College Graduate Catalog.

573 All students contemplating a career in All students contemplating a career in accounting should request an interview with accounting should request an interview with the accounting program adviser during the the accounting program adviser during the lower freshman term. To assure completion lower freshman term. To assure completion of the BS (accounting) degree within four of the BS (accounting) degree within four years, a full-time student should begin the years, a full-time student should begin the accounting major sequence in the upper accounting major sequence in the upper freshman term, if possible, and no later than freshman term, if possible, and no later than the lower sophomore term, by registering for the lower sophomore term, by registering for ACC 27100. ACC 27100. Major Major The Department of Economics offers a major The Department of Economics offers a major leading to the BS in accounting, requiring a leading to the BS in accounting, requiring a minimum of 35 credits of accounting, 36 minimum of 35 credits of accounting, 33 credits of other professional studies, and an credits of other professional studies and an additional 7 credits of Allied required additional 3 – 11 credits of non-professional studies. Details are outlined below. courses. Details are outlined below. Grade Options Grade Options Students enrolled in the BS (accounting) Students enrolled in the BS (accounting) curriculum may not use CR/NC grades for curriculum may not use CR/NC grades for the 35 accounting credits in the accounting the 35 accounting credits in the accounting major. major. Progression in the Major Progression in the Major All courses that are prerequisites to courses All courses that are prerequisites to courses required by the B.S. Program in Accounting required by the B.S. Program in Accounting must be passed with a grade of C, or CR, or must be passed with a grade of C, or CR, or better before students may progress to the better before students may progress to the next course in the sequence and in order to next course in the sequence and in order to graduate. graduate. ECO 22100 is required for the ECO 22100 is required for the major and must be completed with a grade major and must be completed with a grade of C, CR or better to be accepted for credit of C, CR or better to be accepted for credit toward fulfillment of the major. toward fulfillment of the major. Allied Required Course (7 cr) Non-professional Studies (3 -- 11 cr) • ECO 20100 – Principles of • MATH 15000 (STEM) - Calculus with Analytic Geometry I. * Macroeconomics Note: MATH 15200 -- Calculus for the • MATH 15000 (STEM) - Calculus with Life and Social Sciences* or ECO Analytic Geometry I. Note: ECO 22000 22000 – Techniques of Economic – Techniques of Economic Analysis Analysis may also be used to fulfill this may also be used to fulfill this requirement. IMPORTANT: Students requirement. who wish to take higher levels of Calculus are advised to take MATH Additional Information 15000 to satisfy this requirement. Majors are advised to complete MATH • And, if needed (depending on Math 15000 (STEM) and ECO 22100 within their placement examination), one or both of first 75 credits of college work. For students the following: already at or beyond these points when they become majors, such courses should be MATH 10100 - Algebra o taken within the first 12 credits following for College Students* declaration of the major. The department may waive the requirement of any of the o MATH 12500 (STEM) above or other courses upon satisfactory Precalculus* proof of course equivalency. Courses waived *These courses may be counted for credit in through substitution or examination do not

574 more than one program. provide course credit nor do they count toward the major. Additional Information (68 cr) Professional Studies Majors are advised to complete MATH 15000 (STEM) and ECO 22100 within their Accounting (35 cr) first 75 credits of college work. For students already at or beyond these points when they ACC 27100 - Accounting I • become majors, such courses should be • ACC 27200 - Accounting II taken within the first 12 credits following declaration of the major. The department ACCP 37100 - Intermediate • may waive the requirement of any of the Accounting I above or other courses upon satisfactory proof of course equivalency. Courses waived • ACCP 37200 - Intermediate through substitution or examination do not Accounting II provide course credit nor do they count toward the major. ACCP 37300 - Federal Income • Taxation Students may place out of MATH 10100 and MATH 12500 requirements without replacing • ACCP 37400 - Managerial the credits. See the Department of Accounting (Cost Accounting) Mathematics and Statistics for details. Students may place out of MATH 15000 but • ACCP 47100 - Advanced Accounting must replace the course with a 3 credit I course approved by the Accounting Program. ACCP 47200 - Advanced Accounting • II Professional Studies (71 cr) • ACCP 47300 - Business Taxes Accounting (35 cr) • ACCP 47500 – Auditing • ACC 27100 - Accounting I • ACCP 49000 – Accounting and • ACC 27200 - Accounting II Auditing Research • ACCP 37100 - Intermediate Additional Information Accounting I An overall average of at least “C+” (2.3 ACCP 37200 - Intermediate • Grade Point Average) must be maintained in Accounting II these 35 Accounting credits. ACCP 37300 - Federal Income • Students who receive a grade of “D” or lower Taxation in any of the eleven required Accounting courses in the Professional Studies • ACCP 37400 - Managerial Requirement will be allowed to repeat the Accounting (Cost Accounting) course only once. In total, students may repeat no more than three Accounting ACCP 47100 - Advanced Accounting • courses for which they received a grade of I “D” or lower. Students who exceed this allowed number of course repeats will be ACCP 47200 - Advanced Accounting • dismissed from the B.S. program in II Accounting. The Academic Advisor for the B.S. program in Accounting may, under • ACCP 47300 - Business Taxes extraordinary circumstances, make exceptions to this rule. ACCP 47500 – Auditing • (33 credits) Other Professional Studies • ACCP 49000 – Accounting and Auditing Research Business Law (6 cr) Additional Information ACC 28000 - Business Law I • An overall average of at least “C+” (2.3 • ACCP 38000 - Business Law II Grade Point Average) must be maintained in these 35 Accounting credits. Statistics (3 cr)

575 Students who receive a grade of “D” or lower ECO 22100 - Economic Statistics • in any of the eleven required Accounting should be completed within the first 75 courses in the Professional Studies credits of college work. Note: STAT Requirement will be allowed to repeat the 21300 (STEM) - Introduction to Applied course only once. In total, students may Statistics may also be used to fulfill this repeat no more than three Accounting requirement courses for which they received a grade of “D” or lower. Students who exceed this Additional Information allowed number of course repeats will be dismissed from the B.S. program in For students already at or beyond this point Accounting. The Academic Advisor for the when they become majors, the course B.S. program in Accounting may, under should be taken within the first 12 credits extraordinary circumstances, make following declaration of the major. exceptions to this rule. Finance (6 cr) Other Professional Studies (36 credits) Required: ECO 36500 - Corporate Finance Business Law (6 cr) and one additional course from the following: ACC 28000 - Business Law I • • ECO 21000 - Money and Banking • ACCP 38000 - Business Law II ECO 36600 - Security and • Statistics (3 cr) Investment Analysis ECO 22100 - Economic Statistics • • ACCP 36700 - Analysis of Financial should be completed within the first 75 Statements Note: STAT credits of college work. 21300 (STEM) - Introduction to Applied Business Core-Required (6 cr) Statistics may also be used to fulfill this requirement • ECO 20000 - Principles of Microeconomics Additional Information • One course in computer science. For students already at or beyond this point when they become majors, the course note: ACCP 47600 Computer should be taken within the first 12 credits Accounting Systems is strongly following declaration of the major. recommended. Finance (6 cr) Business elective (12 cr) Required: ECO 36500 - Corporate Finance Choose from the following: and one additional course from the following: • ECO 26000 - Business Organization and Management ECO 21000 - Money and Banking • Any 300- or 400-level ACCP or ECO • • ECO 36600 - Security and ; Note: course (excluding ACCP 47600 Investment Analysis ACCP 48000 is strongly recommended) ACCP 36700 - Analysis of Financial • Statements Additional Information Business Core-Required (9 cr) An overall average of at least “C+” (2.3 Grade Point Average) must be maintained in ECO 20000 - Principles of • these 33 credits of Other Professional Microeconomics Studies (Business Law, Statistics, Finance, Business Core, and Business Elective). This ECO 20100 - Principles of • requirement is separate and measured Macroeconomics independently of the required 2.3 GPA for credits) the 35 Accounting . • One course in computer science. Note: There is no minimum required Grade note: ACCP 47600 Computer Point Average for the seven required Allied Accounting Systems is strongly credits.

576 recommended. Total credits required 75 Business Electives (12 cr) Courses required prior to the major: Choose from the following: MATH 12500 (prerequisite to ECO • ECO 26000 - Business Organization • 22100 and MATH 15000) and Management • MATH 10100 (prerequisite to ECO • Any 300- or 400-level ACCP or ECO 20000 and MATH 12500) course (excluding ACCP 47600 and ; Note: ACCP 48000 is ECO 49800 strongly recommended) NOTE: Students may not use any course to fulfill the business elective requirement that is also being used to satisfy any other requirement of the Accounting major. Additional Information An overall average of at least “C+” (2.3 Grade Point Average) must be maintained in these 36 credits of Other Professional Studies (Business Law, Statistics, Finance, Business Core, and Business Elective). This requirement is separate and measured independently of the required 2.3 GPA for the 35 Accounting credits . Note: There is no minimum required Grade Point Average for the four to eleven Non- professional Studies credits. Students enrolled in the BS (accounting) curriculum may use a CR/NC grade only one time toward the 36 credits in the Other Professional Studies requirement. If a student exceeds this limit, any additional CR grades in these 36 credits will be converted to a grade of C and any additional NC grades in these 36 credits will be converted to a grade of F. Total credits required 74 - 82 Note : The proposal should show the complete text of existing requirements and of proposed requirements. The State Education department requires that all program changes include a complete listing of required courses. Please make sure to list ALL courses required prior to the major. : 4. Rationale (Single paragraph justification) Revision A: This proposal is in response to CUNY’s request that “Allied” and “Foundational” requirements be folded into the program requirements. To accommodate this request. We’ve created a new category, called “Non-professional Studies.” We’ve brought the calculus requirement into this category as well as the two prerequisites to the calculus requirement – College Algebra and Precalculus. ECO 20100 – Principles of Macroeconomics used to be part of the Allied Required Courses. Rather than include it in the Non- professional Studies requirement, we’ve moved it to the Business Core Requirement under Professional Studies. This is more appropriate as a categorization for this course, as ECO 20000 – Principles of Microeconomics is also included in this requirement. Revision B: The Math Department at Hunter College has introduced a Course – MATH 15200 – Calculus for the Life and Social

577 Sciences. We have been allowing Accounting Students to use this course as a substitution for MATH 15000 – Calculus and Analytic Geometry. By making the substitution explicit in the Chancellor’s Report, students may freely use this course without requiring a letter from the department to Degree Works. Revision C: In our ongoing efforts to add rigor to the B.S. program in Accounting, we recently instituted a minimum GPA (2.3) requirement for the 36 credits in the “Other Professional Studies” requirement. We have found that students often use the CR/NC option towards these requirements (often students use all four allowed uses of this option against this major requirement). Doing so allows some students to get around the minimum GPA requirement for these credits. Further, the use of the CR/NC option for these courses inflates students’ major GPAs, sometimes significantly, which has led employers to discount the major GPA for Hunter students. This has been a problem for program reputation. Revision D: Technically, as the rule currently reads, any 300- or 400-level Economics course may be used towards the Business Elective requirement. Thus, technically, the one-credit ECO 49800 – Internship in Accounting and Economics, by virtue of being a 400-level Economics course, should be applicable against this requirement. However, it was never our intention to allow the Internship credits to satisfy major requirements. This exclusion is to handle a loophole we hadn’t previously considered. Since ECO 49800 is a one-credit course and may only be taken twice, students can’t really use it anyway. This explicit exclusion clears up any misunderstandings among students about this. We have also added language to the Business Electives requirement in the “Other Professional Studies” requirement that students may not use courses to fulfill this requirement that are also being used to satisfy other major requirements of the B.S. program in Accounting. This has always been the rule. We just want to state it plainly so students are aware of this. Consultation Statement: a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b. Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A AIII.6 THE FOLLOWING IS THE REVISED CURRICULUM FOR THE FILM PROGRAM LEADING TO THE BA DEGREE. DEPARTMENT OF FILM & MEDIA Hunter College, CUNY Proposed Changes in Film Program Program Name and Degree Awarded: Film Studies BA HEGIS Code: 1010.00 NY State Program Code: 85385/6 MHC Code HEGIS Code 60149 ) http://www.nysed.gov/heds/irpsl1.html Note: Codes can be found in the State's Inventory of Registered Programs at Effective term: Fall 2018 The film major combines theoretical perspectives and practical production experience to provide students with a thorough understanding of the cinema and of their creative potential as filmmakers. The major is composed of required and elective courses in film and video production and film studies. Program Learning Outcomes Students majoring in Film will be able to: - Detect and describe the aesthetic elements as well as the technical aspects of a film or video. - Examine and place films within the history of various film industries as well as in cinema’s broader national historical and cultural contexts.

578 - Consider films in relation to genre, mode (documentary, experimental, fiction) or thematic focus. - Appreciate, recognize and explore narrative and alternative filmic practices. - Be conversant with and articulate a coherent argument on current critical theories and various national, multicultural, and gender-based perspectives on cinema. - Produce a script for short films and features; Direct short films - Be technically proficient in the various aspects of producing a film—sound, editing and cinematography. Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) Foundation courses have been moved into the major. The modifications in requirements for the Film Studies BA changes affect only the requirements of 6 credits in the Film History sequence of courses, which would now consist of one 200-level course and one 300-level course. The change reflects the need to provide students with greater clarity and flexibility in choosing their courses as well as guaranteeing that students will have at least one course at a 300-level focused on Film History. In addition, FILM 23000: Movies in American Culture is now an elective given its more general focus on the relationship between cinema and national culture. History and Objectives We’ve designed our curriculum so that students taking analytical courses would gain exposure to courses focused on film style and close analysis as well as on film history. The film history courses on the 200-level include National Cinema courses (focused on specific periods of a country’s cinematic history and its relationship to that country’s social and cultural history) as well as two survey courses. Over the years we devised 300-level Topics in Film History classes that we have been offering with different decades’ focus—‘30s, ‘50s, ‘60s, ‘70s, ‘80s. We intend to design one on the 1920s. These courses are essential and one of our objectives is to have students be required to also take a 300-level course. FROM (strikethrough (underline the changes) what will be changed) TO List of Course List of Course Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), Crs. Crs. and Name and Name Film - BA Film– BA (30-36 credits) Foundational Courses Major Hunter Core Requirement Foundational Courses must be completed before embarking upon the major. Students ourses within this major may fulfill Several c with appropriate background may be parts of the Hunter Core Requirement exempted from some or all Foundational equirement (CUNY Common Core R Courses. See department for proper [CCCR ], Concurrent Requirements). When placement. selecting courses, it may be to a student’s advantage to choose courses that count •FILM 10100 - Introduction to Cinema toward the Hunter Core Requirement and * note: a B or better is required in this course also advance the student on the path to the in order to continue in the Film major major. Details on the Hunter Core Requirement can be found here: Hunter •FILMP 16000 - Media & Film in a Digital Core Requirement Age II In the case of the Film major, the course -or- that meets CCCR is: •MEDP 16000 - Media and Film in a Digital Course CUNY Common Core Requirement Age Pt. 2 FILM 10100 Creative Expression Hunter Core Requirement equired for the M ajor ( 36 credits) Courses R within ourses leading to (foundational) or C this major may fulfill parts of the Hunter Core 30-36 credits, combined total: up to 6

579 Requirement (CUNY Common Core [CCC], introductory, 12 credits analytical, 12 credits Hunter Focus, Concurrent Requirements). production and 6 credits electives from When selecting courses, it may be to a analytical and/or production courses. student’s advantage to choose courses that count toward the Hunter Core Requirement Students must receive a grade of B or better and also advance the student on the path to in FILM 10100 to continue a major in film. the major. Details on the Hunter Core The major must be declared in person with Requirement can be found here: Hunter an undergraduate film adviser (call (212) Core Requirement 772-4949 to schedule). The student must bring his or her transcript, and, where In the case of the Film major, the course that relevant, transcripts from other colleges meets CCC is: attended, when meeting with the undergraduate film adviser to declare a film Foundational Course CUNY Common Core major. Students majoring in film must also or Major take FILMP 16000/MEDP 16000 which is prerequisite for all film production courses. A FILM 10100 Creative Expression maximum of 6 credits in MEDIA courses at Foundational the 200 or 300 level may be applied toward the major in film. Students must meet any BA in Film prerequisites for these courses. I ndependent study and internship courses 36 Credits r equired for the ajor 30- m do not count toward the major. Students must see a program adviser to plan choice Foundational Courses (for students without and sequence of courses. background in the field) up to 6 Introductory Courses (6 credits) Major in Film 30 FILM 10100 - Introduction to Cinema (3)* - ∙ Analytic Course Requirements (12) note: a B or better is required in this course Production Course Requirements (12) in order to continue in the Film major Electives (6) FILMP 16000 - Media & Film in a Digital ∙ Age II (3)* Total for students without background in field 36 -or- Major in Film (30 cr) ∙ MEDP 16000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 2 (3)* 30 credits, combined total: 12 credits analytical, 12 credits production and 6 credits I. Analytical Course Requirements (12 electives from analytical and/or production credits ) courses. ) A) Film Style and Close Analysis (6 credits Students must receive a grade of B or better •FILM 20100 - Practical Film Analysis in FILM 10100 to declare a major in film. The major must be declared in person with an plus 3 credits from one of the following undergraduate film adviser (call (212) 772- courses: 4949 to schedule). The student must bring his or her transcript, and, where relevant, •FILM 22400 - Cinematic Space transcripts from other colleges attended, when meeting with the undergraduate film •FILM 23100 - Studies of Selected Directors adviser to declare a film major. Students majoring in film must also take FILMP •FILM 32300 - Film Technology and 16000/MEDP 16000 which is prerequisite for Aesthetic Theory all film production courses. FILM 10100 and FILMP 16000/MEDP 16000 do not count •FILM 32351 - Aesthetics of Film Sound A maximum of 6 credits in towards the major. MEDIA courses at the 200 or 300 level may •FILM 33300 - Styles and Theories of Film be applied toward the major in film. Students Acting must meet any prerequisites for these ): B) Film History (6 credits courses. Courses at the 100 level, i ndependent study , and internship courses one course (3 cr) from the following 200- do not count toward the major. Students level courses: must see a program adviser to plan choice

580 and sequence of courses. •FILM 21100 - Film History I: 1895-1942 I. Analytical Course Requirements (12 cr ) •FILM 21200 - Film History II: Since 1942 ) A) Film Style and Close Analysis (6 cr •FILM 21300 - National Cinema •FILM 20100 - Practical Film Analysis one course (3cr) from the following 300- level courses: plus 3 credits from one of the following courses: •FILM 34400 - History of Cinematography •FILM 22400 - Cinematic Space •FILM 39700 - Topics in Film History •FILM 23100 - Studies of Selected Directors II. Production Course Requirements (12 ): credits •FILM 32300 - Film Technology and Aesthetic Theory A) Required Production Sequence (9 credits ): •FILM 32351 - Aesthetics of Film Sound •FILMP 25100 - Film Production I •FILM 33300 - Styles and Theories of Film Acting •FILPL 27600 - Screen Writing I - The Short (W) ): B) Film History (6 cr •FILMP 35200 - Film Production II •FILM 21100 - Film History I: 1895-1942 and/or ): B) Advanced Production Cluster (3 credits •FILM 21200 - Film History II: Since 1942 •FILMP 37100 - Screen Directing I or If students choose to take only FLM 21100 or •FILPL 37700 - Screen Writing II The only FLM 21200, they must also choose from Feature (W) the following: III. Elective Course Requirements (6 •FILM 21300 - National Cinema or ): credits •FILM 23000 - Movies in American Culture or From analytical and/or production electives: At least one elective must be a 300 level or or •FILM 34400 - History of Cinematography above course. •FILM 39700 - Topics in Film History A) Analytical Electives: ): II. Production Course Requirements (12 cr •FILM 21400 - Multicultural Perspectives in Cinema ): cr A) Required Production Sequence (9 •FILM 21500 - Women and Film •FILMP 25100 - Film Production I •FILM 22200 - Topics in Genre Studies •FILPL 27600 - Screen Writing I - The Short (W) •FILM 22252 - Topics in Genre Studies: “The Woman's Film” of the 1940s •FILMP 35200 - Film Production II FILM 23000 - Movies In American Culture ): cr B) Advanced Production Cluster (3 •FILM 23200 - Experimental Film and Video •FILMP 37100 - Screen Directing I or •FILM 29900 - Special Topics in Film •FILPL 37700 - Screen Writing II The Feature (W) •FILM 32200 - Contemporary Film Theory ): cr III. Elective Course Requirements (6 •FILM 32400 - Narrative Strategies From analytical and/or production electives: •FILM 32600 - America in American Film At least one elective must be a 300 level or and Video above course. •FILM 32700 - Representations of Race and A) Analytical Electives:

581 Ethnicity in U.S. Media •FILM 21400 - Multicultural Perspectives in •FILM 32800 - Images of Resistance in the Cinema Developing World •FILM 21500 - Women and Film •FILM 33200 - Myths and Images in the Media •FILM 22200 - Topics in Genre Studies •FILM 33400 - Theatricality and the •FILM 22252 - Topics in Genre Studies: “The Presentation of Self Woman's Film” of the 1940s •FILM 39100 - Problems in Film Research •FILM 23200 - Experimental Film and Video •FILM 39900 - Studies in Film •FILM 29900 - Special Topics in Film •FILM 40100 - Independent Research •FILM 32200 - Contemporary Film Theory •FILM 40200 - Honors Project •FILM 32400 - Narrative Strategies •FILM 49900 - Advanced Seminar •FILM 32600 - America in American Film and Video B) Film Production Electives: •FILM 32700 - Representations of Race and A second course from the advanced Ethnicity in U.S. Media production cluster may be taken as an elective course •FILM 32800 - Images of Resistance in the Developing World •FILMP 37100 - Screen Directing I •FILM 33200 - Myths and Images in the •FILPL 37700 - Screen Writing II The Media Feature (W) •FILM 33400 - Theatricality and the •FILMP 31100 - Directing Documentary Presentation of Self Video Production •FILM 39100 - Problems in Film Research or •FILM 39900 - Studies in Film •FILMP 28600 - Location Sound •FILM 40100 - Independent Research •FILMP 34100 - Producing the Film •FILM 40200 - Honors Project •FILMP 37200 - Screen Directing II •FILM 49900 - Advanced Seminar •FILMP 38100 - Techniques of Cinematography B) Film Production Electives: •FILMP 38200 - Narrative Editing A second course from the advanced production cluster may be taken as an •FILMP 38300 - Sound Design elective course •FILMP 38400 - Film and Video Production •FILMP 37100 - Screen Directing I •FILMP 39900 - Special Topics in Advanced •FILPL 37700 - Screen Writing II The Film Practice Feature (W) •FILMP 45100 - Film and Video Production •FILMP 31100 - Directing Documentary Seminar Video Production •FILMP 49800 - Internship or *These courses may be counted for credit in •FILMP 28600 - Location Sound more than one program. •FILMP 34100 - Producing the Film Sub-total 30 Electives 6 •FILMP 37200 - Screen Directing II ______ ET electives+ •FILMP 38100 - Techniques of Total credits required 36

582 Cinematography •FILMP 38200 - Narrative Editing •FILMP 38300 - Sound Design •FILMP 38400 - Film and Video Production •FILMP 39900 - Special Topics in Advanced Film Practice •FILMP 45100 - Film and Video Production Seminar •FILMP 49800 - Internship 30 Sub-total Electives 6 ______ ET electives+ Total credits required 36 : The proposal should show the complete text of existing requirements and of proposed requirements. The State Education Note department requires that all program changes include a complete listing of required courses. Please make sure to list ALL courses required prior to the major. 4. Rationale : Prior to the proposed change, the requirements had left the possibility open for students to take two 200-level courses within the Film History category of the Analytical section of the program. The proposed change with a requirement of a 200-level course and a 300-level course guarantees exposure to different levels of analysis. In addition, all of the courses listed are taught frequently by full-time staff allowing for greater flexibility for students to graduate expeditiously. The change of FILM 23000: Movies in American Culture from the history section of analytical courses to the electives pool of courses guarantees that when students fulfill the History requirements in the analytical section they will be taking courses that focus on historical issues or methodology. Consultation Statement: a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A a. Does this affect the Library? [ X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A AIII.7 THE FOLLOWING IS THE REVISED CURRICULUM FOR MEDIA STUDIES LEADING TO THE BA DEGREE. DEPARTMENT OF FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES Hunter College, CUNY Proposed Changes in a Degree Program Program Name and Degree Awarded: Media Studies BA HEGIS Code: 0601 NY State Program Code: 88296 MHC Code HEGIS Code (when applicable): 60171 ) Note: Codes can be found in the State's Inventory of Registered Programs at http://www.nysed.gov/heds/irpsl1.html

583 Effective term: Fall 2018 Program Learning Outcomes: Students majoring in Media Studies will be able to: • Apply dominant media studies terminology • Develop listening and observational skills for the systematic study of media • Master a wide range of analytical concepts specific to media studies • Gain insight into the contextual relationship between media and culture through examination of the history, production, and aesthetics of the media. • Develop a portfolio of work specific to the concentration in Media Analysis and Criticism, Documentary and Television Production, Journalism, or Emerging Media Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) The proposed modifications consist of the inclusion of the new prefixes FILPL and MEDPL as possible elective courses in the General Media Studies major, the Documentary and Television Production concentration, and the Emerging Media concentration. One new course has been added to the Journalism curriculum: MEDPL 29700 - Data Journalism. In the Emerging Media concentration, the course MEDP 39910 - Game Programming 2 has been moved from a “Special Topics” listing under the “Advanced Media Production umbrella” to the list of “Required Production Courses.” History and Objectives The Media Studies major combines theoretical perspectives and practical production experience to provide students with a thorough understanding of media and of their creative potential as media-makers. The major is composed of required and elective courses in media analysis and production for a total of 36 credits. The analytical courses provide students with a broad base in critical thinking. They include the study of media representations; media technologies, industries, and policies; and news, politics, and propaganda. The production curriculum offers students an in-depth understanding of applied aesthetics, creative concepts, and technical proficiency. The Department offers a General Media Studies Major, or students may elect to major in an area of concentration. The concentrations are Media Analysis and Criticism, Documentary and Television Production, Journalism, Emerging Media. Just as with the General Media Major, each concentration is 36 credits; however, the curriculum has been tailored to help the student develop greater specialization in the area of concentration. the changes) (underline what will be changed) TO (strikethrough FROM List of Course List of Course Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Name Crs. Crs. Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Name Requirements for the Degree Program: Requirements for the Degree Program: Media Studies BA: General Media Studies Major (36 credits) Media Studies BA: General Media Studies Major Hunter Core Requirement Hunter Core Requirement Several courses within this major may fulfill parts of the Several courses within this major may fulfill parts of the Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY Common Core Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY Common Core [CCC], Requirement [ CCCR ], Concurrent Requirements). When Hunter Focus, Concurrent Requirements). When selecting selecting courses, it may be to a student’s advantage to courses, it may be to a student’s advantage to choose choose courses that count toward the Hunter Core courses that count toward the Hunter Core Requirement and Requirement and also advance the student on the path to the also advance the student on the path to the major. Details on major. Details on the Hunter Core Requirement can be found the Hunter Core Requirement can be found here: Hunter here: Hunter Core Requirement Core Requirement In the case of the Media Studies major, the courses that meet In the case of the Media Studies major, the courses that meet CCCR are: CCC are:

584 Courses Courses CUNY Common Core Requirement Foundational or Major CUNY Common Core MEDIA 18000 Individual & Society MEDIA 18000 Individual & Society Major Courses Required for the Major - 36 credits A. Required Introductory Courses (9 cr.) A. Required Introductory Courses (9 cr.) •MEDIA 18000 - Introduction to Media Studies* •MEDIA 18000 - Introduction to Media Studies •MEDP 15000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 1 •MEDP 15000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 1 •MEDP 16000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 2 •MEDP 16000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 2 *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one B. Required Analytical Courses (9 cr.) program. Students must take at least 9 credits of analytical courses. B. Required Analytical Courses (9 cr.) Any 200- and 300-level MEDIA courses may be used to meet this requirement. Any 200- or 300-level FILM course counts Students must take at least 9 credits of analytical courses. toward this requirement as well, though students may only Any 200- and 300-level MEDIA courses may be used to meet count up to 6 credits total of FILM or FILMP classes toward this requirement. Any 200- or 300-level FILM course counts the major. MEDP and FILMP courses do not count toward the toward this requirement as well, though students may only analytical requirement. or FILPL count up to 6 credits total of FILM or FILMP classes toward the major. MEDP, MEDPL, FILMP, andFILPL and C. Elective Analytical or Production Courses (18 cr.) courses do not count toward the analytical FILMP requirement. Students must take an additional 18 credits of analytical and/or production courses. These may be any 200- or 300- C. Elective Analytical or Production Courses (18 cr.) level MEDIA or MEDP courses. Any 200- or 300-level FILM or FILMP course counts toward this requirement as well, though Students must take an additional 18 credits of analytical students may only count up to 6 credits total of FILM or and/or production courses. These may be any 200- or 300- FILMP classes toward the major. level MEDIA or MEDP or MEDPL courses. Any 200- or 300- level FILM or FILMP or FILPL course counts toward this Sub-total 18 requirement as well, though students may only count up to 6 Electives 18 credits total of FILM, FILMP or FILPL course counts classes ______ ET electives+ toward the major. Total credits required 36 Sub-total 18 Electives 18 ______ ET electives+ Total credits required 36 Requirements for the Degree Program: Requirements for the Degree Program: Media Studies BA: Concentration in Media Analysis and Media Studies BA: Concentration in Media Analysis and Criticism (36 credits) Criticism The media analysis concentration develops critical thinking in The media analysis concentration develops critical thinking in students and offers students in-depth understanding of the students and offers students an in-depth understanding of the field of media studies. It includes the study of Media field of media studies. It includes the study of Media Representations; Media Technologies, Industries, and Representations; Media Technologies, Industries, and Policies; and News, Politics, and Propaganda. Policies; and News, Politics, and Propaganda. Hunter Core Requirement Hunter Core Requirement Several courses within this major may fulfill parts of the Several courses within this major may fulfill parts of the Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY Common Core [CCC], Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY Common Core [CCC], Hunter Focus, Concurrent Requirements). When selecting Hunter Focus, Concurrent Requirements). When selecting courses, it may be to a student’s advantage to choose courses, it may be to a student’s advantage to choose courses that count toward the Hunter Core Requirement and courses that count toward the Hunter Core Requirement and also advance the student on the path to the major. Details on also advance the student on the path to the major. Details on the Hunter Core Requirement can be found here: Hunter the Hunter Core Requirement can be found here: Hunter Core Requirement Core Requirement

585 In the case of the Media Studies major, the courses that meet In the case of the Media Studies major, the courses that meet CCC are: CCC are: Courses Courses CUNY Common Core Foundational or Major CUNY Common Core MEDIA 18000 Individual & Society Major MEDIA 18000 Individual & Society Major Major Major- 36 credits Courses Required for the A. Introductory Courses (9 cr.) A. Introductory Courses (9 cr.) •MEDIA 18000 - Introduction to Media Studies •MEDIA 18000 - Introduction to Media Studies* •MEDP 15000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 1 •MEDP 15000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 1 •MEDP 16000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 2 •MEDP 16000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 2 B. Required Analytical Courses (21 cr): *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one program. Analytical courses in 3 categories, as outlined below. B. Required Analytical Courses (21 cr): Some courses are listed in more than 1 place, but each Analytical courses in 3 categories, as outlined below. course fulfills a requirement in just 1 category. (Students may not double count a course.) Some courses are listed in more than 1 place, but each course fulfills a requirement in just 1 category. (Students may 1. Media Representations (9 credits from the following) not double count a course.) •MEDIA 27100 - Television Culture 1. Media Representations (9 credits from the following) •MEDIA 29853 - The Horror Film •MEDIA 27100 - Television Culture •MEDIA 31500 - Nonfiction Film and Video •MEDIA 29853 - The Horror Film •MEDIA 32600 - America in American Film and Video •MEDIA 31500 - Nonfiction Film and Video •MEDIA 32700 - Representations of Race and Ethnicity in •MEDIA 32600 - America in American Film and Video U.S. Media •MEDIA 32700 - Representations of Race and Ethnicity in •MEDIA 33200 - Myths and Images in the Media U.S. Media •MEDIA 33300 - Typecasting •MEDIA 33200 - Myths and Images in the Media •MEDIA 37400 - Media, Sports, and Society •MEDIA 33300 - Typecasting •MEDIA 38400 - Women and Media •MEDIA 37400 - Media, Sports, and Society •MEDIA 39700 - Cult TV and its Audiences •MEDIA 38400 - Women and Media •MEDIA 39800 - Complex Television Narratives (W) •MEDIA 39700 - Cult TV and its Audiences •MEDIA 39900 - Special Issues in Media Studies •MEDIA 39800 - Complex Television Narratives (W) These two topics courses under the MEDIA 39900 Special •MEDIA 39900 - Special Issues in Media Studies Issues in Media Studies umbrella can fulfill the Representations Area: These two topics courses under the MEDIA 39900 Special Issues in Media Studies umbrella can fulfill the MEDIA 39931 Women and Television Representations Area: MEDIA 39940 TV Genres MEDIA 39931 Women and Television Consult the Schedule of Classes for availability. MEDIA 39940 TV Genres 2. Media Technologies, Industries, and Policies (6 credits Consult the Schedule of Classes for availability. from the following)

586 •MEDIA 26000 - Internet and Society 2. Media Technologies, Industries, and Policies (6 credits from the following) •MEDIA 36500 - Digital Copyright •MEDIA 26000 - Internet and Society •MEDIA 37400 - Media, Sports, and Society •MEDIA 36500 - Digital Copyright •MEDIA 38000 - History of Broadcasting •MEDIA 37400 - Media, Sports, and Society •MEDIA 38300 - Popular Music and the Music Industry •MEDIA 38000 - History of Broadcasting •MEDIA 39400 - Mass Communications and the Law •MEDIA 38300 - Popular Music and the Music Industry •MEDIA 39500 - Mass Media in Developing Countries •MEDIA 39400 - Mass Communications and the Law •MEDIA 39600 - Global Communication •MEDIA 39500 - Mass Media in Developing Countries 3. News, Politics, and Propaganda (6 credits from the following) •MEDIA 39600 - Global Communication •MEDIA 21000 - Journalism and Society 3. News, Politics, and Propaganda (6 credits from the following) •MEDIA 21100 - News Literacy in a Digital Age (W) •MEDIA 21000 - Journalism and Society •MEDIA 31300 - The Culture of Publicity •MEDIA 21100 - News Literacy in a Digital Age (W) •MEDIA 37300 - Journalism as Literature •MEDIA 31300 - The Culture of Publicity •MEDIA 37500 - Media and Politics •MEDIA 37300 - Journalism as Literature •MEDIA 38000 - History of Broadcasting •MEDIA 37500 - Media and Politics •MEDIA 38100 - Propaganda and the Mass Media •MEDIA 38000 - History of Broadcasting •MEDIA 39000 - Broadcast Journalism •MEDIA 38100 - Propaganda and the Mass Media •MEDIA 39100 - History of Print Journalism •MEDIA 39000 - Broadcast Journalism C. Elective Analytical or Production Courses at the 200-level or higher (6 cr.) •MEDIA 39100 - History of Print Journalism Sub-total 30 C. Elective Analytical or Production Courses at the 200-level Electives 6 or higher (6 cr.) ______ ET electives+ Sub-total 30 Total credits required 36 Electives 6 ______ ET electives+ Total credits required 36 Requirements for the Degree Program: Requirements for the Degree Program: Media Studies BA: Concentration in Documentary and Media Studies BA: Concentration in Documentary and Television Production (36 credits) Television Production This concentration is intended to give students foundational This concentration is intended to give students foundational knowledge in the theory and practice of linear non-fiction knowledge in the theory and practice of linear non-fiction video and related digital media skills. Students in this video and related digital media skills. Students in this concentration will also specialize in one of three advanced concentration will also specialize in one of three advanced areas: Documentary Production, Experimental Media areas: Documentary Production, Experimental Media Production or Studio Television Production. Production or Studio Television Production. Hunter Core Requirement Hunter Core Requirement Several courses within this major may fulfill parts of the Several courses within this major may fulfill parts of the Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY Common Core Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY Common Core [CCC], Requirement [CCCR ], Concurrent Requirements). When Concurrent Requirements). When selecting Hunter Focus, selecting courses, it may be to a student’s advantage to courses, it may be to a student’s advantage to choose courses that count toward the Hunter Core Requirement and choose courses that count toward the Hunter Core

587 also advance the student on the path to the major. Details on Requirement and also advance the student on the path to the the Hunter Core Requirement can be found here: Hunter major. Details on the Hunter Core Requirement can be found Core Requirement here: Hunter Core Requirement In the case of the Media Studies major, the courses that meet In the case of the Media Studies major, the courses that meet CCCR CCC are: are: Courses Courses CUNY Common Core Foundational or Major CUNY Common Core Requirement MEDIA 18000 Individual & Society MEDIA 18000 Individual & Society Major Major Courses Required for the Major- 36 credits A. Introductory Courses (9 cr.) A. Introductory Courses (9 cr.) •MEDIA 18000 - Introduction to Media Studies •MEDIA 18000 - Introduction to Media Studies* •MEDP 15000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 1 •MEDP 15000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 1 •MEDP 16000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 2 •MEDP 16000 - Media and Film in a Digital Age Pt. 2 B. Required Production Courses (9 cr.) *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one program. •MEDP 28100 - Documentary Video Production 1 B. Required Production Courses (9 cr.) •MEDPL 29000 - Developing the Documentary (W) •MEDP 28100 - Documentary Video Production 1 Choice of one course from the following •MEDPL 29000 - Developing the Documentary (W) •MEDP 31100 - Documentary Video Production 2 Choice of one course from the following -or- •MEDP 31100 - Documentary Video Production 2 •MEDPL 31600 - Experimental Production -or- -or- •MEDPL 31600 - Experime