City 2018 2019

Transcript

1 2018–2019 CATALOG Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Summer 2019 1313 Park Blvd., San Diego, CA 92101 619-388-3400 www.sdcity.edu Ricky Shabazz, Ed.D. President San Diego City College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, 10 Commercial Blvd., Ste. 204, Novato, CA 94949, 415-506-0234, an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. GED is a registered trademark of the American Council on Education and may not be used or reproduced without express written permission of the American Council on Education.

2 President’s Message Welcome to City College A Pathway to Success Creating your future! Dear Students, Welcome to San Diego City College! Serving students for more than 100 years, we celebrate the rich heritage of all of our students and staff. We respect that you come to City College with an important family heritage, a valuable collection of life experiences, and a great expectation for your future. Although we come from different places, we join together here at City College focused on one goal: student success. Student success has different definitions, but here at City College it means that each and every student is provided a pathway to reach their academic, career, and life goals. What is your pathway? To help you find your pathway, take advantage of the treasure trove of student resources available. As a student, you only have to ask for help and you will uncover an abundance of tools that can help you develop an Education Plan, set up time to work with a tutor, or obtain financial aid or scholarship dollars. Also, our faculty members are masters at helping our students build personal and professional networks to open up new journeys of exploration. The more time you take in exploring the resources available at City College, the more empowered you are to achieve your goals. The things that you learn at City College will change who you are, preparing you for employment, family, and life. Through City College, you will open the gateway to your future. Enjoy the journey and take advantage of all City College has to offer! I look forward to seeing you on campus. Sincerely, Ricky Shabazz Ricky Shabazz, Ed.D. President S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 2

3 District Administration Board of Trustees Constance M. Carroll, Ph.D. Maria Nieto Senour, Ph.D. President Chancellor Bonnie Ann Dowd, Ed.D. Bernie Rhinerson Vice Chancellor, Business and Executive Executive Vice President Technology Services Mary Graham Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness Stephanie R. Bulger, Ph.D. Vice Chancellor, Instructional Services Rich Grosch Vice President for Educational Collaboration Will Surbrook Vice Chancellor, Human Resources Peter Zschiesche Vice President for Community Development Lynn Ceresino Neault, Ed.D. Welcome to City College Vice Chancellor, Student Services Student Members 2018–2019 Christopher Manis City College Susana Molina-Bibian Mesa College Vice Chancellor, Facilities Management Sofia Castellani-Staedler Alana Mahal Bermodes Miramar College Jack Beresford Chancellor and Secretary to the Board Director, Communications and Public Relations Constance M. Carroll, Ph.D. Margaret Lamb Executive Assistant to the Chancellor San Diego Community College District Board of Trustees (from left, back row) Peter Zschiesche, Rich Grosch, and Mary Graham, (front row) Maria Nieto Senour, Chancellor Constance M. Carroll, and Bernie Rhinerson. an 3 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

4 San Diego City College Administrative and Supervisory Welcome to City College Personnel Ricky Shabazz, Ed.D. President ... Director, Tutorial Anourak (Lance) Soukhaseum Vice President, Administrative Services ... Services ... Seher Awan, Ed.D. Coordinator, Affirmative Action Officer/Title IX ... Marciano Perez Acting Vice President, ... Trevor Walker Instruction ... Minou Spradley, Ph.D. Coordinator, Outreach Coordinator, Student Affairs ... Lori Oldham Vice President, Student Services Supervisor, Accounting/Business Denise S. Whisenhunt, J.D. ... Dean, Information and Learning Services ... Roxann Solis Technology ... Robbi L. Ewell Supervisor, Accounting/Student Dean, Institutional Shirin Mohseni Accounting ... Effectiveness ... Susan Allen Murray, Ph.D. Supervisor, Admissions/Records/ Veterans ... Megan Soto, Dora Meza Dean, School of Arts, Humanities, Communications, and Supervisor, Business Office Support ... Brenda Sturkey Telecommunications ... Trudy Gerald, Ed.D. Supervisor, Counseling/Evaluation/ Josolyn Hill, Ed.D. ... Assessment Dean, School of Behavioral & Social Sciences, and Consumer & Supervisor, Digital Print Production/ Mail Room ... Patricia Fernandez Family Studies ... Lori Erreca Elizabeth Vargas Supervisor, First Year Services ... Dean, School of Business, Information Rose LaMuraglia Technology, and Cosmetology ... Supervisor, Independent Learning Center (ILC) ... Dean, School of Engineering & Majeda Nasrawi Technologies, Mathematics, Supervisor, Institutional Minou Spradley, Ph.D. Sciences, and Nursing ... Research ... Clair Johnson, Ph.D. Supervisor, Library ... Dean, School of Health, Exercise Daniel Gonzalez Supervisor, Office of Classroom Science, and Athletics ... Randall Barnes, Ed.D. ... Technology Management Marciano Perez, Jr. Dean, Student Affairs and Multimedia (OCTM) ... Dean, Student Development/ Majeda Nasrawi Supervisor, Receiving/ Matriculation ... Nesha Savage, Ed.D. Francisco Navallez ... Stock Room Christopher Barker Dean, Student Equity ... Supervisor, Technical Support Associate Dean, Nursing Education Group (TSG) ... Al Cordeiro Raelene Brooks, Ph.D. ... Associate Dean, Articulation Officer ... Elizabeth Norvell Jeanie M. Tyler Edgar Hopida Public Information Officer ... Strong Workforce ... Director, Center for Applied Competitive Ed Smith Technologies ... Director, Disability Support Brianne Kennedy Programs & Services (DSPS) ... Director, EOPS/CARE/ Beverly Warren, M.A. CalWORKs ... Gregory Sanchez ... Director, Financial Aid Leslie Easton, LCSW Director, Mental Health ... Director, MESA Program ... Rafael Alvarez Director, Military Education ... Josh Pohribnak Acting Director, Off Campus Programs ... Catherine Shafer Director, Student Health Clinic ... Dotti Cordell, Ed.D., M.P.H., R.N. Director, Student Transition Vacant Services ... S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 4

5 In accordance with the doctrine of academic b. Accreditation freedom, faculty have the following fundamental rights: San Diego City College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Faculty primacy as a collective body in 1. Junior Colleges of the Western Association of designing and approving curriculum Schools and Colleges, an institutional accrediting and instructional methods regardless of body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary delivery modality; Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. Individual faculty member 2. City College is also approved by the California determination of instructional State Department of Education. In addition, certain materials, course content, and programs at City College hold special accreditation: presentation, and student evaluation Nursing— California Board of Registered Nursing methods, in concert with colleagues, so (BRN), Accreditation Commission for Education in as to assure consistency of instruction Welcome to City College Nursing (ACEN) and academic standards; City College is accredited by the Office of Private Individual faculty member freedom to 3. Postsecondary Education for the training of veterans, discuss subject matter of the course, as well as the U.S. Department of State and the as appropriate to the standards U.S. Immigration Service for international student of the discipline and academic education. Courses paralleling university level community, even when that material is work are accepted by the University of California, controversial; California State University, and by other universities Individual faculty member authority to 4. and colleges. evaluate enrolled students on the basis Persons interested in the institution’s accreditation of the academic merit of the students’ and program approvals may review documents performance; describing these activities in the President’s Office. These documents will be available for such review at 5. Individual faculty member freedom to a mutually convenient time during regular business choose of professional research topics hours, and an appropriate interpretation of their and methods of investigation— subject contents will be provided if requested. to professional and peer-determined standards—as well as unconditional freedom to publish their work; and Academic Freedom & 6. Individual faculty member right to participate in curriculum review, Freedom of Expression accreditation processes, and other (Board of Trustees Policy – BP 5030) forms of participatory governance. The San Diego Community College District is 2. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION committed to an academic environment that a. Freedom of expression affords the faculty, embraces the principles of academic freedom and staff, and students the right to speak freedom of expression. This commitment is based and write freely in accordance with the upon the value that free expression is essential to constitutional protections of free speech- excellence in teaching, learning, critical inquiry and without fear of retaliation. In particular: service to the community. The District shall protect the rights of 1. You may view a full copy of the policy faculty to express their views in the by accessing the following website: classroom that pertain to class content. http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/. While it is understood that controversy 1. ACADEMIC FREEDOM is often at the core of inquiry, such controversy should be addressed in a a. Academic freedom affords the faculty the mutually respectful manner; right to speak and write freely, without unreasonable restrictions or prejudices. S 5 • 2018–2019 an C ity C iego D ollege

6 The District shall protect the rights of 2. faculty, staff, and students to speak Welcome to City College freely on matters of public concern; 3. Faculty, staff, and students are free to explore a wide range of views and judge the merits of competing ideas; As outlined in board policies and 4. administrative procedures, faculty, staff, and students have responsibilities which are based upon principles of fairness, integrity, confidentiality, safety, professionalism, and respect for others; Faculty, staff, and students have the 5. right to join or form organizations in accordance with District policy and procedures; and Faculty, staff, and students have the 6. right to participate in governance in accordance to District policy and procedures. Disclaimer The San Diego Community College District is governed by its Board of Trustees. No oral or written representation by any employee of the college is binding on the San Diego Community College District without the express approval of the Board of Trustees. S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 6

7 Table of Contents CalWORKs/TANF Believe Program ... 39 1 Welcome to City College ... 39 ... Financial Aid President’s Message ... 2 Veterans and Service Members ... 44 3 ... Board of Trustees 46 Learning Resource Center (LRC) ... 3 District Administration ... ... Tutorial Services 47 San Diego City College Administrative and Student Health Clinic ... 47 Supervisory Personnel ... 4 Table of Contents 48 Mental Health Counseling Center ... 5 Accreditation ... 48 Child Development Center ... Academic Freedom & Freedom of Expression ... 5 Student Affairs/Campus Life ... 49 49 Athletics ... Academic Calendar 2018–2019 ... 9 50 Performing Arts ... ... Fall Semester 2018 9 50 Digital Journalism ... 9 Intersession 2019 ... ... 50 Student Accounting 9 Spring Semester 2019 ... 50 ... Support Services Summer Session 2019 ... 10 Academic Information and General Information ... 11 Regulations ... 53 12 History ... 54 Academic Information ... San Diego City College Foundation ... 13 ... 56 Grading System 14 Statement of General Education Philosophy ... ... 58 Standards of Academic Progress 14 Institutional Learning Outcomes ... 59 Academic Regulations ... Mission ... 14 61 Academic Transcripts ... Institutional Priorities ... 15 Transfer of Credits ... 61 Student Learning Outcomes ... 15 Volunteer/Visitor Conduct Expectations ... 87 15 Disclaimer ... Student Records, Release, Correction and 88 ... Challenge 17 Admissions and Registration ... Complaint Processes ... 88 Student Success and Support Program ... 18 Academic Requirements ... 91 Registration ... 22 Prerequisites, Corequisites, Limitations on 92 The Associate Degree ... 26 Enrollment and Advisories ... All Degrees Have the Following Residency ... 26 92 Requirements in Common ... International Students ... 28 Associate in Arts for Transfer (AA-T) or Fees ... 29 Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T) for California State University (CSU) ... 92 33 Student Services ... Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Counseling Services ... 34 94 Degree Requirements ... 34 Student Transition Services ... ... 106 Graduation 35 Work Experience Program ... 109 Transfer Guide ... 35 Outreach ... English Language Acquisition (ELAC) University Transfer ... 110 (formally known as ESOL) ... 35 Steps to Transfer 110 ... Puente Project 35 ... Transfer General Education Options ... 117 Umoja ... 36 Other Transfer General Education Options ... 136 First Year Experience (FYE) Program ... 36 36 ... MESA Program Associate Degree and Certificate Disability Support Programs and Services 137 Programs ... 37 ... (DSPS) ... Agriculture 146 Extended Opportunity Programs and 37 Services (EOPS) ... an 7 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D ollege

8 Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and 258 Machine Technology ... 149 261 Manufacturing Engineering Technology ... Environmental Control Technology ... Table of Contents Alcohol and Other Drug Studies ... 152 Mathematics ... 265 154 Anthropology ... Music ... 268 ... 157 Art–Fine Arts Visual and Performing Arts ... 268 163 268 Art–Graphic Design ... Audio Production ... 165 Astronomy ... ... 269 Nursing Education 274 166 ... Peace Studies Biology ... 276 Black Studies ... 169 Philosophy ... Photography 278 ... 171 ... Business Studies Physics ... 281 183 Chemistry ... ... Chicana and Chicano Studies ... 184 Political Science 283 285 Child Development ... 185 ... Psychology Radio, Television and Film ... 288 Communication Studies ... 191 Computer Business Technology ... 193 298 ... Selected Studies 197 Computer Information Systems ... ... Social Work 299 Computer Technical Illustration ... 300 201 Sociology ... Spanish ... 203 302 Conflict Resolution ... ... Theatre Construction Trades ... 204 304 307 Musical Theatre ... Cosmetology ... 206 Dance ... 309 ... Apprenticeship 209 ... Digital Journalism Associated Builders and Contractors 211 Construction Electronic Systems Economics ... 213 310 Technician Apprenticeship ... Electricity ... 214 217 Electromechanical Engineering Technology .. Associated Builders and Contractors 311 Electronics ... 218 Electrical Apprenticeship ... Engineering ... 221 Associated Builders and Contractors English ... 223 Heating, Ventilation & Air 227 Conditioning Apprenticeship ... 312 English Language Acquisition ... Associated Builders and Contractors 228 Exercise Science ... Pipefitting Apprenticeship ... 312 Health and Wellness Coaching ... 228 Associated Builders and Contractors Fitness Specialist ... 230 314 French ... 232 Plumbing Apprenticeship ... Associated Builders and Contractors Futures Studies ... 233 General Education ... Sheet Metal Apprenticeship ... 314 235 Honors Global Competencies 315 Honeywell Tool and Die Apprenticeship . 235 Operating and Maintenance Engineers ... Certificate ... 316 236 Communications Technician Geography ... 317 Apprenticeship ... Geology ... 238 San Diego Gas and Electric Company Global Development Studies ... 240 Apprenticeship ... German ... 318 241 History ... 242 San Diego Transit Electronic Technician Human Services ... Apprenticeship ... 245 319 Community Health Work ... San Diego Trolley Apprenticeship ... 245 319 245 Youth Development Work ... Solar Turbines Incorporated 321 Italian ... 246 Apprenticeship ... 247 Labor Studies ... 323 Course Descriptions ... Liberal Arts and Sciences ... 249 Visual and Performing Arts ... 249 579 San Diego City College Community ... Language Arts and Humanities: ... 251 Scientific Studies ... 253 595 Index ... Elementary Multiple Subject Teaching Preparation ... 256 Map of Campus ... 605 257 Social and Behavioral Sciences ... S • 2018–2019 ollege C 8 C iego D an ity

9 Academic Calendar 2018–2019 Fall Semester 2018 August 7, 2018 – December 17, 2018 16-WEEK SEMESTER: Fall Classes ... SPECIAL DATES Deadline to file an application for admission and receive a priority June 30, 2018 ... registration date and time for Fall. Students who file an application after the deadline will have open registration and will not receive priority for access to services. August 19, 2018 ... RESIDENCE DETERMINATION DATE (APPLIES TO ALL SESSIONS) Holiday – Labor Day* September 3, 2018 ... Constitution Day (Classes are in session) September 17, 2018 ... Holiday – Veterans Day* November 12, 2018 ... Academic Calendar 2018–2019 November 16, 2018 ... Last day to file a petition for graduation for an Associate Degree or Certificate of Achievement for Fall 2017 completion. November 19 – 21, 2018 ... Classes not in session November 22 & 23, 2018 ... Holiday – Thanksgiving* December 18, 2018 – January 26, 2019 .. Winter Recess Intersession 2019 4-WEEK INTERSESSION: ... January 2–26, 2019 SPECIAL DATES October 19, 2018 ... Deadline to file an application for admission and receive a priority registration date and time for Intersession. Students who file an application after the deadline will have open registration and will not receive priority access to services. January 27, 2019 ... RESIDENCE DETERMINATION DATE (APPLIES TO ALL SESSIONS) Spring Semester 2019 16-WEEK SEMESTER: Spring Classes ... January 28, 2019 – May 25, 2019 SPECIAL DATES October 19, 2018 ... Deadline to file an application for admission and receive a priority registration date and time for Spring. Students who file an application after the deadline will have open registration and will not receive priority access to services. January 21, 2019 ... Holiday – Martin Luther King Day* January 27, 2019 ... RESIDENCE DETERMINATION DATE (APPLIES TO ALL SESSIONS) Holiday – Lincoln Day* February 15, 2019 ... Holiday – Washington Day* February 18, 2019 ... Last day to file a petition for graduation for an Associate Degree or March 22, 2019 ... Certificate of Achievement for Spring 2018 completion. Spring Recess – Classes not in session. March 25 – 30, 2019 ... Holiday – Cesar Chavez Day* March 29, 2019 ... Holiday – Memorial Day* May 27, 2019 ... * No Saturday or Sunday classes after a Friday holiday. No Sunday classes before a Monday holiday. Note: Holidays apply to all sessions. an 9 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

10 Summer Session 2019 Academic Calendar 2018–2019 June 3, 2018 – August 10, 2019 Summer Classes: ... SPECIAL DATES April 12, 2019 ... Deadline to file an application for admission and receive a priority registration date and time for Summer. Students who file an application after the deadline will have open registration and will not receive priority access to services. ... RESIDENCE DETERMINATION DATE (APPLIES TO ALL SESSIONS) June 2, 2019 July 4, 2019 ... Holiday – Independence Day* Last day to file a petition for graduation for an Associate Degree or July 31, 2019 ... Certificate of Achievement for Summer 2018 completion. * No Saturday or Sunday classes after a Friday holiday. No Sunday classes before a Monday holiday. Holidays apply to all sessions. Note: S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 10

11 General Information At-A-Glance Page 12 History ... San Diego City College Foundation ... 13 14 Statement of General Education Philosophy ... Institutional Learning Outcomes ... 14 Mission ... 14 ... Institutional Priorities 15 Student Learning Outcomes ... 15 Disclaimer ... 15 an 11 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

12 1972 History San Diego voters authorized a separate Community General Information San Diego City College is a public, two-year College District. community college administered by the San Diego Community College District. Serving as the 1988 educational cornerstone of downtown San Diego, A Facilities Master Plan was developed to the college comprises 60 acres and is 1/5 of the recommend modifications to the existing facility, to downtown footprint. The college offers 250 majors meet current and future needs. and certificate programs and 1,500 classes each semester to more than 16,000 students. City College 1989 celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2014. City College celebrated its 75th Anniversary. Chronology 1992 1914 The new 3,000 sqft. Fitness Center opened with full fitness and exercise facilities. City College was the first community college in San Diego (San Diego Junior College) with 34 1998 students and 4 instructors. City College was the fifth City College leased to San Diego Unified School community college established in California. District the property on which Garfield High School 1921 and a 420-space parking structure is built. City students shared use of the parking and the College City College moved from the high school to share can offer classes in the facility. facilities with the State Normal School, the four-year teachers’ college, which became San Diego State 2000 University. Construction completed on the 8,000 sqft. 1939 Educational Technology Center. The ETC is fully equipped with state-of-the-art media and San Diego Evening Junior College was created by teleconferencing equipment. splitting the institution into two entities, day and evening. With the industrial growth in San Diego, the 2002 Evening College was needed to meet the demand The 67,000 sqft. Learning Resource Center (LRC) for college courses for daytime working people. replaced the 30-year-old library. Complete with the 1946 most advanced research and learning tools available with 300-internet connected computers, multiple City College moved back to San Diego High School electronic databases, plasma displays, a collection and reorganized into three branches: San Diego of more than 67,000 books and over 200 periodicals. Vocational High School, San Diego College Arts and The three-level LRC also houses the Office of Sciences, and San Diego Evening Junior College. Classroom Technology and Multimedia Center, 1953–54 the Independent Learning Center, and CitySITE – a center for faculty and staff development. The first parcel of land, a single city block between Russ Boulevard and A Street, from 14th to 15th 2005 Streets, was purchased for the permanent home A new Facilities Master Plan was approved by the of what is now San Diego City College. The first Board of Trustees and projects a 20-year build-out to buildings constructed were the “A” and “T” buildings. accommodate 25,000 students. 1970s 2005 Increasing enrollment resulted in a major expansion The 2,000-seat, 55,000 sqft. Harry West Gymnasium project bounded by Russ Boulevard, 17th, 12th and “P” building opened. Dedicated to beloved Coach C Streets. The “L,” “C,” “S,” “M,” “E,” “D” and “F” buildings West, students enjoy three regulation basketball were constructed. courts, six badminton courts, three volleyball courts, intercollegiate team rooms, workout facilities and new classrooms. S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 12

13 2016 2007 In spring, the 31,155 sqft. Center for the Media Eight high-tech classrooms added to the LRC lower level, with additional offices and meeting space. and Performing Arts “C” building opened with contemporary new spaces for Dance, Drama & 2009 Theater, Music, and Radio, TV & Film programs. Students now enjoy a cutting-edge, fully digital The 27,800 sqft. Academic Success Center “L” TV studio and recording studios for producing its building opened to provide a one-stop service area for students, including: Tutorials, Math and English weekly, student produced “Newscene” news show. Centers, and the EOPS, MESA (Math, Engineering, & Science Achievement), New Horizons, Puente, Umoja, and CalWORKs Programs. San Diego City College General Information 2010 Foundation The new 88,000 sqft. “V” building CTC – Career As San Diego City College honors its past, the Technology Center – opened. This five-level building San Diego City College Foundation is working to at 16th & C Streets houses Cosmetology, Nursing, strengthen its future. Established in 1972, the San Photography and Digital Arts, a Student Gallery, Diego City College Foundation Board of Directors is the College Police and an 11-story 700-car parking comprised of distinguished business and community structure. leaders. The Foundation fundraises to empower staff, students, alumni and community members 2013 with financial support for student success. The The 66,000 sqft. Mathematics and Social Sciences Foundation is dedicated to supporting programs “MS” building opened. This five-story facility houses that foster community partnerships and enhance the Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Alcohol and educational excellence provided by City College. Other Drug Studies, Human Services, Peace Studies, Futures Studies, Gender Studies, the Institute for Foundation Board Human Development, the Corporate Education Center and the District’s Military Education program. Officers A seven-story, 400-stall parking garage is adjacent to Chair the building. Douglas Gray 2014 President and Chief Advocate Office 3rd Party In spring, the 98,000 sqft. Life Sciences and Physical Sciences “S” building opened. The four-story Vice-Chair building includes classrooms, labs, an outdoor Sid Voorakkara teaching garden, a rooftop observation deck and a Senior Business Development Specialist planetarium. Governor Brown’s Office of Business and Economic Development In fall, the 128,000 sqft. Arts & Humanities and 62,000 sqft. Business and Technology buildings Treasurer welcomed new students for classes in the Visual Dan Campion Arts, English, Speech, Foreign Languages, Business Director, Turbomachinery Operations Studies, and Computer Systems. A new art gallery Solar Turbines Corporation and sculpture garden hosts fine arts exhibits and Directors events. Santiago Garza 2015 Broker The 15,000 sqft. “M” building renovation provided Harcourts Pacific Realty new homes for the Office of Student Affairs, and Colton T. Sudberry a working and gathering space for Associated CEO/President Students Government and student clubs. Facilities Sudberry Properties, Inc. operations are located on the lower floor. S 13 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

14 2. Critical Thinking Statement of Students will be able to apply critical thinking skills General Information in order to analyze data, text and issues. General Education 3. Analysis/Computation Philosophy Students will be able to apply mathematical concepts to perform computations and analyze and The general education program at the colleges interpret data. in the San Diego Community College District is designed to broaden students’ knowledge and their Cultural Sensitivity/Global Awareness 4. understanding of methods of gaining knowledge Students will be able to successfully interact in a variety of disciplines and to develop students’ with individuals representing a wide range of abilities in critical thinking, in oral and written backgrounds, analyze varying cultural beliefs and communication, and in mathematics. behaviors, and identify social, political and economic The awarding of an Associate Degree symbolizes an issues relevant to the local community, the state, the attempt on the part of the college to lead students nation, and the world. through patterns of learning experiences designed 5. Information Management/Literacy to develop an awareness of other cultures and times; to achieve insights gained through experience in Students will be able to obtain data from various thinking about ethical problems; and to develop the sources, as well as organize, process and analyze capacity for self-understanding. In addition to these data for relevancy. accomplishments, students should possess sufficient 6. Personal Responsibility depth in some field of knowledge to contribute to lifetime interest. Students will be able to demonstrate self-awareness and navigate effectively between one’s own value system, professional obligations and responsibilities Institutional as a member of society. 7. Civic and Environmental Responsibility Learning Outcomes Students will be able to relate the natural (also referred to as Institutional environment to human health and happiness and Competencies) evaluate the effect of human activity on the welfare The Institutional Student Learning Outcomes (ISLOs) of the global environment. for San Diego City College reflect the college’s General Education philosophy and describe the knowledge, skills, abilities, and attitudes students Mission will develop as a result of their overall experience San Diego City College has as its highest priority at SDCC. Achievement of ISLOs is marked by the student learning and achievement. The college successful completion of an Associate’s degree, provides lower division and general education completion of transfer curriculum and/or a courses that lead to certificates, associate degrees or Certificate of Completion. A single course is not transfer to a four-year college or university; career expected to meet all the ISLOs; rather, it is the technical education programs that meet specific successful completion of a combination of courses in industry needs, upgrade the employment skills a specific program of study that enables the student of students and fulfill licensing requirements of to achieve the ISLOs. the state of California as well as contribute to the SDCC has identified the following ISLOs, based upon economic development of our region; basic skills established Institutional Core Competencies: instruction to assist all students in meeting their educational goals; and essential student support 1. Communication/Interpersonal Skills services for all students. Students will be able to communicate effectively in a variety of settings using oral and written communication modalities. S • 2018–2019 ollege 14 ity C iego D an C

15 essential student support services, including Values co-curricular and cultural activities. San Diego City College is a multicultural institution Equity, Inclusiveness, and Diversity— • committed to providing open access to all who Strengthen and support an inclusive and diverse can benefit from instruction and to meeting the campus culture which enhances student, faculty, diverse and ever-changing educational, cultural, and closes equity gaps and staff success and . City economic needs of the urban core and surrounding College promotes lifelong learning, social communities of San Diego. We are committed to the justice advocacy, and information technology tradition of academic freedom and responsibility, literacy. to employee empowerment, and to maintaining a climate that promotes learning, understanding and Collaborative & Outreach Ventures— Develop • respect for students, faculty, staff, community, and collaborative and outreach ventures that General Information the environment. The following are core tenets of enhance student learning within the college, our value system: district and community, public and private agencies, businesses, and industry—locally, The development of informed, active individuals • nationally, and globally. who will be engaged in the global community, lifelong learners, social justice advocates, and Strengthen a • Environmental Stewardship— literate in information technology; measurable environmental stewardship effort • Institutional community involvement, that implements sustainable practices and community development and community educates the campus community. service; • Institutional Accountability— Demonstrate Equity, inclusiveness and diversity in all of its • accountability through the integrated process manifestations; of assessment, program review, planning, High quality instructional programs • resource allocation, accreditation, and on-going emphasizing creative and critical thinking; evaluation. • Essential student support services, including co- curricular and cultural activities; Strategic Planning— • Links campus planning to • Environmental sustainability and a campus District planning efforts. culture of conservation; and A continuous campus-wide cycle of assessment • and program review with integrated planning Student Learning and resource allocation. Outcomes Institutional Priorities Student learning outcomes are defined for each program. Students should be aware that course San Diego City College’s Mission Statement is central outcomes link to the larger institution via program to planning and decision-making. Derived from the outcomes which map to institutional learning mission statement, there exists more specific college outcomes, institutional priorities and San Diego City goals, our Institutional Priorities. All ongoing and College’s mission. new initiatives are linked to these priorities. There currently are eight institutional priorities: • Student Success— Support improved student Disclaimer learning, achievement of student learning While every reasonable effort has been made to outcomes, course completion, certificate and ensure that statements in this catalog are accurate, it degree completion, transfer rates, and workforce must be understood that the information contained competencies. herein is subject to change or elimination without • Provide state- Innovative Approaches— notice by the administration of the San Diego of-the-art general education, transfer , and Community College District. Students should career technical programs by utilizing current consult the appropriate campus or department for technologies, innovative teaching and learning current information, as well as for any special rules or approaches, and delivery systems, and academic requirements imposed. which include and student support services an 15 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D C

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17 Important Advisory: The colleges are migrating to a new student system. Many processes will For the most up to date information be changing throughout the year. . go to http://www.sdccd.edu/mysdccd/ Admissions and Registration At-A-Glance Page 18 Student Success and Support Program ... Registration ... 22 Prerequisites, Corequisites, Limitations on Enrollment and Advisories ... 26 Residency ... 26 ... International Students 28 Fees ... 30 • 2018–2019 an 17 ollege C ity C iego D S

18 Enrollment may be limited due to budget b. Student Success and reductions and extraordinary demand. Admissions and Registration c. High school students must satisfy course Support Program prerequisites and eligibility requirements. (formerly the College Matriculation Program) d. Enrollment in Exercise Science ( formerly The goals of the Student Success and Support ) classes will not be Physical Education Program (SSSP) are to ensure that all students permitted. complete their college courses, persist to the next e. The course is advanced scholastic or academic term, and achieve their educational technical (college degree applicable). objectives through admissions, orientation, assessment, educational planning with a counselor, f. The course is not available at the school of and student follow-up. attendance. g. Students will be given college credit for all Steps to Student Success courses. Grades will be part of the student’s permanent college record. Step 1 – Admission Application h. Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point Step 2 – Apply for Financial Aid average (GPA) each semester in all college Step 3 – Orientation work. Step 4 – Assessment If the number of units of W, I, and NP exceed i. 40%, in any semester or session, the student Step 5 – Educational Plan will be academically disqualified. Students Step 6 – Register and Pay whose grade point average falls below a 2.0, or who do not complete 60% of all units Step 7 – Follow up with a counselor attempted, will not be permitted to re-enroll These services have been designed especially for without approval from a college counselor. students who intend to earn a certificate or degree j. High school students taking college classes at the college or to transfer to a four-year college or on campus are required to pay both the university. However, the services are available to all enrollment and health fees. students admitted to the college, and all students are encouraged to participate in the various services Persons who are under 18 years of age who do • of the program. not have a high school diploma and are not enrolled in a high school may be admitted as a 1. Admission Application special full-time student pursuant to Education Code §48800.5 subject to approval of the high Admission is open to anyone who meets one of the school governing board and the college President following criteria: where the student is planning to attend. Special • Persons who possess a high school diploma full-time students will be admitted under or California high school proficiency exam provisional admission status. certification or a high school equivalency Persons who do not meet one of the admission • certificate. criteria stated above will not be admitted under Persons 18 years of age or older or emancipated • any circumstances. minors who do not possess a high school In accordance with §76038 of the California diploma or equivalent may be admitted by the Education Code, students seeking admission who college under provisional admission status. have been previously expelled from a California • High school students requesting concurrent community college within the past five years, or who enrollment may be admitted as “special part-time” are currently in the process of a formal expulsion students subject to the following criteria: hearing for any offense listed in AP 3000.2, Student 2.a.1-7, are required to inform the Admission Status, a. Students must have completed the 10th District. Admission eligibility shall be determined in grade. AP 3000.2, Student Admission Status. accordance with S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 18

19 last day of classes for the term or June 30, 2018 All new students must file an application for whichever date comes first. The Deadline for Cal admission. Students who have previously Grant application is March 2nd. attended, but have not been in continuous attendance for one year must file a new 3. Orientation application for admission. The orientation provides important information to Apply Online students about the programs and services available Applications for admission to San Diego City, at the college as well as strategies for student Mesa and Miramar Colleges are available online. success. Orientation includes assessment and Students access the online application at: program planning. Non-Exempt students who have . https://www.sdccd.edu/ future-students/admissions/ been admitted to the college are expected to attend an assessment/orientation session before registering Social Security Number for classes. Your Social Security Number (SSN) or Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN) is required for Federal 4. Assessment Admissions and Registration and State reporting, and for students applying for Assessment is a process that is designed to assist Financial Aid. It is maintained in a secure manner and students in determining which English, math or WILL NOT be visible or released to third parties for ESOL courses they should start with, specifically identification purposes for any reason. identifying skill levels in these areas. Assessment Section 483 and 484 of the Higher Education Act also helps students in meeting course prerequisites. of 1965, as amended, also gives the Financial Aid Students may also meet course prerequisites Office the authority to collect your SSN. The U.S. based on other factors such as past educational Department of Education uses your Social Security achievements in mathematics or English or course Number to verify your identity and retrieve your completion, and other standardized tests. Additional records. Providing incorrect information may result advancement options for English and math in penalties from the IRS. placement may be available; please see a counselor for details. All students will be assigned a unique 7-digit entification (CSID) number upon C ollege S tudent ID Assessment via Placement Assistant successful submission of their application that will be Students who have recently graduated (within the required to conduct all college business. last 10 years) from a U.S. high school are eligible for this assessment. The Placement Assistant will identify Important Reminder courses that students can enroll in using prior Every male citizen of the U.S. and male immigrant academic history. Students will report cumulative, residing in the U.S., ages 18 through 25, must register unweighted high school GPA, courses completed, with the Selective Service. and grades received in English and math courses. Based on the information reported, students could 2. Apply for Financial Aid be placed in English and mathematics courses or referred to take the English and/or mathematics To apply for financial aid applicants must complete assessment tests. Students should have a high the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), school transcript available to ensure appropriate or a California Dream Act application for all financial placement using this assessment. aid, including the California College Promise Grant – CCPG (formerly known as BOG Fee Waiver). To Assessment via Accuplacer Assessment complete your FAFSA, go to www.fafsa.gov . To Some students may have to, or may opt to, take an complete a California Dream Act application, go assessment for placement rather than alternative to https://dream.csac.ca.gov . FAFSA Application measures of assessment. The Accuplacer assessment materials are available on October 1st for the consists of Reading Comprehension, Sentence Skills, following academic year. The priority filing deadline Elementary Algebra, and Arithmetic. The assessment for aid is April 15th. Students filing their application may only be completed once per calendar year. by this date will be considered first in the award Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage process. Deadline to apply: The Central Processing of preparatory workshops, refresher courses, System (CPS) must receive your application by your practice assessments, and tutoring services prior an 19 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

20 Note: The District will to taking this assessment. Test Minimum Score Required be transitioning away from using the Accuplacer English Admissions and Registration assessment effective Spring 2019. Standard Exceeded: 1. English Language Acquisition (ELAC) (formally Ready for college-level English known as ESOL) Assessment coursework The ELAC exam is designed for students primarily OR educated outside of the U.S. in a language other than English. This timed exam is designed 1. Standard Met: to help non-native English speaking students Conditionally Ready for college- select appropriate English classes. Students are level English encouraged to review sample test questions prior to AND taking this assessment. Completion of approved senior 2. Assessment Exemptions year-long course with a grade of C Students are exempt from assessment if they or better (see course list below) C A A SPP/ have earned an Associate degree or higher, EAP Status Math have completed English and math courses, have Standard Exceeded: 1. received a qualifying score on an SAT, ACT, EPT, Ready for college-level math ELM or CAASPP/EAP, or have taken a test at another coursework California community college. OR Students should bring or send official copies of the SAT, ACT, EPT, ELM, or EAP test scores directly to 1. Standard Met: the District Student Services Office to determine Conditionally Ready for college- readiness for English 101 or 105 or for courses with level math All tests must have been a Math 96 prerequisite. AND completed within the past two years. Students who have assessment scores from another California Completion of approved senior 2. community college can have those sent directly to year-long course with a grade of C the college Assessment & Testing Office. or better (see course list below) Minimum Score Required * Beginning November 1st, 2019 these test scores will Test no longer be accepted. English Math Approved High School Senior Year-Long Courses 550 570 SAT Evidence-Based English: Reading and Writing • Expository Reading & Writing Course (ERWC) ACT 22 23 • IB English N/A EPT* 147 N/A ELM* 50 AP Language and Composition • AP Literature and Composition • Weighted Honors English • Math: • Trigonometry Math Analysis • • Pre-Calculus or Calculus • AP Calculus AB or BC AP Statistics • S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 20

21 AP Physics • 7. Follow up with a counselor A qualifying score from the College Board Advanced Follow-up services are available to all students as Placement English or Math Exam may be taken part of the college’s commitment to student success. directly to the college Counseling office for These services include a periodic review of student consideration. Please refer to the College Catalog for progress and education plans to assist students in AP exam score requirements. reaching their educational goal. Students who need additional support services will be referred to those 5. Educational Plan services. An education plan is an important tool to assist Exemptions students in successfully attaining their goals without wasted time and effort. Counseling and career Students who meet the following criteria are exempt planning services are available to help students from components of the matriculation process: make informed choices concerning the programs 1. Admission Application and courses available. Admissions and Registration No exemptions • The education plan is an agreement which contains the official requirements for graduation and/or Apply for Financial Aid 2. All official transcripts of prior college transfer. • No exemptions work must be on file and evaluated before an official education plan can be prepared. Orientation 3. Transcripts from foreign institutions are not Students with the following educational goals: • required. See the Graduation section on page 106 for graduation filing requirements. Maintenance of a certificate or license, • educational development, or completion Education plans outline a suggested pathway for of credits for high school diploma a student to take based on their major, transfer plans, or other pertinent objectives. These plans • Students who have an associate degree or allow students to determine how long it will take higher to complete a program of study and to be sure • Students concurrently enrolled at a that all program requirements can be met within a four-year college or university particular period of time. The student should review their education plan periodically with a counselor as Students concurrently enrolled in high • goals or objectives change. school Career, interest, and aptitudes assessments are Assessment 4. available for students who wish to explore other Students with the following educational goals: • options or who are undecided on their educational goal. Maintenance of a certificate or license, • educational development, or completion 6. Register and Pay of credits for high school diploma You will receive an email with your assigned Students who have an associate degree or • registration date and time. Register online at higher .sdccd.edu/future-students/registration/ https://www • Students concurrently enrolled at a . You are responsible for ensuring that all index.aspx four-year college fees, including the Health Fee (which is not covered by the California College Promise Grant – CCPG • Students concurrently enrolled in high waiver (formerly known as BOG Fee Waiver)) are school paid in full by the deadline or you will be dropped Students who have taken the placement • for nonpayment. Pay online or in person at the tests within the last three years Accounting Office. S 21 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

22 5. Educational Plan Wait List activities – adding, dropping and Wait • List status • Students with the following educational goals: Admissions and Registration • Pass/No Pass grading options • Maintenance of a certificate or license, educational development, or completion • View the student’s Financial Aid of credits for high school diploma • View attendance hours for tracking classes Students who have an associate degree or • View Skill Levels/Milestones • higher • Academic deadlines and calendar Students concurrently enrolled at a • four-year college Note: You may only access one semester at a time. The portal also grants access to: • Students concurrently enrolled in high school Grade information • 6. Register and Pay Academic history • No exemptions • • Petitions to graduate 7. Follow up with a counselor Ordering transcripts • No exemptions • • View 1098-T tax information • Apply to the Honors Program Registration • Apply for a California College Promise Grant – CCPG (formerly known as BOG Fee Waiver). Important Advisory: The colleges are migrating to a new student system. Many processes will be Audit Policy changing throughout the year. For the most up to date information go to http://www.sdccd.edu/ Auditing courses is not permitted under any mysdccd/. circumstances. Students must be officially enrolled in all classes which they attend. With the exception of Special-Admit High School students, all students receive an appointment to Online Class Restrictions register online using the San Diego Community College District’s online registration system. In accordance with federal regulations City, Special-Admit High School students must enroll in Mesa and Miramar colleges may not permit person at the time of their registration appointment. students residing outside of California to enroll in online classes without approval of the state By using the combined schedule of classes and the where the student resides. Students residing in a online registration system, a student can enroll in non-approved state/territory are any available course offered at ECC, City, Mesa, or not permitted Miramar Colleges. Instructions for the class schedule to enroll in online classes and will be dropped. Go and online registration are available on campus and to https://www.sdccd.edu/docs/StudentServices/ . on the web at: http://schedule.sdccd.edu/ for an up-to-date list OnlineStatesNotPermitted.pdf of restricted states and territories. The online services offered are: Registration – add, drop & withdraw from classes • Responsibility for Maintaining Accurate Registration • View the student’s class schedule and payment deadlines It is the student’s obligation to add, drop, or withdraw from classes before the deadlines stated Pay fees and view payment records • in the schedule of classes. This applies even if the Purchase a parking permit • student has never attended class. Any student who anticipates difficulty in paying fees should check • Purchase an Associated Students Membership with the Financial Aid Office about eligibility and S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 22

23 sources of assistance. Registration will be canceled • Wait Listed students will be given first priority for nonpayment of fees. to add their Wait Listed class if a space becomes available before the semester begins. Time/Schedule Conflicts The college will attempt to notify students that • a space is available via email according to their Students may not register for classes with times • priority number; however, it is the students’ that overlap (includes 10 minute passing period). responsibility to check the status of their Wait • Students may not enroll in two classes of the Listed classes in the online registration system same subject and course number if the start and/ daily. or end date of one class overlaps with the other Upon notification, students will be given five (5) • class. business days, including the day of notification, to add the Wait Listed class. (An add code Class Schedules on Internet (permission number) is not required.) Up-to-date class schedule information and course • If students do not add their Wait Listed class descriptions for each campus are available online at Admissions and Registration within the 5-day period, they will be removed . This website displays http://schedule.sdccd.edu/ from the Wait List and lose their priority. new classes, cancellations, and changes after the printed schedule has been distributed. A search Students remaining on the Wait List after classes • engine allows students to search for classes by begin MUST attend the first class meeting academic subject, by time and day, or by key words. (and be on time) to have their Wait List priority considered. Wait List Students enrolled in SDCCD Online courses must Important Advisory: The colleges are migrating contact the instructor on the first day of class via to a new student system. Many processes will be email if they wish to have their Wait List priority changing throughout the year. For the most up considered. to date information go to http://www.sdccd.edu/ mysdccd/. Adding Classes Students who attempt to register in a class that is Students may add classes online until the deadline closed may select the option to have his/her name date published in the schedule of classes. Students placed on a Wait List. will not be allowed to add classes beyond the published deadline. IMPORTANT NOTE: Wait Listing is not a guaranteed priority for enrollment. To add a class once the semester has begun, students must obtain an add code (permission Criteria: number) from the instructor, then must process and Students may place their name on only one Wait • pay for the added class online or at the Accounting List for a specific subject and course number. Office, Room B-203 & B-204. Students must meet course prerequisites to be • Students are not officially enrolled until the add code placed on the Wait List. (permission number) is processed through the online registration system and fees are paid in full. Add • Students who are on a Wait List and later enroll in code (permission number) for Special-Admit part- another section of the same subject and course time high school and Joint Diploma students must number will be automatically removed from the be processed in person in the college Admissions Wait List. Office prior to the add deadline. • Students can check their priority number on the If an instructor finds that a student has given his Wait List online. or her add code (permission number) to another Students have the option to remove themselves • student, the instructor should administratively from the Wait List at any time. drop the student who was not issued the add code (permission number). • There is a limit to the number of students allowed on each Wait List. an 23 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D ollege

24 2. Using an add code (permission number) issued to Class Attendance another student; Students who do not attend the first class meeting Admissions and Registration Failure to meet the terms and conditions of a fee 3. may be dropped by the instructor. Students, deferment; who cannot attend because of illness, religious observation, or a serious problem, should notify the 4. Failure to meet academic or progress standards; instructor. Students who miss the first class meeting Denial of a “Petition to Challenge a Prerequisite”; 5. and do not plan to attend must log-in online and drop the class to avoid receiving an “F” grade. 6. Failure to meet a prerequisite or co-requisite Requirement; It is the student’s responsibility to drop by the published deadlines. Enrolling in an online course while residing 7. in a state not approved by the department of Drop/Withdrawal from Classes education; Important Advisory: The colleges are migrating 8. Students who do not show proof of to a new student system. Many processes will be immunizations on the first day of class for select changing throughout the year. For the most up Child Development courses. to date information go to http://www.sdccd.edu/ mysdccd/. Exclusion from Classes Students may drop or withdraw from classes online A student may be excluded from class or the college until the published deadline dates. Deadline dates whenever the student: are available in the Admissions Office or in the online Exhibits behavior which interferes with 1. schedule of classes at: http://schedule.sdccd.edu/ the educational process. An instructor may and by clicking on the “details” box next to the class remove a student from two class sessions for they are interested in viewing. disruptive behavior. (Refer to BP 3100: Student • It is the student’s responsibility to drop all classes Rights, Responsibilities, Campus Safety and in which he/she is no longer participating. Administrative Due Process); or • Students, who remain enrolled in a class beyond 2. Is found to have a communicable disease which the published withdrawal deadline, as stated requires isolation pursuant to a directive from the in the online class schedule, will receive an County Department of Public Health. evaluative letter grade. Study Load Limit Final grades may be affected by attendance as • described in the class syllabus. The maximum study load for a semester is 20 academic units including Exercise Science (formerly DROP —ending enrollment in a class prior to about Physical Education) activity units. the 20% point of class meetings. A drop is not recorded on the student’s academic record. Students are reminded that each unit of credit is calculated to involve a total of at least three hours —ending enrollment in a class WITHDRAWAL of classroom and outside time per week. Thus, a between about the 20% point and up to about 20-unit study load represents a 60-hour work load the 60% point of class meetings. A withdrawal is each week. Students working full-time are advised a permanent symbol on the student’s academic NOT to attempt a full-time college program. record and is included in progress probation and disqualification determination. Twelve units of credit is considered a minimum full-time program during a semester; nine units is Administrative Drop three-quarters time and six units, half-time. Registration may be administratively cancelled for The maximum study load for summer session the following reasons: is 12 academic units including Exercise Science formerly Physical Education) ( activity units. 1. Failure to pay all mandatory fees in accordance with the fee payment schedule; 24 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

25 Six units of credit is considered a minimum Group 5 full-time during the summer session; four units is Students with 100+ Units (Does NOT include • three-quarters time, and three units, half time. Basic Skills units.) Note: Study load requirements may vary at each (Active Military & Veterans, Foster Youth, college for financial aid purposes. Inquire at your Homeless Youth, Intercollegiate Athletes, college Financial Aid Office for detailed information. CalWorks, DSPS & EOPS students will receive first priority within this group.) Basic Skills Unit Limit Group 6 Title 5, 55035 states: “...no student shall receive • Students with a Baccalaureate Degree more than 30 semester units of credit for basic skills coursework.” Registration will be blocked prior (Active Military & Veterans, Foster Youth, to students reaching this limit so that students Homeless Youth, Intercollegiate Athletes, can meet with a counselor to ensure that they are CalWorks, DSPS & EOPS students will receive first successful when this unit limit is met. Students priority within this group.) with a verified learning disability are exempt from Admissions and Registration Group 7 this limitation (contact the DSPS office for more information). • Students who are academically disqualified or disqualified for lack of progress or who have not Priority Enrollment System yet returned to good academic standing. Consistent with state law and the goal of providing (Active Military & Veterans, Foster Youth, a fair and equitable registration system for all Homeless Youth, Intercollegiate Athletes, students, the San Diego Community College District CalWorks, DSPS & EOPS students will receive first has established the following priority system for priority within this group.) assigning registration appointments. Group 8 Priority Groups Students concurrently enrolled in High School • Group 1 Within each priority group above, students are prioritized according to cumulative units, including • Active Military & Veterans who meet the eligibility transfer units. criteria*, Foster Youth**, Homeless**, CalWorks, EOPS and DSPS students, Intercollegiate Range Athletes***. Non-matriculated students are • 50.0 – 72.0 units placed at the end of this group. • 30.0 – 49.9 units Group 2 15.0 – 29.9 units • Continuing Students who have completed • orientation, assessment, and have an education 00.0 – 14.9 units • plan (Abbreviated education plans only grant a • 72.1 – 89.9 units student priority for 3 semesters.) 90.0+ units • Continuing CE Advantage Students • * Students who are Active Duty Military or Veterans, Group 3 discharged within the past fifteen (15) years, may • New & Returning Students who have completed be eligible for up to 4 years of priority registration. orientation, assessment, and have an education Students should contact the Admissions Office for plan (Abbreviated education plans only grant a additional information. A military ID card or DD214 student priority for 3 semesters.) will be required for verification. Group 4 ** Foster Youth or Homeless under 25 years of age may be eligible for priority registration. For Continuing, New & Returning Students who have • information, contact the College Admissions Office. not completed all three services: orientation, assessment, and have an education plan. an 25 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D ollege

26 are other *** Intercollegiate Athletes participating and LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT registered on a team roster may be eligible for restrictions that are stated in the course description Admissions and Registration priority registration. For information, contact the such as “not open to students with credit in...” College Athletic Department. ADVISORIES are departmental recommendations to be completed prior to enrolling in the course. Change of Name, Mailing or Email Advisories do not prevent a student from enrolling, Address but are strongly encouraged by the department for a student’s academic success. All students must report immediately any change of address to the college Admissions Office or online Challenge Procedures . Failure at https://studentweb.sdccd.edu/reg-e/ to provide this information will result in delays in Students who believe they have sufficient grounds registration, and other important information sent may challenge a prerequisite, corequisite, or by the college. Name changes must be supported limitation on enrollment in a specific course (the with legal documentation and a picture ID and student does not get units for a challenged class). reported in person at the Admissions Office. A student may obtain a Petition to Challenge in the Admissions Office. The completed petition with supporting documentation must be filed in the Prerequisites, 10 working days prior AT LE A ST Admissions Office to the start of the primary term/semester. Contact the Admissions Office for additional information. For Corequisites, . credit by examination, please refer to page 81 Limitations on Enrollment and Residency Residency is determined when a student applies for Advisories admission to the College. The following paragraphs summarize the rules and regulations related to PLAN AHEAD! All prerequisites, corequisites, and student residency for tuition purposes. Details are limitations on enrollment stated in the course found in the CA Education Code, section 68000 and descriptions listed in this catalog will be strictly Title 5, sections 54000-54072. enforced at the time of registration. Students who do not meet the prerequisite requirements according to college records will not be permitted to register Residency Status for the course. Students who believe they have met Every person who is married or is age 18 or older and the prerequisite at another institution are strongly under no legal restriction may establish residence. advised to have all transcripts of prior college work Certain minors may also establish residence. evaluated and on file well in advance of registration to minimize registration delays. A California “resident” is a person who has resided in the state for more than one year prior to the Note: Unofficial transcripts are accepted for residence determination date and shows “intent” prerequisite clearance. to make the State of California their permanent residence. Students should plan their schedules early and see a counselor for assistance. An undocumented student is precluded from establishing residency. Restrictions also apply to are courses that must be PREREQUISITES some visas, please see the Admissions Office. completed with a “C” or better prior to registration in a specific course. The residence determination date is the day immediately preceding the first day of classes for are courses that are required to be COREQUISITES each semester. taken the same semester as another course. 26 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

27 Self-supporting minors • Factors Considered to Determine Residency Full-time employees of the college or a state • agency, or a child or spouse of the full-time No one factor determines residency. The following employee factors are called “indices of intent.” They, along with a person’s presence in California, are among A nonresident special part-time high school • the factors considered in determining California student who meets admission requirements is residency: exempt from paying nonresident tuition • Filing California state and federal tax returns with Nonresident Students W-2 form (required) A student’s residency status is determined at the Possessing a California driver’s license and a • time of application. Nonresident students must pay vehicle registered in California nonresident tuition in addition to the enrollment fee Voting in California • and other fees for credit classes. Tuition must be paid in full at the time of registration. • Owning residential property in California for Admissions and Registration personal use Assembly Bill (AB) 540 Being licensed to practice a profession in • Assembly Bill 540 exempts nonresident students California who meet the following criteria, from paying • Having an active checking and/or savings nonresident tuition: account in a California bank • have attended a California school full-time for Showing California on military records (Leave and • three or more years. Earnings Statement) have received a high school diploma or • Possessing a marriage license or a divorce decree • equivalent, or an Associate Degree or fulfillment issued in California of transfer requirements for CSU/UC Institutions. Having paid nonresident tuition in another state • • have registered as an entering student at, or concurrent enrollment at an accredited • A nonresident special part-time high school institution of higher education in California. student who meets admission requirements is exempt from paying nonresident tuition Students who meet the criteria must file an affidavit with the college stating that he or she has filed an Exceptions to Residency application to legalize his or her immigration status. Requirements Incorrect Classification Several exceptions to the residency rules apply. They include, but are not limited, to the following: A student incorrectly classified as a California resident is subject to reclassification as a nonresident • Active duty military personnel and their and payment of all nonresident tuition. If incorrect dependents stationed in California classification results from false or misleading facts, a • Active military and dependents previously student may be excluded from classes or the college stationed in California, who are currently enrolled, upon notification. and subsequently receive orders to change their duty station to out-of-state Reclassification A Veteran or dependent using or intending to • Reclassification to resident status must be requested use their GI Bill® benefits while currently living by the student. Financial independence during in California and has enrolled at San Diego City, the current year and preceding two years will Mesa or Miramar College within three years of be considered at the time the student requests their discharge date reclassification. Information regarding requirements for reclassification is available in the Admissions • Certain minors who remained in California when Office. their parents moved S 27 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

28 academic performance of all international Tuition will not be refunded to a student classified as a nonresident due to lack of documentation if, at a students will be monitored by the college. Admissions and Registration later date, documentation is presented for a previous 2. A recent photograph must be submitted with an semester. application (passport size is acceptable). Prospective international students are advised 3. Appeals that they must comply with all requirements of To appeal a residency determination decision, a the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services student may file a Residency Determination Appeal and of San Diego City College to be admitted as form with the college Admissions and Records international students. Supervisor. 4. Restriction on Aviation Program. The Federal government prohibits all F-visa (F-1, F-2 and Limitation of Residency Rules F-3) students from enrolling in any Aviation Students are cautioned that this summary of rules Maintenance Technology (AVIM) and/or Aviation regarding residency determination is by no means a Operations (AVIA) classes and programs. No complete explanation of their meaning or content. exceptions will be made. Student enrollment is monitored and students will be administratively For further information, contact the residency clerk dropped. in the Admissions Office. Changes may have been made in the statutes and in the regulations since this A transfer student from another accredited 5. catalog was published. United States college or university must: a. follow set transfer procedures of the U.S. False Information Citizenship and Immigration Services; and Providing false information necessary for b. have pursued a full-time course of study establishing residency will result in disciplinary with a minimum GPA of 2.0 (“C”) at the action up to and including dismissal from the college the student was last authorized to college. attend. (An official transcript must be filed.) Contact the Admissions Office for more details. Admission Requirements All international students Application Fee: International are required to pay a $100.00 non-refundable application fee. Upon admission to the college, Students the fee will be applied toward the first semester nonresident tuition. The fee is valid for up to one (F-1 Visa Students) year from the date processed. San Diego City College welcomes application from Admission for Fall Semester: Students must nonimmigrant F-1 visa students. Acceptance into complete all admissions requirements no later than a program at the college is necessary before U.S. May 15 to be admitted for the fall semester. The Citizenship and Immigration Services Form I-20 processing of an application normally requires a (certificate of eligibility) is issued by the college minimum of three to five months. Students who Admissions Office. The decision to grant an meet the May 15 deadline will be notified as soon as acceptance will be based on all evidence received possible of their admission status. prior to the deadlines. The application forms are . available at: www.sdcity.edu Admission for Spring Semester: Students must complete all admissions requirements no later than General Information October 15 to be admitted for the Spring semester. Students who meet the October 15 deadline will be An international student must register for and 1. notified as soon as possible of their admission status. maintain a minimum of 12 units each semester while at City College. Part-time F-1 status will not be approved. The registration status and C • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D an 28

29 nonresident tuition, enrollment fees, and health Academic Achievement services fees. An international student must have graduated 1. 3. Financial aid is not available to international from high school (or its equivalent) with a GPA students. of 2.0 (“C”) or better, or have obtained a GED® certificate (General Education Development). An international student may not accept 4. off-campus employment while attending college 2. Official transcripts of all previous secondary and unless approval is granted by the U.S. Citizenship college/university education must be submitted, and Immigration Services and the International including an English translation of the transcript, Student Advisor. before an application will be considered. Health Clearance English Proficiency Requirements 1. Students must be in good health and free of To be considered for admission, an international communicable diseases. The “Report of Health student whose native language is not English Examination” form or a medical examination must take an International Test of English as a Admissions and Registration report by a physician must be submitted prior Foreign Language (TOEFL) and score a minimum to admission. The medical examination must of 500 on the paper-based test, 173 on the certify immunization against polio, diphtheria, computerized version, or 61 on the internet-based measles, rubella, and tetanus, and must provide test. For questions regarding the TOEFL test, tuberculosis clearance. please visit the Educational Testing Service website . Institutional reports or at: www.ets.org/toefl/ Each student is 2. Mandatory Health Insurance: photocopies will not be accepted. Students may required to provide a notarized letter (in English) petition to waive the TOEFL requirement under one certifying that he/she has secured a health of the following conditions: insurance coverage in the United States for the duration of their studies. completion of a transfer level college English 1. composition course at an accredited United Housing States institution with a grade of “C” or higher; The college is located near public transportation and 2. completion of ELAC (formally known as ESOL) housing. The college does not provide or assist with assessment and placement at a level of ELAC housing. Housing is the responsibility of the student. 45 (formerly ESOL 40) or higher; in addition, the student must take the prescribed course work at the level of assessment; or Visa Students (other than F-1) 3. a minimum SAT verbal score of 450. All other visa categories or immigrant classifications, other than F-1, must see the Admissions Office. An international student in Advanced Degrees: possession of an associate degree or its equivalent, Students who are residing in the United States or higher (completion of about 60 semester units) on other than F-1 student visas must comply with may be determined to be beyond the course all restrictions on total units enrolled as specified offerings of City college and is encouraged to apply by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. to a four-year college or university. Students who have additional questions may contact the International Student Admissions Office at the following address: Financial Resources International Student Admissions Office L-111 Each international student must submit 1. 619-388-3476 – Office verification of sufficient financial resources. San Diego City College The verification must indicate the ability of the 1313 Park Blvd. student to finance each year’s education and San Diego, CA 92101 living expenses. Minimum of $26,408 required for one school year (two semesters). 2. An international student attending the college must pay all mandatory fees, including an 29 S ollege C ity C iego D • 2018–2019

30 2018–2019 nonresident tuition fee is $245.00 per Fees unit. Admissions and Registration Community College Enrollment Fee Library The enrollment fee is assessed of all students, Overdue fines and fees apply to late and lost library including nonresidents. The fee is currently $46.00 materials. per unit. Enrollment fees subject to change. Baccalaureate Degree Program Fee • Waiver of the enrollment fee is available to students who petition and qualify as A baccalaureate degree program fee will be charged recipients of benefits under the Temporary for all upper division coursework. The fee is $84.00 Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program, per unit and will be assessed in addition to the the Supplemental Security Income/State $46.00 per unit enrollment fee. Nonresident students Supplementary (SSI) program, or the General in upper division coursework will be charged the Assistance program. $84.00 per unit in addition to the $46.00 enrollment fee, and the nonresident tuition fee of $245.00 per • Indentured apprentices are exempt from unit. enrollment fees for Apprenticeship Program classes only. Additional Fees • Financial Aid may be available to students who Automobile permits per semester qualify for assistance. $40.00 (hanger included) ... $30.00 Carpool permits per semester ... Health Services Fee $17.50 Motorcycle permits per semester ... are assessed a mandatory fee for health All students $5.00 Transcript of Record ... services and accident insurance, whether or not (after two have been issued free of charge) they choose to use the health services available to cost ... Loss or damage of equipment and books them. The health services fee is currently $19.00 per A.S. College Membership (per academic year) ... $8.00 semester for Fall and Spring semesters, and $16.00 Credit by Examination $46.00/unit ... for the Summer session. The following students are Student Representation Fee ... $1.00 exempt from the health fee: Students receiving public assistance, or who are Note: Students who meet the income standards for the • determined eligible for financial aid, may purchase a California College Promise Grant – CCPG-A Only single car permit for $25. (formerly known as BOG Fee Waiver). Contact the All fees are subject to change. Financial Aid Office for eligibility determination. Students are expected to buy all books and supplies Students attending under an approved • needed for their courses. Certain occupational apprenticeship program. programs may require additional expenditures for Students who depend on prayer for healing, in • tools, uniforms. accordance with the teachings of a bona fide All students Student Representation Fee: religious sect, denomination, or organization, attending college classes are required to pay may petition to have the fees waived. a $1.00 student representation fee. This fee is To apply for an exemption contact the Admissions expended by the college solely for the purpose of Office. student advocacy efforts to Federal, State and local governments. Students have the right to refuse to For more information, contact the Admissions Office. pay the fee for religious, moral, political or financial reasons. Nonresident Tuition A $25.00 fee will be assessed Returned Check Fee: In addition to the enrollment fee and health fee, for any returned checks. tuition is charged to students who are not legal residents of California for tuition purposes. The S • 2018–2019 ollege C 30 C iego D an ity

31 Debt Owed to the College NOTE: Students who drop all classes and wish to receive a refund must also submit their parking In alignment with California Education Code Section permit before the refund will be granted. If the 76225 grades, transcripts, diplomas, and registration permit is not returned within the two-week privileges, or any combination thereof, shall be refund period, the student will not receive a withheld from any student or former student who refund for the permit. has been provided with written notice that he or she has failed to pay a proper financial obligation. Any item(s) withheld shall be released when the student satisfactorily meets the financial obligation. A service fee may be charged for all delinquent loans; any service fee would be determined by the total cost required to collect the delinquent loans. Refunds Admissions and Registration 1. Fees will be refunded to students who reduce their program in accordance with the following schedule: • Primary Session (16 Weeks) Friday of the second week • Non-Primary Sessions (16 weeks or more) Monday of the third week • Short-Term Sessions (Less than 16 weeks) Monday of the second week Classes 1 week or shorter • See Admissions Office for deadline dates 2. Students who are administratively dropped when a Petition to Challenge is denied will receive a full refund of the class(es) petitioned. 3. Students who are academically disqualified and administratively dropped will receive a full refund. No refund is given for classes dropped after the deadline. In order to receive a refund, 4. parking permits must be returned to College Police or the Accounting Office within the refund deadlines described in #1. Students with a valid address on file and who do not have an outstanding financial obligation to the district will receive a refund in the mail or credit to their credit card. Refunds will be sent to students after the add/drop deadline. For payments by check or e-check, there is a five week waiting period for checks to clear the bank before refunds will be processed. For more information contact the Accounting Office on campus. ollege • 2018–2019 an 31 C ity C iego D S

32 Admissions and Registration 32 an D iego S ity C ollege • 2018–2019 C

33 Important Advisory: The colleges are migrating to a new student system. Many processes will be changing throughout the year. For the most up to date information . go to http://www.sdccd.edu/mysdccd/ Student Services At-A-Glance Page Counseling Services 34 ... Student Transition Services (University Transfer/Career Services) ... 34 Work Experience Program ... 35 Outreach ... 35 English Language Acquisition (ELAC) ... 35 Puente Project ... 35 Umoja ... 36 First-Year Experience (FYE) Program ... 36 MESA Program ... 36 Disability Support Programs and Services (DSPS) ... 37 Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) ... 37 ... CalWORKs/TANF Believe Program Training, Education and Service 39 Financial Aid ... 39 43 Scholarships ... Veterans and Service Members ... 44 46 Learning Resource Center (LRC) ... 47 Tutorial Services ... Student Health Clinic ... 47 Mental Health Counseling Center ... 48 Child Development Center ... 48 Student Affairs/Campus Life ... 49 Athletics ... 49 Performing Arts ... 50 Digital Journalism ... 50 Student Accounting ... 50 Support Services ... 50 an 33 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

34 Transfer Counseling —Through scheduled Counseling Services appointments students will learn how to successfully Student Services transfer to a four-year university. They will receive Counseling Department assistance in researching and choosing the right E-building 619-388-3540 university based on their individual needs. Counselors offer a variety of counseling services, —Students Math/English Skills Assessment both online and in-person, to students in order can sign up for the academic skills assessment to assist and facilitate both personal, career, and which includes the Math and English Placement academic student growth. The following services are Tests. Students who have taken Math and English provided to new, continuing, transfer, and returning courses or placement tests from another college or students. www.sdcity.edu/counseling university may not need to take a placement test at San Diego City College. —Students are encouraged Academic Counseling to speak with counselors regarding any academic College Success/Career Planning —Courses are planning issues which may arise during their time offered in Personal Growth listed in the schedule of at San Diego City College. Counselors will assist classes. with identifying academic goals and developing If the student’s educational objective is Note: computer generated student education plans to receive an Associate Degree, a Certificate of through a scheduled appointment. Achievement, or to satisfy transfer requirements to —Counselors offer guidance Career Counseling a four-year college or university, the student must to those students who are uncertain of their send all official transcripts to the District. career path. Students are encouraged to explore career possibilities through the guidance of career counselors, use of research materials and career Student Transition assessment inventories. Personal Counseling —Students can also receive Services personal counseling from the Counseling Office. M-101 619-388-3722 Counselors will provide support to those students with issues arising from managing the stress of The Student Transition Services department provides school life and personal life. Personal counseling programs, services, and information resources that sessions will be kept confidential. enable students to prepare for their future after City College. The department includes the Transfer/ Walk-in Counseling —A 5–15 minute session is Career Center and the Work Experience Program. available through the academic year to students (See page 109 for the Transfer Guide.) with short questions. Students may walk into the Counseling Office and speak with a counselor on a University Transfer/Career Services first come, first-serve basis. The Transfer/Career Center is a resource center —One hour counseling Counseling Appointments that assists students in planning their transition appointments are available to help students with to a new career, new job, or transfer to a four-year career, educational, transfer planning, and to discuss university. The Center also administers guaranteed personal issues related to academic goals. transfer admission programs to selected universities. Counseling Blog —A student resource for The Transfer/Career Center offers assistance in the up-to-date information from the counseling following areas: department. www.citycounseling.blogspot.com Transfer Resources • Counseling tips • Transfer Counseling • Veterans page • Career/College Success Counseling College and career articles • • CSU GE Breadth and IGETC Certification • Weekly updates Information Meet university representatives • S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 34

35 as the college’s liaison to local high schools and • Transfer coursework requirements continuing education centers within our service • Apply for admission to four-year universities area. In addition, we facilitate tours, campus Career/Employment Prep Resources orientations and participate in community events. Our goal is to promote that City College is a quality • Career counseling institution of higher learning. Please visit our website Career assessment/exploration • for more information. www.sdcity.edu/outreach Research occupations • Learn about training programs • English Language Student Services Research potential employers • Acquisition (ELAC) • Find an internship Search for jobs • (formally known as Create a resume • ESOL) Create a cover letter • Prepare to interview • The English Language Acquisition (ELAC) program is committed to supporting non-native speakers Visit the Transfer/Career Center website: of English in developing their academic English . www.sdcity.edu/transfer language skills to enable them to succeed in college courses. We offer a range of courses designed to engage students from low-intermediate to advanced levels of English. Core courses consist of integrated Work Experience academic reading, writing, and grammar as well as academic listening and speaking. Specialized Program courses in areas such as pronunciation and focused The Work Experience Program awards college grammar are also offered to support the individual credit for learning experiences that take place on needs of each student. a job or internship. The goals and assignments The ELAC program consists of four levels. Students for completion of work experience courses are are placed at a level based on an assessment test. formulated with the student’s workplace supervisor under the direction of the course instructor. More For more information on the English Language information on Work Experience courses is available Acquisition Program, students should contact the in the Programs of Instruction section of the catalog college Counseling Office. under courses numbered 270 or 272. Course enrollment is limited and may not be available to all students. Puente Project To learn more about Work Experience or to apply for enrollment in a Work Experience course, visit room E-Building 619-388-3668 B T-103 I , or call 619-388-3495. The Puente Project, co-sponsored by the University of California and the Community Colleges, is an academic preparation, retention and transfer program. Puente is a program in which students Outreach participate in three components: L-116 619-388-3496 • Writing—students enroll in English 49 for the Fall, The City College Outreach Department provides English 101 for the Spring and English 205 the numerous services to both prospective and following Fall semester. Course materials focus current students. Our Ambassadors are trained on Latino/Chicano literature & experience to student leaders and are well versed in all support enhance writing skills. services. One of our primary functions is to serve S 35 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

36 • their first year and beyond. Services provided are Counseling—academic, personal, transfer and designed to increase student access and success career counseling is offered. Students enroll Student Services in achieving their educational goals by providing in Personal Growth courses for the Fall/Spring semesters. students with the core services to assist each student with academic, personal, and career support. With • Mentoring—students are exposed to various the support of counselors, faculty, and student career options through their close involvement peers, FYE students will find their first year to be with mentors. welcoming and successful. Materials utilized in the Puente Project come from the Latino/Chicano perspective. Classes are open to all students. If interested in participating, MESA Program please stop by the General Counseling Center and speak to the Puente counselor or visit our website: T-393 619-388-3156 . www.sdcity.edu/puente The Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) Program enables educationally disadvantaged students to prepare for and graduate Umoja from a four-year college or university with a math-based degree in areas such as engineering, E-building 619-388-3796 life and physical sciences, computer science, and mathematics. Through MESA, students develop The Umoja Community is a learning community academic and leadership skills, increase educational that seeks to engage, connect, educate, support, performance, and gain confidence in their ability to and encourage students through a program of compete professionally. math, English, and personal growth courses to prepare students for transfer to four-year colleges MESA has particular interest in and focus on students and universities. Course materials, discussions, from those groups who historically have had the and activities focus on African-American culture, lowest levels of attainment to four-year and graduate literature, and experiences. level programs. By closing this achievement gap, Program Components: MESA students and graduates will be better able to make significant contributions to the socioeconomic • Orientation well-being of their families and their communities. Counseling • In MESA you will find: Academic/Cultural Enrichment Activities • • A place to study with other students in your • Mentoring major • Supplemental Instruction/Tutoring • Walk-in tutoring in math and science Umoja Village • • Easy access to computers and printing If you are interested in joining the Umoja MESA advantage program to develop your skills • Community, please visit Erin Charlens in the General and your resume Counseling Center. Scientific calculators and textbooks available for • short- or long-term loan • Current scholarship, internship, and research First Year Experience opportunities • Activities and competitions sponsored by the San (FYE) Program Diego MESA Alliance L-112 619-388-3998 If you are interested in joining the MESA program, First Year Experience (FYE) provides a smooth please visit the MESA Center in room T-393. transition from high school or for any new student starting college. FYE ensures that first year students have the tools and support necessary to succeed S • 2018–2019 ollege 36 ity C iego D an C

37 Extended Disability Support Opportunity Programs and Programs and Services (DSPS) L-206 619-388-3513 Services (EOPS) tty 619-388-3313 www.sdcity.edu/dsps L-117 619-388-3209 City College provides academic accomodations and Student Services services for students with disabilities in compliance What is EOPS? with State and Federal legislation including Section EOPS is a state-funded student support services 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and program. Its purpose is to provide special the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act recruitment, retention, and transition services to (ADAAA). eligible students. The services offered are “above Eligible students who have a verified disability and beyond” those offered by the college’s Student qualify for academic accommodations and services Services division. The primary services include through the Disability Support Programs and assistance in the following areas: priority enrollment, Services (DSPS) department. Student participation counseling/advisement, and preparation for in the DSPS program is voluntary. Academic transition to four-year colleges and universities. accommodations and services are designed to For detailed information on all services offered and support students enrolled in on-campus, online, application procedures, please contact the EOPS and clinical setting courses in the achievement of Office in the Academic Success Center or visit our their academic and vocational goals. Educational website: www.sdcity.edu/EOPS . Assistance classes for students with disabilities may You may be eligible if you are enrolled full-time (at be available to support the college academic and least 12 units). At least 6 of these units must be taken vocational programs through DSPS and the High at City College. In addition, you must meet all of the Tech Center. Academic accommodations provided following criteria: may include, but are not limited to : priority enrollment, assistive technology and alternate 1. You are a resident of the state of California, as media, interpreters and captioning for students who determined by the Admissions Office (AB 540 are deaf or hard of hearing, note taking materials, Students are eligible). test taking accommodations, audio recorders, use 2. You are (or plan to be) a full-time student. of specialized equipment and adaptive devices, and disability related counseling and referral. Liaison 3. You qualify to receive a Board of Governors with community agencies is also an important Waiver A or B. component of the program. The campus is physically 4. You have not completed 70 (or more) units of accessible. Students are encouraged to apply early degree-applicable college course work. This for timely services. includes courses taken at other colleges. Service Animals 5. You are determined to be educationally disadvantaged by meeting any one of the The San Diego Community College District will following criteria: permit qualified students with disabilities to use service animals in district facilities and on district a. You do not qualify to enroll for the campuses (Procedure 3105.2) in compliance with minimum level English or mathematics state and federal law. courses required for your degree objective. Animals are not permitted on campus with the b. You have not fulfilled the requirements for a exception of service animals for persons with high school diploma or General Educational disabilities. Refer to Administrative Procedure (AP Development (GED). . 3105. 2) Service Animals an 37 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D ollege

38 Cooperative Agencies Resources for Education c. Upon graduation from high school your (CARE) component. CARE provides additional grade point average (GPA) was 2.5 or less on Student Services support services to address those needs that are a 4.0 scale. unique to single parents. You have been enrolled in an English or d. Math course, or program that is considered How to Apply to be developmental or remedial. Students interested in applying for the EOPS e. You have been enrolled in an English as a program must complete an EOPS application Second Language (ESL) / English Language and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid Acquisition (ELAC) (formally known as ESOL) (FAFSA). These applications are available in the class or program. EOPS Office and the FAFSA is available online at: f. In the judgment of the EOPS director, using . Students should apply early www.fafsa.ed.gov state guidelines, you are determined to be to ensure that they receive consideration for all educationally challenged. services. It is recommended that students complete the FAFSA by the priority filing date published by the Services for Homeless Students Financial Aid Office. under age of 25 Summer Readiness Program (SRP) San Diego City, Mesa and Miramar Colleges are committed to ensuring that all students have a fair SRP is a summer orientation for first-time college and equal opportunity to obtain a high-quality students. Participating students attend classes four days each week for eight weeks. The course work education and complete their educational goals. includes material designed to develop and enhance As part of this commitment, the colleges provide referral services for homeless youth through the college survival skills. In addition to the course work, a full complement of EOPS services is provided. Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) office. Effective Spring 2017, the following Applications are usually available in early January services will be provided: and accepted until the end of the first week of May. Interested applicants should contact the EOPS Office • Access to shower facilities on-campus during designated hours for details. Referrals to student support services including • The Price Scholarship Program financial aid, Cal WORKs, DSPS, food pantries, and mental health services MS-423 (619) 388-3244 • Referrals to outside agencies that support The Price Scholarship Program is funded by Price homeless shelters, housing referrals, etc. as Philanthropies and is a Learning Community whose needed mission is to raise the self-confidence, increase the competence and ultimately strengthen the character Priority Registration, if eligible, starting Summer • of deserving students by assisting them in furthering 2017 registration (requires submission of FAFSA their educational and professional development. The or California College Promise Grant – CCPG Price Scholarship Program is a two year program. (formerly known as BOG Fee Waiver) application City College Price Scholars provide mentoring to our and verification of status) incoming Price Scholars, are required to be full time Students that are homeless, formerly homeless or at- students, are interested in service learning, and are risk are encouraged to visit your college’s EOPS office recent high school graduates. To determine if you for more information. qualify please call 619-388-3244 or 619-388-3119. Cooperative Agencies Resources for Education (CARE) EOPS students who are single parents, have a child less than 14 years of age, and receive CalWORKs Cash Aid are encouraged to apply for the program’s S • 2018–2019 38 C ity C iego D an ollege

39 for all financial aid, including the California College CalWORKs/TANF Promise Grant – CCPG (formerly known as BOG Fee Waiver). To complete your FAFSA, go to Believe Program . To complete a California Dream Act www.fafsa.gov application, go to https://dream.csac.ca.gov FAFSA L-121 619-388-3797 Application materials are available on October The CalWORKs Program offers support services to 1st for the following academic year. The priority students who receive TANF/CalWORKs funding. filing deadline for aid is April 15th. Students filing Specialized services have been designed to their application by this date will be considered support students in their education, career and first in the award process. Deadline to apply: The Student Services personal goals while meeting their welfare to work Central Processing System (CPS) must receive your requirements. Services include academic/vocational application by your last day of classes for the term counseling, job placement, workshops, work study or June 30, 2018 whichever date comes first. The placement and verification of welfare to work hours. Deadline for Cal Grant application is March 2nd. For more information, contact the CalWORKs office A current Admission’s Application to the College in the Academic Success Center or visit our website: must be on file before we can process your FAFSA . www.sdcity.edu/studentresources/CalWORKs application. Complete the application using your personal information as it appears on your Social Security card or our office will not be able to process your financial aid application. Financial Aid Academic transcripts from prior colleges attended B-building 619-388-3501 are not required to be submitted before processing a Important Advisory: The colleges are migrating financial aid application. Academic transcripts must to a new student system. Many processes be submitted directly to the District Records Office. will be changing throughout the year. All inquiries such as disbursement of funds, For the most up to date information go to document submission, appeals, etc., MUST be made http://www.sdccd.edu/mysdccd/. on or before the deadline date. After the close of the The Financial Aid Office is committed to assisting academic year, we will no longer be able to process students who might otherwise be unable to any financial aid application or disbursements. continue their education because of financial disadvantage. Eligibility Financial Aid funds are administered in accordance In order to be eligible to apply for financial aid, a with a nationally established policy of financial student must be a citizen or permanent resident of assistance for education. The basis of this policy is the United States or be in the country for other than the belief that students and their parents have the a temporary purpose with the intention of becoming primary responsibility for meeting educational costs. a permanent resident. The amount of the contribution expected from students and their family is determined by careful Eligible non-citizens must provide proof of analysis of family financial strength taking into permanent residency for Federal Aid (Alien consideration net income, number of dependents, Registration Cards, I-94, I-155, I-688, or U.S. allowable expenses, indebtedness, and assets. Immigration and Naturalization letter granting The U.S. Department of Education, in cooperation asylum, etc.). F-1 Visa students are not eligible for with Congress and educational agencies, has financial aid at City College. For further information established procedures which are used in making an regarding other eligible immigration status, contact evaluation of the amount families can be expected the Financial Aid Office. to contribute. Students who do not have a high school diploma or equivalent are required to demonstrate “Ability to Application Benefit” from instruction. Information is available in the Financial Aid Office. On a yearly basis, all financial aid applicants must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), or a California Dream Act application an 39 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D ollege

40 Return of Title IV Funds Awards Awards take the form of a “package” of financial aid, Federal law requires that if a student receives a Student Services Federal grant and then drops/withdraws from all usually consisting of grant money and work-study, his/her classes, he/she may owe money back to the depending on the financial need of the applicant and availability of funds. Awards may be adjusted Federal Government. at any time upon notice of receipt of resources Note that the earlier a student drops/withdraws, the not previously reported or a change in enrollment more money he/she may have to pay back. status. Revisions to awards may be possible because personal financial circumstances are so If a student receives LOAN money and withdraws, • unpredictable. If funding is available, aid for valid he/she may pay back the money according to the educational expenses not already covered in the normal rules of the loan program. student cost budget may be increased. • If a student receives WORK STUDY money and Financial aid checks are usually ready for withdraws, he/she does not owe anything back and may keep the salary earned, but must stop disbursement approximately four or five weeks after the start of classes. Pell Grant and Cal Grant working immediately. disbursements are based on enrollment levels at the For more information about the timeframe to repay, time of payment and will not be adjusted. However, the consequences of not paying and a sample SEOG and loan payments will be adjusted according Return of Funds calculation, go to: to enrollment status. If you withdraw from classes http://www.sdcity.edu/CollegeServices/ after aid has been disbursed to you, you may be StudentSupportResources/FinancialAid/ required to repay all or part of this aid. (see “Return . ReturntoTitleIVPolicy/ of Title IV Funds” below) An automated system is available in the college Financial Aid Programs Available bookstores to allow California resident students, Following is a basic description of the programs who are enrolled in at least six units, to use a portion available. Contact the Financial Aid Office for of their estimated Pell Grant to purchase books and detailed descriptions and eligibility requirements, or supplies one week prior, and two weeks after, the visit our website. start of the semester. Funds will be set aside from each eligible student’s Pell Grant and placed in a Enrollment Fee Assistance: special account in the bookstore. This account may be used for the purchase of books and supplies until California College Promise Grant – the funds are exhausted. The account is valid at the CCPG (formerly known as BOG Fee City, Mesa, and Miramar College and ECC bookstores, Waiver) regardless of where students are taking classes. State law requires that students attending the The student will be responsible for paying back the college pay an enrollment fee. Students enrolled in Bookstore Pell Grant used if student does not attend credit classes are currently required to pay $46.00 classes. per unit. Students who elect not to purchase books from The college offers the California College Promise the college bookstore, or have any funds remaining Grant (CCPG), a state-funded program which will on account, will receive the funds in the mail or by waive the enrollment fee for all eligible applicants. direct deposit with the remainder of their Pell Grant Students who are eligible for a California College award according to the Pell Grant payment schedule Promise Grant (CCPG) will be required to pay for the semester. the health fee. The health fee will no longer be waived for students who are eligible for a CCPG Students must be making satisfactory academic other than students who are eligible for a CCPGA progress as determined by the Standards of (TANF/CalWorks, SSI/SSP, or General Assistance). Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid Recipients. Copies are available in the Financial Aid Office. S • 2018–2019 ollege 40 ity C iego D an C

41 Students may apply for the CCPG one of two ways: Number In Household Total Family Income for 2016 (including yourself) https://fafsa.ed.gov • Submit a FAFSA ( ) (adjusted gross or a California Dream Act Application income and/or (https://dream.csac.ca.gov ), or untaxed income) • Apply for the CCPG on the online registration system during the application window. 6 $49,440.00 (Application window is three weeks prior to the $55,710.00 7 start of the semester up to census, please visit $61,98 0.0 0 8 http://www.sdccd.edu/students/financial-aid- Student Services for more information.) scholarship Add $6,270 for each additional family member. If you are a California resident or have been To determine your eligibility for the California designated an AB-540 student, you may qualify for a College Promise Grant based on the above income CCPG if any one of the following statements applies standards, you will be considered independent if: to your current status: You do not live with your parents or your parent’s • You have already qualified for financial aid, such • registered domestic partner. as a Federal Pell Grant or a Cal Grant, which demonstrates that you have need as determined • You were not claimed as an exemption on any by Federal Methodology or California DREAM federal income tax filed by your parents or your Act application. You must have at least $1,104 on parent’s registered domestic partner in 2016. “unmet” need to qualify. New State regulations have changed eligibility You, or your parents in the case of a dependent • requirements for the California College Promise student, are receiving TANF (Temporary Aid Grant – CCPG (formerly known as BOG Fee Waiver). for Needy Families, SSI (Supplemental Security Starting Fall 2016, in addition to income and Income), or General Assistance/General Relief as residency requirements, students must maintain main source of income at the time of enrollment. academic and progress standards to maintain California College Promise Grant (CCPG) eligibility. • You have a letter from the Department of Veterans Affairs certifying that you meet the Appeal Process for Loss of CCPG eligibility requirements of “certain disabled Students will maintain their CCPG eligibility as long veterans, dependents of certain deceased or as they are in good academic standing. Students disabled veterans.” who believe their recent academic performance is based on circumstances outside their control, • You are a dependent of a deceased or disabled or believe they have made substantial academic veteran of the California National Guard. You improvement, may appeal the loss of CCPG eligibility must submit a letter of certification from the by submitting a Loss of CCPG/Enrollment Priority California National Guard Adjutant General’s Petition to the Dean of Student Development Office. five (5) business days prior to the Application and You meet the following income standards: • Registration Deadline posted on the Academic Calendar. Petitions will be reviewed in the order they Total Family Number In Household are received by the Dean of Student Matriculation. (including yourself) Income for 2016 (adjusted gross Federal Pell Grant income and/or The Federal Pell Grant is the largest federal grant untaxed income) program and is the foundation of a student’s total 1 $18,09 0.0 0 “aid package.” Eligibility is determined by the federal government using a standard formula for all $24,360.00 2 applicants. $30,630.00 3 Effective July 1st, 2012, all financial aid applicants are $36,900.00 4 subject to 6 years maximum of Pell Grant lifetime 5 $ 43 ,170 . 0 0 eligibility or 600%. an 41 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

42 Must meet all other Federal/State financial aid • Enrollment status will be frozen at the time of requirements disbursement after the add/drop period and will Student Services be the basis for Pell award. Once the Pell Grant Eligible students will be awarded $500 for each award has been processed it will not be adjusted for semester of eligibility. additional units added during the semester. If you have a bachelor’s degree, you are not eligible for a California College Completion Pell Grant. Grant (CCCG) Federal Supplemental Educational California has instituted a new financial aid grant Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) called the “Community College Completion Grant” that provides additional grants (up to $1,500 a year) FSEOG is a federal grant program designed to assist to students. The purpose of this grant is to provide students who have the greatest demonstrated students with additional financial assistance to financial need. Awarding of FSEOG funds is incentivize students in completing their degree in a determined by the Financial Aid Office based on two-year period. available resources. If you have a bachelor’s degree you are no eligible for FSEOG. In order to qualify for this grant, students must: Receive an award of CalGrant and a Full Time • Cal Grants Student Success Grant for the term The Cal Grant program is administered by the • Have available financial aid need as determined California Student Aid Commission to help by your financial aid office low-income students attend college. Students at the Be a California resident or AB-540 student • college may receive Cal Grant B or C. • Identify a program of study (major) and have a To be eligible for Cal Grant B a student must be • student education plan on file a California resident, eligible AB-540 designated student and pursuing an undergraduate Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 • academic program of not less than one academic Enroll in 15 major required units in the Fall and/ • year. or Spring Cal Grant C is designed for students enrolled in a • • Be on pace to complete their degree within the vocational program who are California residents timeframe as stated in the college catalog or eligible AB-540 designated students from a low or middle-income family. Eligible students will be awarded for each semester of eligibility. Please note: No appeals are provided • See the Financial Aid Bulletin for important dates by education code for disqualification due to GPA or and deadlines. loss of eligibility due to pace. • Cal Grant Program is not available for students accepted into the comprehensive Transitional Chafee Grant Program Program C2C. The Chafee Grant is a federal program that is If you have a bachelor’s degree, you are not • administered by the California Student Aid eligible for a Cal Grant. Commission to provide financial assistance to prior Foster Youth. The applicant must be certified by the Full-Time Student Success Grant State Department of Social Services of their Foster (FTSSG) Youth status prior to reaching age 16. The grant has no citizenship requirement; however, non-citizens Students who meet the following criteria will be without a valid Social Security Number must call eligible for a FTSSG award for Fall 2018 and/or Spring the CSAC for additional steps and information. The 2019. program awards a maximum of $5,000 per academic Must be enrolled full-time (12 units or more) • year. Renewal applicants must maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined by the school. • Must have been awarded a Cal Grant B and paid at full-time status S • 2018–2019 ollege 42 ity C iego D an C

43 accepted. You are required to pay the Department Federal Work Study of Education loan processing fees that are currently Federal Work Study (FWS) allows students the 1.068%. The fees are deducted from the proceeds opportunity to earn part of their financial aid by of your loan. The origination fee will change for any working in assigned jobs, both on and off campus. loan disbursed after October 1, 2016. The salary received is at least equal to the current To qualify, a student must be enrolled in at least six minimum wage, but many Federal Work Study jobs units, demonstrate Satisfactory Academic Progress pay more than minimum wage. Federal Work Study for aid recipients and must demonstrate financial differs from the other financial aid programs in that need through the federal methodology using the a student is allocated a certain amount of money to FAFSA Application. To apply for a Federal Direct earn. As work on the job is completed, a time card is Student Services Loan, students must complete a mandatory loan submitted for the hours worked just as at a regular entrance counseling session. The counseling session job. Once a month the student receives a paycheck is required even if a student has attended a Stafford for the hours worked. Once the amount allocated in loan workshop in the past. If a student has attended the financial aid package is earned, the job ends. a Direct Loan workshop at San Diego City, or Miramar Colleges in the past, it will not be necessary Scholarships to conduct another entrance counseling session. Students are encouraged to apply for scholarships, Students must contact the Financial Aid Office or which are available for students who meet the visit the College website for application procedures. qualifications. These awards are donated by You many complete the entrance counseling session individual contributors, clubs and organizations online at: www.studentloans.gov. both on campus and in the community. Amounts Congress approved a new lifetime limit on are determined by the donors and vary. Qualifying Subsidized Direct Loans for subsidized loans criteria may include that the student meet financial disbursed on or after July 1, 2013. Students will be need, a designated grade point average or other limited to 150% of subsidized loan eligibility based requirements to be eligible for consideration. on their program of study. Scholarship applications may be obtained from the City College Office of Student Affairs, Room M-200 or The Financial Aid Office will be notified when at the website: www.sdcity.edu/scholarships . the session has successfully been completed. In addition, you must fill out a Loan Request Form form your Financial Aid Office. You must complete Student Loans an online multi-year Master Promissory Note at: Applicants for student loans will be subject to www.studentloans.gov. college policy requirements regarding enrollment You may also be required to submit an Educational status, length of attendance, number of units Plan and be enrolled at the campus of your declared completed, and total amount of previous loans. major. Please ask your Financial Aid Office for more Student loans are not available for students accepted information. The actual loan amount for which you into the comprehensive Transitional Program C2C. are eligible will be determined by the Financial Aid Office. Checks will be disbursed twice per loan Student loans are not auto-awarded to any student. period. If you are a first-time student or borrower, Contact the Financial Aid Office for other your check will not be disbursed until at least 30 requirements. days after the start of the semester. If you have “Late Start” classes, you must be actively attending William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan classes in at least six units, before your loan can be Program disbursed. The Federal Direct Loan is a federal loan program For additional information, contact the Financial Aid where you borrow directly from the Federal Office. Government. The interest rate for new loans is a fixed rate which is currently 4.29% for loans Experimental Site Provisions disbursed from July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017. New Effective with the 2017-2018 school year, San Diego Federal regulations require schools to disburse loans City College, San Diego Mesa College, and San only after the signed Promissory Note has been S 43 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

44 to the parent. Parents must begin repayment Diego Miramar College have been approved by the U.S. Department of Education to participate in an within 60 days of receiving full dispensation of the Student Services loan. The interest rate is a fixed rate. Student and experimental initiative regarding “over-borrowing” borrower must meet all other financial aid eligibility that will require a group of students to complete requirements, including completing the FAFSA. additional loan counseling before loan funds can be disbursed to the student. National Student Clearinghouse Unsubsidized Loan (Under All current SDCCD student’s enrollment levels Experimental Site Provisions – are automatically sent to the National Student Elimination for Certain Groups of Clearinghouse. Submission and disclosure of enrollment levels is a federal requirement for Students) students with current and past student loans Effective within the 2012–2013 school year, San according to regulations. Enrollment information Diego City College along with Mesa College and for students with no prior or current student Miramar College has been approved by the U.S. loan history is protected from disclosure by the Department of Education to participate in an contractual agreement between the National experimental initiative regarding “Overborrowing” Student Clearinghouse and the San Diego that allows our college to reduce or eliminate Community College District. For more information, Unsubsidized Loan eligibility and borrowing for please contact your campus Financial Aid Office. certain groups or categories of students. Based on this initiative, the following groups or categories of students will not be eligible to borrow Veterans and Unsubsidized Loans: 1st Year Students Service Members • 1st year is defined as students who have L-107 619-388-3504 completed less than 24 units in their current program or major based on their educational Veterans Center Military Service plan. Connected Benefit Programs • Units that will be counted towards the 24 The San Diego Community Colleges have been units will be units that fulfill the major, general approved to offer military service connected education and district requirements for benefit programs leading to a Certificate of the current program or major based on the Achievement or Associate Degree or transfer to a educational plan. four-year institution. The Veterans Affairs Office staff Units that will not be counted towards the 24 • provides guidance to veterans and assists them in the selection of educational programs which units are units that are basic skills or remedial, ELAC (formally known as ESOL), electives or any qualify for veterans benefits. The final responsibility for monitoring the process of qualification for other units that are not applicable to the current educational benefits resides with the individual. program or major based on the educational plan. Each veteran must read, understand, and comply Students Approved on a Financial Aid Appeal with the many rules, regulations, and procedures Students who have an “Unsatisfactory” status that influence the benefit process. (Disqualified) for any reason and who are approved on appeal will not be eligible for an Unsubsidized Students on active duty and veterans who have Loan. been discharged within the past 15 years may be eligible for up to 4 years priority registration. Check with the college Admissions Office for eligibility. An Federal Direct Plus Loan Active Duty Military ID card or DD214 are required Parents of dependent undergraduate students may for verification. borrow from the PLUS loan program. The amount borrowed may be up to the cost of attendance minus any financial aid. Checks will be payable S • 2018–2019 ollege 44 ity C iego D an C

45 Short-term and summer session courses are Failure to take the proper classes may result in an computed proportionately for payment purposes. overpayment and the reduction or termination of benefits. Rate of Pursuit (Chapter 33) The Chapter 33 housing allowance is paid if the Disabled Veterans rate of pursuit is more than 50%. The Department Veterans who qualify for educational benefits of Veterans Affairs calculates the rate of pursuit by as disabled veterans may be entitled to special dividing the benefit-eligible credit hours/units (or educational benefits. Veterans should visit the credit hour equivalent) enrolled by the number of Veterans Administration Regional Office, 8810 credit hours/units considered to be full-time by the Student Services Rio San Diego Drive, San Diego, CA, 92108, to school. The resulting percentage is the student’s rate determine their eligibility for disabled status of pursuit. (Telephone: 1-800-827-1000). Please visit www.gibill.va.gov for additional Veterans with disabilities are encouraged to information and updates. pursue services offered through Disability Support Programs and Services, L-206. Withdrawal/Change of Classes Veterans are required to notify the campus Veterans Veteran Dependent Exemption Affairs Office when they stop attending class, Children and spouses of U.S. Veterans with service withdraw from the college, or add or drop a class. connected disabilities may be eligible for waiver of Such changes should be reported immediately college fees and/or for a small monthly payment. after completing the add/drop procedure. Failure For more information see the Veterans Affairs Office to comply with this regulation will be grounds for or the Cal Vet website: https://www.calvet.ca.gov/ decertification of VA benefits. . VetServices/Pages/College-Fee-Waiver.aspx Veterans Academic Progress Liability A veteran student on Academic probation status The veteran assumes full liability for any will be disqualified when his/her semester grade overpayment of veterans benefits. point average (GPA) falls below 2.0 the subsequent semester. A veteran student on Lack of Progress All persons receiving educational benefits must probation status will be disqualified if he/she does report to the Veterans Affairs Office after enrollment not complete over 60% of attempted units in the In to continue their benefits. every semester subsequent semester. The College Veterans Affairs addition, a Student Education Plan (SEP) must be Office is required to notify the Department of otherwise, on file by the end of the first semester; Veterans Affairs (DVA) of this status. The DVA will certification of VA benefits will be delayed for the terminate benefits unless it can be shown that the second semester. This plan must be developed and student is pursuing an appropriate objective and reviewed by a counselor. has a reasonable chance for success in the chosen program. Please contact the Veterans Affairs Office Number of Units Required for more information. For students enrolled in a degree program under CH: 30, 31, 35, 1606/1607, the following number of units Readmission After Termination are required each semester to qualify for educational Status and training allowance: Students who wish to be considered for 12 units or more full allowance readmissions after the VA termination will be 9 – 11.5 units three-fourths allowance required to meet with a VA counselor and develop a 6 – 8.5 units one-half allowance Student Success Plan prior to being readmitted. 2 – 5.5 units one-quarter allowance* * Chapters 32 and 1606 only. All other chapters, Repeated Classes tuition and fees only. Veterans may not receive benefits for a repeat of a course in which a grade of “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” or “P” has an 45 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

46 already been earned. Although District policy allows news and campus information. San Diego City a student to repeat a course in which a “D” grade College students will find that the LRC provides Student Services a multitude of services and scholarly research has been received, the course may be certified for resources specifically selected to support their benefits only if this catalog states that a grade of “C” or better in that course is required to earn a degree academic success. Below is a brief overview of our or meet a prerequisite. resources and services. Please see our web site www.sdcity.edu/lrc / for more details and updated information. Work Experience Veterans may be approved for Work Experience LRC / Library classes only if it is required for their major or electives are available according to their education 619-388-3421 plan. The Library offers an extensive collection of scholarly books, e-books, periodicals, and a robust selection Transcripts of reference and periodical databases available on site, via wireless and remotely to currently enrolled All official transcripts of prior college work and students. San Diego City College students find help military schools, including copies of form DD214, with their research and information needs at the DD2685, Joint Services Transcript, or Smart Transcript Library’s Information Center (reference desk), by must be covering all periods of military service, phone, email, or 24/7 online chat. Students may on file in the Records Office by the end of the enroll in a transferable one-unit course, Information . first semester of attendance at this college Literacy and Research Skills (LIBS 101). Scheduled Certification for benefits for the second semester will tours, instructor requested research sessions, access be withheld if transcripts are not received. Visit the to reserves, circulation services, group study rooms Veterans Affairs Office for necessary forms. and inter-library loan services between district colleges are also offered. Veterans Service Center The Veterans Service Center (VSC) in L106 is open LRC / Independent Learning Center during Fall and Spring semesters. The mission of the 619-388-3265 VSC is to provide a welcoming environment for all veterans. The VSC is designed to serve both men and The Independent Learning Center (ILC) creates a women, from military transition to the completion welcoming environment for students pursuing of their academic goals. The VSC provides services independent learning experiences to augment in three primary areas: academics, community and their in-class activities and improve their academic wellness. skills. Beyond maintaining a media collection and the supporting equipment, the ILC provides access to the Internet, a wide array of specialized software required for a variety of classes, adaptive software, Learning Resource and Microsoft Office Suite. Center (LRC) LRC / Office of Classroom Offering far more than the best views on campus, Technology Management the San Diego City College’s Learning Resource Center (LRC) continues to evolve and mature as 619-388-3418 the college’s information hub. Located in the R The Office of Classroom Technology Management building on the southeast corner of campus at and Multimedia (OCTM) offers the campus the Park Boulevard and B Street, the LRC is comprised educational technology required for a college in of the Library on the second (main) and third the 21st Century by providing maintenance and floors, and the Independent Learning Center, the support for smart classrooms and all campus-wide Office of Classroom Technology Management audiovisual equipment needs. Through the Student and Multimedia, a videoconference room, and Affairs Office, the OCTM addresses requests for CitySITE (faculty/staff development) on the first technical assistance for campus-wide student events. floor. Televisions on each floor are set to broadcast 46 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

47 Additionally, the OCTM manages and maintains the Math Center digital signage services campus-wide. The Math Center, located in the Academic Success Center (L-208), understands the importance of student-success, as well as students’ learning needs. Tutorial Services Our mission is to provide a flexible student-centered environment that supports students’ effort to Tutorial/Learning Center complete college math requirements. We strive to provide multiple services and resources that The Tutorial/Learning Center is located in the are conducive for student learning. These services Academic Success Center (L-205). The Center is include, but are not limited to: Student Services dedicated to providing high quality academic • support to students in art, science, vocational, and Walk-in Tutoring: Math 34A – Math 252 technological courses. The goal is for each student to • One-on-one Tutoring become an independent learner, who will succeed in • the collegiate setting. Small group Tutoring Math 15ABC Refresher Courses (short term) Peer tutors are carefully selected and professionally • trained for most college subjects. Many are bilingual • Weekly Math 38, 46, 96 Workshops to help with language barriers. They provide FREE Computer Access to MyMathLab, Aleks, etc. • walk-in and small group tutoring in most subject areas. Supplemental Instruction (SI) and Online • TI Graphing Calculator Access tutoring are available on limited subjects. The Math Center’s hours of operation are Monday- The Tutorial/Learning Center also offers FREE Thursday 10:00am-6:30pm, Friday 10:00am-3:00pm, one-hour academic skill workshops such as and Saturday 10:00am-2:00pm. The Math Center’s note-taking, test-taking, memory enhancement and services are free of charge to all current students time management to strengthen student learning Student taking a math class at City College. skills. Identification (CSID) is required for all who wish All City and ECC students must sign up to receive to utilize services in the Math Center. tutoring services. For additional information, come to the Math Center (L-208), visit our website https://www.sdcity.edu/ The Tutorial/Learning Center’s hours of operation are MathCenter, or call 619-388-3580. Monday through Thursday 8:00 am–6:00 pm, Friday 9:00 am–1:00 pm, and Saturday 9:00 am–1:00 pm. Computer Services Center for Reading, Writing, English The use of District computer equipment is limited to Language Acquisition (ELAC), and District staff and students. Critical Thinking The Center for Reading, Writing, ELAC, and Critical Thinking is located in the Academic Success Center Student Health (L-209). The Center offers peer tutoring in reading, writing, and critical thinking assignments in classes Clinic across the curriculum. Tutors can provide assistance Medical and Nursing Services on a wide variety of assignments at any stage of the E-1 619-388-3450 writing process. No appointments are taken; tutors see students on a walk-in basis. The Center is a free Mental Health Counseling Center service to City College students. Hours, which may BT-105 619-388-3055 vary from semester to semester, are posted outside The City College Student Health Clinic program the Center. consists of medical, nursing and mental health care. Mental health care and support is provided The by the Mental Health Counseling Center. medical/nursing program provides preventive and an 47 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

48 is designed to support mental health in a proactive, primary health care, with referrals to community relaxed and caring atmosphere. resources as needed. Students are welcome to Student Services walk-in to see a nurse or to call the office to schedule Mental health and personal counseling services an appointment with the Student Health Clinic are provided by a licensed Clinical Social Workers, physician or nurse practitioners. Our services for Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists, Masters students are confidential and free/low cost. level staff and graduate interns/trainees and include: Ambulatory medical care is provided by the • Individual short and long term strengths-based physician or nurse practitioners. This includes therapy history and physical assessment of skin, muscle, joint, respiratory, gastrointestinal, endocrine and/or • Couples and family therapy other system problems. Medical referrals are made • Crisis intervention and referral to the community as indicated. Laboratory tests and • prescription medications are provided at low cost, as Group therapy services ordered by the physician or nurse practitioner. First • Workshops and Psycho-educational seminars aid is provided for minor problems. For severe or life-threatening issues, emergency care is accessed Cognitive behavioral based therapy and • relaxation training targeted at addressing specific through the Emergency Medical Transport System of school related problems such as test taking San Diego. anxiety, math anxiety, panic disorder, etc. For the protection of college students and Faculty/Staff consultations personnel, students may be asked to supply health • records. In addition, the college may require • Disciplinary evaluations/behavioral contract health consultations and physical examinations compliance when they appear necessary. Legal injection of • Working closely with the Student Health Clinic for prescribed medications must occur in the Health wrap around care Clinic for safety purposes. All students are strongly encouraged to obtain immunizations against Students can walk in or call the office to schedule communicable diseases as recommended by the a confidential appointment. For additional State of California and San Diego Public Health information, please see Student Health Clinic. Departments. Student Accident Insurance/Claims Child Development The Student Health Fee provides coverage for on- campus accidents or college-related injuries. All Center student campus injuries are processed through the Student Health Clinic in E-1 as soon as possible after The Child Development Center is a State funded the accident/injury has occurred. program that offers a developmental program meeting social-emotional, physical, and cognitive For additional information on Mental Health needs of children from six weeks to five years old. Counseling, please refer to the Mental Health Priority enrollment is offered to children of parents Counseling Center section. attending day classes at City College. Applications for the waiting list are accepted the first two weeks in May for the Fall semester and the first two weeks in December for the Spring semester. The Child Mental Health Development Center is the college instructional lab for Child Development majors and other students Counseling Center requiring practicum experiences with young BT-105 619-388-3055 children. The Mental Health Counseling Center supports The Center is located at 16th and B Streets. For student success through focus on personal, social, additional information, call 619-388-3205 (License and emotional well-being. Our services for students Numbers 370805154 and 370806172). are confidential and free. Mental health counseling 48 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

49 Student Organizations Student Affairs/ There are over 30 active student organizations on campus reflecting the diversity of interest of the Campus Life student body. Students wishing to charter or register M Building Plaza 619-388-3498 new organizations should contact the Student Affairs Office in M-200. The Office of Student Affairs provides a variety of services designed to provide students with a well-balanced academic and extra-curricular college experience. Athletics Student Services Student leadership, clubs and organizations, cultural P3-200 619-388-3486 events, graduation and other support services are San Diego City College is a member of the Pacific offered through the Office of Student Affairs. Coast Athletic Conference for the following sports: For scholarship information and information about men’s and women’s soccer, men’s and women’s cross other support services, contact the Office of Student country, men’s and women’s basketball, softball, Affairs. men’s and women’s tennis, baseball, women’s volleyball, women’s beach volleyball, and women’s Associated Students Government badminton. (ASG) The Pacific Coast Athletic Conference includes the The Associated Students is the governing body following colleges: Cuyamaca, Grossmont, Imperial that finances, organizes, and directs many Valley, MiraCosta, Mt. San Jacinto, Palomar, San student-sponsored programs and activities at City Diego Miramar, San Diego Mesa, Southwestern, College. Elections are held annually for Associated College of the Desert, and San Bernadino Valley Student President and other officers. Any student College. registered for units at City College at the time of the Students must meet academic requirements election may vote in the elections. established by the California Community College Current district policy allows the elected Associated Athletic Association and pass a physical examination Student President to share the responsibility of the before they are determined to be eligible to Student Trustee. The Student Trustee is a non-voting participate in Intercollegiate Athletics. Academic member of the Board of Trustees of the San Diego eligibility includes enrollment as a full-time student Community College District and represents the during the season of the sport, an educational student voice on the Board. plan on file in the first semester of competition and a minimum 2.0 grade point average by their Any student who participates in student sophomore season of play. For more information, government may not have any Policy 3100 violations contact the Athletic Office. of suspension or greater, as stated on their official student record. Exercise Science ( formerly Physical You may view a full copy of the policy Education) Classes/Intercollegiate by accessing the following website: Sports Disclaimer http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ . Participation in all sports and Exercise Science ( ) activities involves formerly Physical Education Associated Students Membership certain inherent risks. Support your student body by purchasing an AS Risks may include, but are not limited to, neck and membership. The membership entitles you to spinal injuries that may result in paralysis or brain special benefits and privileges. The revenues go back injury, injury to bones, joints, ligaments, muscles, to support various campus events and activities. See tendons and other aspects of the muscular skeleton the Associated Students office, M-200 for a list of system; and serious injury, or impairment, to other current benefits. aspects of the body and general health, including death. The San Diego Community College District, its an 49 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

50 officers, agents and employees are not responsible Student Accounting for the inherent risks associated with participation Student Services ) formerly Physical Education in Exercise Science ( B-203 619-388-3458 classes/intercollegiate sports. The San Diego City College Student Accounting Students are strongly advised to consult a physician Office is located in B-203, You can pay for your prior to participating in any Exercise Science classes, purchase a parking pass, and more. Student formerly Physical Education ) activity. ( Accounting is open Monday–Thursday, 8am–6pm, and Fridays, 8am–12pm. Performing Arts Support Services The City College Department of Visual and Performing Arts offers students the opportunity to present plays and dance performances several times Campus Bookstore a year and sponsors student performances in dance B-105, B-202 619-388-3548 which are open to the public as well as the college community. San Diego City College Bookstore stocks textbooks and supplies required for classes. Rental books are also available. The Bookstore provides study aids, snacks, school supplies, clothing, backpacks, gift Digital Journalism items, greeting cards, emblematic items and general books. The bookstore also buys back textbooks for College Newspaper cash. The college student newspaper, City Times, provides Extended hours are offered at the beginning of each students the opportunity for class workshops and semester. Textbooks can also be purchased online actual experience in writing, editing, and producing . For additional at: www.bookstore.sdccd.edu/city a newspaper and news website, and often works information or special Bookstore hours, please with the student-produced news broadcast, contact the bookstore or visit our website listed Newscene. For degree and course information, see above. pages 211 and 412 . Call the program at 619-388-3880. Cafeteria Legend Magazine At this time, the cafeteria is under renovation. Food City College’s Digital Journalism program is the only trucks are available in the AH/BT quad and E building one of its kind in the district that offers a magazine parking lot Monday–Thursday. production lab. DJRN 220 is a unique opportunity to experience the process of producing a magazine, College Police Department start to finish, for the campus and surrounding The College Police Department is responsible community. Taking DJRN 220 is a great opportunity for providing public safety, law enforcement and to develop published work that you can share as you crime prevention services. Its mission is to maintain begin your media career. peace and order and a safe learning environment throughout our District. It is also responsible for CityWorks administering the campus parking program, lost and CityWorks is San Diego City College’s creative arts found and the building security program. annual anthology which features artwork, poetry The police business office is located in V-100. and prose from students and the community. For information and general assistance, Each October, the staff seek artists, writers, call 619-388-3461. For police assistance, call poets, journalists, editors, graphic designers, 619-388-6405. Emergency services are provided 24 photographers, and other creative people to seek hours a day 7 days a week. Learn more about College submissions for the issue, which is published each . Police at: http://police.sdccd.edu spring. For more information, call 619-388-3522. 50 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

51 ride bicycles, motorized bikes, scooters or Police Escort and Related Services skateboards on campus. Violators are subject to The college police are available to provide escort, citation and/or disciplinary action. vehicle battery jumps, and vehicle lockout services during regular hours of operation. Students who Transportation for Students with wish to use these services should call College Disabilities Police Dispatch at 619-388-6405 or go any of the College Police Offices at the following locations for Paratransit (curb-to-curb) service is available for a fee assistance: to persons with disabilities who cannot use public transportation. ADA certification is required. Please City College (V-100) ... 619-388-3461 Student Services contact DSPS for additional information or forms 619-388-2749 Mesa College (Q-100) ... for certification. Students may also contact MTS 619-388-7353 ... Miramar College (T-100) (Metropolitan Transit System) at 888-517-9627. or 858-536-7353 College Police Dispatch ... 619-388-6405 Vehicle Immobilization/Booting/ Emergency Calls Towing/Hold The college will not interrupt classroom instruction Vehicles that accumulate five (5) or more unpaid to deliver messages, except in extreme emergencies. parking citations are subject to immobilization All calls/inquiries should be referred to the College (booting) of their vehicle and/or impound (towing) at Police Dispatch at 619-388-6405. owners expense. In addition, a hold may be placed on the vehicle registration. If a vehicle accumulates Parking $100 or more in outstanding fines a hold may be placed on student records/grades. 1. Student parking permits are available for purchase during online registration or at the Emergency Cell Phone Numbers campus accounting office. Permits paid for before classes begin are generally mailed and The College encourages students to provide cell those purchased after classes begin must be phone numbers to communicate with them in picked up. Parking permits are required the first the event of a college or district-wide emergency. day of each semester; fall, spring, and summer. Students can provide this important information at: There is no grace period. http://studentweb.sdccd.edu/reg-e/ . Students may not utilize staff/faculty parking 2. areas unless they are the owner of a valid, state issued disabled placard. Owners of a valid disabled placard are not required to buy a parking permit. 3. There are time limited visitor parking spaces at each campus reserved for visitors’ use only. Students, except owners of a valid state issued disabled placards, may not utilize visitor parking. All campuses have pay and display machines for visitor and student use. Visitors and students can also download the MobileNow! mobile app to pay by credit card. Pay and display permits and MobileNow! payments are only valid in student parking spaces. Motorcycles must display a valid motorcycle 4. permit and be parked in designated motorcycle parking only. must be parked only in designated Bicycles 5. bicycle racks. Students are not allowed to S 51 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

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53 Academic Information and Regulations At-A-Glance Page 54 Academic Information ... 56 Grading System ... 58 Standards of Academic Progress ... 59 ... Academic Regulations 87 Volunteer/Visitor Conduct Expectations ... 88 Student Records, Release, Correction and Challenge ... ... 88 Complaint Processes SDCCD continuously reviews and updates policies and procedures Disclaimer: to ensure compliance with state and federal regulations and changes in business practices. Please refer to the SDCCD website for the most up to date information. an 53 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

54 Responsibility for Meeting Academic Requirements Academic Information and Regulations Each student must assume responsibility for Information compliance with the regulations of the college set forth in this catalog, for satisfying prerequisites for Statement of Open Courses any course, and for selecting courses which will It is the policy of the San Diego Community College facilitate attainment of educational objectives. District that, unless specifically exempted by statute, The college does not assume responsibility for every course, section, or class offered by the District misinterpretation of policies and procedures as and reported for state aid shall be fully open to presented in this catalog. Counselors and advisors enrollment and participation by any person who has are available to assist in planning students’ been admitted to the college and who meets course programs. Any questions or doubts concerning this prerequisites. catalog material should be referred to the Office of the Vice President, Student Services. Honest Academic Conduct Honesty and integrity are integral components of Dean’s List the academic process. Students are expected to A Dean’s Honor List is compiled at the close of each be honest and ethical at all times in their pursuit academic year (Fall and Spring). To be eligible for the of academic goals in accordance with Policy 3100, Dean’s Honor List, a student must complete 12 units Student Rights, Responsibilities, Campus Safety, and or more during the academic year and have earned a Administrative Due Process. grade point average of 3.5 or better. Academic dishonesty occurs when a student attempts to show possession of a level of knowledge Honors Program or skill which he or she does not possess. The two The Honors Program is open to any student who most common kinds of academic dishonesty are meets appropriate general and departmental cheating and plagiarism. Cheating is defined as criteria. Honors classes are designed to provide the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit strongly motivated students with a more in-depth or for academic work by the use of any dishonest, cross-disciplinary curriculum and a highly interactive deceptive, or fraudulent means. Plagiarism is defined classroom experience. as the act of incorporating ideas, words, or specific The Honors core curriculum, “A World of Ideas,” is substance of another, whether purchased, borrowed intended for prospective transfer students who or otherwise obtained, and submitting the same are interested in a multicultural, multinational as one’s own work to fulfill academic requirements perspective in their courses. The goal of the without giving credit to the appropriate source. program is to facilitate and increase transfer to the Students who engage in practices of cheating or University of California, California State University, plagiarism may warrant two separate and distinct and distinguished private universities, as well as to courses of disciplinary action which may be enhance employability for vocational students. applied concurrently in response to a violation of Special transfer agreements also exist for City this policy. Students are responsible for knowing College Honors students at the following four-year what constitutes academic dishonesty and for colleges and universities: UCLA, UC Santa Cruz, consulting with instructors about questions or UC Irvine, UC Riverside, USC, Pomona College, concerns. Procedure 3100.3 describes the Academic Occidental College, SDSU, Pepperdine University, and Administrative Sanctions for Students who are Chapman University, Whitman College and Pitzer found to be cheating or plagiarizing. Copies of the College. For information on eligibility requirements procedures can be obtained in the Office of the and course offerings, see the schedule of classes or Vice President of Student Services and online at call (619) 388-3512. http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ . The Honors Program is open to all students (part-time or full-time, day or evening) and can be found in all disciplines (vocational, liberal arts, fine arts, sciences, business, etc.). For specific criteria and S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 54

55 the world in order to develop global competencies other information, please consult the schedule of and to increase cultural awareness while making classes or contact the campus Honors Coordinator. progress towards completion of academic goals. Students enrolled in an Honors section (including an honors contract), may not transfer to a regular Classes are held at educational institutions in the section after the deadline to make a schedule host country. Field trips, excursions, and visits to sites adjustment for the class. Petition for Honors Credit of cultural and historical interest are components of after the course has been completed will not be the program. Housing arrangements include family permitted. homestays, student apartments, and/or residence halls. Financial aid and scholarships are available for students who qualify. SDCCD Online Learning Pathways San Diego City, Mesa, and Miramar Colleges Semester Abroad Programs: These enhanced learning opportunities have been offered in QUALITY ONLINE LEARNING countries such as Argentina, Australia, Costa Rica, Learn anytime, anywhere with our convenient, France, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Courses flexible online courses that fit your busy schedule. are taught by faculty from California community Enjoy interactive communication with your colleges. Classes offered abroad meet general classmates and instructor as you complete your education requirements, are CSU and mostly UC coursework in an engaging, supportive learning transferable, and are selected to take advantage of environment. Our quality online courses are the host country’s history, environment, and culture. developed and taught by experienced instructors Academic Information and Regulations Summer Abroad Programs: Programs from 10 days from our three colleges—City College, Mesa College, to 4 weeks have been available during the summer. and Miramar College. Spanish immersion in Mexico and Costa Rica has Want to get started? Find out if online learning is for been offered; as well as, photography in Italy and the you at: www.sdccdonline.net/newstudents.htm . United Kingdom, and graphic design and dance in Mexico. Get ready for online learning success! Visit www.sdccdonline.net/students/training/ . Contact Information: Additional information can be obtained from the International Education Office Online students receive 24/7 Technical Support at at (619) 388-3652. https://www.sdccdonline.net/help or by calling toll free 866-271-8794. For login instructions visit www.sdccdonline.net/login Work Experience . Work Experience students can receive academic credit for their current employment or volunteer Off-Campus Programs service. For registration information, call City College offers credit courses at various locations 619-388-3495 or contact the Work Experience Office throughout San Diego such as the Educational I in B T-103 . Cultural Complex (ECC), military bases, and other educational and social service agency sites. These Distance Education classes are open to all City College students and are designed to provide an opportunity for students For those students who need (because of child care, health, or scheduling problems) an alternative way to attend classes in the community that are short term, easily accessible, and have convenient parking. to attend college, City College offers a broad range of courses online. The majority of instructional time Off-Campus courses are listed in the class schedule each semester under the subject in which they are will be spent viewing the programs and completing offered. Classes held at the ECC location are also assigned readings in the text and/or workbook, listed in the ECC section of the class schedule. If however, these courses also meet on campus several you have questions about enrolling in off-campus times during the semester. classes, call the Off-Campus Programs office at Check the current schedule of classes for a listing of 619-388-3924 or 619-388-4883. Distance Education courses. For more information, please contact the Distance Education Office at Study Abroad Programs 619-388-3534. San Diego City College has offered students the opportunity to study in different countries around an 55 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D C

56 The San Diego Community College District offers Grade Standing Grade Points per Unit students the opportunity to take online credit Units not counted in NP No Pass Academic Information and Regulations courses at San Diego City College, San Diego Mesa G PA College, and San Diego Miramar College. Online The grade point average (GPA) is determined by courses offer the same curriculum as traditional dividing the total grade points earned by the total courses except that lectures and course materials grade point units completed as listed in the chart are accessed via the district’s web-based learning above. management system. Students engage in classroom discussions and online collaborations Administrative symbols: P/NP—Pass/No Pass; with other students and the instructor. Online I—Incomplete; W—Withdrawal; IP—In Progress; registration, counseling, tutoring, and library EW—Excused Withdrawal; RD—Report Delayed. services are available. SDCCD offers a variety of Administrative symbols are not used in the courses including general education and transfer computation of GPA. See below for further requirements online. Courses offered meet the explanation. Americans with Disabilities Act (42 U.S.C. §12100 et Pass/No Pass (P/NP) is a non-punitive grading seq.) and section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of system where such units earned will be counted in 1973, as amended, (29 U.S.C. §794d). satisfaction of curricular requirements but will be To ensure student authentication and academic disregarded in determining a student’s grade point integrity, students have secure logins and are average. For more specific information, refer to the required to perform activities that demonstrate discussion of the “Pass/No Pass Grading Policy” on meaningful participation on a weekly basis. . page 57 Students must logon the first day of class. Incomplete: A symbol of “I,” Incomplete, may In accordance with federal regulations City, Mesa be assigned by an instructor when a student and Miramar colleges may not permit students has been unable to complete academic work for residing outside of California to enroll in online unforeseeable emergency and/or justifiable reason classes without approval of the state where at the end of term. A copy of the “Assignment of the student resides. Students residing in a non- Incomplete” form will be mailed to the student not permitted approved state/territory are to and the original retained in the District Records enroll in online classes and will be dropped. Go Office. A final grade will be assigned when the work to https://www.sdccd.edu/docs/StudentServices/ stipulated has been completed and evaluated by for an up-to-date list OnlineStatesNotPermitted.pdf the instructor or when the time limit for completion of restricted states and territories. of the work has passed. An “I” must be made up no later than one year following the end of the term in which it was assigned. In the event of unusual, verifiable circumstances beyond the student’s Grading System control, a petition may be filed in the Office of the Unit of Credit: A unit of credit represents one hour Vice President, Student Services for extension of of lecture or recitation and two hours of preparation the one-year time limit. Course repetition is not per week, or three hours of laboratory per week for permitted to remove an Incomplete. one semester. An official withdrawal from classes may W ithdrawal: Academic Grades be requested by the student or initiated on his/her Grade Points per Unit Grade Standing behalf by the instructor or Vice President, Student Services. 4 Excellent A 3 B Good The following conditions apply to official withdrawal: C Satisfactory 2 No record of the class will be entered on the 1. Passing—less than 1 D student’s permanent record if the official satisfactory withdrawal is made by the deadline to drop F Fail 0 without a “W” being recorded as published in Pass P Units earned not the schedule of classes. counted in GPA 56 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

57 Counseling • 2. If the withdrawal is made after the deadline for withdrawing without a “W” and prior to • Office of the Vice-President of Student the deadline for withdrawal published in the Services class schedule for that session, a “W” will be recorded on the student’s permanent record. No • Petitions are to be submitted in the Vice- exceptions to this policy will be made. Petitions President of Student Services Office for review. will not be accepted for exception to policy. • All petitions must be accompanied by supporting 3. documentation substantiating the student’s A student attending a session after the deadline for withdrawal will not be eligible to receive a extenuating circumstances, including pertinent “W” and must be assigned an academic grade or dates and times. other administrative symbol by the instructor. It is recommended that students visit with a • Exceptions to this policy will be made only upon counselor to discuss alternative options to an verification of extreme circumstances beyond Excused Withdrawal to be sure that this choice the control of the student. Petitions requesting is the best course of action for the student’s exception must be filed in the Admissions Office. academic career. 4. Withdrawal (W) symbols will be used in the Grade Challenge calculation of lack of progress probation and disqualification status. Final grades will be issued at the end of each semester. In the absence of mistake, fraud, Students on active duty or reserve duty 5. incompetence, or bad faith, the determination of the Academic Information and Regulations may petition for a “military” withdrawal. student’s grade by the instructor shall be final once it This withdrawal is not calculated in the has been recorded by the Registrar’s Office. determination of academic progress and is noted on the student’s academic record. A student may challenge a grade or request a change to his/her academic record within two 6. Students will be allowed a maximum of three years from the date of issuance. Requests beyond withdrawals in any course. two years will not be accepted. Students wishing A symbol of “IP,” In Progress, will be In Progress: to challenge a grade should first attempt to resolve assigned when a class extends beyond the normal the challenge informally with the instructor. Grade end of a semester or summer session, that is, when challenges must be processed under District the class “carries over” from one term to the next. Procedure 3001.2, Grade Challenge Procedure. The appropriate grade, however, shall be assigned Copies of Procedure 3001.2 are available in the Office and appear on a student’s record for the term during of the Vice President, Instruction. which the course is completed. The “IP” will remain on the academic record. The “IP” shall not be used in Pass/No Pass Grading Policy the calculation of a student’s grade point average. Consistent with District policy, a student in good standing may elect to be graded on a Pass/No Excused Withdrawal: A symbol of “EW”, Excused Pass basis in a course. A grade of “Pass” (P) shall be Withdrawal, may be assigned when a student is awarded only for work which otherwise would have permitted to withdraw from a course(s) due to received a grade of “C” or better. Work that would specific circumstances beyond the control of the have received a “D” or “F” will be graded “No Pass” student affecting his or her ability to complete a (NP). The units earned will be counted in satisfaction course(s). of program requirements, but will be disregarded in Excused withdrawal will not be counted in • determining a student’s grade point average. progress probation and dismissal calculations. IMPORTANT: Students who plan to transfer to a • Excused withdrawal will not be counted as an four-year institution should review the Pass/No enrollment attempt. Pass acceptance policy of the transfer institution Students requesting an Excused Withdrawal must prior to petitioning for this grading option. obtain a Petition for Excused Withdrawal (EW) Restrictions in the San Diego Community College available in one of the following offices: District also apply. Admissions • an 57 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D C

58 Limitations: Academic Probation* A student whose cumulative grade point average No more than 12 units of a student’s coursework Academic Information and Regulations falls below a 2.0. A student on academic probation completed in the San Diego Community College will return to good standing when his/her District graded on a Pass/No Pass basis will be used cumulative grade point average reaches or exceeds to meet Associate Degree requirements. 2.0. Conditions: Academic Disqualification Students who wish to be graded on a Pass/ 1. A student on academic probation status will be No Pass basis must submit a petition to the disqualified when his/her semester GPA falls below Admissions Office or select the Pass/No Pass 2.0 in a subsequent semester. An enrollment hold option online by the deadline date listed in will be placed on the student’s record. Students who the schedule of classes. No exceptions to the are disqualified after registering for the subsequent deadline will be made. semester will be administratively dropped from all An evaluation on a Pass/No Pass basis may not 2. classes. later be changed to a letter grade nor may the No exceptions to this condition reverse occur. Lack of Progress Probation* will be made. Petitions will not be accepted A student shall be placed on lack of progress for exception to policy. probation when the percentage of all (cumulative) There are courses in which Pass/No Pass grades are units for which entries of “W,” “I,” and “NP” are used exclusively; these are designated in the catalog recorded reaches or exceeds 40%. course description by the statement “Pass/No Pass Only.” In addition, there are courses which cannot be Lack of Progress Disqualification taken on a Pass/No Pass basis; these are designated A student who has been placed on lack of progress in the course description by the statement “Letter probation shall be disqualified and an enrollment Grade Only.” hold placed on the student’s record when the percentage of units for which entries of “W,” “I,” Effective Fall 2009, the Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) and “NP” are recorded in a subsequent semester grading option changed to Pass/No Pass (P/NP). (not-cumulative), reaches or exceeds 40%. Students who are disqualified after registering for the subsequent semester will be administratively Standards of dropped from all classes. * EXCEPTIONS: Academic Progress Provisional, Joint Diploma and Special Admit Students are in good academic standing when High School students who do not maintain good they have a 2.0 grade point average or higher and academic standing will be automatically disqualified. have completed at least 61% of units they have PROBATIONARY STATUS WILL NOT APPLY! attempted. There are two kinds of probation and disqualification, one based upon GPA (Academic If Disqualified: Performance) and the other based upon the number • Special Admit High School students will not be of units completed (Progress Performance). permitted to re-enroll without approval from a Certain programs may have more stringent high school counselor. standards for academic progress. Consult the Joint Diploma students must see a JD counselor • program director for more information. for readmission. Students enrolled in the core curriculum of medically-related programs will be governed by the Readmission After Disqualification probation and disqualification policies as outlined in Disqualification status is determined based upon Note: the program policy manuals that reflect the tenets Progress Performance, Academic Performance, or a of safe medical practice and respond to program combination of both. accreditation guidelines. 58 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

59 First Disqualification Academic • Students who wish to be considered for readmission after the first disqualification will be Regulations required to meet with a counselor and develop a Student Success Plan prior to being readmitted. Course Repetition Policy Students who are disqualified after registering • No course in which a “C” or better grade has been for the next semester will be administratively earned may be repeated, unless students meet dropped from all classes. the following exception criteria: Second Disqualification Legally Mandated Training Requirement • Students who are disqualified a second time will • • Disabled Student as part of a Disability- be required to sit out for one full year. Students Related Accommodation who are disqualified after registering for the next semester will be administratively dropped from Extenuating Circumstances beyond the • all classes. No exceptions. control of the student (documentation required) Third Disqualification Significant Lapse of Time • • Students who are disqualified a third time (and each disqualification thereafter) will be • Students will not be allowed more than four required to sit out for one year. Students who enrollments in similar active participatory courses Academic Information and Regulations are disqualified after registering for the next formerly Physical Education) in Exercise Science ( semester will be administratively dropped from and Visual and Performing Arts, regardless of all classes. No exceptions. grade or symbol earned. Readmission after disqualification • Academic renewal is not allowed for work experience courses. • Students who have been disqualified three or more times must file a Petition for Each course in which an unsatisfactory grade • Readmission. Students must provide supporting (“D,” “F,” or “NP”) has been earned may be documentation of how circumstances have repeated twice without a petition. The course changed to allow for academic success. If the being repeated must be the same as the original Petition is accepted for consideration, the course, not its equivalent. Only the newly-earned student will be invited to present his/her case to units and grades will be used in computing the a hearing panel. Information as well as deadline grade point average. dates for filing a Petition for Readmission • Students will not be allowed more than three are available in Student Web Services under enrollments in any course, regardless of grade or Standards of Academic Progress at: Information symbol earned. for filing a Petition for Readmission are available online under Standards of Academic Progress Academic renewal by course repetition for the • at: https://www.sdccd.edu/students/college- third course will only be applicable when the policies/standards-of-academic-progress. third course repeated was completed spring 2010 aspx. Deadline dates for filing a Petition or later. for Readmission are available online at: https://www.sdccd.edu/students/dates-and- Course Repetition—Limitations on deadlines/index.aspx. Active Participatory Courses Due to changes in the regulations that govern community colleges, enrollment limits have been placed on certain types of active participatory courses that are related in content. Active participatory courses include courses in exercise science, visual arts, and performing arts (e.g., music, art, photography, theatre arts). These courses have been put into groups of courses an 59 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

60 If grade alleviation has already been applied two 3. related in content. A student may enroll in active participatory courses in exercise science, visual times for a course, the course will not be eligible Academic Information and Regulations arts, or performing arts that are in a group of for academic renewal without repetition and will related content for no more than four (4) courses remain on the academic record. in each content area (group). All grades, including 4. If previous action for academic renewal has been “W’s,” will count toward the four course enrollment applied to coursework included in the semester maximum for each group of courses. See the current to be disregarded, the course will not be eligible listing of groups of courses related in content in for academic renewal without repetition and will the Students section under “Course Repetition - remain on the academic record. Limitations on Active Participatory Courses” online /students/forms-and- 5. Academic renewal without course repetition at: https://www.sdccd.edu may be applied to substandard course(s)/ . For further information regarding documents.aspx course groupings, please consult with a counselor. semester(s) from another accredited institution. 6. The permanent academic record will be Academic Renewal Without Course annotated in such a manner that the record of Repetition all work remains legible, ensuring a true and A student with substandard academic performance complete academic record. (GPA below 2.0) that is not reflective of present 7. Recalculation of the grade point average will be demonstrated ability may petition to have a used toward qualification for graduation with maximum of 12 units or one full semester, whichever honors. is greater, of substandard performance disregarded in computation of grade point average. 8. Academic standing for the semester/session(s) will not be adjusted. The following conditions apply: Once the petition is approved, the action is not 9. To be eligible for academic renewal without 1. reversible. course repetition a student must: Once an associate degree has been posted 10. a. have transcripts from all institutions to the student’s academic record, academic attended officially on file; renewal without course repetition may only be b. successfully complete, in an accredited applied to classes with an evaluative symbol of college or university, 15 units with a grade “ F ”. point average of at least 2.0 subsequent to the work to be disregarded. All courses Course Repetition—Lapse of Time taken during the semester/session in which Academic departments may require that courses for the student reaches or exceeds the 15-unit the major be completed within a specified number minimum will be used in computing the 2.0 of years prior to the granting of the Associate grade point average; Degree, Certificate of Achievement, or Certificate of Performance. Students may be required to repeat a c. have one year elapsed since the coursework course in which a satisfactory grade (A, B, C, or P) has to be disregarded was completed. already been earned. Students with questions about A maximum of 12 units or one semester 2. the applicability of previous coursework are advised or summer sessions, may be disregarded, to consult the department as early as possible. whichever is greater. For purposes of academic renewal for summer session work, a summer Disability Support Programs and session will be defined as all courses which Services (DSPS) Repeat commence after the termination of the Spring Additional repetitions of a DSPS course to semester and end prior to the commencement accommodate a student’s disability-related needs of the Fall semester. Intersession work will be may be permitted. For students with disabilities, included in the Spring semester. Short-term course repetition is determined on an individual or carry-over classes will be considered to be student basis. Contact the DSPS Office on campus part of the semester or session in which credit for more information. is awarded or a grade is posted to the student’s permanent academic record. S • 2018–2019 ollege C 60 C iego D an ity

61 Registrar will certify only to the accuracy of the Mandated Training records prepared by and issued directly from that Students who are required to meet a legally office to another institution. mandated training requirement as a condition of continued paid or volunteer employment may More information on ordering transcripts is available repeat a credit course any number of times. Students at: https://www.sdccd.edu/students/transcripts/ . should complete the Mandated Training Course Repetition form. Transfer of Credits For more information on course repetition, consult the Counseling Office at your college. Transcripts of Prior Academic Credit Academic Transcripts Students with credit from other colleges and universities must have official transcripts on file with the college. Transcripts of Record A student may order an official transcript of Official transcripts are those sent directly from • record online, in person, by mail or via fax. one institution to another. To order an official transcript online, visit: Transcripts will only be accepted for one year • . https://www.sdccd.edu/students/transcripts/ after issuance. Transcripts ordered online will be mailed within 1–2 business days. Academic Information and Regulations • Transcripts brought in by students not in an official, sealed envelope will be considered To order a transcript in person, a student may unofficial. complete a request at the Accounting Office at the college, or in person at the District Office of the Transcripts are required even if prior credits do • Registrar, San Diego Community College District, not appear relevant or if units were taken years Administrative Office, 3375 Camino del Rio South, ago. San Diego, CA 92108. Students receiving veterans benefits must have • Payment of fees must be made prior to processing a transcripts on file within one semester. request for transcripts. • Certain programs require transcripts before The following policy has been adopted by the San admission to the program. Diego Community College District Board of Trustees • Official transcripts from other institutions regarding the issuance of transcripts of record: become the property of the college and will not The first two transcripts will be issued without 1. be duplicated or returned. charge. • Official transcripts should be sent to the following 2. There will be a charge of $5.00 for each address: additional transcript. San Diego Community College District 3. All transcript requests are processed within 3375 Camino del Rio South, Rm. 100 10 working days except “RUSH” orders. San Diego, CA 92108-3883 4. A $10.00 special handling fee will be charged for Upper Division Coursework all “RUSH” order transcript requests, including The San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) hand carried transcript requests ordered at the accepts all lower division courses taken at U.S. District Office. Rushed transcripts are processed regionally accredited colleges. All lower division immediately upon receipt. The special handling courses will be counted toward the Associate fee will be charged per request. degree. The SDCCD does not accept upper division Requests will not be processed if students have coursework. Petitions to use upper division courses outstanding holds preventing the release of the from U.S. regionally accredited colleges will only official transcript. be accepted if needed to meet minimum Associate degree requirements for the major or district All official copies of the student’s permanent record requirements. All petitions must be approved by the are in the Office of the Registrar. The Office of the S 61 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

62 All official transcripts must be on file. • faculty in the discipline, or an appropriate designee, and/or college committee. • Official copies of test scores must be submitted. Academic Information and Regulations International Transfer Credits • Students must be currently enrolled. Students who elect to submit transcripts from Limitations on credit by standardized examination: international colleges and universities must submit • AP and CLEP examinations may be used their transcripts to an approved credential evaluation to partially clear the American Institutions service, and request a comprehensive evaluation be sent to San Diego City, Mesa, or Miramar College. requirement. See following charts regarding nontraditional education for details. Credit for transfer courses taken at an institution outside the United States are evaluated dependent • The English composition requirement can be met upon course equivalency and student learning by the AP exam. outcomes on a course by course basis. International • transcripts are not required. Students who elect to Credit will not be granted for equivalent courses waive the requirement of an international transcript completed. must submit a Foreign Transcript Waiver Agreement • Grades are not assigned, nor is the credit used in form available at the college Counseling Office. For calculating grade point average. more information contact the District Evaluations Office. Credit granted by SDCCD does not necessarily • transfer to other institutions. Transferability of credit is determined by the receiving college or Credits from Other Regionally university. Accredited Institutions Credits from other regionally accredited institutions • Credit awarded through non-traditional may be accepted for transfer credit after evaluation education may not be used for grade alleviation. by District evaluators. San Diego City College A maximum of 30 cumulative units may • accept the transfer credits from another will not be granted for acceptable scores on any institution if the evaluation by the District and combination of AP, CLEP, DANTES, or IB. college evaluators determines that the credits received from another accredited institution do not • Duplicate credit will not be awarded for meet the equivalent standards for a similar course nontraditional education sources and completed taken at San Diego City College. coursework. The tables below indicate the score necessary, the Academic Credit for Nontraditional credit allowed, and the area(s) satisfied for each of Education the examinations accepted for credit. (Administrative Procedure AP-3900.4) You may view a full copy of the policy Academic credit may also be available to currently by accessing the following website: enrolled SDCCD students for skills or knowledge not http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ . obtained by formal scholastic experience or for prior course work with content determined equivalent to district courses. Credit is available through the following: Advanced Placement Examinations (AP) • • College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education • Support (DANTES) International Baccalaureate (IB) • To obtain credit, students must request the evaluation of tests and meet the following criteria: S 62 ollege C ity C iego D an • 2018–2019

63 Advanced Placement Test (AP) EXAM AND UNIT GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) REQUIREMENTS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED FULFILLED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: ARTF 110 or ARTF 111 SDCCD GE: 3 semester units Art History SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units 3, 4, or 5 CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C1 or C2 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3A or 3B SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Biology towards Area B 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 4 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area B2 & B3 units IGETC: 4 semester units towards Area 5B & 5C SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester Calculus AB units towards Area A2 and CSU: 3 semester units or BC/AB 1 UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester Mathematics Competency subscore 3, 4, or 5 units CSU GE: 3 semester units towards Area B4 Academic Information and Regulations IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 2A 1 SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester SDCCD: N/A Calculus BC units towards Area A2 and 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 6 semester units Mathematics Competency UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units towards Area B4 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 2A Chemistry SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 6 semester units SDCCD: CHEM 200 3 CSU: 6 semester units towards Area B Exam taken prior to UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 6 semester units Fall 2009 units towards Area B1 & B3 IGETC: 4 semester units towards Area 5A & 5C Chemistry SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 6 semester units SDCCD: CHEM 200 & CHEM 201 4 or 5 CSU: 6 semester units towards Area B Exam taken prior to UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 6 semester units Fall 2009 units towards Area B1 & B3 IGETC: 4 semester units towards Area 5A & 5C Chemistry SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: CHEM 200 3 CSU: 6 semester units towards Area B Exam taken Fall UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 4 semester units 2009 or later units towards Area B1 & B3 IGETC: 4 semester units towards Area 5A & 5C Chemistry SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD: CHEM 200 & CHEM 201 SDCCD GE: 4 semester units 4 or 5 CSU: 6 semester units towards Area B Exam taken Fall UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 4 semester units 2009 or later units towards Area B1 & B3 IGETC: 4 semester units towards Area 5A & 5C iego ity C D an • 2018–2019 ollege 63 C S

64 Advanced Placement Test (AP) EXAM AND Academic Information and Regulations GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) MAJOR REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS UNIT REQUIRED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Chinese towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units Language & CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester Culture towards Area C2 units 3, 4, or 5 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD: POLI 103 SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester units Comparative towards Area D CSU: 3 semester units Government & CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester Politics towards Area D8 units 3, 4, or 5 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 4H SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Computer 1 CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: N/A Science A IGETC: N/A 3, 4, or 5 UC: 2 quarter/1.3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Computer 1 CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: N/A Science AB 3, 4, or 5 UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester IGETC: N/A Exam taken prior to units Fall 2009 Computer SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units Science CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: N/A Principles IGETC: N/A UC: N/A 3, 4, or 5 SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: ENGL 101 English SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area A1 and Reading Language and CSU: 6 semester units and Written Expression Composition UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 2 Competency 3, 4, or 5 units CSU GE: 3 semester units towards Area A2 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 1A SDCCD GE: 6 semester SDCCD: ENGL 101 English SDCCD: 6 semester units units towards Area A1 & C Literature and CSU: 6 semester units and Reading and Written Composition UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 2 Expression Competency 3, 4, or 5 units CSU GE: 6 semester units towards Area A2 & C2 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 1A or 3B SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: N/A Environmental SDCCD: 4 semester units towards Area B Science CSU: 4 semester units CSU GE: 4 semester units 3 UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester towards Area B1 & B3 or Exam taken prior to units Area B2 & B3 Fall 2009 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 5A & 5C D S an ollege C ity • 2018–2019 C iego 64

65 Advanced Placement Test (AP) EXAM AND MAJOR REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) UNIT REQUIRED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED FULFILLED FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: BIOL 120 SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: 4 semester units Environmental towards Area B CSU: 4 semester units Science CSU GE: 4 semester units UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester 4 or 5 towards Area B1 & B3 or units Exam taken prior to Area B2 & B3 Fall 2009 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 5A & 5C SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: 4 semester units Environmental towards Area B CSU: 4 semester units Science CSU GE: 4 semester units UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester 3 towards Area B1 & B3 units Exam taken Fall IGETC: 3 semester units 2009 or later towards Area 5A & 5C SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: 4 semester units Environmental SDCCD: BIOL 120 towards Area B Science CSU: 4 semester units UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester CSU GE: 4 semester units 4 or 5 towards Area B1 & B3 Exam taken Fall units Academic Information and Regulations 2009 or later IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 5A & 5C SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units European History towards Area C or D CSU: 6 semester units 3, 4, or 5 CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 or D6 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B or 4F SDCCD GE: 6 semester units SDCCD: N/A French Language SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 6 semester units Exam taken prior to UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 Fall 2009 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A French Language SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units Exam taken UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 between Fall 2009 units IGETC: 3 semester units and Fall 2011 towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD.: N/A French Language SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C and Culture CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units 3, 4, or 5 UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency ity C D iego an • 2018–2019 ollege 65 C S

66 Advanced Placement Test (AP) EXAM AND Academic Information and Regulations GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) UNIT MAJOR REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED FULFILLED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units French Literature towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units 3, 4, or 5 CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester Exam taken prior to towards Area C2 units Fall 2009 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 6 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units German towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units Language CSU GE: 6 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 3, 4, or 5 towards Area C2 units Exam taken prior to IGETC: 3 semester units Fall 2009 towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A German SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C Language CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units 3, 4, or 5 UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 Exam taken units IGETC: 3 semester units between Fall 2009 towards Area 3B and Area 6A and Fall 2011 Competency SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A German SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C Language and CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units Culture UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 3, 4, or 5 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency Human SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: GEOG 102 CSU: 3 semester units Geography towards Area D 3, 4, or 5 UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units units towards Area D5 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 4E SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: ITAL 101 Italian Language SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C and Culture CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units 3 UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: ITAL 102 Italian Language SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C and Culture CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units 4 or 5 UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency C iego an D S ollege C • 2018–2019 ity 66

67 Advanced Placement Test (AP) EXAM AND REQUIREMENTS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) UNIT REQUIRED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Japanese towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units Language and CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester Culture towards Area C2 units 3, 4, or 5 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Latin Literature towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units 3, 4, or 5 CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester Exam taken prior to towards Area C2 units Fall 2009 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units Latin towards Area C 3, 4 or 5 CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester Academic Information and Regulations towards Area C2 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Latin: Vergil SDCCD: 3 semester units towards Area C 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units Exam taken prior to UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester towards Area C2 Fall 2012 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency Macroeconomics SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: ECON 120 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 3 semester units towards Area D UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units units towards Area D2 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 4B SDCCD: 3 semester units Microeconomics SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: ECON 121 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 3 semester units towards Area D UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units units towards Area D2 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 4B SDCCD: 3 semester units Music Theory SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A CSU: N/A 3, 4, or 5 towards Area C UC: N/A CSU GE: N/A UC: N/A Music Theory SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 6 semester units towards Area C Exam taken prior to UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units Fall 2009 units towards Area C1 IGETC: N/A iego C ity C D an • 2018–2019 ollege 67 S

68 Advanced Placement Test (AP) EXAM AND Academic Information and Regulations GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) MAJOR REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS UNIT REQUIRED FULFILLED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units Music Theory CSU GE: N/A CSU: 6 semester units 3, 4, or 5 IGETC: N/A UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester Exam taken Fall units 2009 or later 3 SDCCD GE: 6 semester units SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units Physics B 3 3 CSU: 6 semester units towards Area B 3, 4, or 5 CSU GE: 6 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester Exam taken prior to 3 5 towards Area B1 & B3 units Fall 2009 IGETC: 4 semester units towards Area 5A & 5C 3 SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Physics B 3 3 towards Area B CSU: 6 semester units 3, 4, or 5 CSU GE: 4 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester Exam taken 5 3 units towards Area B1 & B3 between Fall 2009 IGETC: 4 semester units and Fall 2013 towards Area 5A & 5C 3 SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: N/A Physics 1 SDCCD: 4 semester units 3 3 CSU: 4 semester units towards Area B 3, 4, or 5 UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 4 semester units 5 3 units towards Areas B1 & B3 IGETC: N/A 3 SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 4 semester units Physics 2 SDCCD: 4 semester units 3 3 CSU: 4 semester units towards Area B 3, 4, or 5 CSU GE: 4 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 3 5 towards Area B1 & B3 units IGETC: N/A 3 SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: N/A Physics C SDCCD: 4 semester units 3 3 CSU: 4 semester units towards Area B (electricity / UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester CSU GE: 4 semester units magnetism) 3 5 units towards Areas B1 & B3 3, 4, or 5 IGETC: 3 semester units 4 towards Areas 5A & 5C 3 SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 4 semester units SDCCD: 4 semester units Physics C 3 3 CSU: 4 semester units towards Area B (mechanics) UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester CSU GE: 4 semester units 3, 4, or 5 5 3 units towards Areas B1 & B3 IGETC: 3 semester units 4 towards Areas 5A & 5C SDCCD: 3 semester units Psychology SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: PSYC 101 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 3 semester units towards Area D UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units units towards Area D9 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 4I Seminar SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A 3, 4, 5 CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: N/A UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester IGETC: N/A units D S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity an C iego 68

69 Advanced Placement Test (AP) EXAM AND REQUIREMENTS GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) UNIT MAJOR REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 6 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Spanish towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units Language CSU GE: 6 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 3, 4, or 5 towards Area C2 units Exam taken prior to IGETC: 3 semester units Spring 2014 towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Spanish towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units Language and CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester Culture towards Area C2 units 3, 4, or 5 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD GE: 6 semester units SDCCD: N/A Spanish SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C Literature CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 6 semester units 3, 4, or 5 UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester Academic Information and Regulations towards Area C2 Exam taken prior to units IGETC: 3 semester units Spring 2013 towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Spanish SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C Literature and CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units Culture UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 3, 4, or 5 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B and Area 6A Competency SDCCD GE: 3 semester SDCCD: MATH 119 Statistics SDCCD: 3 semester units units towards Area A2 and 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 3 semester units Mathematics Competency UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units units towards Area B4 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 2A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: ARTF 150A & Studio Art: SDCCD: 3 semester units CSU GE: N/A ARTF 155A CSU: 3 semester units Drawing IGETC: N/A UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 3, 4, or 5 6 units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Studio Art: 2-D SDCCD: 3 semester units CSU GE: N/A Design CSU: 3 semester units IGETC: N/A 3, 4, or 5 UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 6 units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Studio Art: 3-D SDCCD: 3 semester units CSU GE: N/A Design CSU: 3 semester units IGETC: N/A 3, 4, or 5 UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 6 units 69 ollege C ity C iego D an • 2018–2019 S

70 Advanced Placement Test (AP) EXAM AND Academic Information and Regulations REQUIREMENTS GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) MAJOR REQUIREMENTS UNIT REQUIRED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: POLI 101 SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester units U.S. Government 7 towards Area D & US-2 CSU: 3 semester units & Politics CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 4 quarter/2.7 semester 3, 4, or 5 towards Area D8 & units 7 US-2 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 4H & 7 US-2 SDCCD: HIST 109 SDCCD GE: 3 semester units U.S. History SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area C & US-1 or 3, 4, or 5 CSU: 6 semester units 7 Area D & US-1 UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units units towards Area C2 & 7 US-1 or Area D6 & US-1 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B & 7 US-1 or Area 4F & US-1 SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: HIST 101 SDCCD: 6 semester units World History towards Area C or D CSU: 6 semester units 3, 4, or 5 CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 or D6 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B or 4F * Credit may not be awarded for exams which duplicate credit for the same content earned through other means. If a student passes more than one exam in calculus or computer science, only one exam may be applied to UC / 1. CSU baccalaureate or SDCCD associate degree / certificate requirements. Students passing both English AP exams will receive a maximum of 8 quarter units / 5.3 semester units toward UC 2. baccalaureate degree requirements. Students passing more than one AP exam in physics will receive a maximum of 6 units of credit toward CSU 3. baccalaureate or SDCCD associate degree / certificate requirements and a maximum of 4 units of credit toward CSU GE certification or SDCCD associate degree GE requirements. Students passing either of the Physics C exams will be required to complete at least 4 additional semester units in 4. IGETC Area 5 coursework to meet the IGETC Area 5 unit requirement. 5. Students passing more than one physics AP exam will receive a maximum of 8 quarter units / 5.3 semester units toward UC baccalaureate degree requirements. Students passing more than one AP exam in studio art will receive a maximum of 8 quarter units / 5.3 semester 6. units of credit toward UC baccalaureate degree requirements. Students who have completed the American Institutions requirement except for the California government portion 7. must complete one course approved in Area US-3. To request an official transcript, write to: PSAT/NMSQT Office, P.O. Box 6720, Princeton, NJ, 08541-6720 S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 70

71 International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit EXAM AND REQUIREMENTS MAJOR (GE) UNIT REQUIREMENTS EDUCATION GENERAL REQUIRED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units Biology SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area B 5-7 Higher Level CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area B2 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 5B SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units Chemistry SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area B 5-7 Higher Level CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area B1 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 5A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units Economics SDCCD: ECON 120 & SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area D CSU: 6 semester units ECON 121 5-7 Higher Level CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester units towards Area D2 IGETC: 3 semester units Academic Information and Regulations towards Area 4B Geography SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A CSU: 6 semester units 5-7 Higher Level towards Area D UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units units towards Area D5 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 4E SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units History (any towards Area C or D CSU: 6 semester units region) CSU GE: 3 semester units 5-7 Higher Level UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area C2 or D6 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3B or 4F Language A1 SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD: N/A (any language) CSU: 6 semester units towards Area C 4 Higher Level CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A Exam taken prior to towards Area C2 Fall 2013 IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A Language A1 SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units (any language) CSU: 6 semester units towards Area C 5-7 Higher Level UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units Exam taken prior to units towards Area C2 Fall 2013 IGETC: 3 semester units 1 towards Area 3B Language A2 SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A (any language) CSU: 6 semester units towards Area C 4 Higher Level UC: N/A CSU GE: 3 semester units Exam taken prior to towards Area C2 Fall 2013 IGETC: N/A 71 iego C ity D C an • 2018–2019 ollege S

72 International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit EXAM AND Academic Information and Regulations UNIT MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (GE) EDUCATION GENERAL REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED FULFILLED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Language A2 towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units (any language) CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 5-7 Higher Level towards Area C2 units Exam taken prior to IGETC: 3 semester units Fall 2013 1 towards Area 3B SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Language A towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units Literature CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A 4 Higher Level towards Area C2 IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 6 semester units Language A towards Area C CSU: 6 semester units Literature CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester 5-7 Higher Level towards Area C2 units IGETC: 3 semester units 1 towards Area 3B Language A SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Language and CSU: 6 semester units towards Area C Literature UC: N/A CSU GE: 3 semester units 4 Higher Level towards Area C2 IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A Language A SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units Language and CSU: 6 semester units towards Area C Literature UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units 5-7 Higher Level units towards Area C2 IGETC: 3 semester units 1 towards Area 3B SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units Language B (any 2 CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: N/A language) IGETC: N/A 4 Higher Level UC: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Language B (any 2 CSU: 6 semester units CSU GE: N/A language) 5-7 Higher Level UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester IGETC: Area 6A Competency units SDCCD GE: 3 semester SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units Mathematics units towards Area A2 and 4 Higher Level CSU: 6 semester units Mathematics Competency UC: N/A CSU GE: 3 semester units towards Area B4 IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester units Mathematics units towards Area A2 and CSU: 6 semester units 5-7 Higher Level Mathematics Competency UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units units towards Area B4 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 2A ity C an iego D S ollege C • 2018–2019 72

73 International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit EXAM AND MAJOR EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (GE) UNIT REQUIREMENTS GENERAL REQUIRED FULFILLED FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED SCORE SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units Physics SDCCD: 6 semester units towards Area B CSU: 6 semester units 5-7 Higher Level CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area B1 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 5A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester units Psychology towards Area D CSU: 3 semester units 5-7 Higher Level CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester towards Area D9 units IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 4I SDCCD GE: 3 semester units Theatre SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD: N/A CSU: 6 semester units towards Area C 4 Higher Level CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area C1 IGETC: N/A Academic Information and Regulations Theatre SDCCD: 6 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A CSU: 6 semester units 5-7 Higher Level towards Area C UC: 8 quarter/5.3 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units units towards Area C1 IGETC: 3 semester units towards Area 3A * Credit may not be awarded for exams which duplicate credit for the same content earned through other means. 1. Students who pass the Language A or A1 Higher Level exam in a language other than English with a score of 5 or higher will also receive credit for IGETC area 6A. 2. If a student passes more than one test in the same language other than English (e.g., two exams in French) then only one examination may be applied. Credit is not awarded for the following exams: Art. IB transcripts may be requested from your high school. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) EDUCATION GENERAL UNIT EXAM AND MAJOR FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS (GE) REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED SCORE FULFILLED FULFILLED American SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Government units towards Area D 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area D8 IGETC: N/A American SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Literature units towards Area C 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area C2 IGETC: N/A iego ollege C ity D C an • 2018–2019 73 S

74 College Level Examination Program (CLEP) GENERAL EDUCATION UNIT Academic Information and Regulations EXAM AND FULFILLED (GE) REQUIREMENTS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED SCORE FULFILLED FULFILLED SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester Analyzing and towards Area C units Interpreting CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 3 semester units Literature towards Area C2 UC: N/A 50 or higher IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester Biology towards Area B 50 or higher units CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 3 semester units towards Area B2 UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester SDCCD: 3 semester Calculus units towards Area A2 and 50 or higher units Mathematics Competency CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area B4 IGETC: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester Chemistry SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A 50 or higher units towards Area B CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area B1 IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester College Algebra units towards Area A2 and 50 or higher units Mathematics Competency CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area B4 IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester College Algebra - units towards Area A2 and units Trigonometry Mathematics Competency 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area B4 IGETC: N/A English Literature SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A 50 or higher units towards Area C Exam taken prior to CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units Fall 2011 UC: N/A towards Area C2 IGETC: N/A Financial SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Accounting units CSU GE: N/A 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units IGETC: N/A UC: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester French – Level I 1 CSU GE: N/A units 50 or higher 1 CSU: 6 semester units IGETC: N/A UC: N/A ity C iego D S ollege an C • 2018–2019 74

75 College Level Examination Program (CLEP) EDUCATION GENERAL UNIT EXAM AND MAJOR FULFILLED (GE) REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED SCORE FULFILLED FULFILLED SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 12 semester French – Level II 1 towards Area C units 59 or higher CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 12 semester Exam taken prior to 1 towards Area C2 units Fall 2015 IGETC: N/A UC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units French – Level II SDCCD: 12 semester 1 towards Area C 59 or higher units 1 CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 9 semester units towards Area C2 UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 6 semester German – Level I 1 CSU GE: N/A 50 or higher units 1 IGETC: N/A CSU: 6 semester units UC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A German – Level II SDCCD: 12 semester 1 towards Area C 60 or higher units Academic Information and Regulations CSU: 12 semester CSU GE: 3 semester units Exam taken prior to 1 units towards Area C2 Fall 2015 UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A German – Level II SDCCD: 12 semester 1 towards Area C 60 or higher units 1 CSU: 9 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area C2 IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester History of the SDCCD GE: 3 semester units 2 United States I units towards Area D & US-1 CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 3 semester units 50 or higher 2 towards Area D6 & US-1 UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A History of the SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: 3 semester units 2 United States II units towards Area D & US-1 CSU GE: 3 semester units 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units 2 towards Area D6 & US-1 UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester Human Growth SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A units and Development CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 3 semester units 50 or higher towards Area E UC: N/A IGETC: N/A Humanities SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A units 50 or higher towards Area C CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area C2 IGETC: N/A Information SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Systems and units CSU GE: N/A Computer CSU: 3 semester units IGETC: N/A Applications UC: N/A 50 or higher 75 ollege iego C ity C D an • 2018–2019 S

76 College Level Examination Program (CLEP) EDUCATION GENERAL UNIT Academic Information and Regulations EXAM AND REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED MAJOR (GE) REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED SCORE FULFILLED FULFILLED SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester Introduction CSU GE: N/A units to Educational IGETC: N/A CSU: 3 semester units Psychology UC: N/A 50 or higher SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester Introductory CSU GE: N/A units Business Law IGETC: N/A CSU: 3 semester units 50 or higher UC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester Introductory towards Area D units Psychology CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 3 semester units 50 or higher towards Area D9 UC: N/A IGETC: N/A Introductory SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A units Sociology towards Area D 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area D0 IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Natural Sciences SDCCD: 3 semester towards Area B 50 or higher units CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 3 semester units towards Area B1 or B2 UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester Pre-Calculus units towards Area A2 and units 50 or higher Mathematics Competency CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area B4 IGETC: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester Principles of SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A units Accounting CSU GE: N/A 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units IGETC: N/A UC: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester Principles of SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A units Macroeconomics towards Area D CSU: 3 semester units 50 or higher CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area D2 IGETC: N/A Principles of SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Management units CSU GE: N/A 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units IGETC: N/A UC: N/A Principles of SDCCD: 3 semester SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Marketing units CSU GE: N/A 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units IGETC: N/A UC: N/A S • 2018–2019 D ollege C ity an C iego 76

77 College Level Examination Program (CLEP) GENERAL EDUCATION UNIT EXAM AND (GE) REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS MAJOR FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED SCORE FULFILLED FULFILLED SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester Principles of towards Area D units Microeconomics CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 3 semester units 50 or higher towards Area D2 UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A Spanish – Level I SDCCD: 6 semester 1 CSU GE: N/A units 50 or higher 1 IGETC: N/A CSU: 6 semester units UC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 12 semester Spanish – Level II 1 towards Area C units 63 or higher CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 12 semester Exam taken prior to 1 towards Area C2 units Fall 2015 IGETC: N/A UC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 12 semester Spanish – Level II 1 towards Area C units 63 or higher 1 Academic Information and Regulations CSU: 9 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area C2 IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester Trigonometry units towards Area A2 and 50 or higher units Exam taken prior to Mathematics Competency CSU: 3 semester units Fall 2006 CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area B4 IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Western SDCCD: 3 semester towards Area C or D units Civilization I CSU GE: 3 semester units CSU: 3 semester units 50 or higher towards Area C2 or D6 UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester Western SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Civilization II units towards Area D 50 or higher CSU: 3 semester units CSU GE: 3 semester units UC: N/A towards Area D6 IGETC: N/A * Credit may not be awarded for exams which duplicate credit for the same content earned through other means. 1. If a student passes more than one exam in the same language other than English (e.g. two exams in French), then only one examination may be applied toward CSU baccalaureate degree requirements. 2. Students who have completed the American Institutions requirement except for the California government portion must complete one course approved in Area US-3. Credit is not awarded for the following exams: College Composition, College Composition Modular, College Mathematics, English Composition (with or without Essay), Freshman College Composition and Social Sciences and History. To request an official CLEP transcript, write to: Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6600, Princeton, NJ 08541-6600 an 77 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

78 DANTES Subject Standardized Test (DANTES/DSST) MAJOR Academic Information and Regulations UNIT REQUIREMENTS EXAM AND GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED REQUIRED SCORE FULFILLED FULFILLED SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units A History of the CSU GE: N/A CSU: N/A Vietnam War IGETC: N/A UC: N/A 400 or higher SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester units Art of the Western towards Area C CSU: N/A World CSU GE: N/A UC: N/A 400 or higher IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester units Astronomy towards Area B 400 or higher CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A UC: N/A IGETC: N/A Business Ethics & SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A CSU: N/A Society CSU GE: N/A 400 or higher UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Business SDCCD: 3 semester units CSU: N/A Mathematics CSU GE: N/A 400 or higher UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A Criminal Justice SDCCD: 3 semester units CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A 400 or higher UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: N/A Environment and CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A Humanity 400 or higher UC: N/A IGETC: N/A Ethics in America SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A CSU: N/A 400 or higher CSU GE: N/A UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units Foundations of SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Education CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A 400 or higher IGETC: N/A UC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Fundamentals SDCCD: 3 semester units towards Area A2 and Mathematics College Algebra CSU: N/A Competency 400 or higher UC: N/A CSU GE: N/A IGETC: N/A Fundamentals of SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Counseling CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A 400 or higher UC: N/A IGETC: N/A Fundamentals of SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Cybersecurity CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A 400 or higher UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: Health Education SDCCD: 3 semester units Here’s to Your Health CSU: N/A District Requirement 400 or higher UC: N/A CSU GE: N/A IGETC: N/A S • 2018–2019 D ollege C an ity C iego 78

79 DANTES Subject Standardized Test (DANTES/DSST) MAJOR UNIT REQUIREMENTS GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) EXAM AND REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED FULFILLED REQUIRED SCORE FULFILLED SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units Human Cultural CSU GE: N/A CSU: N/A Geography IGETC: N/A UC: N/A 400 or higher SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units Human Resources CSU GE: N/A CSU: N/A Management IGETC: N/A UC: N/A 400 or higher SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester units Introduction to towards Area D CSU: N/A Business CSU GE: N/A UC: N/A 400 or higher IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units Introduction to SDCCD: N/A Computing CSU GE: N/A CSU: N/A IGETC: N/A 400 or higher UC: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units Introduction to SDCCD: N/A Academic Information and Regulations towards Area D Law Enforcement CSU: N/A 400 or higher CSU GE: N/A UC: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units Introduction to SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A World Religions CSU: N/A towards Area C 400 or higher CSU GE: N/A UC: N/A IGETC: N/A Lifespan SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A Developmental CSU GE: N/A CSU: N/A Psychology IGETC: N/A UC: N/A 400 or higher Management SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Information CSU GE: N/A CSU: N/A Systems UC: N/A IGETC: N/A 400 or higher SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units Organizational Behavior CSU GE: N/A CSU: N/A 400 or higher IGETC: N/A UC: N/A Personal Finance SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A 400 or higher CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A UC: N/A IGETC: N/A Principles of SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: N/A Finance CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A 400 or higher UC: N/A IGETC: N/A Principles of SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A Physical Science CSU: N/A towards Area B 400 or higher UC: N/A CSU GE: N/A IGETC: N/A an 79 iego • 2018–2019 ollege D C ity C S

80 DANTES Subject Standardized Test (DANTES/DSST) MAJOR Academic Information and Regulations GENERAL EDUCATION (GE) EXAM AND UNIT REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS REQUIRED SCORE FULFILLED REQUIREMENTS FULFILLED FULFILLED SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester units Principles of Public towards Area A2 CSU: N/A Speaking CSU GE: N/A UC: N/A 400 or higher IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: 3 semester units SDCCD: 3 semester units Principles of towards Area A2 and Mathematics CSU: N/A Statistics Competency UC: N/A 400 or higher CSU GE: N/A IGETC: N/A SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units Principles of CSU GE: N/A CSU: N/A Supervision IGETC: N/A UC: N/A 400 or higher Substance Abuse SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units (formerly Drug & CSU GE: N/A CSU: N/A Alcohol Abuse) UC: N/A IGETC: N/A 400 or higher SDCCD: N/A SDCCD GE: N/A Technical Writing SDCCD: 3 semester units CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A 400 or higher UC: N/A IGETC: N/A The Civil War and SDCCD GE: N/A SDCCD: 3 semester units SDCCD: N/A CSU: N/A CSU GE: N/A Reconstruction IGETC: N/A 400 or higher UC: N/A * Credit may not be awarded for exams which duplicate credit for the same content earned through other means. To request an official DANTES transcript, write to: PROMETRIC ATTN: DSST Program, 1260 Energy Lane, St. Paul, MN 55108 Phone: 877-471-9860 (toll free) or 651-603-3011 or request transcripts at http://getcollegecredit.com/resources CTE (Career Technical Education) Transitions Program (formerly Tech Prep) Approved Courses For the most updated list visit: http://techprep.sdccd.edu HIGH SCHOOL UNITS HIGH SCHOOL SITE(S) CITY COURSE(S) COURSE(S)/PROGRAM Computerized Graphic La Jolla, Patrick Henry, Point Loma, A R TG 12 5 3 Design Kearny High, School of Business and Leadership at San Diego Educational Complex, Scripps Ranch, Serra, Twain, Mira Mesa Developmental Psychology Garfield, Morse, Patrick Henry, Scripps 2 CHIL 160 CHIL 161 Ranch, Twain, University City of Children 1-4 Introduction to Teaching and 2 EDUC 200 Point Loma Learning 1,2 C ollege C ity • 2018–2019 iego S D an 80

81 CTE (Career Technical Education) Transitions Program (formerly Tech Prep) Approved Courses For the most updated list visit: http://techprep.sdccd.edu HIGH SCHOOL HIGH SCHOOL SITE(S) CITY COURSE(S) UNITS COURSE(S)/PROGRAM 1 Introduction to Teaching and Patrick Henry, Morse, Point Loma, EDUC 203 Scripps Ranch Learning 3,4 3 SDSCPA, Patrick Henry, Mira Mesa Photographic Imaging PH OT 143 3 EN G N 130 Scripps Ranch, Morse, Mission Bay, Introduction to Engineering Design Madison, Sci Tech at San Diego Educational Complex Mira Mesa, Patrick Henry, Kearny High, University City, Serra, Clairemont, Point Loma, Lincoln ENGE 101 EID at Kearny Educational Complex, 1. 5 Principles of Engineering Madison, Mira Mesa, Mission Bay, Morse, Patrick Henry, Sci Tech at San Diego Educational Complex, Scripps Academic Information and Regulations Ranch, Point Loma, Clairemont, University City Serra Acceptance and Application of Credit by Examination designed and approved by individual Military Credit disciplines (Administrative Procedure AP-3900.3 and 3900.5) (Administrative Procedure AP-3900.1) San Diego City, Mesa, and Miramar Colleges apply The term “examination” means any written, oral or credit for educational experience completed performance standards determined by the individual during military service toward the associate degree departments. Students must meet specific criteria to in accordance with the associate/baccalaureate be eligible for credit by examination. The approved credit recommendations contained in “A Guide list of courses and forms are available in the College to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in Evaluations Office. the Armed Services” published by the American You may view a full copy of the policy Council on Education (ACE). Students must submit by accessing the following website: documentation of educational experiences during . http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ military service. Acceptable documents include: • Joint Services Transcript Credit for non-college credit AARTS or SMART Transcript • vocational courses • DD -214 Students who complete non-college credit DD -295 • articulated courses (SDUSD/SDCCD) that are • NAV/PERS 1070/604 equivalent in subject matter, content, educational DD -2586 • objectives, length of course, and performance • National Guard Bureau (NGB) Form 22E standards and pass a college faculty approved Coast Guard Institute • examination for the course offered by the college Community College of the Air Force (CCAF) • may have these courses converted to college credit. For questions and more information, contact the CTE Military service credit may be granted upon Transition Program at 619-388-6572. verification of six (6) months of continuous active duty, or completion of basic training for National Guard/Reservists. Four (4) units of credit may an 81 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

82 be awarded to meet the district graduation High School Courses for College requirements in Health and PE. Three (3) of those Credit (Credit by Exam) Academic Information and Regulations units may also be used to satisfy Area E of the CSU (Administrative Procedure AP-3900.1) General Education Breadth pattern. As part of an early college program called CTE Other educational experiences during military Transitions (formerly known as Tech Prep), high service may also fulfill additional major, general school students may earn college credit equivalent education, or elective degree requirements. More to the courses in the table on page 80 . To receive specific information is available in the San Diego credit, students must: 1) demonstrate acquisition of Community College District Evaluations Office. the college student learning outcomes by earning You may view a full copy of the policy a grade of ‘B’ or better in the approved course and by accessing the following website: on the college approved examination 2) successfully . http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ complete the SDCCD online college application and CTE Transitions certification process. The Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges high school instructor must verify grades, ensure Degree Network System (SOC DNS) successful completion of enrollment process and assists students with submitting requests for grades San Diego City College is a member of the to the CTE Transitions Office. Approved requests are Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Degree processed annually each July. Students may request Network System (SOC DNS). As member, the college an SDCCD transcript after July 31st. For questions provides educational assistance to active duty and more information, contact the CTE Transitions service members and agrees to accept credit for Program at 619-388-6572. educational experiences during military service as recommended by the American Council on You may view a full copy of the policy Education (ACE). In addition, the college accepts by accessing the following website: credit from other non-traditional sources such as . http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ DANTES and CLEP examinations. The San Diego Community College District is committed to military Academic Accommodations and personnel who may choose to participate in the Disability Discrimination for SOC DNS Program network through the campus of Students with Disabilities San Diego City College. SOC DNS was established to better serve highly mobile service members (Board of Trustees Policy – BP 3105) and their families. For more information on these The San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) programs, contact the Military Education advisor at is committed to all provisions of Section 504 of the following locations: the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 508 of 619 -233 -5617 Naval Base San Diego (32nd St.) the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The fundamental 619 -295 - 9 974 Marine Corps Recruit Depot principles of nondiscrimination and accommodation (MCRD) in academic programs provide that: Marine Corps Air Station Miramar 858-536-4329 1. No student with a qualified disability shall, on (MCAS) the basis of the disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefit of, or U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army ROTC Programs otherwise be subjected to discrimination Under the provisions of a special agreement, under any post-secondary education activity or students may participate in the Army or Air Force program; and Reserve Officers Training Program (ROTC) at SDSU. Reasonable accommodations to academic 2. San Diego City, Mesa and Miramar College students activities or requirements shall be made as are may enroll and attend ROTC classes at SDSU by necessary to ensure that such requirements contacting the SDSU Military Science Department do not discriminate or have the effect of 619-594-5545. Financial assistance may also be discrimination on a student with a qualified available. The credits earned in these classes may disability; and be transferred as electives to meet the degree requirements of City, Mesa and Miramar Colleges. S • 2018–2019 ollege C 82 C iego D an ity

83 college Accommodation Grievance process. 3. The institution shall create an educational ). environment where students with (http://californiacommunitycolleges.cccco.edu disabilities may request and utilize academic Students may file a complaint with the Federal accommodations, including those that take Office of Civil Rights in San Francisco, California, place in a clinical setting, without compromising if he or she believes that the college or one of the essential components of the course, its representatives is violating his or her rights. educational program or degree. ) (www.2ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/doc/howto.pdf SDCCD identifies Disability Support Programs and Services (DSPS), or the campus 504 officer, as the Exclusion from Classes office to determine academic accommodations A student may be excluded from class or the college under Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act. whenever the student: The Site Compliance Officer (SCO) is identified as 1. Exhibits behavior which interferes with the campus individual to handle all discrimination the educational process. An instructor may grievances under the Americans with Disabilities Act remove a student from two class sessions or the District’s Equal Employment Opportunity and for disruptive behavior. (Refer to Policy Diversity Office, BP 3410. 3100: Student Rights, Responsibilities, Campus Safety and Administrative Due The intent of this policy is to ensure compliance Process). You may view a full copy of the with state and federal laws. SDCCD Procedure 3105.1 policy by accessing the following website: is intended to provide consistent and fair review http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ ; Academic Information and Regulations of all academic adjustments requests and dispute or resolution. 2. Is found to have a communicable disease which You may view a full copy of the Student Services requires isolation pursuant to a directive from policy and administrative procedure by accessing the County Department of Public Health. the following website: http://www.sdccd.edu/public/ . district/policies/ Minor Children on Campus Students with verified disabilities who may require Minor children who are not enrolled are not academic accommodations or auxiliary aids are permitted in any classroom at any time. strongly recommended to contact the Disability Minor children who are not enrolled are not to be Support Programs and Services (DSPS) Department, left unattended at any time while on the campus. Room L-206, 619-388-3513, www.sdcity.edu/dsps and complete the orientation procedures well before classes begin to ensure timely provision of services. Consumer Information The Student Consumer Information Regulations Students are encouraged to identify themselves to the appropriate instructors to discuss the details of the United States Department of Education and time lines necessary to provide appropriate require all colleges and universities to provide their accommodations. Students enrolled in online students access to certain information to which courses are encouraged to contact the college DSPS they are entitled to as consumers. Under these department where the courses are being offered regulations, San Diego City, Mesa, and Miramar to request academic accommodation. Questions College and Continuing Education annually regarding academic accommodations and disability distributes to all students a notice of the availability discrimination, including how to file a complaint of consumer information. Please visit our webpage or a formal grievance with regards to academic at http://www.sdccd.edu/consumer to review the accommodations should be directed to the college information outlined for consumer disclosure by the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA). 504 Officer, Beverly Warren at 619-388-3246 in room L-117. This information is available in a hard-copy form Students may file a complaint with the upon request. Chancellor of the California Community Colleges within thirty calendar days of the Student Right to Know event or following the completion of the In compliance with the federal Student-Right-to- Know and Campus Security Act of 1990, it is the an 83 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

84 accordance with state and federal laws. The San policy of the college district to make available completion and transfer rates for all certificate, Diego Community College District is committed Academic Information and Regulations to equal opportunity in educational programs, degree and transfer seeking first-time, full-time students who began in Fall 2012, a three year employment, and all access to institutional programs tracking period. and activities. The District, and each individual who represents The completion and transfer rates are listed below: the District, shall provide access to its services, Transfer-Out Rates Completion Rates classes, and programs without regard to national origin, religion, age, gender, gender identity, 15.13% 9.71% City gender expression, race or ethnicity, color, medical 15.86% 25.78% Mesa condition, genetic information, ancestry, sexual 36.01% 11.94% Miramar orientation, marital status, physical or mental disability, pregnancy, military or veteran status, These rates do not represent the success rates of or because he/she is perceived to have one or the entire student population at the college. Our more of the foregoing characteristics, or based on statewide completion indicators for student success association with a person or group with one or more include a six-year tracking period for all first-time of these actual or perceived characteristics. No students. Current information can be found at: qualified student with a disability shall, by reason http://scorecard.cccco.edu/scorecard.aspx of such disability, be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs Athlete Graduation Rate for Fall 2013 Cohort or activities of the district or be subjected to Transfer Completion Initial discrimination by it. Rate Cohort Rate Students wishing to file complaints based upon City 17 12% 6% discrimination should contact the campus College/ECC Site Compliance Officer (SCO), Edwin Heil at Mesa 619-388-3036. Appeals may be made to the 17% 23 0% College District EEO Compliance Manager at the District Miramar Administrative Office, 3375 Camino del Rio South, 1 100% 0% College San Diego, CA 92108. Source: SDCCD Information System and National Student Students with disabilities who want to file a Clearinghouse grievance under Section 504 of the 1973 Federal The cohort includes first‐time athletes who are Rehabilitation Act should contact the campus 504 enrolled full‐time. Athletes are identified in a fall Officer, Beverly Warren at 619-388-3246 in room L-117 term based on enrollment in intercollegiate athletic or Disability Support Programs and Services in room courses. Student athletes are tracked for four years L-206 or call 619-388-3464. Students who want to to measure their outcomes. Two measures are file a disability discrimination grievance under the provided. The first measure, completion rate, is Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should contact the total number of students who earn a degree, the campus Site Compliance Officer (SCO), Edwin certificate, or reach transfer prepared status (60 Heil at 619-388-3036. transferable units with a GPA greater than equal You may view a full copy of the policy to 2.0). The second measure is transfer rate, which by accessing the following website: includes all non‐completers who transferred to a . http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ four‐year institution. This matches the methodology used for the Student Right‐To‐Know (SRTK) Free Speech graduation rates, which is consistent with how the Free speech areas have been designated on the NCAA reports Athlete graduation rates. college campuses to maximize the opportunity for free discussion and expression, while minimizing Nondiscrimination Policy the potential for disruption of classroom and college (Board of Trustees Policy – BP 3410) activities. San Diego Community College District Board of Trustees Policy BP 3410 prohibits discrimination in S • 2018–2019 ollege C 84 C iego D an ity

85 Information concerning free speech areas is available battery, and sexual coercion. All such acts of sexual violence are forms of sexual harassment covered in the office of the Vice President of Student Services, under Title IX. or the Dean of Student Affairs office on campus. Further information and procedures for filing a Gender Equity formal complaint of discrimination on the basis The Gender Equity Coordinator facilitates the of sex or sexual harassment are found online at development or updating of the campus Gender http://www.sdccd.edu/titleix Equity Plan in cooperation with committees that are You may also file a complaint with the District’s Title responsible for equity concerns. The Gender Equity IX Coordinator: Coordinator can be reached at 619-388-3940 at San Diego City College, Building E, President’s Office. Christopher May (619) 388-6805 Title IX. Prohibiting Gender [email protected] Discrimination and Sexual If you have any questions regarding these policies, Harassment please contact the Title IX Coordinator or contact San Diego City, Mesa and Miramar College are your campus Title IX Deputy. committed to support all regulations under Title IX. Campus Title IX Deputy Title IX states: “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation San Diego City College (M-200) in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to Marciano Perez Academic Information and Regulations discrimination under any education program or [email protected] activity receiving Federal financial assistance.” (619) 38 8 -3981 – 20 USC 1681 San Diego Mesa College (I-400) San Diego City, Mesa and Miramar Colleges do not Ashanti Hands discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, or sexual [email protected] orientation in its education programs or activities. (619) 38 8 -2678 Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, San Diego Miramar College (N-203) and certain other federal and state laws, prohibit Gerald Ramsey discrimination on the basis of gender, gender [email protected] identity, or sexual orientation in employment, as well (619) 38 8 -7810 as all education programs and activities, and protect all people regardless of their gender or gender San Diego Continuing Education identity from sex discrimination, which includes (Rm 104, Educational Cultural Complex (ECC)) sexual harassment and sexual violence. These Star Rivera-Lacey procedures are used when a complaint concerns [email protected] discrimination on the basis of gender, including (619) 38 8 - 4 850 sexual harassment. The sexual harassment of students, including Drug Abuse and Alcohol the crime of sexual violence, is a form of sex Prevention Program (DAAPP) discrimination and interferes with students’ right to The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act and receive an education free from discrimination and Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations harassment. (Education Department General Administrative Regulations [EDGAR]), specifies that no institution Sexual violence, as that term is used in this section, of higher education shall be eligible to receive refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against a funds or any other form of financial assistance person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving under any Federal program, including participation consent due to the victim’s use of drugs or alcohol. in any federally funded or guaranteed student An individual also may be unable to give consent loan program, unless the institution certifies to due to an intellectual or other disability. A number the Secretary that the institution has adopted of different acts fall into the category of sexual and has implemented a program to prevent the violence, including rape, sexual assault, sexual use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol by an 85 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

86 students and employees. In response, the San Diego are subject to BP 0505 regulations, which will be Community College District (SDCCD) has adopted strictly enforced at all times. Student Health Services Academic Information and Regulations and implemented program and policies to prevent at City College offers Cessation Program Referrals the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit to educate the college community about the risks drugs and alcohol by students and employees. of tobacco and the availability of Smoking Control Programs. Visit or call the Student Health Services on The San Diego Community College District (San campus for additional information at 619-388-3450. Diego City College, San Diego Mesa College, San Diego Miramar College and Continuing Education) Additional information is available in the Campus is committed to providing a drug free environment. Police Office. For complete SDCCD Policy 0505 The institutions also prohibit the use of tobacco and Procedure 0505.2 information, please visit: products and electronic delivery devices on campus . http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ or at college/district sponsored events. Any type of drug use, including alcohol, is dangerous and Crime Awareness and Campus potentially life threatening. Drugs and alcohol Security adversely affect the body, mind and behavior. The Jeanne Clery Act Crime Statistics effects vary from person to person and from usage to usage. Even low doses of drugs and alcohol can The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security impair judgment and coordination. If you use drugs Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act is the or alcohol, you risk overdose, accidents, dependence, landmark federal law, originally known as the ill health, as well as legal, financial and personal Campus Security Act, which requires colleges and problems. The federal laws against drugs are divided universities across the United States to disclose into two categories: possession and distribution. information about crime on and around their The penalties are severe depending upon the type campuses. of drug, quantity of the drug, and any prior offenses. The San Diego Community College District Annual Possession will earn up to one year in prison and a Security Report, titled ”Safe and Sound, a guide to $5,000 fine. Distribution will earn up to life in prison safety and security in the San Diego Community and an $8 million fine. State laws vary and may be College District”, includes statistics for the more severe. previous three years concerning reported crimes For more information, please visit the Drug Abuse that occurred on campus; in certain off-campus and Alcohol Prevention Program (DAAPP) webpage buildings or property owned or controlled by the at http://www.sdccd.edu/daapp San Diego Community College District; and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. The report Smoking Regulation also includes institutional policies concerning CITY COLLEGE IS A SMOKE AND TOBACCO-FREE campus security, such as policies on drug use, crime CAMPUS prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault (Board Policy – BP 0505) and other matters. You can obtain a copy of this All campuses and facilities of the San Diego report by contacting any campus admissions office, Community College District, City College, Mesa Vice President of Student Services (I-422) office or College, Miramar College, and Continuing Education college police business office. At any time you may operate in compliance with the provisions of view a full copy by accessing the following website: Government Code 7597 and San Diego Municipal http://police.sdccd.edu/crimestats.htm . Code section 43.1003(a) regulating smoking in a Pursuant to State and Federal Law information public place or place of employment. In accordance concerning registered sex offenders enrolled or with Board Policy (BP 0505) Smoke and Tobacco Free employed by the college may be obtained through District Property smoking and the use of any tobacco the College Police Office. product are prohibited on all properties owned or controlled by the District. Elder and Dependent Adult Abuse City College is committed to creating a clean, An elder is defined as a resident of the State of healthy working and learning environment for California who is 65 years of age or older; or a students, faculty, staff and visitors. All students, dependent adult, defined as a resident of the State employees and visitors on the City College property 86 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

87 San Diego Community College District, as well as all of California between the ages of 18 and 64 years, federal, state, and local laws. Students are subject to who has a physical or mental limitation that restricts charges of misconduct concerning acts committed his or her ability to carry out normal activities or to on District-owned or controlled property or the protect his/her rights. District-sponsored activities as specified in the Post-secondary educational institutions serving polic y. dependent adults are designated as mandated You may view a full copy of the policy reporters with an individual, personal responsibility by accessing the following website: to comply with the reporting requirements. . http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ Any mandated reporter, who, in his or her professional capacity, or within the scope of his or Student Grievance Procedure her employment, has observed or had knowledge of The purpose of this procedure is to provide a an incident that reasonably appears to be physical prompt and equitable means for resolving student abuse, abandonment, isolation, financial abuse, or grievances. The procedures enumerated in Student neglect, or is told by an elder or dependent adult Grievance Procedures 3100.1 shall be available to any that he or she has experienced behavior constituting student who believes a district decision or action physical abuse, abandonment, isolation, financial has adversely affected his/her rights as a student abuse, or neglect, or reasonably suspects abuse as specified in Student Rights and Responsibilities, shall report the known or suspected instance of Campus Safety and Administrative Due Process, abuse immediately to Adult Protective Services at j BP 3100, Section a . Note that grades are through 1- 800 -510 -2020. Academic Information and Regulations not grievable under this policy. Refer to the Grade , of this catalog. Challenge section, page 57 Copyright Responsibility You may view a full copy of the policy Any duplication request of copyrighted materials by accessing the following website: for use in the college’s instructional programs must http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ . be accompanied by written permission from the copyright owner. Any duplication of copyrighted materials by student, staff, or faculty is to be for the sole purpose of private scholarly study. Volunteer/ Since the liability for infringement of statutory or common-law copyright occurs during misuse Visitor Conduct of duplicated materials, the duplicated copies cannot be sold or distributed. A designated portion Expectations of the duplicated copy cannot be included in In accordance with Procedure 3100.4, all visitors and another’s work without the written permission of volunteers are expected to adhere to the policies the copyright owner. All copyright responsibility and procedures of the San Diego Community is assumed by the individual requesting the College District, as well as all federal, state and duplication. San Diego City College, its agents, local laws. Visitors and volunteers will be subject representatives, and employees are held harmless to removal from classrooms, service areas, and against all claims, suits, damage costs, and expenses activities of the campus for any of the following of charges of statutory or common-law infringement acts (but not limited to) while on campus. Any resulting from the college’s efforts to provide violation may be subject to permanent removal services, materials, and equipment to the requestor. from campus. Violations of state, federal, or local laws or ordinances, while on district premises, will be Student Rights, Responsibilities, addressed by college police in accordance with the Campus Safety and Administrative California Penal Code. Due Process • Act or threat of damage to or theft of property (Board of Trustees Policy – BP 3100) belonging to or located on District-controlled This policy enumerates the rights and property or facilities. responsibilities of all San Diego Community The physical or verbal intimidation or harassment • College District students. All students are subject of such severity or pervasiveness as to have the to adhering to the policies and procedures of the S 87 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

88 purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering Student Records, with a student’s academic performance, or a Academic Information and Regulations District employee’s work performance, or of Release, Correction creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational or work environment. and Challenge • Physical or verbal disruption that is incompatible with instructional or student services activities, (Administrative Procedure – AP 3001.1) administrative procedures, public service San Diego Community College District strictly functions, authorized curricular or co-curricular adheres to the Family Education Rights and Privacy activities or prevention of authorized guests from Act (FERPA). This procedure specifies limitations on carrying out the purpose for which they are on federal and state law, and ensures that appropriate campus when such a disruption occurs inside record maintenance and destruction systems are in of any classroom or facility or in such proximity place. as to appear reasonably likely to interfere with activities inside of the classroom or facility, or the Pursuant to the “Family Rights and Privacy Act substantial and material disruption of any other of 1974” (Public Law 93-380) and the California regular campus activity which occurs in any other Education Code, a student may request to inspect portion of District-controlled property. all official school records, files, and related data that are classified as Student Records. The records will Disorderly, lewd, indecent or obscene conduct • be available for review at a mutually convenient or expression or habitual profanity or vulgarity; time during regular working hours. Contact the Vice any expression which is obscene, libelous or President, Student Services. If information in the file slanderous according to current legal standards is inaccurate, misleading, or inappropriate, a student or which so incites students as to create a may request removal of the information or include a clear and present danger of the commission of statement disputing the material that is challenged. unlawful acts, or the substantial disruption of The law provides that no individual, agency, or the orderly operation of the community college. organization shall have access to a student’s records (Ed. Code 76120) without the written consent of the student, except • Assault or battery upon a student or district under very specific conditions. personnel on district premises or at any time You may view a full copy of the procedure or place while under the authority of District by accessing the following website: personnel. . http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ • Possession of weapons, explosives, unlicensed dangerous chemicals or objects which may be used as weapons or to threaten bodily harm, as Complaint Processes specified in District Policty, the California Penal Code, or other applicable laws. San Diego City, Mesa, and Miramar Colleges are committed to an educational environment that Failure to comply with the reasonable directions of is free from interference and disruption, and that staff members of the district who are acting within fosters equity and mutual respect. the scope of their employment. Continued and willful disobedience or open and persistent defiance Students may file a complaint when they believe of the authority of district personnel, provided that a College faculty or staff member has violated such authority is related to district activities or the following Board Policies and Administrative college/center attendance. Procedures: You may view a full copy of the policy 1. Student Rights, Responsibilities, Campus Safety by accessing the following website: and Administrative Due Process: Policy 3100 http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ . 2. Student Grievance: Procedure 3100.1 3. Student Discipline: Procedure 3100.2 Honest Academic Conduct: Procedure 3100.3 4. S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 88

89 with Disabilities Act (ADA) may do so online at 5. Academic Accommodations and Disability https://www.sdccd.edu Discrimination for Students with Disabilities: /students/complaint-process/ Procedure 3105.1 index.aspx or contact the campus 504 Officer: 6. Prohibition of Harassment: Policy 3430 Campus 504 Officer Nondiscrimination: Policy 3410 7. San Diego City College (Room L-117) Beverly Warren Fraud/Whistle Blower: Policy 6125 8. [email protected] 9. Grade Challenge: Procedure 3001.2 (619) 388-3246 Board Policies and Administrative Procedures San Diego Mesa College (LRC – Room 464) are available to Individuals online at Claudia Perkins http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ . [email protected] Most complaints, grievances or disciplinary matters (619) 388-2699 should be resolved at the campus level. Individuals San Diego Miramar College (Room N-203) are strongly encouraged to make every attempt to resolve matters through the appropriate Gerald Ramsey administrative processes. [email protected] (619) 388-7810 More information on the complaint processes can be found online a https://www.sdccd.edu/students/ San Diego Continuing Education (Room 104, Academic Information and Regulations complaint-process/index.aspx . Educational Cultural Complex (ECC)) Star Rivera-Lacey Academic Complaint [email protected] An academic complaint may be filed with the (619) 388-4845 department chair or instructional dean when a student feels that a faculty member has violated General Complaint state law, federal law, or College policies and A general student complaint may be filed by a procedures relative to grading or other academic student who feels an action of a College staff matters*. Students may directly contact the member, office, or group violates existing College department chair or instructional dean or submit rules, policy, or procedures or other local, state, and their complaint online at: https://www.sdccd.edu/ federal laws. A complaint of gender discrimination or students/complaint-process/index.aspx . sexual assault or harassment is not included in this *Please note: All grades awarded by the instructor category; please see Title IX complaint below. of record shall be final. The California Code of The complaint procedures are formalized procedures Regulations, Title 5 §55025, states “the determination to ensure timely resolution at the lowest possible of the student’s grade by the instructor shall be level. The first step is the informal resolution stage, final in the absence of mistake, fraud, bad faith, or which involves the student who has a complaint incompetency.” and the faculty/staff member or specific group with whom the student has a complaint. The student Academic Accommodation must notify the faculty/staff person or representative Due to Disability Complaint of a group that he or she wishes to make an (Section 504/ADA) appointment for an informal meeting to review Students who have a complaint regarding access to, an action. In the absence of the instructor or staff or quality of, their academic accommodations may person and after a good faith effort to make contact, contact the DSPS counselor. Students may submit the student may directly contact the instructional a complaint online at https://www.sdccd.edu/ dean or appropriate administrator or submit their or contact students/complaint-process/index.aspx complaint online at: https://www.sdccd.edu/ the campus 504 Officer. students/complaint-process/index.aspx . Students with disabilities who want to file a formal complaint under Section 504 of the 1973 Federal Rehabilitation Act and Americans an 89 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D ollege

90 Unlawful Harassment or San Diego Continuing Education (Room 115F, North City Campus) Discrimination Complaint not Academic Information and Regulations Based on Sex or Gender Lynda Reeves San Diego City, Mesa and Miramar Colleges are [email protected] committed to providing an academic environment (619) 388-1827 free of unlawful harassment and unlawful Students wishing to pursue a civil rights complaint discrimination. Board Policy 3100 defines verbal, beyond the college/district level should direct their physical, visual or written, environmental and inquiries to the Office of Civil Rights, United States harassment and other forms of harassment Department of Education, 50 Beale Street, Suite on campus, and sets forth a procedure for the 7200, San Francisco, CA 94105-1813. investigation and resolution of complaints of harassment by or against any staff, or faculty member, or student within the District. Other Complaint Process If your complaint is associated with the You may view a full copy of the policy institution’s compliance with academic by accessing the following website: program quality and accrediting standards, . http://www.sdccd.edu/public/district/policies/ you may contact the Accrediting Commission These procedures are used when a complaint for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) at concerns matters of discrimination or failure to http://www.accjc.org/complaint-process ACCJC is comply with College policy or procedures or the agency that accredits the academic programs of federal and/or state regulations including the Civil the California Community Colleges. Rights Act; Executive Orders 11246 and 11375; the If your complaint does not concern the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974; the California Community College’s compliance Age Discrimination and Employment Act of 1967; with academic program quality and Section 504 of the 1973 Federal Rehabilitation Act accrediting standards, you may contact the and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); and the California Community College Chancellor’s nondiscrimination laws of the State of California. Office by completing the web form found at: Students who wish to file a complaint may do / http://californiacommunitycolleges.cccco.edu so online at: https://www.sdccd.edu/students/ ComplaintsForm.aspx complaint-process/index.aspx or contact your college Site Compliance Officer (SCO): Campus Site Compliance Officer San Diego City College (E-Building) Edwin Hiel [email protected] (619) 388-3036 San Diego Mesa College (LRC – Room 464) Claudia Perkins [email protected] (619) 388-2699 Mailbox, Room G-248 San Diego Miramar College (Room A-201D) George Beitey [email protected] (619) 388-7860 S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 90

91 Academic Requirements At-A-Glance Page The Associate Degree ... 92 All Degrees Have the Following Requirements in Common ... 92 Associate in Arts for Transfer (AA-T) or Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T) for California State University (CSU) ... 92 94 Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Degree Requirements ... Graduation ... 106 an 91 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

92 applicability of previous coursework are advised to The Associate consult the Department as early as possible. Academic Requirements Degree Associate in Arts for On the recommendation of the faculty, the colleges Transfer (AA-T) or of the San Diego Community College District award the Associate of Arts degree or the Associate of Associate in Science Science degree. for Transfer (AS-T) for The Associate of Arts degree is awarded in the social California State University sciences, humanities, the arts, and similar disciplines. The Associate of Science degree is awarded in (CSU) engineering, physical and biological sciences, and The Associate in Arts for Transfer (AA-T) or the occupational curricula. Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T) is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s Proactive Award Degree degree in a similar major at a CSU campus. Each Students who have an official education plan on file AA-T or AS-T is accepted by some but not all CSU and meet degree requirements may be awarded an campuses. Students transferring to a CSU campus associate degree. that does accept the AA-T or AS-T will be required to complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree in that major. Please see a All Degrees Have the counselor and http://ADegreeWithAGuarantee.com for more information. Following Requirements in Common Students intending to transfer to a CSU should consult a counselor and visit www.assist.org for Minimum Units in Residence guidance on appropriate transfer coursework. A minimum of 12 degree applicable units must be AA-T/AS-T Majors completed in residence at the college granting the degree. • Anthropology for Transfer (page 156) The 12-unit in residence requirement is effective for • Art History for Transfer (page 159) all degrees awarded regardless of catalog year. • Biology for Transfer (page 168) Courses completed credit by exam do not qualify for • Business Administration for Transfer (page 172) the 12 unit in residence requirement. • Communication Studies for Transfer (page 192) Major/Area of Emphasis • Elementary Teacher Education for Transfer (page Requirements 188) Eighteen semester units or more are required. • • English for Transfer (page 225) • Six semester units must be completed at City, • Geology for Transfer (page 239) Mesa, or Miramar College. Refer to the Degree Curricula and Certificate Programs section of this Geography for Transfer (page 237) • catalog for specific requirements for each major. History for Transfer (page 243) • Recency of Coursework Limitation: Journalism for Transfer (page 211) • Academic departments may require that courses • Kinesiology for Transfer (page 230) for the major be completed within a specified Mathematics for Transfer (page 267) • period of time prior to the granting of the Associate Degree, Certificate of Achievement, or Certificate • Philosophy for Transfer (page 277) of Performance. Students with questions about the Physics for Transfer (page 282) • S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 92

93 transfer. IGETC for STEM is applicable only to Biology • Political Science for Transfer (page 283) majors in which the Transfer Model Curriculum • Psychology for Transfer (page 286) explicitly indicates the availability of the option. • Sociology for Transfer (page 301) Students using IGETC for STEM may delay until after • transfer: Spanish for Transfer (page 303) One general education course in Area 3 (Arts • Studio Arts for Transfer (page 161) a. and Humanities); and • Theatre Arts for Transfer (page 307) b. One general education course in Area 4 (Social and Behavioral Sciences). Degree Requirements It is strongly recommended that students consult The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: with a counselor to determine which general Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester 1. education pattern is most appropriate for their Academic Requirements units. individual educational goals. Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2. CSUGE for STEM 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a Students pursuing an Associate Degree for Transfer minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some in Biology are eligible to take CSUGE-Breadth for CSU campuses and majors may require a higher STEM, deferring two lower-division GE courses until GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. after transfer. CSUGE-Breadth for STEM is applicable 3. Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units only to Biology majors in which the Transfer Model in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list above). All Curriculum explicitly indicates the availability of the courses in the major must be completed with a option. grade of C or better. A “P” (pass) grade meets this Students using CSUGE-Breadth for STEM must requirement. complete: Certified completion of the California State 4. All courses in Areas A, B, and E of the traditional a. University General Education-Breadth pattern GE Breadth curriculum; and (CSU GE; see page 126 for more information); OR the Intersegmental General Education Transfer b. One course in Area C1 Arts and one course in for more Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 Area C2 Humanities; and information). Two courses in Area D from two different c. Note: disciplines. IGETC for STEM It is strongly recommended that students consult with a counselor to determine which general Students pursuing an Associate Degree for Transfer education pattern is most appropriate for their in Biology are eligible to take IGETC for STEM, individual educational goals. deferring two lower-division GE courses until after S 93 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

94 Visual and Performing Arts • Associate of Arts and Language Arts and Humanities • Academic Requirements Associate of Science Scientific Studies: • Degree Requirements Biological Science Specialization • Minimum 60 Units Required Mathematics and Pre-Engineering • Specialization All degrees require a minimum of 60 degree applicable semester units. See course descriptions. Physical and Earth Sciences Specialization • • Elementary (Multiple Subject) Teaching Grade Point Average (GPA) and Preparation Minimum Grade Requirements Social and Behavioral Sciences • Effective 2009-2010 catalog year (and each year • thereafter), students must earn a grade of “C” • Nursing Education or better in courses required for the major. A “P” –Students who submit an official Option 5 • (pass) grade meets this requirement. Note: No transcript showing they have earned a more than 12 units of a student’s coursework baccalaureate degree from a regionally completed in the San Diego Community College accredited institution will have satisfied the District graded on a Pass/No Pass basis will be SDCCD associate degree general education used to meet Associate Degree requirements. and District requirements by having previously A grade point average of at least 2.0 (a “C “ completed the baccalaureate degree. Students • seeking the Associate in Arts for Transfer (AA-T) average) is required in the curriculum upon which the degree is based. or Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T) degree must complete either the California State University General Education Breadth (CSU-GE) District Competencies pattern or the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) pattern. District competencies in reading, written expression, and mathematics (See City College Catalog page 94). Students should plan programs with long range goals in mind. Students who plan to transfer to a Select One of the Following Four four-year institution should review the Transfer Requirements section of this catalog. General Education Options: –San Diego Community College Option 1 • District Requirements (Option 1) District General Education AND District Requirements. (See City College Catalog Colleges in parenthesis indicate where the ( ) page 94). course is approved for District Requirements. • Option 2 –CSU General Education Breadth (CSU C—City College GE Pattern). (See City College Catalog page 126) M—Mesa College MMR—Miramar College Option 3 –Intersegmental General Education • Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) pattern. (See City ^ Courses with carets fulfill District multicultural College Catalog page 117) studies graduation requirement. –San Diego Community College Option 4 • The following information is effective for students District General Education Requirements. graduating under the 2009-2010 catalog year or (See City College Catalog page 99). Students each term thereafter and is subject to change. Please selecting this option should meet with a contact the Counseling Department for updates. counselor to determine the appropriate General 1. Competence in Reading and Written Education courses for their individual transfer Expression Option 4 is only available for the goals. NOTE: following City College degrees designed for Complete one course with a grade of “C” or transfer students: better from General Education Requirements S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 94

95 Completing, with a grade of “C” or better, c. Area A.1 Language and Rationality, English Composition. any other course for which one of the above listed courses is a prerequisite or any math Note: The course selected to meet this course with a number higher than 100. requirement may also be used to meet the general education requirement for English * These courses cannot be used to meet the Composition. prerequisite for any transfer-level mathematics course. 2. Competence in Mathematics ** This course may only be used to meet the Competence is demonstrated by: prerequisite for MATH 118, 119 , and 210A; it a. SDCCD Skill Level/Milestone M45 or higher cannot be used to meet the prerequisite for any other transfer-level mathematics course. OR Note: The course selected to meet these b. Completing one of the following courses Academic Requirements requirements may also be used to meet the general with a grade of “C” or better: education requirement for Communications and Analytical Thinking. Practical Geometry (M) MATH 84* 3. American Institutions/California Government M AT H 92* * Applied Beginning and Intermediate Algebra (C,M) Students are required to complete the United States History, Constitution and American Ideals Intermediate Algebra and MATH 96 Geometry (C,M,MMR) before being awarded an associate degree. This requirement may be fulfilled by completing MATH 98* Technical Intermediate Algebra and Geometry (C) any combination of two classes that, when combined, fulfill areas: US-1, US-2, and US-3. A OR course may be used to fulfill more than one area. A check mark [ ] indicates course has been approved to meet the requirement for the area. p Area US-2: Area US-3: Area US-1: US California Development Constitution of American State & Local Institutions Course Governments ^BLAS 140A History of the United States, Black Perspectives (C,M,MMR) p p ^BLAS 140B History of the United States, Black Perspectives (C,M,MMR) p p ^CHIC 141A U.S. History from a Chicano Perspective (C,M) p p ^CHIC 141B U.S. History from a Chicano Perspective (C,M) p p HIST 109 History of the United States I (C,M,MMR) p p HIST 110 History of the United States II (C,M,MMR) p p ^HIST 115A History of the Americas I (C,M,MMR) p p ^HIST 115B History of the Americas II (C,M,MMR) p p ^HIST 123 U.S. History from the Asian Pacific American Perspective (C,M) p p HIST 141 Women in United States History I (M,MMR) p p HIST 142 Women in United States History II (M,MMR) p p ^HIST 150 Native Americans in U.S. History (M) p p ^HIST 151 Native Americans in U.S. History (M) p p an 95 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

96 Area US-3: Area US-1: Area US-2: California US Development Academic Requirements Constitution State & Local of American Institutions Course Governments HIST 175 California History (M) p POLI 102 The American Political System (C,M,MMR) p p NOTES: • Courses designated with a caret (^) may also be used to fulfill the District Multicultural studies requirement. • Completion of the Advanced Placement examination in U.S. History with a score of 3 or higher will satisfy the requirement for the CSU American Institutions Area US-1 only. • Completion of the Advanced Placement examination in U.S. Government & Politics with a score of 3 or higher will satisfy the requirement for Area US-2. • Students who have completed the American Institutions requirement except for the California government portion must complete one course approved in Area US-3. Health Education 4. Science (formerly Physical Education) classes are available. A Physician’s medical release form is This requirement is met by completing Health required. Education 101: Health and Lifestyle, three units. Note: This requirement is waived for students who Note: This requirement is waived for students possess an accredited Fire Fighter I certification who earn degrees in Nursing Education, Physical or are graduates of a POST Commission certified Therapist Assistant, or are graduates of a certified regional law enforcement academy. U.S. Veterans paramedic training program. U.S. Veterans and active duty U.S. military personnel may and active duty U.S. military personnel may be be granted two units of college credit to fulfill granted two units of college credit to fulfill the the Exercise Science Activity (formerly Physical Health Education Requirement if service has been Education) requirement if service has been continuous for at least six months. Copies of form continuous for at least six months. Copies of form DD-214 or DD-295 or Joint Services Transcript (JST) DD-214 or DD-295 or Joint Services Transcript (JST) or CCAF Transcript covering all periods of military or CCAF Transcript covering all periods of military service must be on file in the Records Office. service must be on file in the Records Office. (formerly Physical Exercise Science Activity 5. Multicultural Studies 6. Education) Students may satisfy the District multicultural Students must complete two activity courses. studies graduation requirement by satisfactorily Exercise Science (formerly Physical Education) completing a course related to the culture of courses numbered below PHYE 240 or below one or more of the ethnic groups which are EXSC 229 are acceptable. Dance courses are represented in American society. The course also acceptable, except for DANC 181, 183 and shall include a focus on the role of men and 253. Administration of Justice 127A, 127B, 127C, women in the origin, development, and current 127D, 128A,128B, 128C, 128D, 323, 381 and 382 status of these cultures. are also acceptable. Fire Protection Technology Note: Each student seeking the Associate Degree 100D, 150A, 160, 360, 380W, 381F are also must complete a three-unit multicultural studies acceptable. Students with physical conditions course selected from the general education which prevent participation in regular exercise courses marked with a ^ indicating that it meets science (formerly Physical Education) activity the Multicultural Requirement. The three units classes must file a physician’s statement with may be applied to the 18 units required in general the College Evaluations Office. Adapted Exercise education. S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 96

97 This requirement is met by completing one of ^ Introduction to Linguistics (C,M) ENGL 202 the following courses (these courses are also on Asian American Literature (M,MMR) ENGL 230 ^ the District General Education list). FILI 100 ^ Filipino American Experience (MMR) ADJU 106 ^ Diversity and Community Relations ^ GEND 101 Introduction to Gender Studies (C) (MMR) ^ Cultural Geography (C,M,MMR) GEOG 102 Introduction to Deaf Culture (M) AMSL 150 ^ ^ History of the Americas I (C,M,MMR) HIST 115A ANTH 103 ^ Introduction to Cultural Anthropology History of the Americas II (C,M,MMR) HIST 115B ^ (C,M,MMR) HIST 120 ^ Introduction to Asian Civilizations ^ ANTH 200 Introduction to North American Indians (C,M,MMR) (M) Asian Civilizations in Modern Times ^ HIST 121 Introduction to California Indians (C,M) ANTH 210 ^ (C,M,MMR) Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the ^ ARTF 113 ^ HIST 123 U.S. History from the Asian Pacific Americas (M,MMR) Academic Requirements American Perspective (C,M) African Art (C,M) ARTF 115 ^ The Modern Middle East (M) HIST 130 ^ ^ Native American Art (M) ARTF 120 ^ HIST 150 Native Americans in United States Black Psychology (C,M) BLAS 104 ^ History (M) African American Art (C,M) ^ BLAS 110 HIST 151 ^ Native Americans in United States History (M) Cultural Influences on African Art (M) ^ BLAS 111 INTE 125 History of Furniture and Interiors (M) ^ ^ BLAS 115 Sociology from a Black Perspective (C) ^ MUSI 109 World Music (C,M,MMR) Contemporary Social Problems from a ^ BLAS 116 Black Perspective (C,M) Cultural Foods (M) ^ NUTR 153 ^ BLAS 120 Black Music (C,M) ^ PHIL 125 Philosophy of Women (C,M) ^ Dynamics of the Black Community (M) BLAS 125 ^ POLI 103 Comparative Politics (C,M,MMR) The Black Family (C,M) ^ BLAS 130 Contemporary International Politics POLI 140 ^ (C,M,MMR) BLAS 135 Introduction to Black Politics (C) ^ ^ Principles of Sociology (C,M,MMR) SOCO 101 ^ History of the U.S., Black Perspectives BLAS 140A (C,M,MMR) SOCO 110 ^ Contemporary Social Problems (C,M,MMR) ^ BLAS 140B History of the U.S., Black Perspectives (C,M,MMR) Sociology of the Family (C,M) SOCO 125 ^ ^ Introduction to African History (C,M) BLAS 145A ^ Sociology of Latinos/Latinas (C,M) SOCO 150 ^ Introduction to African History (C) BLAS 145B ^ Globalization and Social Change SOCO 223 (C,M,MMR) BLAS 150 Black Women in Literature, Film and the ^ Media (C,M) General Education Defined African American Literature (C,M) BLAS 155 ^ CHIC 110A Introduction to Chicano Studies (C,M) ^ General Education courses should contribute to the broad education of career technical and transfer ^ CHIC 110B Introduction to Chicano Studies (C,M) students in the areas of critical thinking, writing, CHIC 135 Chicana/o Literature (C,M) ^ and oral communication skills, understanding of ^ CHIC 141A United States History from a Chicano and the ability to use quantitative analysis, and Perspective (C,M) awareness of the arts and humanities; and of the ^ CHIC 141B United States History from a Chicano physical, social and behavioral sciences as they affect Perspective (C,M) one’s interaction with the diverse local and global CHIC 190 ^ Chicano Images in Film (C,M) communities. General Education Requirements ^ Chicano Culture (C,M) CHIC 210 Title 5: Section 55063: ^ The Child, Family and Community CHIL 141 a. Natural Sciences. Courses in the natural (C,M,MMR) sciences are those that examine the ^ Intercultural Communication COMS 180 physical universe, its life forms, and its (C,M,MMR) natural phenomena. To satisfy the General Theatre and Social Issues (C,M) ^ DRAM 109 an 97 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D ollege

98 • articulate how societies and social Education Requirement in natural sciences, a course shall be designed to help the subgroups operate in specific historical Academic Requirements and contemporary contexts student develop an appreciation and understanding of the scientific method, • use methods of inquiry and and encourage an understanding of the measurement appropriate to the relationships between science and other particular discipline being studied human activities. This category would include introductory or integrative courses Courses in the humanities are c. Humanities. in astronomy, biology, chemistry, general those which study the cultural activities and physical science, geology, meteorology, artistic expressions of human beings. To oceanography, physical geography, physical satisfy the general education requirement in anthropology, physics and other scientific the humanities, a course shall be designed disciplines. to help the student develop an awareness of the ways in which people throughout Students who complete natural sciences the ages and in different cultures have general education courses will be able to: responded to themselves, help the student develop aesthetic understanding and an • demonstrate an understanding and ability to make value judgments. Such appreciation of the scientific method courses could include introductory or • express an understanding of the integrative courses in the arts, foreign relationships between science and other languages, literature, philosophy, and human activities religion. examine the natural physical world and • Students who complete humanities general its life forms in a variety of courses education courses will be able to: utilize critical thinking skills in a variety • • express understanding and appreciation of scientific applications of varieties of cultural and artistic expression Courses b. Social and Behavioral Sciences. in the social and behavioral sciences articulate an understanding of the • are those which focus on people as complex relationships between the members of society. To satisfy the general arts and their cultural, historical, and education requirement in social and economic contexts behavioral sciences, a course shall be • designed to develop an awareness of the evaluate the various elements of artistic works method of inquiry used by the social and behavioral sciences. It shall be designed to d. Courses in Language and Rationality. stimulate critical thinking about the ways language and rationality are those which people act and have acted in response develop for the student the principles and to their societies and should promote applications of language toward logical appreciation of how societies and social thought, clear and precise expression and subgroups operate. This category would critical evaluation of communication in include introductory or integrative survey whatever symbol system the student uses. courses in cultural anthropology, cultural geography, economics, history, political 1. English Composition. Courses fulfilling the written composition requirement science, psychology, sociology and related disciplines. shall be designed to include both expository and argumentative writing. Students who complete social and behavioral sciences general education Communication and Analytical 2. courses will be able to: Thinking. Courses fulfilling the communication and analytical express understanding of how people • thinking requirement include oral act and have acted in response to their communication, mathematics, logic, societies and the natural environment 98 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

99 statistics, computer languages and A. Language and Rationality programming, and related disciplines. A minimum of three semester units, or four quarter Students who complete language and units, must be completed. Choose one course from the rationality general education courses will be following: able to: 1. English Composition • demonstrate an understanding of the principles of clear and coherent ENGL 101 Reading and Composition (C,M,MMR) communication Composition and Literature (C,M,MMR) ENGL 105 • use verbal and non-verbal languages in a ENGL 205 Critical Thinking and Intermediate Composition (C,M,MMR) clear and precise manner A minimum of three semester units, or four quarter • develop logical and rational units, must be completed. Choose one course from the thinking skills while analyzing and Academic Requirements following: communicating processes evaluate different quantitative and • 2. Communication and Analytical Thinking qualitative symbol expressions and systems Biological Statistics (C,M) BIOL 200 Business Mathematics (C,M,MMR) BUSE 101 Ethnic Studies will be offered in at least one BUSE 115 Statistics for Business (C,M,MMR) of the required areas. CISC 150 Introduction to Computer and Information Sciences (C,M) General Education Requirements CISC 181 Principles of Information Systems (Option 4) (C,M,MMR) Voice and Diction for Non-Native COMS 99 Colleges in parenthesis indicate where the () Speakers of English (C,MMR) course is approved for General Education COMS 101 Voice and Articulation (C,M) Requirements. C—City College Oral Communication (C,M,MMR) COMS 103 M—Mesa College COMS 135 Interpersonal Communication MMR—Miramar College (C,M,MMR) COMS 160 Argumentation (C,M,MMR) ^ Courses with a caret fulfill District multicultural COMS 170 Small Group Communication studies graduation requirement. (C,M,MMR) * Courses with an asterisk may satisfy more than ^ COMS 180 Intercultural Communication one area and/or general education requirement (C,M,MMR) but may not be counted more than once for this. GISG 104 Geographic Information Science and Spatial Reasoning (C,M) The following information is based on 2018–2019 Practical Geometry (M) MATH 84 course offerings and is subject to change. Please Practical Career Mathematics (C,M) MATH 85 contact the Counseling Department for updates. MATH 92 Applied Beginning and Intermediate The State of California requires the completion of a Algebra (C,M) minimum of 18 units of general education with at MATH 96 Intermediate Algebra and Geometry least a 2.0 grade point average. One course must be (C,M,MMR) selected from each of the following areas: English MATH 98 Technical Intermediate Algebra and Composition; Communication/Analytical Thinking; Geometry (C) the Sciences (Life or Physical, not both); Humanities; MATH 104 Trigonometry (C,M,MMR) Social Sciences; and a sixth course chosen from any MATH 107 Introduction to Scientific area. Programming (C) MATH 107L Introduction to Scientific Programming Lab (C) an 99 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

100 BIOL 109 MATH 115 Gateway to Experimental Statistics Introduction to Applied Biology (C) (C,MMR) Introduction to Oceanography (C,M) BIOL 110 Academic Requirements College and Matrix Algebra MATH 116 BIOL 111 Cancer Biology (C) (C,M,MMR) Marine Biology (C,M,MMR) BIOL 115 A Survey of Modern Mathematics MATH 118 (C,M) BIOL 120 The Environment of Man (M) Elementary Statistics (C,M,MMR) MATH 119 BIOL 130 Human Heredity (C,M,MMR) MATH 121 Basic Techniques of Applied Introduction to Biotechnology (MMR) BIOL 131 Calculus I (C,M,MMR) BIOL 135 Biology of Human Nutrition (C,MMR) MATH 122 Basic Techniques of Calculus II BIOL 160 Elements of Human Anatomy & (C,M,MMR) Physiology - Lecture/Laboratory MATH 141 Precalculus (C,M,MMR) (M,MMR) Calculus with Analytic Geometry I MATH 150 Plants and People (C,M,MMR) BIOL 180 (C,M,MMR) BIOL 205 General Microbiology (C,M,MMR) Calculus with Analytic Geometry II MATH 151 Introduction to the Biological BIOL 210A (C,M,MMR) Sciences I - Lecture/Laboratory MATH 183 Mecomtronics Calculus I (C) (C,M,MMR) Concepts of Elementary School MATH 210A BIOL 210B Introduction to the Biological Mathematics I (C,M) Sciences II - Lecture/Laboratory (C,M,MMR) MATH 210B Concepts of Elementary School Mathematics II (C,M) Introduction to Zoology (C,M) BIOL 215 Discrete Mathematics (C,M,MMR) MATH 245 Human Anatomy (C,M,MMR) BIOL 230 MATH 252 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III BIOL 235 Human Physiology (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Botany (M) BIOL 250 MATH 254 Introduction to Linear Algebra BIOL 285 Tropical Biology Field Experience (C,M,MMR) (MMR) MATH 255 Differential Equations (C,M,MMR) General, Organic, and Biological CHEM 103 PHIL 100 Logic and Critical Thinking (C,M,MMR) Chemistry (MMR) PHIL 101 Symbolic Logic (C,M,MMR) MEDA 55 Fundamentals Human Anatomy and Physiology (M) * PHIL 205 Critical Thinking and Writing in Philosophy (C,M,MMR) NUTR 150 Nutrition (C,M,MMR) Behavioral Science Statistics PSYC 258 Advanced Nutrition (M,MMR) NUTR 155 (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Physiological PSYC 260 Psychology (C,M,MMR) B. Natural Sciences 2. Physical Sciences A minimum of three semester units, or four quarter units, must be completed. Choose one course from the ASTR 101 Descriptive Astronomy (C,M,MMR) following: ASTR 109 Practice in Observing - Laboratory (C,M) 1. Life Sciences ASTR 111 Astronomy Laboratory (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Physical Anthropology ANTH 102 AVIA 115 Aviation Weather (MMR) (C,M,MMR) Fundamentals of Chemistry CHEM 100 ANTH 104 Laboratory in Physical Anthropology (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Fundamentals of Chemistry - CHEM 100L Natural History - Environmental BIOL 100 Laboratory (C,M,MMR) Biology - Lecture/Laboratory (M,MMR) CHEM 103 General, Organic, and Biological Issues in Environmental Science & BIOL 101 Chemistry (MMR) Sustainability - Lecture/Laboratory (C) Chemistry in Society (C,M,MMR) CHEM 111 General Biology - Lecture/Laboratory BIOL 107 Chemistry and Society Laboratory CHEM 111L (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 100

101 CHEM 130 Introduction to Organic & Biological General Physics Lab II (C,MMR) PHYS 181B Chemistry (C,M,MMR) Mechanics (C,M,MMR) PHYS 195 Introduction to Organic & Biological CHEM 130L Electricity and Magnetism (C,M,MMR) PHYS 196 Chemistry - Laboratory (C,M,MMR) PHYS 197 Waves, Optics and Modern Physics CHEM 152 Introduction to General Chemistry (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) CHEM 152L Introduction to General Chemistry C. Humanities Laboratory (C,M,MMR) CHEM 200 General Chemistry I - Lecture A minimum of three semester units, or four quarter (C,M,MMR) units, must be completed. Choose one course from the General Chemistry I - Laboratory CHEM 200L following: (C,M,MMR) AMSL 115 American Sign Language Level I General Chemistry II - Lecture CHEM 201 (C,M) (C,M,MMR) Academic Requirements AMSL 116 American Sign Language Level II General Chemistry II - Laboratory CHEM 201L (C,M) (C,M,MMR) American Sign Language Level III AMSL 215 CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry I - Lecture (C,M) (C,M,MMR) American Sign Language Level IV AMSL 216 CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry I - Laboratory (C,M) (C,M,MMR) ARAB 101 First Course in Arabic (C) CHEM 233 Organic Chemistry II - Lecture (C,M,MMR) ARAB 102 Second Course in Arabic (C) CHEM 233L Organic Chemistry II - Laboratory ARAB 201A Third Course in Arabic (C) (C,M,MMR) ARCH 126 History of Ancient World CHEM 251 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry Architecture (M) (C,M,MMR) History of World Architecture: ARCH 127 GEOG 101 Physical Geography (C,M,MMR) Renaissance Through Contemporary (M) GEOG 101L Physical Geography - Laboratory (C,M,MMR) Art Orientation (C,M,MMR) ARTF 100 GEOL 100 Physical Geology (C,M,MMR) Contemporary Art (M,MMR) ARTF 107 GEOL 101 Physical Geology - Laboratory Women in Art (M) ARTF 108 (C,M,MMR) ARTF 109 Modern Art (C,M,MMR) GEOL 104 Earth Science (C,M,MMR) ARTF 110 Art History: Prehistoric to Gothic GEOL 111 The Earth Through Time (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Earth Science Laboratory (C,M) GEOL 120 ARTF 111 Art History: Renaissance to Modern (C,M,MMR) Basic Physics for Technical MCTR 120B Applications II (C) Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the ^ ARTF 113 Americas (M,MMR) Survey of Physical Science - Lecture PHYN 100 (C,M,MMR) ARTF 115 ^ African Art (C,M) Survey of Physical Science - PHYN 101 Native American Art (M) ARTF 120 ^ Laboratory (C,M,MMR) ARTF 125 Art History: Arts of the Asian PHYN 105 Physical Science for Elementary Continent (C,M,MMR) Education (M,MMR) ARTF 130 Pre-Columbian Art (M) The Oceans (M,MMR) PHYN 120 ARTF 191 Cultural Influences on Photography Introductory Physics Lecture/ PHYS 100 (M) Laboratory (C,M) Critical Photography (M) ARTF 194 General Physics (C,M,MMR) PHYS 125 ARTG 118 Graphic Design History (C) General Physics II (C,M,MMR) PHYS 126 African American Art (C,M) BLAS 110 ^ General Physics I (C,MMR) PHYS 180A ^ BLAS 111 Cultural Influences on African Art (M) General Physics II (C,MMR) PHYS 180B BLAS 120 ^ Black Music (C,M) General Physics Lab I (C,MMR) PHYS 181A an 101 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D C

102 ^ Black Women in Literature, Film and BLAS 150 Masterpieces of World Literature II: ENGL 221 the Media (C,M) 1600–Present (C,M,MMR) Academic Requirements African American Literature (C,M) ^ BLAS 155 Asian American Literature (M,MMR) ENGL 230 ^ Mexican Literature in Translation CHIC 130 Women in Literature (C,MMR) ENGL 237 (C,M) Evaluating Children's Literature (C,M) ENGL 238 Chicana/o Literature (C,M) CHIC 135 ^ Shakespeare (C,M) ENGL 240 Literature of La Raza in Latin America CHIC 138 FASH 120 Fashion History and Trends (M) in Translation (C,M) First Course in French (C,M) FREN 101 CHIC 190 ^ Chicano Images in Film (C,M) Second Course in French (C,M) FREN 102 Chicano Culture (C,M) CHIC 210 ^ FREN 201 Third Course in French (C,M) CHIC 230 Chicano Art (C,M) FREN 202 Fourth Course in French (C,M) CHIN 101 First Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) First Course in German (C,M) GERM 101 CHIN 102 Second Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) GERM 102 Second Course in German (C,M) CHIN 201 Third Course in Mandarin Chinese Third Course in German (C,M) GERM 201 (M) HIST 100 * World History I (C,M,MMR) CHIN 202 Fourth Course in Mandarin Chinese HIST 101 * World History II (C,M,MMR) (M) HIST 105 Introduction to Western * DANC 181 History of Dance (C,M) Civilization I (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Film (MMR) DFLM 101 Introduction to Western * HIST 106 DFLM 102 The American Cinema (MMR) Civilization II (C,M,MMR) DRAM 105 Introduction to Dramatic Arts (C,M) ^* Introduction to Asian Civilizations HIST 120 (C,M,MMR) Study of Filmed Plays (C) DRAM 107 Asian Civilizations in Modern Times HIST 121 ^* Playwriting (C) DRAM 108 (C,M,MMR) Theatre and Social Issues (C,M) DRAM 109 ^ HIST 123 ^* U.S. History from the Asian Pacific Chicana/o Theatre (C) DRAM 111 American Perspective (C,M) DRAM 136 History of Canonized Theatre - * HIST 131 Latin America Before Independence Ancient Greece to the Restoration (M) (C,M) HIST 132 * Latin America Since Independence DRAM 137 History of Canonized Western (M) Theatre - Restoration to the Present Introduction to the Humanities I HUMA 101 (C,M) (C,M,MMR) Cinema as Art and Communication I DRAM 150 Introduction to the Humanities II HUMA 102 (M) (C,M,MMR) Cinema as Art and DRAM 151 Introduction to the New HUMA 103 Communication II (M) Testament(C,M) The Art of the Sentence (M) ENGL 207 Introduction to the Old Testament HUMA 104 ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature (C,M,MMR) (M) Literary Approaches to Film ENGL 209 HUMA 106 World Religions (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Eastern Humanities (M) HUMA 118 American Literature I (C,M,MMR) ENGL 210 HUMA 119 Western Humanities (M) American Literature II (C,M,MMR) ENGL 211 HUMA 201 Mythology (C,M,MMR) English Literature I: 800–1799 ENGL 215 HUMA 202 Mythology: Hero's Journey (C) (C,M,MMR) HUMA 205 Exploring Human Values Through ENGL 216 English Literature II: 1800–Present Film (M) (C,M,MMR) HUMA 210 Women in Religion and Myth (M) ENGL 220 Masterpieces of World Literature I: 1500 BCE–1600 CE (C,M,MMR) History of Furniture and Interiors (M) ^ INTE 125 First Course in Italian (C,M) ITAL 101 S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 102

103 Second Course in Italian (C,M) ITAL 102 Environmental Ethics (C,M) PHIL 131 ITAL 201 Third Course in Italian (C,M) PHIL 205 Critical Thinking and Writing in * Philosophy (C,M,MMR) First Course in Japanese (M) JAPN 101 History of Photography (C) PHOT 150 JAPN 102 Second Course in Japanese (M) RTVF 160 Introduction to Cinema (C) Third Course in Japanese (M) JAPN 201 Women in Film (C) RTVF 162 Fourth Course in Japanese (M) JAPN 202 RUSS 101 First Course in Russian (C,M) LATI 101 First Course in Latin (M) Second Course in Russian (C,M) RUSS 102 LATI 102 Second Course in Latin (M) Third Course in Russian (M) RUSS 201 LATI 201 Third Course in Latin (M) SPAN 101 First Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) MULT 116 Unity Game Development (M) SPAN 102 Second Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) MUSI 100 Introduction to Music (C,M,MMR) Academic Requirements SPAN 201 Third Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) Music History I: Middle Ages to Mid MUSI 101 18th Century (M) SPAN 202 Fourth Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) Music History II: Mid 18th to Early MUSI 102 SPAN 215 Spanish for Spanish Speakers I (C,M) 20th Century (M) Spanish for Spanish Speakers II (C,M) SPAN 216 History of Rock Music (C,M,MMR) MUSI 103 Environmental Ethics (C) SUST 102 MUSI 105 Music of Our Time (M) First Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) TAGA 101 MUSI 109 World Music (C,M,MMR) ^ TAGA 102 Second Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) Jazz - History and Development MUSI 111 TAGA 201 Third Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) First Course in Vietnamese (M) VIET 101 Music in the United States (M) MUSI 117 Second Course in Vietnamese (M) VIET 102 Asian Music (M) MUSI 118 VIET 201 Third Course in Vietnamese (M) Music in the Americas, Africa & MUSI 119 Europe (M) D. Social and Behavioral Sciences Music, the Arts and Humanity (M) MUSI 125 MUSI 158A Music Theory I (C,M,MMR) A minimum of three semester units, or four quarter units, must be completed. Choose one course from the MUSI 158B Music Theory II (M,MMR) following: Introduction to Philosophy: Reality PHIL 102A and Knowledge (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Administration of ADJU 101 PHIL 102B Introduction to Philosophy: Values Justice (C,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Diversity and Community Relations ^ ADJU 106 Historical Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 103 (MMR) (M) Concepts of Criminal Law (MMR) ADJU 193 History of Western Philosophy PHIL 104A Constitutional Law I (MMR) ADJU 230 (C,M,MMR) AGRI 100 Principles of Sustainable Agriculture History of Western Philosophy (C,M) PHIL 104B (C) PHIL 105 Contemporary Philosophy (C) ^ Introduction to Deaf Culture (M) AMSL 150 PHIL 106 Asian Philosophy (C,M) Introduction to Cultural ANTH 103 ^ Reflections on Human Nature PHIL 107 Anthropology (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Archaeology ANTH 107 Perspectives on Human Nature and * PHIL 108 (C,M,MMR) Society (C,M) ANTH 110 Anthropology of Magic, Witchcraft, PHIL 110 Philosophy of Religion (M) and Religion (M) Philosophy in Literature (C,M) PHIL 111 ^ ANTH 200 Introduction to North American Indians (M) Philosophy of Science (M) PHIL 112 Introduction to Medical ANTH 205 ^* Philosophy of Women (C,M) PHIL 125 Anthropology (M) Philosophy of Art and Music (C,M) PHIL 130 an 103 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D C

104 ECON 220 Economics of the Environment (M) ANTH 210 Introduction to California Indians ^ (C,M) Introduction to Linguistics (C,M) ENGL 202 ^ Academic Requirements Cultures of Latin America (C,M) ANTH 215 ^ FILI 100 Filipino American Experience (MMR) Introduction to Black Studies (C,M) BLAS 100 Introduction to Futures Studies (C) FUTR 101 Black Psychology (C,M) BLAS 104 ^ FUTR 102 Creating Futures: Methods and Tools (C) Sociology from a Black Perspective BLAS 115 ^ (C) Emerging Technologies (C) FUTR 103 Contemporary Social Problems from ^ BLAS 116 Introduction to Global Development GDEV 101 a Black Perspective (C,M) Studies (C) Dynamics of the Black Community BLAS 125 ^ Introduction to Gender Studies (C) GEND 101 ^ (M) ^ GEOG 102 Cultural Geography (C,M,MMR) The Black Family (C,M) BLAS 130 ^ GEOG 104 World Regional Geography Introduction to Black Politics (C) BLAS 135 ^ (C,M,MMR) BLAS 140A History of the U.S., Black ^ Introduction to Urban Geography GEOG 154 Perspectives (C,M,MMR) (C,M) BLAS 140B ^ History of the U.S., Black World History I (C,M,MMR) HIST 100 * Perspectives (C,M,MMR) HIST 101 * World History II (C,M,MMR) ^ BLAS 145A Introduction to African History (C,M) HIST 105 Introduction to Western * BLAS 145B ^ Introduction to African History (C) Civilization I (C,M,MMR) BLAS 165 Sexuality and Black Culture (C,M) * Introduction to Western HIST 106 Civilization II (C,M,MMR) BLAS 175 Psycho-History of Racism and Sexism (M) HIST 109 History of the United States I (C,M,MMR) BUSE 100 Introduction to Business (C,M,MMR) HIST 110 History of the United States II Business Law and the Legal BUSE 140 (C,M,MMR) Environment (C,M,MMR) History of the Americas I (C,M,MMR) ^ HIST 115A Introduction to Chicano Studies ^ CHIC 110A (C,M) ^ HIST 115B History of the Americas II (C,M,MMR) CHIC 110B ^ Introduction to Chicano Studies HIST 120 Introduction to Asian Civilization ^* (C,M) (C,M,MMR) ^ CHIC 141A United States History from a ^* Asian Civilizations in Modern Times HIST 121 Chicano Perspective (C,M) (C,M,MMR) ^ United States History from a CHIC 141B U.S. History from the Asian Pacific ^* HIST 123 Chicano Perspective (C,M) American Perspective (C,M) History of Mexico (C,M) CHIC 150 The Modern Middle East (M) ^ HIST 130 La Chicana (C,M) CHIC 170 * HIST 131 Latin America Before Independence (M) CHIC 201 The Indigenous Tradition of Mexico and Ancient Mesoamerica (C,M) HIST 132 Latin America Since Independence * (M) Human Growth and Development CHIL 101 (C,M,MMR) HIST 141 Women in United States History I (M,MMR) Lifespan Growth and Development CHIL 103 (MMR) HIST 142 Women in United States History II (M,MMR) ^ The Child, Family and Community CHIL 141 (C,M,MMR) HIST 150 Native Americans in United States ^ History (M) Conflict Resolution and Mediation CRES 101 (C) ^ HIST 151 Native Americans in United States History (M) DJRN 100 Mass Media in the Digital Age (C) Ancient Egypt (M) HIST 154 ECON 120 Principles of Macroeconomics (C,M,MMR) HIST 175 California History (M) ECON 121 Principles of Microeconomics HUMS 101 Introduction to Human Aging (C) (C,M,MMR) 104 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

105 JOUR 202 Introduction to Mass SOCO 220 Introduction to Research Methods in Communication (C,M,MMR) Sociology (C,MMR) ^ NUTR 153 Cultural Foods (M) SOCO 223 Globalization and Social Change ^ (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Peace Studies (C) PEAC 101 SUST 101 Introduction to Sustainability (C) Nonviolence and Conflict Resolution PEAC 102 (C) Certificate of Achievement Environmental Sustainability, Justice PEAC 201 and Ethics (C) Programs in which a Certificate of Achievement may * Perspectives on Human Nature and PHIL 108 be awarded are described in the Degree Curricula Society (C,M) and Certificate Programs section of this catalog. PHIL 109 Issues in Social Philosophy (M) Certificate programs are designed for students with ^* PHIL 125 Philosophy of Women (C,M) specific personal or occupational goals. To qualify for the Certificate of Achievement, students must satisfy PHIL 126 Introduction to Philosophy of Academic Requirements Contemporary Gender Issues (C,M) the following requirements: Introduction to Political Science POLI 101 1. meet all standards for admission to the desired (C,M,MMR) certificate program; The American Political System POLI 102 (C,M,MMR) earn a grade of “C” or higher in each course. A “P” 2. (pass) grade meets this requirement, Comparative Politics (C,M,MMR) POLI 103 ^ POLI 140 ^ Contemporary International Politics complete a minimum of three courses in 3. (C,M,MMR) residence; PSYC 101 General Psychology (C,M,MMR) 4. and a minimum of six semester units of PSYC 111 Psychological /Social Aspects of the required courses for the major must be Aging, Death and Dying (C,M) completed at City, Mesa or Miramar College. PSYC 121 Introduction to Child Psychology (M) Adolescent Psychology (C,MMR) PSYC 123 Certificate of Performance PSYC 133 Psychology of Women (M,MMR) Programs in which a Certificate of Performance may PSYC 135 Marriage and Family Relations be awarded are described in the Degree Curricula (C,M,MMR) and Certificate Programs section of this catalog. A PSYC 137 Human Sexual Behavior (C,M,MMR) Certificate of Performance recognizes the attainment PSYC 155 Introduction to Personality of knowledge and/or skill through the successful (C,M,MMR) completion of two or more courses as specified Introduction to Social Psychology PSYC 166 by a department. Certificates of Performance are (C,M,MMR) designed to prepare students for employment, job Learning (C,M,MMR) PSYC 211 enhancement and/or job advancement. To qualify PSYC 230 Psychology of Lifespan for the Certificate of Performance, students must Development (C,M,MMR) satisfy the following requirements: PSYC 245 Abnormal Psychology (C,M,MMR) Achieve a grade of “C” or better in each of the 1. RTVF 101 Media Law and Ethics (C) required courses. A “P” (pass) grade meets this SOCO 101 ^ Principles of Sociology (C,M,MMR) requirement. Contemporary Social Problems SOCO 110 ^ Complete all required course work in the San 2. (C,M,MMR) Diego Community College District. ^ SOCO 125 Sociology of the Family (C,M) Course substitutions or course equivalencies 3. SOCO 145 Health and Society (C,MMR) from other colleges may not be used to satisfy ^ Sociology of Latinos/Latinas (C,M) SOCO 150 Certificate of Performance requirements. Advanced Principles of Sociology SOCO 201 For additional information, contact the campus (C,M,MMR) Evaluations Office or subject-area department. an 105 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

106 certification pattern used by a certifying institution Graduation or a CSU or UC campus. Academic Requirements Petition for Graduation Continuous Enrollment Students who expect to receive an Associate Continuous enrollment is defined as attendance Degree or a Certificate of Achievement should in one semester or two quarters within a calendar file a Petition for Graduation. The Petition may year in either the CSU, UC, or California Community be completed online at: https://www.sdccd.edu/ College System. students/evaluations/graduation/ , or obtained in the Counseling Office. See Academic Calendar section Awarding of Degrees or Certificates for important filing dates. Associate Degrees/Certificates of Achievement will be awarded at the end of the semester in which the Official college transcripts from all colleges requirements are completed. attended must be on file before submitting the petition for Associate Degree or Certificate of The graduation ceremony is held once a year. Achievement. Candidates for Fall, Spring and Summer graduation may participate in the ceremony which is held at the An evaluation is a summary of college work end of the Spring semester. completed and of requirements to be completed for the associate degree or the certificate of achievement. Only evaluations completed by one of Associate Degree Initiative the Evaluators are official. The San Diego Community College District A petition for an associate degree evaluation should proactively reviews student academic records to be submitted one year before the student plans to determine if program requirements for an associate graduate. degree have been met. Students who are working toward a certificate of Student academic records will be reviewed if the achievement should file the Petition for Graduation student: prior to the beginning of the semester in which completed at least 70 degree applicable units, • they plan to complete the requirements of their certificate program. submitted all transcripts from other institutions • attended, and Petition for Exceptions • has an education plan on file. Petitions for exceptions to graduation requirements, If the degree requirements are met, students will be substitutions, or waiver of requirements are filed notified via email and awarded a diploma. Students with the Evaluations Office. All petitions are acted have until the end of the semester to decline the upon by the appropriate college committees/offices. degree. All students may participate in the commencement Catalog Rights ceremony which occurs annually at the end of the Students who maintain continuous enrollment may spring semester. Note that students who plan to choose to graduate under the (City College, Mesa transfer to a California State University (CSU), may College, and Miramar College) catalog in effect at and Associate Degree for Transfer want to consider an the time they began their studies in a California should consult a counselor or the Transfer Center for Community College, California State University, or options. University of California campus, or under the catalog in effect at the time of graduation. Diplomas Certification of a student’s completion of Diplomas are issued only after completion of CSU general education requirements or the all graduation requirements has been verified. Intersegmental General Education Transfer Diplomas will be issued in the name and to the Curriculum (IGETC) is not a graduation requirement. address of record at the time the diploma is Therefore, students do not have catalog rights to a awarded. For information on obtaining your diploma S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 106

107 of the new major or concentration must be or certificate of achievement, or a duplicate copy, completed in residence at City, Mesa and/or please contact the Evaluations Office on campus. Miramar. Graduation with Distinction A student must fulfill current catalog associate 3. degree requirements. Graduation with honors distinction will be based upon all coursework that is associate degree and In order to receive an additional college degree, 4. lower division baccalaureate degree applicable. the student must file a Petition for Graduation in the Evaluations Office. Counselors will review all Graduation with Honors is granted to students who previous college work to determine the student’s achieve an overall 3.5 GPA, High Honors is granted eligibility for a second degree. to students who achieve an overall 3.75 GPA, and Highest Honors is granted to students who achieve an overall 4.0 GPA for coursework for the degree or certificate. Academic Requirements Students will be notified that this distinction is pending at the time of the graduation ceremony, when the GPA will be calculated based upon degree or certificate applicable coursework completed for the degree or certificate through the Fall semester of the year of the ceremony. The final distinction will be determined upon completion of all coursework completed through the Fall semester for fall graduates, the Spring semester for spring graduates or the summer term for summer graduates. Additional College Degree A student having received an associate or baccalaureate degree may qualify for an additional Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree in a new major or concentration. An additional degree: Permits upgrading or preparation for upgrading 1. current employment. Prepares for employment in an area different 2. from that provided by previous training. Provides general knowledge leading to 3. fulfillment of personal goals. The following requirements are applicable: 1. The degree to be earned must represent a change in major or concentration from the degree or degrees previously earned. A student must earn a minimum of 18 required 2. semester units in the new major or concentration beyond the minimum 60 units required for the Associate Degree, bringing the total units required for the second degree to a minimum of 78 units, a minimum of 96 units for the third degree, and so on. Twelve (12) semester units an 107 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D ollege

108 Academic Requirements 108 an D iego S ity C ollege • 2018–2019 C

109 Transfer Guide At-A-Glance Page ... 110 University Transfer 110 Steps to Transfer ... 117 University of California and California State University ... Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) ... 117 125 The CSUGE-Breadth Pattern ... Other Transfer General Education Options ... 136 an 109 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

110 For additional information regarding specific University Transfer services, contact the San Diego City College Transfer Guide Transfer/Career Center in Room M-101 at 619-388-3722 or the Counseling Department What is Transfer? in the E Building at 619-388-3540, or visit: Transfer is the process of continuing your education . www.sdcity.edu/transfer at a baccalaureate-degree granting college or university, usually after completing your major preparation and general education at a community college. If planned correctly, the courses that you Steps to Transfer pass at community college will count towards requirements for your Bachelor degree just as if STEP 1: Career Exploration they had been taken at the four-year institution. Career Objective: Your career objective will City College students transfer to a wide variety of determine the type of degree you need and your universities within California and throughout the choices for selecting a major. See a counselor for world. more assistance. Transfer Services STEP 2: Choosing Your University Students are advised to plan transfer programs as Major early as possible and enroll in transferable courses in both general education and in courses that A major is a field of study that you emphasize in prepare for the specific university major. Questions your college education. It is what you “specialize“ related to transfer programs should be discussed in with your degree. It’s important to remember with counselors or the Transfer/Career Center that your major is what you will study at the staff. Students interested in transfer should meet university you transfer to. At City College, you can a counselor in the Counseling Department, in the prepare to transfer into virtually any major at any E Building to develop a Transfer Educational Plan university-there are literally thousands to choose which will identify the courses needed to transfer. from. To narrow down the options, students often The Transfer/Career Center is located Room M-101. begin to select their major by one of the following For information, call 619-388-3722. techniques: The City College Transfer Center is designed to help If you have an idea of the career field you want • you during each step of your transfer experience to to enter, you can find majors that are related ensure a smooth and positive transition. A variety of to, or prepare for, that career field. Majors and resources are available, including: career fields are not always “perfectly matched.“ However, knowing your intended career field • Academic/Career Counseling can help narrow your options. You can visit the Guidance in researching and selecting a transfer • Counseling Office or Transfer/Career Center for institution assistance in researching career fields. • Individual appointments with representatives If you know what university you want to attend, • from UC, CSU, and independent colleges and you can select from the list of majors at that universities university. Lists of majors at California public universities are available at www.assist.org (click • Transfer Workshops on “Explore Majors“). • Transfer Admissions Agreements and • If you think you might be interested in a Guarantees with selected universities particular major but are not sure, try taking a • A library of catalogs & college publications general education class in the major and see how you like it. Students often select their major Information on important dates and deadlines • based simply on the courses that are the most • Computer software for college research interesting to them. • Transfer Fairs • For descriptions of the 75 most popular majors, visit: www.petersons.com/majordecision/ . Field Trips • S • 2018–2019 ollege C 110 C iego D an ity

111 Students who complete the Intersegmental General STEP 3: Choosing Your Transfer Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) pattern University prior to transferring to the UC system will meet the Each university may have different transfer transfer eligibility coursework requirement listed requirements, so choosing a transfer university is above (for details on IGETC, see appropriate section important to ensure you complete the right courses. of this guide for details). Students are strongly Universities in the United States are organized into recommended to meet with a counselor to discuss different systems and categories. Choosing a transfer additional requirements for competitive admissions university is also important because: based on major and campus choice. Transfer Guide The majors offered at each university are • UC Transfer and Physical Education different. Activity Courses Each university has unique features, including • The University of California grants a maximum of factors like its student body, its location, and its four semester units of credit for appropriate Physical extracurricular activities. Education activity courses. Courses that are subject to this limit are listed as such on the college’s UC • You are more likely to do well academically in a Transfer Course Agreement, available on web ASSIST university environment that you enjoy. at www.assist.org under the UC Transferable Courses The most common universities that City students link. Physical Education Theory courses or courses transfer to include: that do not fit either the Theory or Activity category are not included in the four semester credit limit. University of California (UC) UC Transfer and Variable Topics Courses Combines undergraduate education (leading to a Bachelor’s degree) with emphasis on graduate These courses are also called “Independent Studies“, program (Master and Doctorate degrees) and “Special Studies“, “Special Topics“, “Internships“, research. Relatively inexpensive for California “Field Work“, etc. Credit for variable topics courses residents. UC San Diego (UCSD) is one of the 10 is given only after a review of the scope and universities in the University of California system. See content of the course by the enrolling UC campus. for details. www.universityofcalifornia.edu This usually occurs after transfer and may require recommendations from faculty. UC does not grant UC Minimum Admission Requirements credit for variable topics courses in Journalism, Transfer students will be eligible for admission if they Photography, Health, Business Administration, meet the following requirements: Architecture, Administration of Justice (Criminology) or Library Departments because of credit restrictions Complete a minimum of 60 UC-transferable 1. in these areas. semester units or 90 transferable quarter units. California State University (CSU) 2. Obtain a minimum 2.4 GPA (2.8 for California non-residents). The GPA for admission can be Emphasizes undergraduate education (leading to a significantly higher due to the applicant pool. Bachelor’s degree) but also offers Master degrees. Professors spend more time in the classroom and Complete two UC-transferable college courses in 3. less time on research than those in the University English composition (3 semester or 4–5 quarter of California system. Emphasizes preparation for units each) and one transferable college course specific careers. Relatively inexpensive for California in mathematical concepts and quantitative residents. San Diego State University (SDSU) and reasoning (3 semester or 4–5 quarter units). CSU San Marcos are two local universities in the Complete four UC-transferable college courses 4. 23-campus California State University system. See chosen from at least two of the following subject for details. www.calstate.edu areas: arts and humanities, social and behavioral CSU Minimum Admission Requirements sciences, physical and biological sciences. Transfer students will be eligible for admission if they The UC gives high priority to students who complete meet the following requirements: major preparation coursework early in their academic career. an 111 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D C

112 1. Complete a minimum of 60 CSU-transferable Institutions (HSIs) located in 11 U.S. states and Puerto Rico. To be considered a Hispanic-Serving Institution, semester units or 90 transferable quarter units. Transfer Guide the Hispanic enrollment at a college or university 2. Obtain a minimum 2.0 GPA (2.4 for California must be at least 25 percent of the total student non-residents). Impacted majors may have higher enrollment. California is home to 54 Hispanic-Serving GPA Requirements. for details. Institutions. See www.hacu.net 3. Complete “The Golden Four“ (Oral Tribal Colleges and Universities Communications, Written Communication, Critical Thinking, and Mathematics/Quantitative There are 35 federally recognized Tribal Colleges Reasoning) with a grade of “C” or better. and Universities in the United States. Located mainly Pass/No-Pass grades are not recommended in in the Midwest and Southwest, Tribal Colleges and these areas. Universities service approximately 30,000 full- and part-time students. They offer two-year associate Students are urged to complete a General Education degrees in over 200 disciplines with some providing pattern such as CSUGE-Breadth or IGETC (see a bachelor’s and master’s degree. They also offer 200 appropriate section of this guide for details). vocational certificate programs. See www.aihec.org Students are strongly recommended to meet with for details. a counselor to discuss additional requirements for Out-of-State Colleges and Universities competitive admissions based on major and campus choice. Colleges and universities that are not in California. May be public or private. Useful websites: Associate Degrees for Transfer are another option to transfer to the CSU system. See your counselor or www.wiche.edu • Transfer/Career Center for details. www.regionaladmissions.com • Private Colleges and Universities • www.collegesource.org Colleges and universities that are not funded by public taxes, sometimes also called “independent.“ STEP 4: Application Each university is unique with its own programs, Major Preparation majors, and degrees. Some offer academic programs Some majors require specific lower-division courses grounded in a specific religion or philosophy. to be admitted to a major upon transfer. For public Others offer programs in only one discipline, such universities in California, visit www.assist.org for as the arts or technical degrees. Others specialize in this articulation information. Articulation is the providing continuing education to working adults. process whereby a course (or set of courses) offered Usually smaller and more focused in academic at one institution is accepted as equivalent to or emphasis than public universities. Useful websites: in lieu of a comparable course (or set of courses) www.aiccu.edu , www.sandiegocolleges.info at another institution. For current City College Historically Black Colleges and articulation agreements with private/independent universities, visit the Transfer Center website at Universities (HBCU’s) www.sdcity.edu/transfer . Usually have a majority African-American student General Education Requirements: body, although students of all races attend them. General Education requirements are courses May be private or out-of-state public schools. Most required of everyone regardless of major. Each are located in the southern United States. See university has different general education patterns. for details. www.hbcumentor.org City students can choose from the following: Hispanic-Serving Institutions Complete specific general education a. The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities requirements for an individual university, or (HACU) is a national educational association that b. Complete the approved Intersegmental represents colleges and universities committed to General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) Hispanic Higher education success in the United pattern of courses acceptable at all campuses States (including Puerto Rico), Latin America, and Spain. HACU has 193 member Hispanic-Serving S • 2018–2019 ollege C 112 C iego D an ity

113 • Area of Emphasis in Elementary (Multiple of the CSU, most campuses of the UC, and some private institutions, or Subject) Teaching Preparation Area of Emphasis in Social and Behavioral c. Complete the approved CSUGE-Breadth • pattern of lower-division courses acceptable at Sciences all campuses of the CSU system. Electives Electives are additional courses taken to meet the It is strongly advised that you work closely with a counselor before making a decision. For a list number of required units or to meet additional of transfer GE options for the IGETC coursework lower-division graduation requirements. Make sure Transfer Guide patterns see page 118 . the courses you select are transferable courses by referring to the course descriptions in this catalog. General Education Certification General Education Certification is a legal agreement Other Transfer General Education between the UC or CSU systems and the California Options Community Colleges that permits a student to Some transfer students are best served by following transfer from a community college to a UC or CSU a general education pattern other than the IGETC campus without the need to complete additional or CSUGE-Breadth patterns. These typically include lower division general education courses to students who fall into one of the following three satisfy university GE requirements after transfer. categories: City College will provide an IGETC or CSUGE- Breadth certification to one university campus Students entering high unit majors such as 1. when specifically requested by the student. This an engineering or science discipline. Major certification may include courses taken from other preparation for the engineering and science fields colleges, or credit earned through other means, such typically consists of a high number of units. Most as Advanced Placement (AP) test credit. Students do universities prefer (and some require) that these not have “catalog rights” to a certification pattern. preparation for major courses be completed prior Additional information on certification rules that are to transfer. Therefore, it may be more beneficial specific to the IGETC and CSUGE-Breadth patterns for students entering these majors to complete are discussed later in those sections. relatively fewer GE courses and more major preparation courses at the community college, Students who transfer without certification may have while still meeting the minimum admission to meet additional GE requirements at the university. requirements of the university. Students should This often means taking additional courses after review the catalog or other published advising transfer. materials of the university and major to which Completion of the IGETC or CSUGE-Breadth pattern they intend to transfer and then consult a City also fulfills the requirements for a Certificate of counselor for assistance in selecting appropriate Achievement in General Education (see “General courses. Education” on page 235 ). Students who complete Students transferring to a private/independent 2. one of these patterns and additional transfer or out-of-state university. Some private/ coursework may also qualify to complete the City independent and out-of-state universities College associate degree in Liberal Arts & Sciences accept IGETC or CSUGE-Breadth, but most (see page 249 ). The following Areas of Emphasis or do not. Instead, each university has its own Specialization are available: unique GE pattern. City College has established Area of Emphasis in Visual and Performing Arts • articulation agreements with many of these institutions. These agreements specify the Area of Emphasis in Language Arts and • courses students can complete at City to fulfill Humanities the university’s GE requirements. They are • Area of Emphasis in Scientific Studies: . available at www.sdcity.edu/transfer/articulation For more information on transferring to a private/ Biological Science Specialization • independent or out-of-state university, visit the • Mathematics and Pre-Engineering Specialization Transfer Center (A-111) or see a counselor. Physical and Earth Sciences Specialization • an 113 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D C

114 Students who wish to complete the general 3. Application dates and deadlines education requirements of one specific Different systems have different dates and deadlines Transfer Guide university. Some students decide to complete to apply. If you plan to attend a private/independent the GE requirements for one specific university, or out-of-state university, you should check with rather than the more universally applicable IGETC that school to find their application deadline and or CSUGE-Breadth patterns, for several reasons: procedures. The following dates and deadlines apply Some universities and/or majors do not accept • to California public universities only: IGETC and instead suggest following the California State University university’s own GE pattern. • Some students know that they will attend only Term of Transfer Initial Filing Period one university (such as those with a guarantee Summer February 1–28/29 of of transfer admission) and so plan to complete current year the specific GE pattern for that institution only. October 1–November Fall • Some university-specific GE patterns require 30 of preceding year fewer total units than IGETC or CSUGE- Winter June 1–30 of preceding Breadth. year Each university’s unique GE pattern can be found August 1–31 of Spring in the university catalog. In addition, some UC and preceding year CSU campuses have posted their unique general education patterns to the ASSIST website at University of California . www.assist.org Term of Transfer Initial Filing Period Guarantee Admission Programs Fall Semester or Quarter November 1–30 of preceding year City College offers a number of Guaranteed Winter Quarter July 1–31 of preceding Admission Programs. Come to the Transfer Center year for program requirements. Plan early as some agreements must be signed at least a year in Spring Quarter October 1–31 of advance of the transfer semester/quarter. Interested preceding year students are strongly urged to meet with a All campuses are open for any given Fall term. Counselor for program details as requirements and For Winter/Spring terms, students should verify eligibility often change. that the specific campus accepts transfers for that for Associate in Arts for Please refer to page 92 for CSU specific term. Check www.calstate.edu Transfer (AA-T) or Associate in Science for Transfer for campuses and www.universityofcalifornia.edu (AS-T) for California State University (CSU) offered at UC campuses. San Diego City College. Each campus accepts applications until the end of the filing period or until capacities are reached. STEP 5: Applying to a University If applying after the initial filing period check the campus websites to verify if the campus is still open. About applying for admission How to apply Universities require you to apply and be admitted before you start attending school there. All students The UC and CSU systems strongly encourage all who apply must meet the minimum requirements students to apply using the online application (usually certain coursework requirements and a process. Not only does it make it easier to read and minimum transferable GPA). Some schools accept evaluate your application, but the websites also all transfer students who meet the minimum “check your work“ to make sure you are not missing requirements, while others go through a selection any required information before you submit your process to determine which students will be offered final application. admission. The UC application is available at: www.universityofcalifornia.edu/apply S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 114

115 Submit Intent to Register and Transcripts The CSU application is available at: www2.calstate.edu/apply After offering you admission, most universities require you to send a statement of intent to register (SIR), official transcripts, a deposit, and STEP 6: Final Steps to Transfer sometimes additional materials. Review your Many universities require you to submit documents, university admission paperwork for details. take assessment exams, attend orientations, or meet Information on ordering transcripts from the San other requirements before you enroll. It’s also a good Diego Community College District is available at idea to apply for your degree and General Education www.sdccd.edu/alumni/transcripts . certification from City College prior to transfer. You Transfer Guide Attend New Student Orientation should do as much as you can now to make the Most universities offer a new student orientation transition to your university as smooth as possible. day, where you learn about university services Petition to Graduate from City and requirements, get academic advising, tour Graduation from City College is not automatic. You the campus, etc. Review your university admission must petition at the Records Office to receive your paperwork for details. degree or certificate. We recommend you petition Complete Assessment Tests to graduate even if you are only completing transfer Some universities require transfer students to coursework. Most transfer students are eligible to complete assessment tests either prior to enrollment receive a General Education Certificate (see page or during their first year of attendance. Review your ) and/or an Associate degree in a transfer-related 99 university admission paperwork for details. ). You should petition to subject area (see page 93 graduate during your second to last semester at City. Find Housing Are you going to live on campus? If so, you will need File for General Education (GE) Certification to apply for campus housing. See your university GE certification is a legal agreement between City admission paperwork or the university website College and a California public university (UC or for more information. If you are living off campus CSU campus) that all of your lower division GE you may need to start searching for housing in the requirements have been completed. Certification local community. Most universities have housing can be awarded for completion or part of assistance offices to help you. completion of the IGETC or CSUGE-Breadth patterns. Send Your Final Transcripts Some California private/independent situations You are usually required to send your university also accept IGETC or CSUGE-Breadth certification. a final official transcript after the end of your last IGETC or CSUGE-Breadth certification also fulfills the regular semester prior to transfer. Information requirements for a General Education Certificate. You on ordering transcripts from the San Diego should file for GE certification when you are enrolled Community College District is available at: in your final GE courses and know which university www.sdccd.edu/alumni/transcripts . you will be attending. Apply at the Evaluations Office i n A -110 . Meet Immunization Requirements Most universities require you to provide Attend Graduation documentation of immunizations against certain You don’t have to attend City College graduation to communicable diseases, like measles or rubella. transfer or to receive a degree, but it’s a great way Review your university admission paperwork for to celebrate and be publicly recognized for your more information. achievement. You earned it! Information about the graduation ceremony is available on the City College . website at www.sdcity.edu/graduation Find Out How to Get There Are you using public transportation to commute to your new university? It’s a good idea to figure out your best route to the university now, before you start attending. S 115 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an

116 This requirement may be fulfilled at a California CSU U.S. History, Constitution, and Community College prior to transfer by completing American Ideals Certification Transfer Guide a combination of courses that satisfies all three areas The California State University, before awarding a of the requirement. The requirement may also be degree, requires students to complete courses or completed at a CSU campus after transfer. Courses examinations that address: approved in two US areas may be used to satisfy both areas. 1. The historical development of American institutions and ideals (Area US-1), and Although this requirement is not part of the General Education requirements for CSU, all students must The Constitution of the United States and 2. complete course work in U.S. History, Constitution the operation of representative democratic and Government before graduation from a CSU government under that Constitution (Area US-2), campus. The courses may also be used to partially and fulfill Area D of the CSU General Education Breadth The process of California state and local 3. Requirements. government (Area US-3). ] indicates course has been approved to meet the requirement for the area. A check mark [ p Note: Not required for Certification. Area US-1: Area US-3: Area US-2: California Development US of American Constitution State & Local Governments Course Institutions BLAS 140A History of the U.S., Black Perspectives (C,M,MMR) p p BLAS 140B History of the U.S., Black Perspectives (C,M,MMR) p p CHIC 141A U.S. History from a Chicano Perspective (C,M) p p CHIC 141B U.S. History from a Chicano Perspective (C,M) p p HIST 109 History of the United States I (C,M,MMR) p p HIST 110 History of the United States II (C,M,MMR) p p HIST 115A History of the Americas I (C,M,MMR) p p HIST 115B History of the Americas II (C,M,MMR) p p HIST 123 U.S. History from the Asian Pacific American Perspective (C,M) p p HIST 141 Women in United States History I (M,MMR) p p HIST 142 Women in United States History II (M,MMR) p p HIST 150 Native Americans in U.S. History (M) p p HIST 151 Native Americans in U.S. History (M) p p HIST 175 California History (M) p POLI 102 The American Political System (C,M,MMR) p p NOTES: Completion of the Advanced Placement examination in U.S. History with a score of 3 or higher will • satisfy the requirement for Area US-1. • Completion of the Advanced Placement examination in U.S. Government & Politics with a score of 3 or higher will satisfy the requirement for Area US-2. • Students who have completed this requirement except for the California government portion must complete one course approved in Area US-3. S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 116

117 Courses may be approved for more than one • Transfer General IGETC area. However, each course may be used to certify only one of the areas it is approved for. Education Options • Students should apply for IGETC certification at the last community college attended University of California and prior to transfer. IGETC certification requests California State University will be processed for students who have completed at least one course at a SDCCD Intersegmental General Education college. Certification forms are available at the Transfer Guide Counseling or Evaluations Office. Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) (Option 3) AP credit and coursework completed at • accredited U.S. colleges and universities may About The IGETC Pattern be used to fulfill some IGETC requirements. The Intersegmental General Education Transfer All such credit must be evaluated through the Curriculum (IGETC) is a general education pattern Evaluations office. Foreign coursework is not that will fulfill all lower-division general education acceptable. requirements at all California State University • All courses must be passed with a “C” or higher. (CSU) campuses and most University of California Pass (P) grades are also acceptable. “C-” is not (UC) campuses/majors. It is also accepted by some acceptable. private/independent or out of state universities. IGETC is usually recommended for students who • Students transferring to UC need not complete intend to transfer to a UC campus, or who are not yet the Oral Communication requirement (Area 1C). sure of their intended transfer university. Completion Students transferring to CSU need not complete • of the IGETC pattern is not an admission requirement the Languages Other than English requirement. for transfer to most UC or CSU campuses, nor is it the only way to fulfill the lower division GE requirements Some UC campuses do not allow use of IGETC • of a UC or CSU campus prior to transfer. for students who were previously enrolled at a UC campus. IGETC for STEM Some community college courses have • Students pursuing an Associate Degree for Transfer limitations on the amount of credit awarded by in Biology are eligible to take IGETC for STEM, the receiving university. See a counselor, the deferring two lower-division GE courses until after course description in the college catalog, or transfer. IGETC for STEM is applicable only to Biology for more information. www.assist.org majors in which the Transfer Model Curriculum explicitly indicates the availability of the option. IGETC is not recommended for the following transfer destinations: Students using IGETC for STEM may delay until after transfer: UC San Diego Eleanor Roosevelt College • One general education course in Area 3 (Arts a. • UC Berkeley Colleges of Business, Chemistry, and Humanities); and Environmental Design (Architecture), Engineering, Natural Resources, Optometry One general education course in Area 4 (Social b. and Behavioral Sciences). UC Davis College of Engineering • It is strongly recommended that students consult • UC Irvine Schools of Engineering, Biological with a counselor to determine which general Sciences, Physical Sciences education pattern is most appropriate for their • UC Riverside Colleges of Engineering, Natural individual educational goals. and Agricultural Sciences Additional IGETC information and restrictions: UC Santa Barbara Colleges of Engineering, • Each course must have been IGETC approved at • Creative Studies the time it was completed. See www.assist.org UC Los Angeles Schools of Engineering and • for a list of certified courses and approval dates. Applied Science, Nursing an 117 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

118 Area 2—Mathematical Concepts The IGETC Pattern and Quantitative Reasoning Transfer Guide Colleges in parenthesis indicate where the () 1 course, 3 semester/4–5 quarter units course is approved for IGETC Requirements. Courses must have Intermediate Algebra as a C—City College prerequisite. M—Mesa College MMR—Miramar College Biological Statistics (C,M) BIOL 200 + * Courses with asterisks are listed in more than Statistics for Business (C,M,MMR) BUSE 115 one area but shall not be certified in more than Gateway to Experimental Statistics MATH 115 one area. (C,MMR) College and Matrix Algebra (C,M,MMR) MATH 116 + Courses with pluses indicate transfer credit may + be limited by either UC or CSU, or both. Please + MATH 119 Elementary Statistics (C,M,MMR) consult a counselor for additional information. + MATH 121 Basic Techniques of Applied Calculus I (C,M,MMR) Courses with @ symbols indicate CSU-only @ Basic Techniques of Calculus II + MATH 122 requirements. (C,M,MMR) Precalculus (C,M,MMR) + MATH 141 Area 1—English Communication MATH 150 + Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (C,M,MMR) 2–3 courses, 6–9 semester/8–12 quarter units Calculus with Analytic Geometry II + MATH 151 (C,M,MMR) Group A: English Composition MATH 245 Discrete Mathematics (C,M,MMR) 1 course, 3 semester/4–5 quarter units MATH 252 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (C,M,MMR) Reading and Composition (C,M,MMR) ENGL 101 Introduction to Linear Algebra MATH 254 OR (C,M,MMR) ENGL 105 Composition and Literature (C,M,MMR) Differential Equations (C,M,MMR) MATH 255 Behavioral Science Statistics (C,M,MMR) + PSYC 258 Group B: Critical Thinking - English Composition 1 course, 3 semester/4–5 quarter units Area 3—Arts and Humanities Courses must have English Composition as a prerequisite 3 courses, 9 semester/12–15 quarter units At least one course from the Arts and one from the ENGL 205 Critical Thinking and Intermediate Humanities. Composition (C,M,MMR) PHIL 205 Critical Thinking and Writing in 3A: Arts Courses Philosophy (C,M,MMR) ARTF 100 Art Orientation (C,M,MMR) ARTF 107 Contemporary Art (M,MMR) Group C: Oral Communication ARTF 108 Women in Art (M) * 1 course, 3 semester/4–5 quarter units Modern Art (C,M,MMR) ARTF 109 Oral Communication (C,M,MMR) @ COMS 103 ARTF 110 Art History: Prehistoric to Gothic (C,M,MMR) Interpersonal Communication COMS 135 @ * (C,M,MMR) ARTF 111 Art History: Renaissance to Modern (C,M,MMR) COMS 160 Argumentation (C,M,MMR) @ + ARTF 113 Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the @ COMS 170 Small Group Communication Americas (M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) African Art (C,M) ARTF 115 + + Native American Art (M) ARTF 120 S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 118

119 ARTF 125 Art History: Arts of the Asian Continent Second Course in Arabic (C) ARAB 102 (C,M,MMR) Third Course in Arabic (C) ARAB 201A Pre-Columbian Art (M) ARTF 130 ARCH 126 History of Ancient World Architecture ARTF 191 Cultural Influences on Photography (M) (M) ARTF 194 Critical Photography (M) History of World Architecture: ARCH 127 Renaissance Through Contemporary Graphic Design History (C) ARTG 118 (M) African American Art (C,M) BLAS 110 ARTF 108 Women in Art (M) * Cultural Influences on African Art (M) BLAS 111 + ARTF 191 Cultural Influences on Photography (M) Transfer Guide Black Music (C,M) BLAS 120 * BLAS 145A Introduction to African History (C,M) Chicano Art (C,M) CHIC 230 * BLAS 145B Introduction to African History (C) Introduction to Film (MMR) DFLM 101 Black Women in Literature, Film and the BLAS 150 Media (C,M) DFLM 102 The American Cinema (MMR) African American Literature (C,M) BLAS 155 Introduction to Dramatic Arts (C,M) DRAM 105 CHIC 130 Mexican Literature in Translation (C,M) DRAM 107 Study of Filmed Plays (C) CHIC 135 Chicana/o Literature (C,M) DRAM 109 Theatre and Social Issues (C,M) CHIC 138 Literature of La Raza in Latin America in DRAM 136 History of Canonized Theatre - Ancient Translation (C,M) Greece to the Restoration (C,M) CHIC 190 Chicano Images in Film (C,M) DRAM 137 History of Canonized Western Theatre - Restoration to the Present (C,M) Chicano Culture (C,M) * CHIC 210 DRAM 150 Cinema as Art & Communication I (M) CHIN 102 Second Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) DRAM 151 Cinema as Art & Communication II (M) Third Course Mandarin Chinese (M) CHIN 201 MUSI 100 Introduction to Music (C,M,MMR) Fourth Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) CHIN 202 MUSI 101 Music History I: Middle Ages to Mid ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature (C,M,MMR) 18th Century (M) ENGL 209 Literary Approaches to Film (C,M,MMR) MUSI 102 Music History II: Mid 18th–Early 20th Century (M) ENGL 210 American Literature I (C,M,MMR) MUSI 103 History of Rock Music (C,M,MMR) American Literature II (C,M,MMR) ENGL 211 Music of Our Time (M) MUSI 105 English Literature I: 800–1799 ENGL 215 (C,M,MMR) World Music (C,M,MMR) MUSI 109 ENGL 216 English Literature II: 1800–Present MUSI 111 Jazz - History & Development (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Masterpieces of World Literature I: ENGL 220 MUSI 117 Music in the United States (M) 1500 BCE–1600 CE (C,M,MMR) MUSI 118 Asian Music (M) Masterpieces of World Literature II: ENGL 221 1600–Present (C,M,MMR) MUSI 119 Music in the Americas, Africa & Europe (M) ENGL 230 Asian American Literature (M,MMR) MUSI 125 Music, The Arts, and Humanity (M) ENGL 237 Women in Literature (C,MMR) History of Photography (C) PHOT 150 ENGL 240 Shakespeare (C,M) Introduction to Cinema (C) RTVF 160 FREN 102 Second Course in French (C,M) Women in Film (C) RTVF 162 Third Course in French (C,M) FREN 201 Fourth Course in French (C,M) FREN 202 3B: Humanities Courses Second Course in German (C,M) GERM 102 Third Course in German (C,M) GERM 201 AMSL 116 American Sign Language Level II (C,M) * World History I (C,M,MMR) HIST 100 * AMSL 150 Introduction to Deaf Culture (M) * HIST 101 World History II (C,M,MMR) American Sign Language Level III (C,M) AMSL 215 Introduction to Western Civilization I * HIST 105 AMSL 216 American Sign Language Level IV (C,M) (C,M,MMR) an 119 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

120 * HIST 106 Introduction to Western Civilization II PHIL 131 Environmental Ethics (C,M) (C,M,MMR) RUSS 102 Second Course in Russian (C,M) Transfer Guide Introduction to Asian Civilizations * HIST 120 RUSS 201 Third Course in Russian (M) (C,M,MMR) + SPAN 102 Second Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) * HIST 121 Asian Civilizations in Modern Times (C,M,MMR) Third Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) SPAN 201 + HIST 131 Latin America Before Independence (M) * Fourth Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) SPAN 202 * Latin America Since Independence (M) HIST 132 SPAN 215 Spanish for Spanish Speakers I (C,M) HUMA 101 Introduction to the Humanities I SPAN 216 Spanish for Spanish Speakers II (C,M) (C,M,MMR) SUST 102 Environmental Ethics (C) HUMA 102 Introduction to the Humanities II Second Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) TAGA 102 (C,M,MMR) Third Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) TAGA 201 Introduction to the New Testament HUMA 103 (C,M) Second Course in Vietnamese (M) VIET 102 Introduction to the Old Testament (M) HUMA 104 Third Course in Vietnamese (M) VIET 201 HUMA 106 World Religions (C,M,MMR) Mythology (C,M,MMR) HUMA 201 Area 4—Social and Behavioral HUMA 205 Exploring Human Values through Film (M) Sciences Second Course in Italian (C,M) ITAL 102 3 courses, 9 semester/12–15 quarter units ITAL 201 Third Course in Italian (C,M) Courses from at least two disciplines or an interdisciplinary sequence. JAPN 102 Second Course in Japanese (M) Third Course in Japanese (M) JAPN 201 4A: Anthropology and Archaeology Courses Fourth Course in Japanese (M) JAPN 202 Second Course in Latin (M) LATI 102 ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (C,M,MMR) Third Course in Latin (M) LATI 201 World Prehistory (C,M) ANTH 106 PHIL 102A Introduction to Philosophy: Reality & Knowledge (C,M,MMR) ANTH 107 Introduction to Archaeology (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Philosophy: Values PHIL 102B ANTH 110 Anthropology of Magic, Witchcraft, and (C,M,MMR) Religion (M) Historical Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 103 ANTH 200 Introduction to North American Indians (M) (M) PHIL 104A History of Western Philosophy Introduction to California Indians (C,M) ANTH 210 (C,M,MMR) Cultures of Latin America (C,M) ANTH 215 History of Western Philosophy (C,M) PHIL 104B CHIC 201 The Indigenous Tradition of Mexico and Contemporary Philosophy (C) PHIL 105 Ancient Mesoamerica (C,M) PHIL 106 Asian Philosophy (C,M) Reflections on Human Nature PHIL 107 4B: Economics Courses (C,M,MMR) Perspectives on Human Nature & PHIL 108 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON 120 Society (C,M) (C,M,MMR) Philosophy of Religion (M) PHIL 110 Principles of Microeconomics ECON 121 (C,M,MMR) PHIL 111 Philosophy in Literature (C,M) Economics of the Environment (M) ECON 220 PHIL 112 Philosophy of Science (M) PHIL 125 Philosophy of Women (C,M) 4C: Ethnic Studies Courses Introduction to Philosophy of * PHIL 126 Contemporary Gender Issues (C,M) Introduction to Deaf Culture (M) * AMSL 150 PHIL 130 Philosophy of Art and Music (C,M) BLAS 100 Introduction to Black Studies (C,M) S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 120

121 BLAS 104 Black Psychology (C,M) + 4E: Geography Courses + BLAS 115 Sociology from a Black Perspective (C) Cultural Geography (C,M,MMR) GEOG 102 BLAS 116 Contemporary Social Problems From a GEOG 104 World Regional Geography (C,M,MMR) Black Perspective (C,M) Introduction to Urban Geography (C,M) GEOG 154 Dynamics of the Black Community (M) BLAS 125 The Black Family (C,M) BLAS 130 Introduction to Black Politics (C) BLAS 135 4F: History Courses History of the U.S., Black Perspectives + BLAS 140A Transfer Guide BLAS 140A History of the United States, Black (C,M,MMR) Perspectives (C,M,MMR) + History of the U.S., Black Perspectives BLAS 140B History of the United States, Black BLAS 140B (C,M,MMR) Perspectives (C,M,MMR) Introduction to African History (C,M) BLAS 145A * + CHIC 141A United States History from a Chicano Introduction to African History (C) * BLAS 145B Perspective (C,M) Introduction to Chicano Studies (C,M) CHIC 110A United States History from a Chicano CHIC 141B Perspective (C,M) CHIC 110B Introduction to Chicano Studies (C,M) CHIC 150 History of Mexico (C,M) + United States History From a Chicano CHIC 141A Perspective (C,M) * HIST 100 World History I (C,M,MMR) CHIC 141B United States History From a Chicano + * HIST 101 World History II (C,M,MMR) Perspective (C,M) * HIST 105 Introduction to Western Civilization I History of Mexico (C,M) CHIC 150 (C,M,MMR) La Chicana (C,M) CHIC 170 Introduction to Western Civilization II HIST 106 * (C,M,MMR) The Indigenous Tradition of Mexico and CHIC 201 Ancient Mesoamerica (C,M) + HIST 109 History of the United States I (C,M,MMR) * CHIC 210 Chicano Culture (C,M) + HIST 110 History of the United States II (C,M,MMR) Filipino American Experience (MMR) FILI 100 History of the Americas I (C,M,MMR) HIST 115A + HIST 150 Native Americans in United States History (M) HIST 115B History of the Americas II (C,M,MMR) Native Americans in United States + HIST 151 Introduction to Asian Civilizations HIST 120 * History (M) (C,M,MMR) SOCO 150 Sociology of Latinos/Latinas (C,M) * HIST 121 Asian Civilizations in Modern Times (C,M,MMR) HIST 123 U.S. History from the Asian Pacific 4D: Gender Studies American Perspective (C,M) The Modern Middle East (M) HIST 130 Women in Art (M) ARTF 108 * Latin America Before Independence (M) HIST 131 * Psycho-History of Racism and Sexism BLAS 175 (M) * Latin America Since Independence (M) HIST 132 CHIC 170 La Chicana (C,M) + HIST 141 Women in United States History I (M,MMR) Introduction to Gender Studies (C) GEND 101 Women in United States History II + HIST 142 HIST 141 Women in United States History I + (M,MMR) (M,MMR) + Native Americans in United States HIST 150 HIST 142 Women in United States History II + History (M) (M,MMR) Native Americans in United States HIST 151 + * Introduction to Philosophy of PHIL 126 History (M) Contemporary Gender Issues (C,M) Ancient Egypt (M) HIST 154 PSYC 133 Psychology of Women (M,MMR) HIST 175 California History (M) an 121 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

122 PSYC 111 Psychological/Social Aspects of Aging, 4G: Interdisciplinary, Social & Behavioral Sciences Death and Dying (C,M) Transfer Guide AGRI 100 Principles of Sustainable Agriculture (C) Introduction to Child Psychology (M) + PSYC 121 Human Growth and Development + CHIL 101 + PSYC 123 Adolescent Psychology (C,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Psychology of Women (M,MMR) PSYC 133 Lifespan Growth and Development CHIL 103 + Marriage and Family Relations PSYC 135 (C,MMR) (C,M,MMR) COMS 135 Interpersonal Communication * PSYC 137 Human Sexual Behavior (C,M,MMR) + (C,M,MMR) PSYC 155 Introduction to Personality (C,M,MMR) CRES 101 Conflict Resolution and Mediation (C) PSYC 166 Introduction to Social Psychology Mass Media in the Digital Age (C) DJRN 100 (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Linguistics (C,M) ENGL 202 PSYC 211 Learning (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Futures Studies (C) FUTR 101 Psychology of Lifespan Development PSYC 230 Creating Futures: Methods and Tools (C) FUTR 102 (C,M,MMR) Emerging Technologies (C) FUTR 103 Abnormal Psychology (C,M,MMR) PSYC 245 JOUR 202 Introduction to Mass Communication (C,M,MMR) 4J: Sociology & Criminology Courses NUTR 153 Cultural Foods (M,MMR) PEAC 101 Introduction to Peace Studies (C) BLAS 125 Dynamics of the Black Community (M) Nonviolence and Conflict Resolution (C) PEAC 102 Issues in Social Philosophy (M) PHIL 109 Environmental Sustainability, Justice PEAC 201 SOCO 101 Principles of Sociology (C,M,MMR) + and Ethics (C) Contemporary Social Problems SOCO 110 RTVF 101 Media Law and Ethics (C) (C,M,MMR) SOCO 220 Introduction to Research Methods in Sociology of the Family (C,M) SOCO 125 Sociology (C,MMR) SOCO 145 Health and Society (C,MMR) SOCO 223 Globalization and Social Change SOCO 150 Sociology of Latinos/Latinas (C,M) (C,M,MMR) SOCO 201 Advanced Principles of Sociology Introduction to Sustainability (C,MMR) SUST 101 (C,M,MMR) SOCO 220 Introduction to Research Methods in Sociology (C,MMR) 4H: Political Science, Government & Legal Institutions Courses SOCO 223 Globalization and Social Change (C,M,MMR) ADJU 101 Introduction to Administration of Justice (C,MMR) Concepts of Criminal Law (MMR) ADJU 193 Area 5—Physical and Biological Constitutional Law I (MMR) ADJU 230 Sciences Introduction to Political Science POLI 101 At least 2 courses required, 7–9 semester/9–12 (C,M,MMR) quarter units. POLI 102 The American Political System One Physical Science course and one Biological (C,M,MMR) Science course; at least one must include a Comparative Politics (C,M,MMR) POLI 103 laboratory. POLI 140 Contemporary International Politics One course in 5A (underlined courses include a • (C,M,MMR) lab component) Globalization and Social Change SOCO 223 (C,M,MMR) • One course in 5B (underlined courses include a lab component) 4I: Psychology Courses • One of the courses selected to fulfill the requirement for 5A or 5B must include a PSYC 101 + General Psychology (C,M,MMR) laboratory component or a separate course S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 122

123 must be taken from 5C. If a separate laboratory Issues in Environmental Science & BIOL 101 course is taken from 5C, it must match one of Sustainability (C) the two lecture courses taken from 5A or 5B. BIOL 107 General Biology - Lecture and Lab + (C,M,MMR) 5A: Physical Science Courses Introduction to Oceanography (C,M) BIOL 110 BIOL 115 Marine Biology (C,M,MMR) Descriptive Astronomy (C,M,MMR) ASTR 101 BIOL 120 + The Environment of Man (M) AVIA 115 Aviation Weather (MMR) Human Heredity (C,M,MMR) BIOL 130 Fundamentals of Chemistry (C,M,MMR) CHEM 100 + Transfer Guide BIOL 131 Introduction to Biotechnology (MMR) General, Organic, and Biological CHEM 103 Chemistry (MMR) + Plants and People (C,M,MMR) BIOL 180 CHEM 111 Chemistry in Society (C,M,MMR) General Microbiology (C,M,MMR) BIOL 205 CHEM 130 + Introduction to Organic & Biological BIOL 210A Introduction to the Biological Chemistry (C,M,MMR) Sciences I (C,M,MMR) + Introduction to General Chemistry CHEM 152 Introduction to the Biological BIOL 210B (C,M,MMR) Sciences II (C,M,MMR) CHEM 200 General Chemistry I - Lecture Introduction to Zoology (C,M) BIOL 215 + (C,M,MMR) Human Anatomy (C,M,MMR) BIOL 230 CHEM 201 General Chemistry II - Lecture (C,M,MMR) Human Physiology (C,M,MMR) BIOL 235 + Organic Chemistry I - Lecture CHEM 231 BIOL 250 Introduction to Botany (M) + (C,M,MMR) PSYC 260 Introduction to Physiological CHEM 233 Organic Chemistry II - Lecture Psychology (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) CHEM 251 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry (C,M,MMR) 5C: Science Laboratory GEOG 101 Physical Geography (C,M,MMR) ANTH 104 Laboratory in Physical Anthropology Physical Geology (C,M,MMR) GEOL 100 (C,M,MMR) GEOL 104 Earth Science (C,M,MMR) + ASTR 109 Practice in Observing Lab (C,M) GEOL 111 The Earth Through Time (C,M,MMR) + Astronomy Lab (C,M,MMR) ASTR 111 + PHYN 100 Survey of Physical Science (C,M,MMR) + CHEM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry Lab (C,M,MMR) Physical Science for Elementary PHYN 105 Education (M) Chemistry in Society Laboratory CHEM 111L (C,M,MMR) PHYN 120 The Oceans (M,MMR) + CHEM 130L Introduction to Organic & Biological Introductory Physics (C,M) PHYS 100 + Chemistry Lab (C,M,MMR) PHYS 125 General Physics (C,M,MMR) + + Introduction to General Chemistry Lab CHEM 152L (C,M,MMR) PHYS 126 General Physics II (C,M,MMR) + General Chemistry I - Lab (C,M,MMR) CHEM 200L PHYS 180A General Physics I (C,MMR) + General Chemistry II - Lab (C,M,MMR) CHEM 201L + General Physics II (C,MMR) PHYS 180B CHEM 231L + Organic Chemistry I - Lab (C,M,MMR) Mechanics (C,M,MMR) PHYS 195 + CHEM 233L Organic Chemistry II - Lab (C,M,MMR) Electricity and Magnetism (C,M,MMR) PHYS 196 + Physical Geography Lab (C,M,MMR) GEOG 101L Waves, Optics and Modern Physics PHYS 197 + (C,M,MMR) Physical Geology Lab (C,M,MMR) GEOL 101 Earth Science Laboratory (C,M) GEOL 120 5B: Biological Science Courses PHYN 101 Survey of Physical Science Lab + (C,M,MMR) ANTH 102 Introduction to Physical Anthropology + PHYS 181A General Physics Lab I (C,MMR) (C,M,MMR) + General Physics Lab II (C,MMR) PHYS 181B BIOL 100 Natural History Environmental Biology + (M,MMR) S 123 • 2018–2019 ollege an ity C iego D C

124 Area 6—Languages other than JAPN 202 Fourth Course in Japanese (M) English LATI 101 First Course in Latin (M) Transfer Guide Second Course in Latin (M) LATI 102 UC Requirement Only. In order to complete IGETC for the University of California system, students are Third Course in Latin (M) LATI 201 required to demonstrate competence/proficiency RUSS 101 First Course in Russian (C,M) in a language other than English equal to two Second Course in Russian (C,M) RUSS 102 years of high school study. Competence may be Third Course in Russian (M) RUSS 201 demonstrated through the following mechanisms: + SPAN 101 First Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) 1. Completion of two years of the same foreign Second Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) + SPAN 102 language of high school level work with grades of SPAN 201 + Third Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) “C” or better. + Fourth Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) SPAN 202 2. Completion of a course or courses at a college or Spanish for Spanish Speakers I (C,M) SPAN 215 university, with a grade of “C” or better in each course. Usually, one semester of college work in a SPAN 216 Spanish for Spanish Speakers II (C,M) language other than English is equivalent to two TAGA 101 First Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) years of high school work. TAGA 102 Second Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) Any one of the following course or courses TAGA 201 Third Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) completed with a grade of “C” or better, will fulfill the First Course in Vietnamese (M) VIET 101 requirement. VIET 102 Second Course in Vietnamese (M) 6A: Languages Other Than English VIET 201 Third Course in Vietnamese (M) American Sign Language Level I (C,M) AMSL 115 Achieve a satisfactory score on the SAT Subject 3. AMSL 116 American Sign Language Level II (C,M) Test in languages other than English, as listed AMSL 215 American Sign Language Level III (C,M) below. If the test was taken before May 1995, the AMSL 216 American Sign Language Level IV (C,M) first score is the minimum; if the test was taken after May 1995, the second score is the minimum: ARAB 101 First Course in Arabic (C) ARAB 102 Second Course in Arabic (C) • Chinese With Listening: not offered before 1995/520 Third Course in Arabic (C) ARAB 201A CHIN 101 First Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) • French/French With Listening: 500/540 Second Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) CHIN 102 • German/German With Listening: 500/510 Third Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) CHIN 201 • Hebrew (Modern): 500/470 CHIN 202 Fourth Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) • Italian: 500/520 FREN 101 First Course in French (C,M) FREN 102 Second Course in French (C,M) • Japanese With Listening: 500/510 FREN 201 Third Course in French (C,M) • Korean/Korean With Listening: not offered FREN 202 Fourth Course in French (C,M) before 1995/500 GERM 101 First Course in German (C,M) • Latin: 500/530 Second Course in German (C,M) GERM 102 Spanish/Spanish With Listening: 500/520 • Third Course in German (C,M) GERM 201 4. Achieve a score of 3, 4 or 5 on a College Board ITAL 101 First Course in Italian (C,M) Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in a Second Course in Italian (C,M) ITAL 102 language other than English. ITAL 201 Third Course in Italian (C,M) 5. Achieve a score of 5 or higher on an International First Course in Japanese (M) JAPN 101 Baccalaureate (IB) Higher Level Examination in a Second Course in Japanese (M) JAPN 102 language other than English. JAPN 201 Third Course in Japanese (M) S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 124

125 It is strongly recommended that students consult 6. Satisfactorily complete a proficiency test administered by a community college, university with a counselor to determine which general education pattern is most appropriate for their or other college in a language other than English. The test must assess the student proficiency at individual educational goals. a level equivalent to at least two years of high Certification of CSUGE-Breadth Requirements school language. The San Diego Community College District does not administer this test. Official notification from a California community college that a transfer student has completed 7. Complete, with grades of “C” or better, two years courses fulfilling lower-division general education of formal schooling at the sixth-grade level or Transfer Guide requirements occurs through a process of higher in an institution where the language of “certification”. Certification is a legal agreement instruction is not English. If secondary school between the CSU and California Community was completed in a non-English-speaking Colleges. country and the language of instruction of the It is the policy of the San Diego Community secondary school was not English, language College District to provide certification of general other than English proficiency can be certified education breadth requirements when such service for IGETC without further evaluation. The student is requested by the student. Certification of general must present appropriate documentation of education courses is generally requested when the attendance at the secondary school. CSUGE-B pattern has been completed. Earn a passing grade on the international A level 8. or O level exam in a language other than English. Additional CSUGE-Breadth Information and Restrictions If an appropriate achievement test is not 9. Completion of the CSUGE-B pattern is not an available to assert proficiency, have competency • verified by a faculty member associated with a admission requirement nor does completion California community college. Such verification guarantee admission to any CSU campus or program. requires that the college provide a document on letterhead asserting that the student’s Certification is based on approved courses listed • proficiency in the language is equivalent to in the CSUGE-B pattern that are completed in two years of high school study. See a counselor the San Diego Community College District or for more information. Only students who have from other regionally accredited institutions. no other means to verify foreign language proficiency may pursue this option. Students • Students pursuing an Associate Degree for Transfer in Biology are eligible to take CSUGE- must petition for faculty member verification through the Evaluations Office. Breadth for STEM, deferring two lower-division GE courses until after transfer. CSUGE-Breadth Completion of courses above proficiency for STEM is applicable only to Biology majors in level, with grades of “C” or better, may also be which the Transfer Model Curriculum explicitly used to meet the requirement. Special Topics indicates the availability of the option. Students and Civilization courses DO NOT meet this using CSUGE-Breadth for STEM must complete: requirement. See a Counselor. All courses in Areas A, B, and E of the a. traditional GE Breadth curriculum; and California State University General Education Breadth (CSUGE-B) One course in Area C1 Arts and one course b. in Area C2 Humanities; and About the CSUGE-Breadth Pattern Two courses in Area D from two different c. The California State University General Education- disciplines. Breadth (CSUGE-B) pattern is one option that allows California community college transfer students Courses completed at a foreign college • to fulfill the lower-division general education or university cannot be used to satisfy requirements of any California State University (CSU) requirements for certification. campus. The curriculum consists of a 39-unit pattern Catalog rights do not apply to the CSUGE-B • with five areas of concentration. pattern. an 125 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

126 • Prior to certification, students must complete a A1: Oral Communication minimum of 3 units of general education within Transfer Guide the CSUGE-B pattern or 12 units in residence at Oral Communication (C,M,MMR) COMS 103 the San Diego Community College District. * COMS 135 Interpersonal Communication (C,M,MMR) Official transcripts from all colleges and • Small Group Communication COMS 170 universities attended must be on file before (C,M,MMR) submitting an application for certification. The application is available in the Evaluations Office and/or Counseling Office. A2: Written Communication • The CSUGE-B pattern is accepted by some ENGL 101 Reading and Composition (C,M,MMR) California private and independent colleges and ENGL 105 Composition and Literature (C,M,MMR) universities in satisfying lower division general education requirements. A3: Critical Thinking For additional information, consult a counselor. COMS 160 Argumentation (C,M,MMR) The CSUGE-Breadth Pattern Critical Thinking and Intermediate ENGL 205 (Option 2) Composition (C,M,MMR) Logic and Critical Thinking (C,M,MMR) PHIL 100 The following information is based on the 2018–2019 agreement and is distributed as follows: Historical Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 103 * (M) Colleges in parenthesis indicate where the () Critical Thinking and Writing in PHIL 205 Philosophy (C,M,MMR) course is approved for CSUGE-B Requirements. C—City College M—Mesa College Area B. Scientific Inquiry and MMR—Miramar College Quantitative Reasoning: * Courses with asterisks are listed in more than No fewer than nine semester units (12–15 quarter units) one area but shall not be certified in more than one area. Including: Courses with the number sign are listed more One course in B1 (underlined courses include a • # than once in the same area, but will only be used lab component) for certification once. • One course in B2 (underlined courses include a lab component) Courses required in Oral Please note: Communication (Area A1), Written • One of the courses selected to fulfill the Communication (Area A2), Critical Thinking requirement for B1 or B2 must include a (Area A3), and Mathematics and Quantitative laboratory component or a separate course Reasoning (Area B4) must be completed with must be taken from B3. If a separate laboratory grades of “C” or better for admission to most course is taken from B3, it must match one of the CSU campuses and CSUGE-Breadth Certification. two lecture courses taken from B1 or B2. For additional information, consult a counselor. One course in B4 • Area A. English Language B1: Physical Science Communication and Critical ASTR 101 Descriptive Astronomy (C,M,MMR) Thinking: Aviation Weather (MMR) AVIA 115 No fewer than nine semester units (12–15 quarter units) Fundamentals of Chemistry (C,M,MMR) CHEM 100 including one course in A1, one course in A2, and one CHEM 103 General, Organic, and Biological course in A3. Chemistry (MMR) Chemistry in Society (C,M,MMR) CHEM 111 S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 126

127 CHEM 130 Introduction to Organic & Biological Elements of Human Anatomy & BIOL 160 Chemistry (C,M,MMR) Physiology (M,MMR) Introduction to General Chemistry Plants and People (C,M,MMR) CHEM 152 BIOL 180 (C,M,MMR) BIOL 205 General Microbiology (C,M,MMR) General Chemistry I - Lecture CHEM 200 Introduction to the Biological BIOL 210A (C,M,MMR) Sciences I (C,M,MMR) CHEM 201 General Chemistry II - Lecture Introduction to the Biological BIOL 210B (C,M,MMR) Sciences II (C,M,MMR) CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry I - Lecture Introduction to Zoology (C,M) BIOL 215 Transfer Guide (C,M,MMR) Human Anatomy (C,M,MMR) BIOL 230 Organic Chemistry II - Lecture CHEM 233 (C,M,MMR) BIOL 235 Human Physiology (C,M,MMR) CHEM 251 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry Introduction to Botany (M) BIOL 250 (C,M,MMR) PSYC 260 Introduction to Physiological GEOG 101 Physical Geography (C,M,MMR) Psychology (C,M,MMR) Physical Geology (C,M,MMR) GEOL 100 GEOL 111 The Earth Through Time (C,M,MMR) B3: Laboratory Activity GEOL 104 Earth Science (C,M,MMR) ANTH 104 Laboratory in Physical Anthropology PHYN 100 Survey of Physical Science (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Physical Science for Elementary PHYN 105 Practice in Observing (C,M) ASTR 109 Education (M) ASTR 111 Astronomy Laboratory (C,M,MMR) The Oceans (M,MMR) PHYN 120 CHEM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry Introductory Physics (C,M) PHYS 100 Laboratory (C,M,MMR) General Physics (C,M,MMR) PHYS 125 Chemistry in Society Laboratory CHEM 111L (C,M,MMR) PHYS 126 General Physics II (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Organic & Biological CHEM 130L PHYS 180A General Physics I (C,MMR) Chemistry Laboratory (C,M,MMR) General Physics II (C,MMR) PHYS 180B Introduction to General Chemistry CHEM 152L Mechanics (C,M,MMR) PHYS 195 Laboratory (C,M,MMR) Electricity and Magnetism (C,M,MMR) PHYS 196 CHEM 200L General Chemistry I - Laboratory (C,M,MMR) PHYS 197 Waves, Light and Modern Physics (C,M,MMR) General Chemistry II - Laboratory CHEM 201L (C,M,MMR) Organic Chemistry I - Laboratory CHEM 231L B2: Life Science (C,M,MMR) Organic Chemistry II - Laboratory CHEM 233L Introduction to Physical Anthropology ANTH 102 (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Physical Geography Laboratory GEOG 101L BIOL 100 Natural History-Environmental Biology (C,M,MMR) (M,MMR) Physical Geology Laboratory GEOL 101 Issues in Environmental Science & BIOL 101 (C,M,MMR) Sustainability (C) GEOL 120 Earth Science Laboratory (C,M) BIOL 107 General Biology - Lecture and Laboratory (C,M,MMR) Survey of Physical Science Laboratory PHYN 101 (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Applied Biology (C) BIOL 109 General Physics Lab I (C,MMR) PHYS 181A Introduction to Oceanography (C,M) BIOL 110 General Physics Lab II (C,MMR) PHYS 181B Cancer Biology (C) BIOL 111 BIOL 115 Marine Biology (C,M,MMR) B4: Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning BIOL 130 Human Heredity (C,M,MMR) BIOL 131 Introduction to Biotechnology (MMR) Biological Statistics (C,M) BIOL 200 an 127 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

128 ARTF 113 Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Statistics for Business (C,M,MMR) BUSE 115 Americas (M,MMR) MATH 104 Trigonometry (C,M,MMR) Transfer Guide African Art (C,M) ARTF 115 MATH 107 Introduction to Scientific ARTF 120 Native American Art (M) Programming (C) ARTF 125 Art History: Arts of the Asian Continent Introduction to Scientific MATH 107L (C,M,MMR) Programming Laboratory (C) ARTF 130 Pre-Columbian Art (M) MATH 115 Gateway to Experimental Statistics (C,MMR) ARTF 191 Cultural Influences on Photography (M) MATH 116 College and Matrix Algebra (C,M,MMR) Critical Photography (M) ARTF 194 A Survey of Modern Mathematics MATH 118 (C,M) Graphic Design History (C) ARTG 118 Elementary Statistics (C,M,MMR) MATH 119 African American Art (C,M) BLAS 110 Basic Techniques of Applied Calculus I MATH 121 Cultural Influences on African Art (M) BLAS 111 (C,M,MMR) BLAS 120 Black Music (C,M) MATH 122 Basic Techniques of Calculus II (C,M,MMR) CHIC 230 Chicano Art (C,M) MATH 141 Precalculus (C,M,MMR) History of Dance (C,M) DANC 181 MATH 150 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I Introduction to Film (MMR) DFLM 101 (C,M,MMR) DFLM 102 The American Cinema (MMR) Calculus with Analytic Geometry II MATH 151 DRAM 105 Introduction to Dramatic Arts (C,M) (C,M,MMR) Study of Filmed Plays (C) DRAM 107 Mecomtronics Calculus I (C) MATH 183 Theatre and Social Issues (C,M) DRAM 109 Concepts of Elementary School MATH 210A Mathematics I (C,M) DRAM 111 Chicana/o Theatre (C) Concepts of Elementary School MATH 210B DRAM 136 History of Canonized Theatre - Ancient Mathematics II (C,M) Greece to the Restoration (C,M) Discrete Mathematics (C,M,MMR) MATH 245 DRAM 137 History of Canonized Western Theatre - Restoration to the Present (C,M) MATH 252 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (C,M,MMR) DRAM 150 Cinema as Art and Communication I (M) MATH 254 Introduction to Linear Algebra (C,M,MMR) Cinema as Art and Communication II DRAM 151 (M) MATH 255 Differential Equations (C,M,MMR) Fashion History and Trends (M) FASH 120 PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics (C,M,MMR) History of Furniture and Interiors (M) INTE 125 MUSI 100 Introduction to Music (C,M,MMR) MUSI 101 Music History I: Middle Ages to Mid Area C. Arts and Humanities: 18th Century (M) Nine semester units (12–15 quarter units) with at least MUSI 102 Music History II: Mid 18th to Early 20th one course each in Arts and Humanities. Century (M) History of Rock Music (C,M,MMR) MUSI 103 C1: Arts (Art, Cinema, Dance, Music, Theater) MUSI 105 Music of Our Time (M) ARTF 100 Art Orientation (C,M,MMR) MUSI 109 World Music (C,M,MMR) Contemporary Art (M,MMR) ARTF 107 MUSI 111 Jazz - History and Development (C,M,MMR) Women in Art (M) ARTF 108 MUSI 117 Music in the United States (M) Modern Art (C,M,MMR) ARTF 109 MUSI 118 Asian Music (M) ARTF 110 Art History: Prehistoric to Gothic (C,M,MMR) MUSI 119 Music in the Americas, Africa & Europe (M) Art History: Renaissance to Modern ARTF 111 (C,M,MMR) Music, the Arts and Humanity (M) MUSI 125 S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 128

129 History of Photography (C) PHOT 150 Masterpieces of World Literature II: ENGL 221 1600–Present (C,M,MMR) RTVF 160 Introduction to Cinema (C) ENGL 230 Asian American Literature (M,MMR) RTVF 162 Women in Film (C) ENGL 237 Women in Literature (C,MMR) ENGL 238 Evaluating Children's Literature (C,M) C2: Humanities (Literature, Philosophy, ENGL 240 Shakespeare (C,M) Languages Other than English) FREN 101 First Course in French (C,M) AMSL 115 American Sign Language Level I (C,M) FREN 102 Second Course in French (C,M) Transfer Guide American Sign Language Level II (C,M) AMSL 116 Third Course in French (C,M) FREN 201 * AMSL 150 Introduction to Deaf Culture (M) FREN 202 Fourth Course in French (C,M) American Sign Language Level III (C,M) AMSL 215 GERM 101 First Course in German (C,M) American Sign Language Level IV (C,M) AMSL 216 GERM 102 Second Course in German (C,M) First Course in Arabic (C) ARAB 101 Third Course in German (C,M) GERM 201 ARAB 102 Second Course in Arabic (C) HIST 100 * World History I (C,M,MMR) ARAB 201A Third Course in Arabic (C) * World History II (C,M,MMR) HIST 101 ARTF 108 Women in Art (M) * Introduction to Western Civilization I HIST 105 (C,M,MMR) ARCH 126 History of Ancient World Architecture (M) * HIST 106 Introduction to Western Civilization II (C,M,MMR) ARCH 127 History of World Architecture: Renaissance Through Contemporary * Introduction to Asian Civilizations HIST 120 (M) (C,M,MMR) ARTF 191 Cultural Influences on Photography Asian Civilizations in Modern Times HIST 121 * (M) (C,M,MMR) BLAS 150 Black Women in Literature, Film and Latin America Before Independence * HIST 131 the Media (C,M) (M) BLAS 155 African American Literature (C,M) Latin America Since Independence (M) * HIST 132 CHIC 130 Mexican Literature in Translation (C,M) Ancient Egypt (M) * HIST 154 CHIC 135 Chicana/o Literature (C,M) Introduction to the Humanities I * HUMA 101 (C,M,MMR) CHIC 138 Literature of La Raza in Latin America in Translation (C,M) HUMA 102 Introduction to the Humanities II (C,M,MMR) CHIC 190 Chicano Images in Film (C,M) Introduction to the New Testament HUMA 103 Chicano Culture (C,M) CHIC 210 (C,M) CHIN 101 First Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) HUMA 104 Introduction to the Old Testament (M) CHIN 102 Second Course in Mandarin Chinese World Religions (C,M,MMR) HUMA 106 (M) HUMA 118 Eastern Humanities (M) CHIN 201 Third Course in Mandarin Chinese (M) HUMA 119 Western Humanities (M) Fourth Course in Mandarin Chinese CHIN 202 (M) Mythology (C,M,MMR) HUMA 201 ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature (C,M,MMR) HUMA 202 Mythology: Hero's Journey (C) Literary Approaches to Film (C,M,MMR) ENGL 209 HUMA 205 Exploring Human Values through Film (M) ENGL 210 American Literature I (C,M,MMR) HUMA 210 Women in Religion and Myth (M) ENGL 211 American Literature II (C,M,MMR) ITAL 101 First Course in Italian (C,M) ENGL 215 English Literature I: 800–1799 (C,M,MMR) ITAL 102 Second Course in Italian (C,M) ENGL 216 English Literature II: 1800–Present ITAL 201 Third Course in Italian (C,M) (C,M,MMR) JAPN 101 First Course in Japanese (M) ENGL 220 Masterpieces of World Literature I: 1500 BCE–1600 CE (C,M,MMR) Second Course in Japanese (M) JAPN 102 an 129 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

130 Area D. Social Sciences: Third Course in Japanese (M) JAPN 201 JAPN 202 Fourth Course in Japanese (M) Nine semester units (12–15 quarter units) required with Transfer Guide First Course in Latin (M) LATI 101 courses in at least two disciplinary perspectives. For example, BLAS and ECON. Second Course in Latin (M) LATI 102 Third Course in Latin (M) LATI 201 ADJU 101 Introduction to Administration of Justice (C,MMR) PHIL 102A Introduction to Philosophy: Reality and Knowledge (C,M,MMR) ADJU 106 Diversity and Community Relations (MMR) Introduction to Philosophy: Values PHIL 102B (C,M,MMR) Concepts of Criminal Law (MMR) ADJU 193 * Historical Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 103 ADJU 230 Constitutional Law I (MMR) (M) Principles of Sustainable Agriculture AGRI 100 History of Western Philosophy PHIL 104A (C) (C,M,MMR) * AMSL 150 Introduction to Deaf Culture (M) PHIL 104B History of Western Philosophy (C,M) ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Contemporary Philosophy (C) PHIL 105 (C,M,MMR) Asian Philosophy (C,M) PHIL 106 World Prehistory (C,M) ANTH 106 Reflections on Human Nature PHIL 107 Introduction to Archaeology ANTH 107 (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) PHIL 108 Perspectives on Human Nature and Anthropology of Magic, Witchcraft, ANTH 110 Society (C,M) and Religion (M) PHIL 110 Philosophy of Religion (M) ANTH 200 Introduction to North American Indians (M) Philosophy in Literature (C,M) PHIL 111 ANTH 205 Introduction to Medical Anthropology PHIL 112 Philosophy of Science (M) (M) PHIL 125 Philosophy of Women (C,M) Introduction to California Indians ANTH 210 Introduction to Philosophy of PHIL 126 * (C,M) Contemporary Gender Issues (C,M) Cultures of Latin America (C,M) ANTH 215 PHIL 130 Philosophy of Art and Music (C,M) ARTF 108 Women in Art (M) Environmental Ethics (C,M) PHIL 131 Introduction to Black Studies (C,M) BLAS 100 First Course in Russian (C,M) RUSS 101 BLAS 104 Black Psychology (C,M) RUSS 102 Second Course in Russian (C,M) Sociology from a Black Perspective (C) BLAS 115 RUSS 201 Third Course in Russian (M) Contemporary Social Problems from a BLAS 116 Black Perspective (C,M) First Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) SPAN 101 BLAS 125 Dynamics of the Black Community (M) Second Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) SPAN 102 The Black Family (C,M) BLAS 130 SPAN 201 Third Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) BLAS 135 Introduction to Black Politics (C) SPAN 202 Fourth Course in Spanish (C,M,MMR) BLAS 140A History of the U.S., Black Perspectives SPAN 215 Spanish for Spanish Speakers I (C,M) (C,M,MMR) Spanish for Spanish Speakers II (C,M) SPAN 216 History of the U.S., Black Perspectives BLAS 140B SUST 102 Environmental Ethics (C) (C,M,MMR) First Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) TAGA 101 BLAS 145A Introduction to African History (C,M) TAGA 102 Second Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) Introduction to African History (C) BLAS 145B TAGA 201 Third Course in Tagalog (M,MMR) Psycho-History of Racism and Sexism BLAS 175 (M) VIET 101 First Course in Vietnamese (M) CHIC 110A Introduction to Chicano Studies (C,M) Second Course in Vietnamese (M) VIET 102 CHIC 110B Introduction to Chicano Studies (C,M) Third Course in Vietnamese (M) VIET 201 CHIC 141A United States History from a Chicano Perspective (C,M) S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 130

131 CHIC 141B United States History from a Chicano * HIST 121 Asian Civilizations in Modern Times Perspective (C,M) (C,M,MMR) CHIC 150 History of Mexico (C,M) HIST 123 U.S. History from the Asian Pacific American Perspective (C,M) CHIC 170 La Chicana (C,M) HIST 130 The Modern Middle East (M) The Indigenous Tradition of Mexico CHIC 201 and Ancient Mesoamerica (C,M) * HIST 131 Latin America Before Independence (M) * CHIL 101 Human Growth and Development (C,M,MMR) Latin America Since Independence HIST 132 * (M) CHIL 103 Lifespan Growth and Development * Transfer Guide (C,MMR) HIST 141 Women in United States History I (M,MMR) The Child, Family and Community CHIL 141 (C,M,MMR) Women in United States History II HIST 142 (M,MMR) COMS 135 Interpersonal Communication * (C,M,MMR) Native Americans in United States HIST 150 History (M) Conflict Resolution and Mediation (C) CRES 101 Native Americans in United States HIST 151 Mass Media in the Digital Age (C) DJRN 100 History (M) ECON 120 Principles of Macroeconomics * Ancient Egypt (M) HIST 154 (C,M,MMR) California History (M) HIST 175 Principles of Microeconomics ECON 121 (C,M,MMR) * HUMS 101 Introduction to Human Aging (C) Economics of the Environment (M) ECON 220 Introduction to Mass Communication JOUR 202 (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Linguistics (C,M) ENGL 202 NUTR 153 Cultural Foods (M,MMR) * Filipino American Experience (MMR) FILI 100 Introduction to Peace Studies (C) PEAC 101 Introduction to Futures Studies (C) FUTR 101 PEAC 102 Nonviolence and Conflict Resolution Creating Futures: Methods and Tools FUTR 102 (C) (C) Environmental Sustainability, Justice PEAC 201 Emerging Technologies (C) FUTR 103 and Ethics (C) Introduction to Global Development GDEV 101 PHIL 109 Issues in Social Philosophy (M) Studies (C) * PHIL 126 Introduction to Philosophy of Introduction to Gender Studies (C) GEND 101 Contemporary Gender Issues (C,M) Cultural Geography (C,M,MMR) GEOG 102 POLI 101 Introduction to Political Science (C,M,MMR) World Regional Geography (C,M,MMR) GEOG 104 The American Political System POLI 102 Introduction to Urban Geography GEOG 154 (C,M,MMR) (C,M) POLI 103 Comparative Politics (C,M,MMR) HIST 100 World History I (C,M,MMR) * POLI 140 Contemporary International Politics * HIST 101 World History II (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) * HIST 105 Introduction to Western Civilization I PSYC 101 General Psychology (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Psychological/Social Aspects of Aging, PSYC 111 * HIST 106 * Introduction to Western Civilization II Death and Dying (C,M) (C,M,MMR) PSYC 121 Introduction to Child Psychology (M) History of the United States I HIST 109 (C,M,MMR) PSYC 123 Adolescent Psychology (C,MMR) History of the United States II HIST 110 Psychology of Women (M,MMR) PSYC 133 (C,M,MMR) * Marriage and Family Relations PSYC 135 HIST 115A History of the Americas I (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) History of the Americas II (C,M,MMR) HIST 115B * Human Sexual Behavior (C,M,MMR) PSYC 137 HIST 120 Introduction to Asian Civilizations * PSYC 155 Introduction to Personality (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Introduction to Social Psychology PSYC 166 (C,M,MMR) an 131 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

132 PSYC 211 Learning (C,M,MMR) PERG 140 Life Skills and Personal Adjustment (C,M,MMR) * PSYC 230 Psychology of Lifespan Development Transfer Guide (C,M,MMR) Aerobic Dance I (C,M,MMR) EXSC 125A Abnormal Psychology (C,M,MMR) PSYC 245 Aerobic Dance II (C,M,MMR) EXSC 125B RTVF 101 Media Law and Ethics (C) EXSC 125C Aerobic Dance III (C,M,MMR) RTVF 162 Women in Film (C) Aerobic Dance IV (C,M,MMR) EXSC 125D Principles of Sociology (C,M,MMR) SOCO 101 Cardio Conditioning I (C,M,MMR) EXSC 126A SOCO 110 Contemporary Social Problems Cardio Conditioning II (C,M,MMR) EXSC 126B (C,M,MMR) Cardio Conditioning III (C,M,MMR) EXSC 126C SOCO 125 Sociology of the Family (C,M) Cardio Conditioning IV (C,M,MMR) EXSC 126D Health and Society (C,MMR) * SOCO 145 EXSC 134 Adapted Weight Training (C,M,MMR) SOCO 150 Sociology of Latinos/Latinas (C,M) EXSC 135A Individual Conditioning I - SOCO 201 Advanced Principles of Sociology Fundamentals (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Individual Conditioning II - Beginning EXSC 135B SOCO 220 Introduction to Research Methods in (C,M,MMR) Sociology (C,MMR) Individual Conditioning III - EXSC 135C SOCO 223 Globalization and Social Change Intermediate (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) EXSC 135D Individual Conditioning IV - Advanced Introduction to Sustainability (C,MMR) SUST 101 (C,M,MMR) Yoga I - Fundamentals of Yoga EXSC 145A (C,M,MMR) Area E. Lifelong Learning and Yoga II - Beginning Yoga (C,M,MMR) EXSC 145B Self-Development: Yoga III - Intermediate (C,M,MMR) EXSC 145C Three semester units (4–5 quarter units), not all in EXSC 145D Yoga IV - Advanced Level (C,M,MMR) physical activity. * PSYC 111 Psychological/Social Aspects of Aging, Death and Dying (C,M) Leadership Theory and Practice ADJU 205 Interpersonal Relations (M) PSYC 112 (MMR) Marriage and Family Relations PSYC 135 * AVIA 133 Human Factors in Aviation (MMR) (C,M,MMR) The Environment of Man (M) BIOL 120 * Human Sexual Behavior (C,M,MMR) PSYC 137 BIOL 135 Biology of Human Nutrition (MMR) * PSYC 230 Psychology of Lifespan Development Sexuality and Black Culture (C,M) BLAS 165 (C,M,MMR) Principles of Money Management BUSE 120 * SOCO 145 Health and Society (C,MMR) (C,M,MMR) Students who have completed at least 6 Note: Human Growth and Development * CHIL 101 (C,M,MMR) months of continuous active US military service have satisfied Area E. DD214 or military transcript must be * CHIL 103 Lifespan Growth and Development (C,MMR) on file. COMS 180 Intercultural Communication (C,M,MMR) Course Identification Numbering DANC 127 Movement for Wellness (C) System (C-ID) Health and Life Style (C,M,MMR) HEAL 101 The Course Identification Numbering System (C-ID) HUMS 101 Introduction to Human Aging (C) * is a statewide numbering system independent NUTR 150 Nutrition (C,M,MMR) from the course numbers assigned by local California community colleges. The purpose of a Cultural Foods (M,MMR) NUTR 153 * C-ID designation is to identify comparable courses PERG 120 College Success and Lifelong within the California community college system Learning (C,M,MMR) and participating four-year institutions. When a PERG 130 Career - Life Planning (C,M,MMR) C-ID number is listed in the catalog in association S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 132

133 with a course, students can be assured that it will C-ID Descriptor Course be accepted in lieu of a course bearing the same ARTS 210 ARTF 165A Composition in Painting C-ID designation at another California community I (C,M,MMR) college. Many universities, including the University of ARTS 280 ARTF 170A Contemporary Crafts I California (UC) do not participate in the C-ID system. (C,MMR) Therefore, students should always reference www. ARTS 200 ARTF 210A Life Drawing I assist.org to confirm how each community college’s (C,M,MMR) course will be accepted at a specific four-year college ARTS 250 ARTF 231 Introduction to Digital or university for transfer credit. Art (M) Transfer Guide Course C-ID Descriptor BIOL 200 Biological Statistics (C,M) SOCI 125 BIOL 140 BIOL 210B Introduction to the ACCT 116A Financial Accounting ACCT 110 Biological Sciences II (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) BIOL 110B BIOL 230 Human Anatomy ACCT 120 ACCT 116B Managerial Accounting (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) BUS 110 BUSE 100 Introduction to Business AJ 110 ADJU 101 Introduction to (C,M,MMR) Administration of Justice (C,MMR) BUS 115 BUSE 119 Business Communications AJ 120 ADJU 102 Criminal Law I (C,MMR) (C,M,MMR) ADJU 162 Criminal Investigation AJ 140 BUSE 140 Business Law and the BUS 120 (MMR) Legal Environment (C,M,MMR) AJ 220 ADJU 161 Juvenile Procedures BUSE 140 Business Law and the BUS 125 (MMR) Legal Environment (C,M,MMR) ADJU 201 California Criminal AJ 122 CHIL 101 Human Growth and CDEV 100 Procedure (MMR) Development (C,M,MMR) ADJU 210 Rules of Evidence (MMR) AJ 124 CHEM 100 Fundamentals of CHEM 101 Chemistry (C,M,MMR) AJ 150 ADJU 220 Law Enforcement Forensics (MMR) CHEM 101 CHEM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry Laboratory (C,M,MMR) AGRI 107 Introduction to AG-PS 106L Agricultural Plant Science (C) CHEM 200 General Chemistry I - CHEM 110 Lecture (C,M,MMR) AGRI 114 Plant Propagation (C) AG-EH 116L CHEM 120S AG-PS 128L AGRI 125 Introduction to Soil CHEM 200L General Chemistry I - CHEM 110 Science (C) Laboratory (C,M,MMR) CHEM 120S ANTH 102 Introduction to Physical ANTH 110 Anthropology (C,M,MMR) CHEM 120S CHEM 201 General Chemistry II - Lecture (C,M,MMR) ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural ANTH 120 Anthropology (C,M,MMR) CHEM 120S CHEM 201L General Chemistry II - Laboratory (C,M,MMR) ANTH 107 Introduction to ANTH 150 Archaeology (C,M,MMR) CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry I - CHEM 160S Lecture (C,M,MMR) ARTH 120 ARTF 111 Art History: Renaissance to Modern (C,M,MMR) CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry I - CHEM 160S Laboratory (C,M,MMR) ARTH 130 ARTF 125 Art History: Arts of the Asian Continent (C,M,MMR) CHEM 233 Organic Chemistry II - CHEM 160S Lecture (C,M,MMR) ARTS 100 ARTF 150A Two-Dimensional Design (C,M,MMR) CHEM 233L Organic Chemistry II - CHEM 160S Laboratory (C,M,MMR) ARTF 151 Three-Dimensional ARTS 101 Design (C,M,MMR) CISC 190 Java Programming COMP 122 (C,M,MMR) ARTS 270 ARTF 152 Color Theory (M) COMP 132 CISC 191 Intermediate Java ARTF 155A Freehand Drawing I ARTS 110 Programming (MMR) (C,M,MMR) CISC 211 Computer Organization COMP 142 ARTF 155B Freehand Drawing II ARTS 205 and Assembly Language (MMR) (C,M,MMR) 133 • 2018–2019 ollege C an C iego D S ity

134 Course C-ID Descriptor C-ID Descriptor Course CISC 246 Discrete Mathematics for COMP 152 ENGL 205 Critical Thinking and ENGL 105 Transfer Guide Intermediate Composition Computer Science (MMR) (C,M,MMR) COMS 103 Oral Communication COMM 110 ENGL 120 ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) COMM 130 COMS 135 Interpersonal Communication (C,M,MMR) ENGL 130 ENGL 210 American Literature I (C,M,MMR) COMM 120 COMS 160 Argumentation (C,M,MMR) ENGL 135 ENGL 211 American Literature II (C,M,MMR) COMS 170 Small Group COMM 140 Communication (C,M,MMR) ENGL 160 ENGL 215 English Literature I: 800 - 1799 (C,M,MMR) COMS 180 Intercultural COMM 150 Communication (C,M,MMR) ENGL 165 ENGL 216 English Literature II: 1800 - Present (C,M,MMR) DJRN 100 Mass Media in the Digital JOUR 100 Age (C) ENGL 140 ENGL 220 Masterpieces of World JOUR 110 DJRN 200 Newswriting for Literature I: 1500 BCE - 1600 CE Multimedia (C) (C,M,MMR) ENGL 221 Masterpieces of World ENGL 145 JOUR 210 DJRN 205 Community Journalism Literature II: 1600 - Present for Multimedia (C) (C,M,MMR) DJRN 210 News Reporting and JOUR 130 Editing for Publication (C) EXSC 241B Introduction to KIN 100 Kinesiology (C,M,MMR) DJRN 211 Online News Concepts for JOUR 131 Publication (C) SOCI 140 GEND 101 Introduction to Gender Studies (C) DJRN 215 Photo Journalism and JOUR 160 Documentary Photography (C) GEOG 110 GEOG 101 Physical Geography (C,M,MMR) DRAM 105 Introduction to Dramatic THTR 111 Arts (C,M) GEOG 111 GEOG 101L Physical Geography Laboratory (C,M,MMR) DRAM 112 Introduction to Script THTR 114 Analysis (M) GEOG 120 GEOG 102 Cultural Geography (C,M,MMR) DRAM 123 Beginning Stagecraft THTR 171 (C,M) GEOG 104 World Regional GEOG 125 Geography (C,M,MMR) THTR 175 DRAM 124 Makeup for the Stage (C,M) GEOL 100 GEOL 100 Physical Geology (C,M,MMR) THTR 151 DRAM 132 Beginning Acting (C,M) GEOL 101 Physical Geology GEOL 100L Laboratory (C,M,MMR) DRAM 133 Intermediate Acting THTR 152 (C,M) GEOL 104 Earth Science (C,M,MMR) GEOL 120 THTR 113 DRAM 136 History of Canonized Theatre-Ancient Greece to the GEOL 111 The Earth Through Time GEOL 111 Restoration (C) (C,M,MMR) THTR 174 DRAM 143 Beginning Costuming (C) GEOL 120 Earth Science Laboratory GEOL 120L (C,M) DRAM 242A Rehearsal and THTR 191 GEOG 155 GISG 104 Geographic Information Performance I (C) Science and Spatial Reasoning (C,M) ECON 202 ECON 120 Principles of GEOG 155 GISG 110 Introduction to Mapping Macroeconomics (C,M,MMR) and Geographic Information Systems (C,M) ECON 121 Principles of ECON 201 Microeconomics (C,M,MMR) HEAL 131 Emergency Response KIN 101 (First Aid/CPR/AED) (M) ENGL 101 Reading and Composition ENGL 100 (C,M,MMR) HIST 160 HIST 101 World History II (C,M,MMR) S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 134

135 C-ID Descriptor Course C-ID Descriptor Course POLI 102 The American Political HIST 105 Introduction to Western HIST 170 POLS 110 Civilization I (C,M,MMR) System (C,M,MMR) POLS 140 POLI 140 Contemporary HIST 180 HIST 106 Introduction to Western International Politics (C,M,MMR) Civilization II (C,M,MMR) PHYS 105 PHYS 125 General Physics JOUR 110 JOUR 200 Introduction to (C,M,MMR) Newswriting and Reporting (C,M) PHYS 205 PHYS 195 Mechanics (C,M,MMR) JOUR 202 Introduction to Mass JOUR 100 Transfer Guide Communication (C,M,MMR) PHYS 196 Electricity and Magnetism PHYS 210 (C,M,MMR) JOUR 120 JOUR 206 Online Journalism (C,M) PHYS 197 Waves, Optics and PHYS 215 JOUR 210A Newspaper Production JOUR 130 Modern Physics (C,M,MMR) 1 (C,M,MMR) POLS 130 POLI 103 Comparative Politics JOUR 210B Newspaper Production JOUR 131 (C,M,MMR) 2 (C,M) PSYC 101 General Psychology PSY 110 JOUR 150 JOUR 220 Principles of Public (C,M,MMR) Relations (M) PSY 170 PSYC 166 Introduction to Social MATH 140 MATH 121 Basic Techniques of Psychology (C,M,MMR) Applied Calculus I (C,M,MMR) PSY 200 PSYC 255 Introduction to MATH 150 Calculus with Analytic MATH 210 Psychological Research (C,M,MMR) Geometry I (C,M,MMR) PSYC 258 Behavioral Science SOCI 125 MATH 252 Calculus with Analytic MATH 230 Statistics (C,M,MMR) Geometry III (C,M,MMR) MATH 110 PSYC 258 Behavioral Science MATH 254 Introduction to Linear MATH 250 and Statistics (C,M,MMR) Algebra (C,M,MMR) PSYC 259 Behavioral Science MUS 100 MUSI 100 Introduction to Music Statistics Laboratory (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) PSYC 260 Introduction to PSY 150 MUS 110 MUSI 150A Basic Musicianship Physiological Psychology (C,M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) MUS 130 MUSI 158B Music Theory II (M,MMR) SOCI 110 SOCO 101 Principles of Sociology (C,M,MMR) MUS 180 MUSI 253A Jazz Ensemble I (M) SOCO 110 Contemporary Social SOCI 115 MUSI 253B Jazz Ensemble II (M) MUS 180 Problems (C,M,MMR) MUS 180 MUSI 253C Jazz Ensemble III (M) SOCO 220 Introduction to Research SOCI 120 MUS 180 MUSI 253D Jazz Ensemble IV (M) Methods in Sociology (C,MMR) MUSI 258A Music Theory III MUS 140 SOCI 130 SOCO 125 Sociology of the Family (M,MMR) (C,M) MUSI 258B Music Theory IV MUS 150 SPAN 101 First Course in Spanish SPAN 100 (M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) MUS 268B Beginning Ear Training MUS 135 SPAN 110 SPAN 102 Second Course in Spanish Laboratory II (M,MMR) (C,M,MMR) MUSI 274B Applied Music II (M) MUS 160 SPAN 201 Third Course in Spanish SPAN 200 (C,M,MMR) MUSI 274C Applied Music III (M) MUS 160 SPAN 202 Fourth Course in Spanish SPAN 210 NUTR 150 Nutrition (C,M,MMR) NUTR 110 (C,M,MMR) PHIL 101 Symbolic Logic (C,M,MMR) PHIL 210 SPAN 220 SPAN 215 Spanish for Spanish Speakers I (C,M) PHIL 100 PHIL 102A Introduction to Philosophy (C,M,MMR) SPAN 230 SPAN 216 Spanish for Spanish Speakers II (C,M) PHIL 120 PHIL 102B Introduction to Philosophy: Values (C,M,MMR) POLS 150 POLI 101 Introduction to Political Science (C,M,MMR) 135 S ollege C ity C iego D an • 2018–2019

136 Instead, each university has its own unique GE Other Transfer pattern. City College has established articulation Transfer Guide agreements with many of these institutions. General Education These agreements specify the courses students can complete at City to fulfill the university’s GE requirements. They are available Options . For at www.sdcity.edu/transfer/articulation Some transfer students are best served by following more information on transferring to a private/ a general education pattern other than the IGETC or independent or out-of-state university, visit the CSUGE-B patterns. These typically include students Transfer Center (A-111) or see a counselor. who fall into one of the following three categories: Students who wish to complete the general 3. 1. Students entering high unit majors such as education requirements of one specific an engineering or science discipline. Major university. Some students decide to complete preparation for the engineering and science the GE requirements for one specific university, fields typically consists of a high number rather than the more universally applicable IGETC of units. Most universities prefer (and some or CSUGE-B patterns, for several reasons: require) that these preparation for major courses • Some universities and/or majors do not accept be completed prior to transfer. Therefore, it IGETC and instead suggest following the may be more beneficial for students entering university’s own GE pattern. these majors to complete relatively fewer GE courses and more major preparation courses • Some students know that they will attend only at the community college, while still meeting one university (such as those with a guarantee the minimum admission requirements of the of transfer admission) and so plan to complete university. Students should review the catalog the specific GE pattern for that institution only. or other published advising materials of the • Some university-specific GE patterns require university and major to which they intend to fewer total units than IGETC or CSUGE-B. transfer and then consult a City counselor for assistance in selecting appropriate courses. Each university’s unique GE pattern can be found in the university catalog. In addition, some UC and Students transferring to a private/independent 2. CSU campuses have posted their unique general or out-of-state university. Some private/ education patterns to the ASSIST website at: independent and out-of-state universities . www.assist.org accept IGETC or CSUGE-B, but most do not. 136 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an ity

137 Associate Degree and Certificate Programs D iego C ity an ollege • 2018–2019 137 S C

138 Degree and Certificate List Associate Degree and Certificate Programs Associate A.S. Certificate of A.A. Certificate of Page Degree for Degree Achievement Degree Performance Degree Transfer Agriculture Organic Gardening for the 147 X Culinary Arts Agriculture Plant Science 148 X Sustainable Urban Agriculture 147 X Urban Farming Professional 147 X Urban Gardening 147 X Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Environmental Control Technology Advanced Air Conditioning and 150 X Direct Digital Control Air Conditioning and Solar 149 X Energy Air Conditioning, Heating, and 150 X Advanced Refrigeration Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, 152 X and Environmental Control Technology Basic Refrigeration and Control X 150 Systems Heating, Air Conditioning and 151 X Solar Energy Heating, Ventilation, and Air X 151 Conditioning Systems Design Stationary Facilities Engineering 151 X and General Maintenance Technician Alcohol and Other Drug Studies Alcohol and Other Drug Studies 153 X X Anthropology Anthropology 156 X X Archaeology 155 X Art–Fine Arts Advanced Arts Entrepreneurship 157 X Art History X 159 Arts Entrepreneurship 157 X Studio Arts X 161 Two-Dimensional Art Emphasis X 159 Three-Dimensional Art Emphasis 159 X Art–Graphic Design Graphic Design X 164 X ollege S an 138 D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

139 Degree and Certificate List Associate Certificate of A.S. A.A. Certificate of Degree Page Degree for Achievement Degree Performance Degree Transfer Astronomy Astronomy X 165 Biology Allied Health Track X 167 Applied Biology Track 168 X Applied Biotechnology X 167 Biology 168 X Transfer Track 167 X Black Studies Black Studies 170 X Business Studies Bookkeeping for a Small X 173 Business Associate Degree and Certificate Programs Business Administration X X 172 Business Communications and X 177 Cultural Competence Business Presentations 178 X Certified Public Accountant 174 X Preparatory Program Customer Relationship 178 X Management Job Skills X 180 Management and Team Building X 176 Real Estate X 182 Real Estate Broker 181 X Real Estate Salesperson X 181 Recordkeeping for a Small 173 X Business Small Business Accounting X 175 Small Business Management 179 X X Entrepreneur Sports Management 176 X Starting and Managing a Small 176 X Business Tax Preparer X 174 VITA Tax Preparation Training X 174 Working Education 180 X Writing and Computational Skills X 178 for Business C S D iego an ity C • 2018–2019 ollege 139

140 Degree and Certificate List Associate Degree and Certificate Programs Associate Certificate of A.S. Certificate of A.A. Degree Page Degree for Performance Degree Achievement Degree Transfer Chemistry Chemistry X 183 Chicana and Chicano Studies Chicana and Chicano Studies X 184 Child Development Associate Teacher 186 X Child Development 188 X Elementary Teacher Education 188 X Master Teacher 187 X School Age Child Care 186 X Site Supervisor 190 X Teacher 187 X Communication Studies Communication Studies X X 191 X Computer Business Technology Administrative Assistant X 195 Administrative Office X 195 Management Business Information Worker X 196 Computer Literacy X 194 Intro to Business Information X Worker Office Support Basics X 194 Computer Information Systems Cybersecurity Specialist X 197 Cyber Incident Response X 198 Desktop Support Technician 198 X Information Technology 200 X X Management Intermediate C++ 198 X Introduction to C++ 198 X Microsoft Technology Specialist X 199 Network Security 200 X Project Management for X 200 Information Technology Computer Technical Illustration Computer Technical Illustration 202 X X X Engineering Emphasis X 202 ollege 140 S an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

141 Degree and Certificate List Associate Certificate of Certificate of A.A. A.S. Degree Page Degree for Degree Performance Degree Achievement Transfer Conflict Resolution Conflict Resolution and 203 X X Mediation Construction Trades Electrical Trade Option X X 205 Pipefitting Trade Option X 205 X Plumbing Trade Option X 205 X Sheet Metal Trade Option X 205 X Cosmetology Cosmetology X X 208 Esthetician X 208 Nail Technician X 208 Dance Associate Degree and Certificate Programs Dance X X 209 Musical Theatre Dance X 210 Digital Journalism Journalism X 211 Economics Economics 213 Electricity Electrical Control Systems 216 X Option Electrical Recertification 215 X Preparation Electricity 216 X X Lineman 215 X X Electromechanical Engineering Technology Advanced Electromechanical 217 X Technology Electromechanical Technology 217 X Electronics Electronic Communication X X 219 Systems Option Electronic Microprocessor/ 219 X X Microcontroller Design Option Electronics 219 X Electronics Technician Level I 219 X Engineering Drafting Option 221 X • 2018–2019 S an D iego C ity C ollege 141

142 Degree and Certificate List Associate Degree and Certificate Programs Associate Certificate of Certificate of A.S. A.A. Page Degree Degree for Degree Achievement Degree Performance Transfer Engineering X 222 Pre-Engineering Technology 222 X Robotics Engineering 223 X English Creative Writing 224 X English X 224 X English Language Acquisition English Language Acquisition 227 X X Exercise Science Fitness Specialist 230 X Health and Wellness Coaching 227 Kinesiology 230 X French French 232 X Futures Studies Futures Studies X 234 Futures Studies Certificate 233 X General Education General Education CSU Transfer X 235 Pattern General Education X 235 Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) Honors Global Competencies 235 X Certificate Geography Geography X 237 X Geology Geology 239 X X German German 242 X Global Development Studies Global Development Studies 240 X History History X 243 X Human Services Community Health Work 245 X Youth Development Work 246 X ollege 142 S an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

143 Degree and Certificate List Associate A.S. A.A. Certificate of Certificate of Degree for Page Degree Achievement Degree Performance Degree Transfer Italian Italian 247 X Labor Studies History and Politics of American 248 X Labor Labor Studies X 248 X Liberal Arts and Sciences Area of Emphasis in Elementary 256 X (Multiple Subject) Teaching Preparation Area of Emphasis in Language 251 X Arts and Humanities Area of Emphasis in Social and 257 X Behavioral Sciences Area of Emphasis in Visual and Associate Degree and Certificate Programs X 249 Performing Arts Biological Science Specialization 253 X Mathematics and Pre- 254 X Engineering Specialization Physical and Earth Sciences 255 X Specialization Machine Technology Computer Aided Manufacturing X 259 C.N.C. Operator X 259 C.N.C. Technology 259 X Computer Aided Manufacturing X 260 X (CAM) Option Computer Numerical Control X 259 (CNC) Technology Option Manufacturing Engineering Technology Advanced Manufacturing 262 X Advanced Mechanical Design 265 X Electronics Manufacturing X 263 Fabrication Manufacturing 263 X Introduction to Manufacturing X 262 Lean Six Sigma 263 X Manufacturing Engineering 264 X Technology Option: Electronics Manufacturing Engineering X 264 Technology Option: Fabrication Manufacturing Fundamentals 262 X Mechanical Design 265 X • 2018–2019 S an D iego C ity C ollege 143

144 Degree and Certificate List Associate Degree and Certificate Programs Associate Certificate of A.S. Certificate of A.A. Degree for Degree Page Performance Degree Achievement Degree Transfer Mathematics Applied Mathematics X 267 Mathematics 266 X X Music Audio Production X 268 Digital Music Technology 269 X Nursing Education Licensed Vocational Nurse to X 272 Registered Nurse (Advanced Placement) LVN - Thirty Unit Option 273 Registered Nurse: Generic 271 X Peace Studies Peace Studies X 275 X Philosophy Philosophy 276 X X Photography Photography X X 280 Digital Photography X 279 Freelance Photography 279 X Physics Physics X X 282 Political Science Political Science 283 X X Psychology Mental Health Work 286 X Psychology X 286 X Radio, Television and Film Broadcast News X X X 289 Digital Media Production X 290 Film Production 295 X X Film, Television, and Electronic X 297 Media Media, Management and 290 X X Marketing Performance 290 X Radio X 291 X X Video Production X X X 291 ollege 144 S an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

145 Degree and Certificate List Associate Certificate of A.S. A.A. Certificate of Degree Degree for Page Performance Degree Degree Achievement Transfer Selected Studies Selected Studies X 298 Social Work Social Work X 299 Sociology Sociology X X 301 Spanish Spanish X X 303 Theatre Musical Theatre X 307 Special Effects (FX) Makeup 305 X Technical Theatre 305 X Theatre X 306 Associate Degree and Certificate Programs Theatre Arts 307 X Theatrical Glamour for Media X 306 and Performance Apprenticeship ABC Construction Electronic X X 310 Systems Technician ABC Electrical X X 311 ABC Heating, Ventilation, & Air X X 312 Conditioning ABC Pipefitting X X 312 ABC Plumbing 314 X X ABC Sheet Metal X 314 X Honeywell Tool & Die X 315 X Operating and Maintenance 316 X X Engineers Communications Technician X X 317 San Diego Gas and Electric Co. X X 318 San Diego Transit Electronic X X 319 Technician San Diego Trolley: Light Rail X X 320 Vehicle Lineman San Diego Trolley: Revenue X X 320 Maintainer San Diego Trolley: Wayside 320 X X Assistant Lineman Solar Turbines X X 321 • 2018–2019 an D iego S C ity C ollege 145

146 Program Emphasis: Accounting See “Business Studies” on page 171. This program provides a foundation in plant and Agriculture soil science, integrated pest management, and crop production while focusing on ecological principles Agriculture of sustainable agriculture. Courses emphasize the how-to aspects of organic gardening and farming, Sustainable Urban Agriculture including compost production, greenhouse propagation, crop planning and production. Award Type Units Career Options: Certificate of Performance Organic Gardening for the Culinary Arts 7 San Diego City College offers certificates, degrees and transfer options in the Sustainable Certificate of Achievement Urban Agriculture program. The Certificate of Urban Farming Professional 27–30 Performance, Organic Gardening for the Culinary Urban Gardening 12 Arts, compliments educational programs in the Associate of Science Degree culinary arts. The Urban Gardening Certificate of 23* Sustainable Urban Agriculture Achievement provides skills and knowledge for careers at an organic farm, nursery, commercial *and courses to meet graduation requirements, greenhouse or to manage a community garden. general education and electives as needed to meet The Certificate of Achievement in Urban Farming the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Professional prepares students and professionals Associate in Science for Transfer Degree: to establish and operate an organic urban farm 20 Sustainable Urban Agriculture business. The Sustainable Urban Agriculture, Associate of Science Degree, prepares students to Sustainable Urban Agriculture transfer to a four-year college to study agriculture, sustainable agriculture, plant science, crop science, Program Description: agricultural business, or ecology. Sustainable Urban Agriculture offers a hands-on Program Learning Outcomes: approach for students to enter into the academic and/or professional fields related to sustainable Students who complete this program should be able agriculture. Students gain skills to critically analyze to: historical and current food systems in order to offer • Understand and explain the three facets alternative solutions to create more sustainable food of sustainability (economic, environmental system models. Students gain practical experience and social) both in general and as they apply working alongside professional urban farmers and specifically to landscaping, practices. farm educators in the Seeds at City Urban Farm on the City College campus. • Understand and explain the components of a food system. Program Goals: Design an organic urban farm that supports • This program provides students the opportunity natural ecosystems, human health, and water to analyze issues and implement solutions related conservation. to small-scale urban agriculture and to apply their Evaluate the soil food web. • knowledge in hands-on learning at the Seeds at City Urban Farm. The primary aim is to train a • Create a crop plan that is appropriate for the diverse group of skilled organic practitioners who southwest region. actively participate in improving the health of their Identify plant disease and pests and incorporate • environment, food, and communities through integrated pest management and other organic small-scale organic food production, education, strategies for a resilient food system. advocacy, and social service programs. • Demonstrate basic propagation techniques. ity C C D an S ollege • 2018–2019 146 iego

147 BUSE 119 3 Business Communications Faculty Office Telephone Total Units = 27–30 S-311C Erin McConnell 619-388-4411 Recommended Electives: Agriculture 128; Biology 101; Business 155; Marketing 100. Certificate of Performance: Organic Gardening for the Culinary Certificate of Achievement: Arts* Urban Gardening Agriculture This certificate prepares students for careers at an This certificate is designed for students who want to learn or improve their organic gardening knowledge organic farm, nursery, commercial greenhouse or to and skills. The program provides the skills and manage a community garden. knowledge to implement a healthier, sustainable Courses: Units food system that emphasizes small-scale urban food AGRI 102 Sustainable Urban Agricultural production. Practice 3 Courses: Units AGRI 104 Sustainable Vegetable Production 3 AGRI 102 Sustainable Urban Agricultural Choose 6 units from the following electives: Practice 3 AGRI 100 3 Principles of Sustainable Agriculture 1 Food Preservation Skills AGRI 128 Introduction to Soil Science AGRI 125 3 Sustainable Vegetable Production 3 AGRI 104 Introduction to Fruit Tree AGRI 110 Total Units = 7 3 Management Plant Propagation 3 AGRI 114 *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental 2 Drip Irrigation Basics AGRI 116 award that does not appear on the student’s Food Preservation Skills AGRI 128 1 transcript. All courses must be completed within the Total Units = 12 San Diego Community College District. Note: This program is not eligible for federal Agriculture 100, 125, 110, Recommended Electives: 114, 116, 128. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Note: This program is not eligible for federal Certificate of Achievement: financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Urban Farming Professional Associate of Science Degree: This certificate prepares students and professionals Sustainable Urban Agriculture to establish and operate an organic urban farm business. The Sustainable Urban Agriculture program Courses: Units prepares students to transfer to a four-year college to continue their studies in agriculture and related AGRI 100 Principles of Sustainable Agriculture 3 fields. Sustainable Urban Agricultural AGRI 102 Practice 3 Courses: Units Sustainable Vegetable Production 3 AGRI 104 AGRI 100 3 Principles of Sustainable Agriculture Introduction to Soil Science AGRI 108 3 AGRI 102 Sustainable Urban Agricultural AGRI 110 Introduction to Fruit Tree Practice 3 Management 3 3 AGRI 104 Sustainable Vegetable Production AGRI 112 Organic Greenhouse Management 3 Introduction to Soil Science AGRI 108 and Plant Propagation 2 BIOL 107 General Biology – Lecture and 2 Drip Irrigation Basics AGRI 116 Laboratory 4 AGRI 130 Agriculture Direct Marketing 3 CHEM 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry Internship 1 CHEM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry Work Experience in Sustainable AGRI 270 Laboratory 1 Urban Agriculture 1–4 SUST 101 Introduction to Sustainability 3 BUSE 157 Developing a Plan for the Total Units = 23 Small Business 3 Recommended Electives: Agriculture 114, 116, 128; Biology 101, 180. ollege C ity 147 iego D an S • 2018–2019 C

148 CSU campuses and majors may require a higher Associate in Science in Agriculture GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. Plant Science for Transfer Degree: Agriculture Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units • Program Description: in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All The Associate in Science in Agriculture Plant Science courses in the major must be completed with a for Transfer Degree is intended for students who grade of C or better. plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in Agriculture Plant Science or a related major in the California • Certified completion of the California State State University (CSU) system. It is accepted by some University General Education-Breadth pattern but not all CSU campuses. Students who complete (CSU GE; see page 12 5 for more information); OR this degree and transfer to a participating CSU the Intersegmental General Education Transfer campus will be required to complete no more than for more Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. information). It may not be appropriate preparation for students Program Emphasis: transferring to a CSU campus that does not accept Careers related to this field typically require the degree. Students who plan to complete this education beyond the associate degree level and degree should consult a counselor for additional some may require a graduate degree. information about participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer Courses Required for the Major: Units requirements. AGRI 125 Introduction to Soil Science 3 AGRI 114 Plant Propagation 3 NOTE: Students intending to transfer into this major AGRI 107 Introduction to Agricultural Plant at a CSU should consult with a counselor and visit 4 Science www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate transfer Fundamentals of Chemistry 3 CHEM 100 coursework. Fundamentals of Chemistry CHEM 100L Award Notes: 1 Laboratory General Education: In addition to the courses listed ECON 121 3 Principles of Microeconomics above, students must complete one of the following Elementary Statistics or MATH 119 general education options: 3 BIOL 200 Biological Statistics Total Units = 20 The IGETC pattern (page 118 ) is accepted by • all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and majors. It is also accepted by some private/ independent or out of state universities. ) is accepted by all • The CSU GE pattern (page 12 5 CSU campuses and some private/independent or out of state universities. It is not accepted by the UC system. • It is strongly recommended that students consult with a counselor to determine which general education option is most appropriate for their individual educational goals. Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 CSU- • transferable units required for the degree. The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: • Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. No more than 60 units are required. • Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some • 2018–2019 148 C ity C iego D an S ollege

149 for advanced job placement and as preparation Air Conditioning, for a four-year engineering or air conditioning and refrigeration technology program. Refrigeration, and Career Options Environmental The AIRE Program trains students in traditional career options that include air conditioning Control Technology and/or refrigeration contractor, service manager, dispatcher, HVAC or refrigeration service technician, Units Award Type manufacturer service representative, sales engineer, Certificate of Performance service engineer, facilities or plant operations 16 Air Conditioning and Solar Energy engineer, HVACR consultant, and control systems 11 Basic Refrigeration and Control Systems designer/commissioner. The AIRE Program also prepares students to enter into Green careers Certificate of Achievement that include solar energy technician or contractor, Advanced Air Conditioning and Direct Digital solar system design engineer and HVAC and solar Control 33 integration specialist. Air Conditioning, Heating, and Advanced Refrigeration 31 Program Learning Outcomes Heating, Air Conditioning and Solar Energy 31 Students who complete the program will be able to: Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Size and design an HVACR system for a structure or 31 Systems Design commercial application. Stationary Facilities Engineering and General 32 Maintenance Technician • Correctly diagnose and repair HVACR equipment using a minimum of replacement parts. Associate of Science Degree Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and • Articulate the effects of deficient or excessive 36* Environmental Control Technology sub-cooling, superheat, air flow or water flow through an HVACR system. * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet Utilize knowledge of the Refrigeration Cycle to • the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. charge a typical AC system. • Trace power and control voltages in the diagnosis Description of HVACR equipment. The Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Environmental Control Technology (AIRE) Program Academic Programs offers a comprehensive study of heating, ventilation, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Environmental Control Technology The certificates of performance and achievement air conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR). The AIRE and associate degree require completion of the Program course of study includes the technology courses listed below. of controlled environments for homes, buildings and conditioned spaces, with topics ranging Certificate of Performance: from residential refrigeration to commercial air Air Conditioning and Solar Energy* conditioning and industrial freezing systems. Particular focus is directed toward energy efficiency With a California and U.S. emphasis on energy and integration with Green Technology, including efficiency and sustainability, there is a need for well alternative energy systems. trained mechanical technicians with knowledge and skill in the integration of conventional Heating Program Goals - Ventilation - Air Conditioning & Refrigeration The AIRE Program offers a series of complementary (HVACR) and solar energy technology. This certificate certificates that may be used for job placement and of performance provides a comprehensive study advancement in the field. When combined with of basic HVACR, solar thermal and photovoltaic the appropriate general education and graduation systems. requirements, an AIRE Program certificate leads to an Associate of Science Degree that may be used iego D an C C ollege • 2018–2019 149 S ity

150 Courses: Units Certificate of Achievement: 4 Basic Refrigeration & AC Theory AIRE 100 Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Environmental Control Technology Basic Refrigeration & AC Lab 2 AIRE 103 and Environmental Control 3 AIRE 124 Power & Control Systems Theory Technology AIRE 125 2 Power & Control Systems Lab AIRE 160 Solar Energy Utilization Theory 3 Advanced Air Conditioning and Direct Solar Energy Utilization Lab 2 AIRE 161 Digital Control Total Units = 16 Advanced Air Conditioning and Direct Digital Recommend AIRE 100, AIRE 103, AIRE 124 and Note: Control focuses on precise, automated control of air AIRE 125 be taken prior to enrolling in AIRE 160 and conditioning and lighting systems with the goal of AIRE 161. providing optimum comfort at minimal operational cost. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Units Courses Required for the Major: transcript. All courses must be completed within the 4 Basic Refrigeration & AC Theory AIRE 100 San Diego Community College District. Basic Refrigeration & AC Lab AIRE 103 2 Power & Control Systems Theory 3 AIRE 124 Certificate of Performance: Power & Control Systems Lab AIRE 125 2 3 Fluid Flow Dynamics AIRE 126 Basic Refrigeration and Control 2 Fluid Flow Dynamics Lab AIRE 127 Systems* AIRE 128 Comfort Heating Systems Theory 4 With a California and U.S. emphasis on energy Comfort Heating Systems Lab 2 AIRE 129 efficiency and sustainability, there is a need for well 3 HVAC System Design AIRE 138 trained mechanical technicians. This Certificate of AIRE 139 HVAC System Design Lab 2 performance prepares students with knowledge Direct Digital Controls Theory AIRE 144 4 and skill in the installation, maintenance and AIRE 145 2 Direct Digital Controls Lab repair of residential and light-commercial Heating Total Units = 33 - Ventilation - Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Recommended Electives: Air Conditioning, (HVACR) systems. Refrigeration, and Environmental Control Courses: Units Technology 132 and 133. 4 AIRE 100 Basic Refrigeration & AC Theory AIRE 103 2 Basic Refrigeration & AC Lab Certificate of Achievement: AIRE 124 Power & Control Systems Theory 3 Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, Power & Control Systems Lab AIRE 125 2 and Environmental Control Total Units = 11 Technology *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Air Conditioning, Heating, and Advanced award that does not appear on the student’s Refrigeration transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. The Air Conditioning, Heating and Advanced Refrigeration certificate focuses on advanced, This program is not eligible for federal Note: complex, high efficiency HVACR systems and their financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. components. Courses Required for the Major: Units 4 AIRE 100 Basic Refrigeration & AC Theory Basic Refrigeration & AC Lab 2 AIRE 103 3 Construction Drawings & Estimating AIRE 122 AIRE 123 Construction Drawings & Estimating Lab 1 AIRE 124 3 Power & Control Systems Theory Power & Control Systems Lab AIRE 125 2 ollege 150 S an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

151 and energy efficient building air conditioning 3 Fluid Flow Dynamics AIRE 126 AIRE 127 systems. Fluid Flow Dynamics Lab 2 AIRE 128 Comfort Heating Systems Theory 4 Courses Required for the Major: Units AIRE 129 Comfort Heating Systems Lab 2 4 AIRE 100 Basic Refrigeration & AC Theory AIRE 132 Advanced Refrigeration Theory 3 2 AIRE 103 Basic Refrigeration & AC Lab Advanced Refrigeration & AC Lab 2 AIRE 133 AIRE 122 Construction Drawings & Estimating 3 Total Units = 31 Construction Drawings & AIRE 123 Estimating Lab 1 Certificate of Achievement: 3 Power & Control Systems Theory AIRE 124 Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, AIRE 125 Power & Control Systems Lab 2 and Environmental Control Fluid Flow Dynamics AIRE 126 3 AIRE 127 Fluid Flow Dynamics Lab 2 Technology AIRE 128 4 Comfort Heating Systems Theory Heating, Air Conditioning and Solar AIRE 129 2 Comfort Heating Systems Lab Energy 3 AIRE 138 HVAC System Design AIRE 139 HVAC System Design Lab 2 The Certificate of Achievement in Heating, Air Total Units = 31 Conditioning and Solar Energy focuses on the design and integration of conventional HVAC systems with Recommended Electives : Air Conditioning, solar energy sources for sustainable residential and Refrigeration, and Environmental Control commercial environments. Technology 132 and 133, 144 and 145. Courses Required for the Major: Units Semester Sequence: 4 Basic Refrigeration & AC Theory AIRE 100 4 AIRE 144 First: 2 Basic Refrigeration & AC Lab AIRE 103 2 Second : AIRE 145 3 AIRE 124 Power & Control Systems Theory Third 3 : AIRE 132 Power & Control Systems Lab AIRE 125 2 2 : AIRE 133 Fourth 4 Comfort Heating Systems Theory AIRE 128 3 Construction Drawings & Estimating AIRE 122 Certificate of Achievement: AIRE 123 Construction Drawings & Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, Estimating Lab 1 and Environmental Control AIRE 126 3 Fluid Flow Dynamics Technology AIRE 127 Fluid Flow Dynamics Lab 2 2 AIRE 129 Comfort Heating Systems Lab Stationary Facilities Engineering and AIRE 160 Solar Energy Utilization Theory 3 General Maintenance Technician 2 AIRE 161 Solar Energy Utilization Lab Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Environmental Control Technology The Certificate of Achievement in Stationary Facilities Total Units = 31 Engineering and General Maintenance Technician is Recommended Electives: Air Conditioning, a practical study of large commercial, high efficiency Refrigeration, and Environmental Control HVACR systems and central plant operations and Technology 138 and 139, 144 and 145. maintenance. Units Courses Required for the Major: Certificate of Achievement: Basic Refrigeration & AC Theory 4 AIRE 100 Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, AIRE 103 2 Basic Refrigeration & AC Lab and Environmental Control Construction Drawings and AIRE 122 Technology Estimating 3 AIRE 123 Construction Drawings and Heating, Ventilation, and Air Estimating Lab 1 Conditioning Systems Design 3 AIRE 124 Power & Control Systems Theory The Certificate of Achievement in Heating, 2 Power & Control Systems Lab AIRE 125 Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems Design AIRE 126 Fluid Flow Dynamics 3 focuses on the integration of HVAC components and AIRE 127 2 Fluid Flow Dynamics Lab equipment into the design of optimally functional 4 Comfort Heating Systems Theory AIRE 128 an D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 151 S

152 2 Comfort Heating Systems Lab AIRE 129 Alcohol and Other 3 Building Codes and Zoning BLDC 70 3 Human Relations in Business BUSE 150 Alcohol and Other Drug Studies Drug Studies Total Units = 32 Recommended Electives: Air Conditioning, Units Award Type Refrigeration and Environmental Control Technology Certificate of Achievement 132 and 133, 144 and 145, 138 and 139. Alcohol and Other Drug Studies 36.5–37 Associate of Science Degree Associate of Science Degree: Alcohol and Other Drug Studies 36.5–37* Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Environmental Control * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet Technology the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. The Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and Environmental Control Technology AS degree Description focuses on the study of complex, high efficiency This program prepares students for certification HVACR, advanced controls and alternative energy as alcohol and other drug counselors in the systems. State of California (units may qualify for other Units Courses Required for the Major: state certification or licensing requirements). 4 Basic Refrigeration & AC Theory AIRE 100 The Certificate of Achievement is designed to 2 Basic Refrigeration & AC Lab AIRE 103 prepare students for entry level alcohol and other 3 AIRE 122 Construction Drawings & Estimating drug counselor employment. The Associate of AIRE 123 Construction Drawings & Science degree provides academic preparation for Estimating Lab 1 baccalaureate study in addiction, psychology, social 3 AIRE 124 Power & Control Systems Theory work, human services, and related disciplines. Power & Control Systems Lab AIRE 125 2 Fluid Flow Dynamics 3 AIRE 126 Program Emphasis 2 Fluid Flow Dynamics Lab AIRE 127 This program is vocational, academic, and clinical in Comfort Heating Systems Theory AIRE 128 4 nature. It trains students in the practice dimensions AIRE 129 Comfort Heating Systems Lab 2 and core competencies of alcohol and other drug AIRE 132 Advanced Refrigeration Theory 3 counseling while providing a theoretical foundation AIRE 133 Advanced Refrigeration & AC Lab 2 in the behavioral sciences and human service HVAC System Design AIRE 138 3 professions. HVAC System Design Lab AIRE 139 2 Total Units = 36 Career Options Additional general education and graduation Upon completion of the certificate of achievement requirements for the associate degree are listed or associate degree, students may be eligible for The associate degree requires a in the catalog. entry level employment as an alcohol and other minimum of 60 units . drug counselor. However, the State of California requires additional credentialing in order to Air Conditioning, Recommended electives: maintain employment in this field. Persons hired as Refrigeration and Environmental Control Technology alcohol and other drug counselors have five years 270, 290, 144 and 145, 160 and 161; Computer to become fully certified and most employers will Business Technology 180. want counselors to be certified within a year of being hired. California does not license alcohol and other drug counselors at this time. Certification is accomplished through private credentialing organizations that are nationally approved and approved by the State of California. The Alcohol and Other Drug Studies Program specifically prepares students for application to two certifying S an D iego C C ollege • 2018–2019 152 ity

153 organizations: the California Association for Certificate of Achievement: Alcohol/Drug Educators (CAADE) and the California Behavioral Sciences Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals Alcohol and Other Drug Studies (CCAPP). CAADE offers certification as a Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor (CATC) and CCAPP Note: The AODS department recommends students offers certification as a Certified Alcohol and Drug take courses in the order listed below: Abuse Counselor (CADC). Both organizations Units Courses required for the major: offer several levels of certification depending on experience and academic achievement. There is one AODS 150 Introduction to Chemical other counselor certifying organization in California: Dependency 3 California Association of DUI Treatment Programs AODS 153 Chemical Dependency Family (CADTP). Students who complete the certificate of 3 Counseling Techniques achievement in AODS will have met the educational AODS 154 Law, Ethics, and Skills in Alcohol and requirements for all three certifying organizations. Other Drug Counseling 3 General Psychology 3 PSYC 101 Program Learning Outcomes SOCO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 AODS 156 Case Management in Alcohol and Students who complete the Alcohol and Other Drug Alcohol and Other Drug Studies 3 Other Drug Counseling Studies Program will: Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs AODS 157 3 Identify diagnostic criteria, apply assessment • Co-Occurring Disorders in Alcohol AODS 159 skills, and describe scientifically validated models and Other Drug Counseling 3 of substance use disorder treatment. Group Dynamics in Alcohol and Other AODS 160 3 Drug Counseling • Identify the behavioral, psychological, physical 3 PSYC 161 Introduction to Counseling health, and social effects of psychoactive Internship Seminar: Alcohol and AODS 162 substances on the person and their significant Other Drug Counseling 3 others. Internship: Alcohol and Other Drug AODS 163 • Explain the potential for medical and mental 3.5 Counseling health conditions to coexist with substance use or disorder. 1 AODS 270 Work Experience in Chemical Dependency 4 Demonstrate an understanding of the laws, • regulations, and ethical codes of the substance Total Units = 36.5–37 use disorder treatment profession. 1 Alcohol and Other Drug Studies 270 must be • Practice in an internship the eight addiction substituted for AODS 163 if a student has a paid counselor practice dimensions: clinical internship. evaluation; treatment planning; referral; Students must complete all required courses Note: service coordination; counseling; client, family, within ten years in order to receive the AODS community education; documentation; Certificate of Achievement. professional and ethical responsibilities. Associate of Science Degree: Director Office Telephone Behavioral Sciences Wendy Wiehl MS-534 619-388-3097 Alcohol and Other Drug Studies Faculty Office Telephone MS-536 619-388-3589 Keith Burke The AODS department recommends students Note: take courses in the order listed below: Academic Programs Courses required for the major: Units Introduction to Chemical AODS 150 The Certificate of Achievement in Behavioral Dependency 3 Sciences, Alcohol and Other Drug Studies program Chemical Dependency Family AODS 153 requires completion of the courses listed below. Counseling Techniques 3 D iego C C ollege • 2018–2019 153 S an ity

154 major preparation courses for their specific transfer Law, Ethics, and Skills in Alcohol and AODS 154 institution and major. Transfer students may also 3 Other Drug Counseling earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts 3 Principles of Sociology SOCO 101 Anthropology and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may PSYC 101 General Psychology 3 be individually tailored to each student’s specific AODS 156 Case Management in Alcohol and 3 Other Drug Counseling transfer requirements in order to provide the most AODS 157 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs 3 efficient path to transfer. More information on AODS 159 Co-Occurring Disorders in Alcohol transfer programs and procedures is available in the 3 and Other Drug Counseling Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Group Dynamics in Alcohol and Other AODS 160 Drug Counseling 3 3 Introduction to Counseling PSYC 161 Anthropology AODS 162 Internship Seminar: Alcohol and 3 Other Drug Counseling Units Award Type AODS 163 Internship: Alcohol and Other Drug Certificate of Performance 3.5 Counseling Archaeology 16 or 1 Work Experience in Chemical AODS 270 Associate of Arts Degree Dependency 4 Anthropology 18* Total Units = 36.5–37 * and courses to meet graduation requirements, 1 general education and electives as needed to meet AODS 270 must be substituted for AODS 163 if the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. student has a paid internship. Students must complete all required courses Note: Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: within ten years in order to receive the AODS Anthropology 18–21 Associate Degree. Description The AODS department recommends students Note: working toward the Associate in Science degree take Anthropology is a scientific discipline that studies two General Education courses during their third and humans and human behavior. The subject is fourth semesters. Students are encouraged, but not divided into five broad fields: physical and cultural required, to choose their General Education courses anthropology, linguistics and archaeology, and from the list below: applied anthropology. Physical anthropology is concerned with hominid evolution and the Recommended Electives : Black Studies 104; biological features of human populations. Cultural Chicana and Chicano Studies 110B; Communication anthropology deals with cross-cultural studies of 2 Studies 180; Health Education 101 ; Sociology 110. learned behavior, such as language, kinship, religion, 2 Health 101 is a graduation requirement. economics, technology, values and personality. Linguistics is the study of the origin and evolution Additional general education and graduation of languages and how they reflect the behavioral requirements for the associate degree are listed patterns of people. Archaeology is involved in the in the catalog. The associate degree requires a recovery of material remains of past peoples with minimum of 60 units. the objective of reconstructing the past. Applied Anthropology applies what we have learned from Transfer Information the other four fields to promote change. As both a Common university majors related to the field biological and social science, anthropology seeks to of Alcohol and Other Drug Studies include: understand and describe humankind. Psychology, Human Services, Social Work. Program Emphasis Course Requirements for Transfer Students Students who plan to transfer to a four year college The anthropology program has been developed or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this to provide the student with a broad perspective of discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the human biological and cultural origins and change Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate which prepares the student for transfer to a four-year S an D iego C C ollege • 2018–2019 154 ity

155 condition including human physical and cultural institution. It also offers a limited course curriculum diversity. in archaeology. A certificate of performance is available for the student who has an interest in the Identify and critically evaluate Anthropology’s • recovery, identification, and analysis of prehistoric contributions to other disciplines of study in and early historic artifacts related to archaeological the Social Sciences, Behavioral Sciences and the research projects. Humanities. Career Options Most careers related to anthropology require Telephone Faculty Office Anthropology education beyond the associate degree, however, 619-388-3748 MS-537 Tori Randall an understanding of broad anthropological and 619-388-3260 MS-538 George (Tim) Gross archaeological concepts provides some preparation for work in museums and local excavations. A partial Certificate of Performance: list of possible career options follows: archaeologist, cultural anthropologist, ethnic relations specialist, Archaeology* ethnologist, exhibit designer, expedition guide, Courses: Units film ethnographer, health researcher, linguist, Introduction to Cultural ANTH 103 medical anthropologist, museum curator, physical Anthropology 3 anthropologist, primatologist, paleoanthropologist, Introduction to Archaeology 3 ANTH 107 population analyst, public health analyst, social ANTH 210 Introduction to California Indians 3 gerontologist, transcultural nurse specialist, travel ANTH 115 Introduction to Archaeological Field consultant, urban planner, international business Work 4 consultant, international law development specialist, ANTH 120 Archaeological Artifact Analysis 3 environmentalist, conflict resolution, and peace Total Units = 16 studies. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Program Learning Outcomes award that does not appear on the student’s Students who complete the program will be able to: transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. • Define Anthropology, identify and discuss its various subfields including: Cultural Associate of Arts Degree: Anthropology, Physical Anthropology, Behavioral Sciences Comparative Linguistics, Archaeology, and Applied Anthropology. Anthropology • Identify and discuss Anthropological methods of The associate degree in anthropology requires inquiry. completion of the courses listed below. Additional general education and graduation requirements for • Identify, discuss, compare, contrast and critically the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The analyze the various theoretical orientations used associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. in the different subfields of Anthropology. Units Courses Required for the Major: • Discuss and critically evaluate the Anthropological Perspective including its global ANTH 102 Introduction to Physical emphasis and cross-cultural and comparative Anthropology 3 approach to understanding the various ways ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural in which people organize themselves, meet Anthropology 3 their various needs, and have adapted to their ANTH 107 Introduction to Archaeology 3 environments. or **PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics Elementary Statistics 3 MATH 119 Identify, describe and discuss different cultural • Electives, transferable, lower division 6 systems ranging from band societies to the state. Total Units = 18 • Identify, critically evaluate, and discuss the Anthropology 215, 290. Recommended electives: contributions Anthropology has made to describing and understanding the human Check University Statistics course **Note: requirement. C 155 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity an D iego S

156 courses in the major must be completed with a Transfer Information grade of “C” or better. Common university majors related to the field of Anthropology Certified completion of the California State Anthropology, Archaeology, Anthropology include: • Biological Anthropology, Global Studies, Conflict University General Education-Breadth pattern Resolution Studies and Peace Studies. (CSU GE; see page 126 for more information); OR the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Course Requirements for Transfer Students Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more Students who plan to transfer to a four year college information). or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Career Options: Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Careers related to this field typically require education beyond the associate degree level and major preparation courses for their specific transfer some may require a graduate degree. institution and major. Transfer students may also earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts Courses Required for the Major: Units and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 ANTH 103 be individually tailored to each student’s specific 3 ANTH 102 Introduction to Physical Anthropology transfer requirements in order to provide the most Introduction to Archaeology ANTH 107 3 efficient path to transfer. More information on transfer programs and procedures is available in the Select one course (3 semester units) Transfer Programs section of the catalog. ENGL 202 Introduction to Linguistics 3 Physical Geography GEOG 101 3 Associate in Arts in Anthropology Cultural Geography 3 GEOG 102 Physical Geology GEOL 100 3 for Transfer Degree: MATH 119 Elementary Statistics or Program Description: 3 PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics The Associate in Arts in Anthropology for Transfer Select one to two courses not selected from Degree is intended for students who plan to above (minimum 3 semester units): complete a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology or ANTH 104 Laboratory in Physical Anthropology 1 a related major in the California State University 4 BIOL 230 Human Anatomy (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all ENGL 202 Introduction to Linguistics 3 CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree Physical Geography GEOG 101 3 and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be GEOG 102 3 Cultural Geography required to complete no more than 60 units after GEOL 100 Physical Geology 3 transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be GEOL 101 1 Physical Geology Laboratory appropriate preparation for students transferring or MATH 119 Elementary Statistics to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. 3 Behavioral Science Statistics PSYC 258 Students who plan to complete this degree should consult a counselor for additional information about Select one course (minimum 3 semester units): participating CSU campuses as well as university Introduction to Archaeological Field ANTH 115 admission, degree and transfer requirements. 4 Work ANTH 120 Archaeological Artifact Analysis 3 Award Notes: ANTH 210 Introduction to California Indians 3 The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: 3 Cultures of Latin America ANTH 215 • Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester Intercultural Communication COMS 180 3 units. No more than 60 units are required. GEOG 154 3 Introduction to Urban Geography HIST 115A History of the Americas I 3 Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least • Introduction to Asian Civilizations 3 HIST 120 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a HUMA 106 3 World Religions minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some 3 World Music MUSI 109 CSU campuses and majors may require a higher Marriage and Family Relations PSYC 135 3 GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. SOCO 101 3 Principles of Sociology Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units • in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list above). All C • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D an 156

157 3 Contemporary Social Problems SOCO 110 Career Options SOCO 125 3 Sociology of the Family Some careers listed require education beyond the Total Units = 18–21 associate degree: art critic, art dealer, educator, historian, arts administrator, advertising specialist, ceramicist, community or computer artist, computer Art–Fine Arts graphics illustrator, computer publishing, design consulting, display designer, gallery director, Award Type Units illustrator, muralist, painter, printmaker, sculptor and Art–Fine Arts visual information specialist. Certificate of Performance 12 Advanced Arts Entrepreneurship Program Learning Outcomes Arts Entrepreneurship 6 Students who complete the program will be able to: Associate of Arts Degree Two-Dimensional Art Emphasis 27* • Solve basic problems of visual expression and 30* Three-Dimensional Art Emphasis describe its historical or contemporary context. * and courses to meet graduation requirements, • Demonstrate knowledge of specific historical and general education and electives as needed to meet cultural art styles. the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. • Produce visual works of art reflecting global awareness, cultural diversity. Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: 18–20 Art History Produce visual works of art in a variety of • Studio Arts 24 mediums. Choose the most appropriate materials, tools and techniques to meet artist goals. Program Description • Interpret, evaluate and critiques orally and in This program provides fundamental training in fine writing visual works of art. arts enabling students to earn an associate degree while completing lower division preparation for Telephone Office Faculty a four-year degree. The curriculum is designed to Terri Hughes-Oelrich AH-315A 619-388-3087 maximize transferable course units and to provide AH-302B 619-388-3693 Wayne Hulgin basic skills required for employment in art-related fields. Cynthia Lyons- AH-407A 619-388-3794 Dailard Program Goals Academic Programs This program provides the opportunity for students to develop fundamental skills in design, drawing, The associate degree in Two- and Three- and art history, and to explore artmaking using Dimensional Art requires completion of the courses a variety of media. The primary aim is to provide listed below. Additional general education and strong foundational skills for transferring to a graduation requirements for the associate degree four-year institution. The program also prepares are listed in the catalog. The associate degree students to create advanced artwork and pursue a requires a minimum of 60 units. career in related fields. Certificate of Performance: Program Emphasis Advanced Arts Entrepreneurship* The Fine Arts program emphasizes critical thinking Description and perceptual awareness to enable students to develop their artistic skills. There are two areas of This program provides advanced preparation emphasis in the Fine Art major: Two Dimensional Art in fine arts entrepreneurship enabling students and Three Dimensional Art. to earn a certificate degree. The curriculum is designed to maximize students art experience while preparing students with the understanding of ity C iego D an ollege • 2018–2019 157 S C

158 Note: This program is not eligible for federal entrepreneurship and small business management financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. with business courses. Art–Fine Arts Goals Certificate of Performance: This program expands student education in Arts Entrepreneurship* entrepreneurship and small business management. Description The primary aim is to prepare students to create advanced artwork and pursue a career in art-related This program provides fundamental preparation in fields. fine arts entrepreneurship enabling students to earn a certificate degree. The curriculum is designed to Emphasis maximize students art experience while providing The Fine Arts entrepreneurship program emphasizes basic skills required for self-employment and preparation for business ownership and working employment in art-related fields. for a small business using their artistic skills. There Goals are two certificates: Arts Entrepreneurship and Advanced Arts Entrepreneurship. This program expands student education in entrepreneurship and small business management. Career Options The primary aim is to prepare students to create Some careers listed require education beyond the advanced artwork and pursue a career in art-related certificate degree: art educator, arts administrator, fields. advertising specialist, ceramicist, illustrator, Emphasis computer publishing, design consulting, display designer, gallery director, graphic artist, muralist, The Fine Arts entrepreneurship program emphasizes painter, printmaker, jeweler, sculptor, photographer preparation for business ownership and working or public artist. for a small business using their artistic skills. There are two certificates: Arts Entrepreneurship and The Certificate of Performance in Fine Art with an Advanced Arts Entrepreneurship. advanced arts entrepreneurship emphasis provides students with the skills and knowledge to foster self- Career Options employment or a small business. Some careers listed require education beyond the Courses: Units certificate degree: art educator, arts administrator, ARTF 206 3 Art Entrepreneurship advertising specialist, ceramicist, illustrator, BUSE 157 Developing a Plan for the Small computer publishing, design consulting, display 3 Business designer, gallery director, graphic artist, muralist, MARK 100 Principles of Marketing 3 painter, printmaker, jeweler, sculptor or public artist. Choose 3 units from the following courses: The Certificate of Performance in Fine Art with an 3 ARTF 165B Composition in Painting II arts entrepreneurship emphasis provides students Composition in Painting III ARTF 165C 3 with the skills and knowledge to foster self- 3 Contemporary Crafts II ARTF 170B employment or a small business. Sculpture II ARTF 175B 3 ARTF 175C Sculpture III 3 Courses: Units Ceramics II 3 ARTF 195B ARTF 206 Art Entrepreneurship 3 Ceramics III 3 ARTF 195C Choose 3 units from the following courses: ARTF 207 Industrial and Architectural Ceramic ARTF 165B Composition in Painting II 3 Design I 3 ARTF 165C Composition in Painting III 3 3 Sustainable Art and Design ARTF 212 Contemporary Crafts II 3 ARTF 170B Total Units = 12 3 Sculpture II ARTF 175B *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental ARTF 175C 3 Sculpture III award that does not appear on the student’s ARTF 195B Ceramics II 3 transcript. All courses must be completed within the 3 Ceramics III ARTF 195C San Diego Community College District. S D iego C an C ollege • 2018–2019 158 ity

159 Industrial and Architectural Ceramic ARTF 207 Associate of Arts Degree: 3 Design I Visual and Performing Arts Total Units = 6 Three-Dimensional Art Emphasis *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Units Courses Required for the Major: award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the 3 ARTF 110 Art History: Prehistoric to Gothic San Diego Community College District. ARTF 111 Art History: Renaissance to Modern 3 ARTF 150A Two-Dimensional Design 3 Note: This program is not eligible for federal Art–Fine Arts Three-Dimensional Design 3 ARTF 151 financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. ARTF 155A 3 Freehand Drawing I ARTF 155B 3 Freehand Drawing II Associate of Arts Degree: 3 ARTF 170A Contemporary Crafts I Visual and Performing Arts ARTF 175A Sculpture I 3 3 Ceramics I ARTF 195A Two-Dimensional Art Emphasis Select 3 units from: The Associate Degree in Fine Art with a 3 Contemporary Crafts II ARTF 170B two-dimensional design (art) emphasis provides 3 ARTF 175B Sculpture II students with the skills and knowledge to continue ARTF 175C Sculpture III 3 artmaking at a four-year institution or as a practicing ARTF 195B 3 Ceramics II artist or designer. 3 Ceramics III ARTF 195C Units Courses Required for the Major: ARTF 196 Clay and Glaze Technology 3 3 ARTF 197A Handbuilding Ceramics I ARTF 110 Art History: Prehistoric to Gothic 3 ARTF 197B Handbuilding Ceramics II 3 3 Art History: Renaissance to Modern ARTF 111 Two-Dimensional Design 3 ARTF 150A Total Units = 30 Three-Dimensional Design ARTF 151 3 Recommended electives: Art–Fine Art 270, 290. 3 ARTF 155A Freehand Drawing I ARTF 155B Freehand Drawing II 3 Associate in Arts in Art History for Life Drawing I 3 ARTF 210A Transfer Degree: Select two courses (6 units) from: ARTF 165A Composition in Painting I or Program Description: ARTF 165B or Composition in Painting II The Associate in Arts in Art History for Transfer Composition in Painting III ARTF 165C or Degree is intended for students who plan to ARTF 165D 3 Composition in Painting IV complete a bachelor’s degree in Art History or Art Orientation ARTF 100 or a related major in the California State University ARTF 210B Life Drawing II or (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all or ARTF 170A Contemporary Crafts I CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree Ceramics I ARTF 195A or and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be ARTF 115 African Art or required to complete no more than 60 units after ARTF 210C Life Drawing III 3 transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be Digital Media 3 ARTG 125 appropriate preparation for students transferring ARTF 175A Sculpture I 3 to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should Total Units = 27 consult a counselor for additional information about Recommended electives: Art–Fine Art 270, 290. participating CSU campuses as well as university Additional general education and graduation admission, degree and transfer requirements. requirements for the associate degree are listed It is recommended for students intending NOTE: in the catalog. The associate degree requires a to transfer to San Diego State University (SDSU) BA minimum of 60 units. in Art History should complete the courses marked with a (#). Students intending to transfer into this major at other CSU’s should consult a counselor and an D iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 159 S C

160 Program Goals: for guidance on appropriate visit www.assist.org course work. The Associate in Arts in Art History for Transfer is intended for students who plan to complete a Art–Fine Arts Award Notes: bachelor’s degree in Art History or a related major *Course also fulfills general education requirements in the California State University (CSU) system. It for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree and transfer # This course fulfills SDSU lower division preparation to a participating CSU campus will be required to for the major in the BA in Art History under the TMC. complete no more than 60 units after transfer to In addition to the courses listed General Education: earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate above, students must complete one of the following preparation for students transferring to a CSU general education options: campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should consult The IGETC pattern (page 118 • ) is accepted by a counselor for additional information about all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and majors. It is also accepted by some private/ participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. independent or out of state universities. NOTE: It is recommended for students intending • The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all to transfer to San Diego State University (SDSU) BA CSU campuses and some private/independent or out of state universities. It is not accepted by the in Art History should complete the courses marked with a (#). Students intending to transfer into this UC system. major at other CSU’s should consult a counselor and It is strongly recommended that students consult visit www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate with a counselor to determine which general course work. education option is most appropriate for their individual educational goals. Career Options: Careers related to this field typically require Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 education beyond the associate degree level and CSU-transferable units required for the degree. some may require a graduate degree. * Course also fulfills general education requirements Required Courses (9 semester units): for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. Units Courses Required for the Major: The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: Art History: Prehistoric to Gothic 3 ARTF 110 ARTF 111 3 Art History: Renaissance to Modern Completion of 60 CSU-tranferable semester units. No Freehand Drawing I ARTF 155A or more than 60 units are required. 3 ARTF 155B Freehand Drawing II Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in Select one course (3 semester units) from the all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum (It is recommended that students select following: of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses courses that meet lower division major preparation and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a requirements for their transfer university). counselor for more information. 3 ARTF 115 African Art Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an Art History: Arts of the Asian ARTF 125 “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in Continent 3 the major must be completed with a grade of “C” or bet ter. Select one course (3 semester units) if not (It is selected above from the following: Certified completion of the California State recommended that students select courses that meet University General Education-Breadth pattern lower division major preparation requirements for their for more information); OR (CSU GE; see page 126 transfer university). the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more ARTF 150A 3 Two-Dimensional Design information). ARTF 151 3 Three-Dimensional Design 3 Composition in Painting I ARTF 165A 3 ARTF 170A Contemporary Crafts I ollege 160 S an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

161 consult a counselor for additional information about 3 Sculpture I ARTF 175A participating CSU campuses as well as university Ceramics I ARTF 195A 3 admission, degree and transfer requirements. 3 Life Drawing I ARTF 210A It is strongly recommended that students consult Select one course (3–5 semester units) if with a counselor to determine which general not selected above from the following: education option is most appropriate for their (It is recommended that students select courses that individual educational goals. meet lower division major preparation requirements for their transfer university). Students are required to complete: Art–Fine Arts A minimum of 18 semester units in the major with a ARTF 109 Modern Art 3 grade of “C” or better while maintaining a minimum Art History: Arts of the Asian ARTF 125 grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in all CSU- 3 Continent transferable work. 3 ARTF 150A Two-Dimensional Design ARTF 151 Three-Dimensional Design 3 Completion of 60 CSU-transferable units 3 ARTF 165A Composition in Painting I using the California State University-General Contemporary Crafts I 3 ARTF 170A Education-Breadth pattern (CSU-GE Breadth); OR 3 Sculpture I ARTF 175A the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Ceramics I ARTF 195A 3 Curriculum (IGETC) pattern. No more than 60 units ARTF 210A Life Drawing I 3 are required. 5 First Course in French FREN 101 Award Notes: 5 Second Course in French FREN 102 *Course also fulfills general education requirements Third Course In French FREN 201 5 for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. FREN 202 Fourth Course in French 5 GERM 101 First Course in German 5 General Education: In addition to the courses listed Second Course in German GERM 102 5 above, students must complete one of the following GERM 201 Third Course in German 5 general education options: ITAL 101 First Course in Italian 5 • The IGETC pattern (page 118 ) is accepted by 5 Second Course in Italian ITAL 102 all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and Third Course in Italian 5 ITAL 201 majors. It is also accepted by some private/ 5 SPAN 101 First Course in Spanish independent or out of state universities. 5 Second Course in Spanish SPAN 102 Third Course in Spanish 5 SPAN 201 The CSU GE pattern (page 126 • ) is accepted by all 5 SPAN 202 Fourth Course in Spanish CSU campuses and some private/independent or 5 Spanish for Spanish Speakers I SPAN 215 out of state universities. It is not accepted by the Spanish for Spanish Speakers II SPAN 216 5 UC system. Total Units = 18–20 It is strongly recommended that students consult with a counselor to determine which general Associate in Arts in Studio Arts for education option is most appropriate for their Transfer Degree individual educational goals. Program Description: Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 The Associate in Arts in Studio Arts for Transfer CSU-transferable units required for the degree. Degree is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in Studio Arts or * Course also fulfills general education requirements a related major in the California State University for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be Completion of 60 CSU-tranferable semester units. No required to complete no more than 60 units after more than 60 units are required. transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in appropriate preparation for students transferring all CSU- transferable coursework. While a minimum to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses Students who plan to complete this degree should C iego C ity D ollege • 2018–2019 161 an S

162 ARTF 111 3 Art History: Renaissance to Modern and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a Two-Dimensional Design 3 counselor for more information. ARTF 150A Three-Dimensional Design ARTF 151 3 Art–Fine Arts Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an 3 Freehand Drawing I ARTF 155A “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in Select three courses (9 semester units) from the the major must be completed with a grade of “C” or bet ter. following: (It is recommended that students select courses that meet lower division major preparation Certified completion of the California State requirements for their transfer university). University General Education-Breadth pattern (CSU GE; see page 126 for more information); OR ARTF 155B Freehand Drawing II 3 ARTF 165A 3 the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Composition in Painting I Contemporary Crafts I 3 Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 ARTF 170A for more 3 information). ARTF 175A Sculpture I ARTF 195A Ceramics I 3 Program Goals: 3 ARTF 197A Handbuilding Ceramics I The Associate in Arts in Studio Arts for Transfer ARTF 210A Life Drawing I 3 is intended for students who plan to complete a Total Units = 24 bachelor’s degree in Studio Arts or a related major in the California State University (CSU) system. It Transfer Information is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. Common university majors related to the field Students who complete this degree and transfer of Art–Fine Art include: Apparel Design and to a participating CSU campus will be required to Merchandising, Art, Art Education, Art History, complete no more than 60 units after transfer to Creative Arts/Studies, Design, Industrial Arts, Interior earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate Design, Multimedia, Photography, Studio Art, preparation for students transferring to a CSU Textiles. campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should consult Course Requirements for Transfer Students a counselor for additional information about Students who plan to transfer to a four year college participating CSU campuses as well as university or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this admission, degree and transfer requirements. discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate It is strongly recommended that students consult major preparation courses for their specific transfer with a counselor to determine which general institution and major. Transfer students may also education option is most appropriate for their earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts individual educational goals. and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Students are required to complete: be individually tailored to each student’s specific A minimum of 18 semester units in the major with a transfer requirements in order to provide the most grade of “C” or better while maintaining a minimum efficient path to transfer. More information on grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in all transfer programs and procedures is available in the CSU-transferable work. Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Completion of 60 CSU-transferable units using the California State University-General Education-Breadth pattern (CSU-GE Breadth); OR the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) pattern. No more than 60 units are required. Career Options: Careers related to this field typically require education beyond the associate degree level and some may require a graduate degree. Units Courses Required for the Major: ARTF 110 3 Art History: Prehistoric to Gothic 162 ollege C ity • 2018–2019 iego D an S C

163 type designer, illustrator, magazine/editorial Art–Graphic Design designer, multimedia designer, web page designer. For additional information please visit our website: Units Award Type ht tp: //s d cc .g d Certificate of Achievement Graphic Design 30 Program Learning Outcomes Associate of Arts Degree Students who complete the program will be able to: Graphic Design 32–33* • Apply the principles and elements of design * and courses to meet graduation requirements, to projects that include packaging, magazine general education and electives as needed to meet production, and design and production of Art–Graphic Design the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. posters, logos, brochures and interactive media. Recognize type terminology and proper usage • Program Description principles. Living in an information-seeking society, we are Illustrate understanding by building typographic • surrounded by words and pictures. It is the task of systems. the graphic designer to research, analyze, organize and make artistic order out of chaos. Graphic • Employ color theory in the creation of graphic design students must learn to speak a global design projects. visual language and develop an awareness of the Demonstrate proficiency with graphic design • meanings and power of symbols and words. The digital software. products and services they design and promote will make a social and ecological impact. • Identify design styles and apply them to contemporary work. Program Emphasis • Develop hierarchy and grids for use in two and Early emphasis is on the design process, form, three-dimensional layout. color and typography. The elements and principles • Recognize design styles and apply them to of design are applied to projects which include contemporary work. identity and branding, multi-page collateral, and packaging. Guided by instructors who are working • Create packaging structures that utilize an designer professionals, students learn to design for understanding of three-dimensional space. the real world. They make decisions about issues Utilize hand building and craftsmanship to basic • of concept, format, imagery, type, printing and book structures. methodology. Computer and traditional methods are used to solve graphic problems. The program • Employ digital and print production culminates in a professional portfolio which can be methodology. used to continue studies to a four-year university or • Develop conceptual thinking strategies and to obtain employment. The portfolio is critiqued by apply them to solve graphic problems. professional designers at the American Institute of Graphic Arts San Diego portfolio review. • Incorporate branding principles into project solutions. Program Goals • Design interactive and mobile experiences for a The main goal of the Graphic Design program is variety of digital devices. to to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to produce a portfolio in design for • Produce a professional portfolio to gain entry employment or university admission requirements. level employment or transfer. Recognize and speak a global visual language • Career Options and demonstrate an awareness of the meanings Some careers in graphic design-related work require and power of symbols and words. education beyond the associate degree. This list is Design products and services that will make a • not all-inclusive: advertising designer, art director, social and ecological impact. environmental graphic designer, graphic designer, an 163 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D C

164 ARTG 133 3 Logo and Packaging Office Faculty Telephone 3 Portfolio A ARTG 148A Sean Bacon AH-404A 619-388-4383 ARTG 148B 3 Portfolio B Astronomy AH-402A 619-388-3560 Candice Lopez ARTG 206 Advanced Typography 3 AH-405B 619-388-3417 Andrea Singer Choose one course from the following: Illustration 3 ARTG 120 Academic Programs Intermediate Digital Media ARTG 126 3 ARTG 144 Web Page Graphic Design 2 The associate degree in Graphic Design requires Portfolio Building ARTG 148C 3 completion of the courses listed below. Additional ARTG 151 3 Travel by Design general education and graduation requirements for ARTG 225 3 Advanced Digital Media the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Total Units = 32–33 Recommended electives: Art–Fine Art 110, Certificate of Achievement: 111, 155A, 210A; Art–Graphic Design 270, 290; Visual and Performing Arts Photography 100. Graphic Design Transfer Information Students are provided with skills for entry-level Common university majors related to the employment in the graphic design field while also field of Art–Graphic Design include: Graphic developing a portfolio in design for jobs and/or Communications, Communication Design, Design specific university admission requirements. Media, Digital Design, Design Graphics, Graphic Units Courses Required for the Major: Design, Illustration. 3 Basic Graphic Design ARTG 100 Course Requirements for Transfer Students Typography 3 ARTG 106 Students who plan to transfer to a four year college ARTG 118 3 Graphic Design History or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this 3 Digital Media ARTG 125 discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Page Layout 3 ARTG 124 Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate or Book Arts I ARTG 174A major preparation courses for their specific transfer 3 Book Arts I ARTF 174A institution and major. Transfer students may also Logo and Packaging 3 ARTG 133 earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts ARTG 148A Portfolio A 3 and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may ARTG 148B Portfolio B 3 be individually tailored to each student’s specific Advanced Typography ARTG 206 3 transfer requirements in order to provide the most Total Units = 30 efficient path to transfer. More information on transfer programs and procedures is available in the Associate of Arts Degree: Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Visual and Performing Arts Graphic Design Astronomy The associate degree program offers employment skills, development of a portfolio in design and offers Award Type Units courses for preparation for university transfer. Associate of Science Degree: Astronomy 32* Units Courses Required for the Major: ARTG 100 3 Basic Graphic Design * and courses to meet graduation requirements, 3 ARTG 106 Typography general education and electives as needed to meet ARTG 118 Graphic Design History 3 the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Book Arts I ARTG 174A or ARTF 174A Book Arts I 3 Description ARTG 124 3 Page Layout Earth and physical sciences, including astronomy, Digital Media ARTG 125 3 chemistry, geography, geographic information C iego D an S ity C ollege • 2018–2019 164

165 systems, geology, and physics are disciplines Associate of Science Degree: classified as natural sciences. They generally Physical and Earth Sciences involve nonliving materials and the principles of fundamental relationships and laws in the universe. Astronomy Courses Required for the Major: Units Program Emphasis 3 Descriptive Astronomy ASTR 101 These programs are designed to prepare students ASTR 109 Practice in Observing or Astronomy with basic concepts in astronomy, chemistry, ASTR 111 Astronomy Laboratory 1 geography, geology and physics which provide MATH 150 5 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I the foundation for upper division study in a MATH 151 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 4 baccalaureate institution and also satisfy general MATH 252 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III 4 education requirements. PHYS 195 Mechanics 5 Electricity and Magnetism 5 PHYS 196 Career Options PHYS 197 Waves, Optics and Modern Physics 5 Most careers in earth and physical sciences fields Total Units = 32 require education beyond the associate degree Recommended electives: Chemistry 200, 200L. and many require a graduate degree. A brief list of career options in the physical sciences includes: Only one astronomy lab course (ASTR 109 OR Note: astronomer, biophysicist, biochemist, chemist, earth ASTR 111) is required for the major. scientist, environmentalist, geographer, geologist, geophysicist, meteorologist, oceanographer, Transfer Information paleontologist, physicist and physical science Common university majors related to the field of instructor. Physical and Earth Sciences include: Astronomy, Program Learning Outcomes Biochemistry, Chemical Engineering, Chemical Physics, Chemistry, Earth Studies and Sciences, Upon successful completion students will be able to: Environmental Chemistry, Geographic Information • Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation Systems, Geography, Geology, Hydrologic Science, of the scientific method. Meteorology and Oceanography, Physical Sciences, Physics. Communicate an understanding of the • connections between science and other human Course Requirements for Transfer Students activities. Students who plan to transfer to a four year college or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this • Examine the universe in a variety of courses. discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the • Utilize critical thinking skills in a variety of Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate scientific applications. major preparation courses for their specific transfer institution and major. Transfer students may also Faculty Telephone Office earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Lorenza Levy S-211F 619-388-3713 be individually tailored to each student’s specific S-211E Gerardo Scappaticci 619-388-3356 transfer requirements in order to provide the most Lisa Will S-211C 619-388-3364 efficient path to transfer. More information on transfer programs and procedures is available in the Academic Programs Transfer Programs section of the catalog. The associate degrees in Physical and Earth Sciences, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geography, Geology and Physics, require completion of the courses listed for each degree. Additional general education and graduation requirements for the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. 165 S ollege C ity C iego D an • 2018–2019

166 are to foster the scientific curiosity of students Biology and to prepare students to achieve academic and professional success. Biology Units Award Type Career Options Certificate of Performance Applied Biotechnology 10–11 The following list is a sample of the many career options available for the biology major. A few require Associate of Science Degree: an associate degree, most require a baccalaureate 23–24* Transfer Track degree, and some require a graduate level degree: Allied Health Track 21* agricultural consultant, animal health technician, 30* Applied Biology Track biotechnology technician, biomedical scientist, * and courses to meet graduation requirements, dentist, environmental consultant, field biologist, general education and electives as needed to meet forester, horticulturist, high school or college the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. teacher, marine biologist, microbiologist, public health technician, physician, pharmaceutical Associate in Science for Transfer Degree: researcher, research biologist and veterinarian. Biology 34–38 In addition, a background in biology may be required for the following: registered nurse, physical Description therapist, respiratory therapist, dental hygienist, medical technician, physician’s assistant and Biology is a natural science that focuses on physical optometrist. and chemical processes of living organisms. This discipline explores how organisms acquire and use energy to maintain homeostasis, how they Telephone Office Faculty reproduce, and how they interact with each Jennifer Chambers 619-388-4415 S-311M other and their environment. Scientific processes Kevin Jagnandan 619-388-4413 S-311G are emphasized as a means of answering these biological questions. Biologists rely heavily on a Roya Lahijani S-311I 619-388-3289 chemistry foundation since living organisms are Michael J. Leboffe S-311S 619-388-3285 chemical systems. Erin McConnell 619-388-4411 S-311 Program Emphasis 619-388-4412 S-311E Heather McGray S-311O Erin Rempala 619-388-3712 The Biology Program serves four areas of study. First, the program curriculum provides a broad David Singer S-311K 619-388-3277 background of studies for the biology major preparing for transfer to a four-year institution. Academic Programs Second, the Applied Biology curriculum provides The three associate degrees in biology require preparation for entry level employment as a completion of the courses listed below. Additional biotechnology technician. Third, the program offers general education and graduation requirements courses in human anatomy, human physiology, for the associate degree are listed in the catalog. and general microbiology which may be used to The Associate Degree requires a minimum of 60 satisfy prerequisites for nursing and other allied units. health programs. Fourth, the program provides courses in natural science to fulfill general education Program Learning Outcomes requirements. All Biology students will be able to: Program Goals Apply core biological concepts that service as • The primary goal of the Biology Program is to the foundation for higher-level science courses. communicate the current state of knowledge and These include theories of evolution, natural technology to members of the community so that selection, processes of scientific inquiry, and they may better understand how various aspects proper laboratory techniques, among others. of the life sciences impact their lives, as well as Evaluate the quality of scientific methodology • local and global communities. Program objectives when it is reported by the popular media. C 166 S an D • 2018–2019 ollege C ity iego

167 Describe the relationship between the processes • Associate of Science Degree: of science, human culture and the environment. Biology Students in the Applied Biology track will also be Transfer Track able to: Units Courses Required for the Major: Apply the skill sets necessary to work in the • Biology BIOL 210A Introduction to the Biological biotechnology industry. Sciences I 4 • Describe applications, regulations, ethical, legal BIOL 210B Introduction to the Biological and social issues related to biotechnology. Sciences II 4 CHEM 200 3 General Chemistry I Demonstrate the soft skill sets necessary to • 2 General Chemistry I Laboratory CHEM 200L acquire employment in the biotechnology field. General Chemistry II 3 CHEM 201 Student satisfying prerequisites of nursing programs CHEM 201L General Chemistry II Laboratory 2 and other allied health fields will also be able to: MATH 121 Basic Techniques of Applied Calculus I 3 and • Demonstrate a detailed mastery of human MATH 122 Basic Techniques of Calculus II 3 body structure and function, from micro- to or macroscopic levels, including its homeostatic MATH 150 Calculus Analytical Geometry I 5 states and processes. Total Units = 23–24 Demonstrate a working knowledge of microbial • Recommended electives: Biology 100 (Mesa & systems, their role in Nature and their impact on Miramar), 101, 110, 115, 130, 180, 200, 205, 230, 232, humans. 235, 250 (Mesa), 290, 296. Certificate of Performance Associate of Science Degree: Applied Biotechnology* Biology The Applied Biotechnology Certificate of Allied Health Track Performance Award is authorized and issued by the Biology Department to recognize student Consult the Nursing Education faculty (City College) achievement in the field of biotechnology. It is or a counselor to verify current course requirements not intended to be, nor will it be recognized as, for associate degree and baccalaureate nursing an official state approved program. It is intended program preparation. to recognize students who have successfully Courses Required for the Major: Units demonstrated competence in intensive laboratory techniques and soft skills necessary to meet BIOL 107 General Biology – Lecture & entry-level employment requirements of the Laboratory 4 biotechnology industry. BIOL 205 General Microbiology 5 4 BIOL 230 Human Anatomy Courses required for the Certificate Units BIOL 235 4 Human Physiology 6 BIOL 206 Biotechnology Instrumentation 3 CHEM 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry BIOL 91 Employment Skills In Biotechnology 4 Fundamentals of Chemistry CHEM 100L or 1 Laboratory Preparation for Biotechnology 5 BIOL 109 Total Units = 21 Total Units = 10–11 Biology 101, 130, 180; Recommended electives: *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Chemistry 130, 130L. award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. Note: This program is not eligible for federal financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. • 2018–2019 D an S iego C ity C ollege 167

168 Associate in Science in Biology for Associate of Science Degree: Transfer Degree: Biology Biology Program Description Applied Biology Track This is a degree which prepares students for The Associate in Science in Biology for Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan to entry-level employment in the biotechnology complete a bachelor’s degree in Biology or a industry. related major in the California State University Courses Required for the Major: Units (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all Preparation for Biotechnology 5 BIOL 109 CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree General Microbiology BIOL 205 5 and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be 6 BIOL 206 Biotechnology Instrumentation required to complete no more than 60 units after 3 General Chemistry I – Lecture CHEM 200 transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be 2 CHEM 200L General Chemistry I – Laboratory appropriate preparation for students transferring General Chemistry II – Lecture CHEM 201 3 to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. General Chemistry II – Laboratory 2 CHEM 201L Students who plan to complete this degree should Principles of Information Systems 4 CISC 181 consult a counselor for additional information about Total Units = 30 participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. Biology 235; Physics Recommended electives: 180A , 180B, 181A , 181B. NOTE: Students intending to transfer into this major at a CSU should consult with a counselor and visit www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate transfer Transfer Information coursework. Common university majors related to the field of Biology include: Agricultural Science, Biochemistry, Award Notes Bioengineering, Bioinformatics, Biological Sciences, General Education: In addition to the courses listed Biophysics, Botany and Plant Sciences, Cell Biology, below, students must complete one of the following Conservation, Developmental Biology, Ecology, general education options: Entomology, Exercise Science, Genetics, Kinesiology, Marine Biology, Medical Sciences, Microbiology, ) is accepted by all CSU The IGETC pattern (page 118 Molecular Biology, Natural Sciences, Neuroscience, campuses and most UC campuses and majors. It is Nursing, Nutrition and Food Science, Psychobiology, also accepted by some private/independent or out Toxicology, Zoology and Animal Science. of state universities. Course Requirements for Transfer Students The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all Students who plan to transfer to a four year college CSU campuses and some private/independent or or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this out of state universities. It is not accepted by the UC discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the system. Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate It is strongly recommended that students consult major preparation courses for their specific transfer with a counselor to determine which general institution and major. Transfer students may also education option is most appropriate for their earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts and individual educational goals. Sciences. This degree may be individually tailored to each student’s specific transfer requirements Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 CSU- in order to provide the most efficient path to transferable units required for the degree. transfer. More information on transfer programs The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: and procedures is available in the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. No more than 60 units are required. Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses S an D C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 168 iego

169 PHYS 196 and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a 5 Electricity and Magnetism counselor for more information. Select 3-5 Units from the following: CHEM 231 3 Organic Chemistry I – Lecture Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in and Organic Chemistry I – Laboratory CHEM 231L the major must be completed with a grade of C or 2 bet ter. 3 Basic Techniques of Calculus II MATH 122 MATH 151 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 4 Certified completion of the California State Total Units = 34–38 University General Education-Breadth pattern Black Studies for more information); OR (CSU GE; see page 126 the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Black Studies Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more information). Award Type Units Program Goals Associate of Arts Degree The purpose of the Associate in Science in Biology Black Studies 21* for Transfer degree is to offer an organized course of study that will prepare students intending to * and courses to meet graduation requirements, major in Biology at the California State University general education and electives as needed to meet (CSU). It is accepted by some but not all CSU the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. campuses. Students who complete this degree and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be Description required to complete no more than 60 units after The Black Studies program at City College provides transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be an interdisciplinary and systemic approach to appropriate preparation for students transferring the historical and contemporary study of African to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. people in Africa and in the Americas. The program Students who plan to complete this degree should is designed to provide enrichment in the social consult a counselor for additional information about sciences and humanities by giving students in participating CSU campuses as well as university these areas the opportunity to link the tools of admission, degree and transfer requirements. formal analysis to a specific cultural area in the Program Emphasis African experience. The student’s career and future alternatives may be increased by adding Careers related to this field typically require a specialized dimension at the undergraduate education beyond the associate degree level and level. Students preparing for transfer to a four- some may require a graduate degree. year university may major in African Studies Courses Required for the Major: Units or humanities, law, social work, or public administration. This will enhance their opportunities Introduction to the Biological BIOL 210A in local, national and international organizations, Sciences I 4 both public and private, through participation in the BIOL 210B Introduction to the Biological program. Sciences II 4 CHEM 200 General Chemistry I – Lecture 3 Program Emphasis CHEM 200L 2 General Chemistry I – Laboratory General Chemistry II – Lecture 3 CHEM 201 Black Studies courses are taught in English. The CHEM 201L General Chemistry II – Laboratory 2 curriculum includes transfer courses which help to MATH 121 Basic Techniques of Applied Calculus I 3 meet District and baccalaureate general education or and multicultural requirements. The program offers Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 5 MATH 150 courses in African history, as well as art, economics, 5 PHYS 125 General Physics United States history, literature, music, Psychology, and Sociology and politics from a Black perspective. 5 PHYS 126 General Physics II or PHYS 195 Mechanics 5 and ollege C ity C iego D an 169 S • 2018–2019

170 or BLAS 145A Introduction to African History Career Options 3 Introduction to African History BLAS 145B Most careers related to Black Studies require Black Women in Literature, Film and BLAS 150 Business Studies education beyond the associate degree. A list or the Media of some sample careers include: social scientist, 3 BLAS 155 African American Literature counselor, international business person, historian, Total Units = 21 social worker, teacher and public administrator. Black Studies 165, 290, Recommended electives: Program Learning Outcomes 296. Upon successful completion the student will acquire Transfer Information the skills and knowledge for preparation in: Common university majors related to the Evaluating the aesthetics, social, and political • Africana Studies, field of Black Studies include: significance of Black artistic, musical and literary Afro-American Studies, Black Studies, Ethnic Studies, expression from its African origins to the present. Liberal Studies. Analyzing the underlying causes of such social • Course Requirements for Transfer Students problems as racism and sexism and class conflict. Students who plan to transfer to a four year college • Critically analyzing current social policies and or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this their historical origins, both on the local and discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the national levels, aimed at addressing current social Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate problems that most affect African-Americans. major preparation courses for their specific transfer institution and major. Transfer students may also Evaluating the role of active citizens who will be • earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts engaged in the global community. and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may be individually tailored to each student’s specific Telephone Office Faculty transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on Alazar Tesfamariam 619-388-3366 MS-440G transfer programs and procedures is available in the Darius Spearman MS-440L 619-388-3187 Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Academic Programs The associate degree in Black Studies requires completion of the courses listed below. Additional general education and graduation requirements for The the associate degree are listed in the catalog. associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Associate of Arts Degree: Black Studies Units Courses Required for the Major: BLAS 100 3 Introduction to Black Studies or BLAS 104 Black Psychology BLAS 130 3 The Black Family African American Art or BLAS 110 BLAS 120 Black Music 3 Sociology from a Black Perspective or BLAS 115 Contemporary Social Problems from BLAS 116 or a Black Perspective BLAS 135 3 Introduction to Black Politics History of the U.S., Black Perspectives BLAS 140A or BLAS 140B 3 History of the U.S., Black Perspectives S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 170

171 to prepare them for certain job skills. However only Business Studies A student one associate degree can be awarded. must choose an associate degree in Transfer or Award Type Units Small Business Accounting or Small Business Management or Real Estate. See each area for Certificate of Performance course requirements for specific vocations. 6 Bookkeeping for a Small Business Business Communications and Cultural Careers Competence 6 Business Presentations 6 Career opportunities available upon successful Certified Public Accountant Preparatory Program 9 completion of each of the Business Studies awards Business Studies Customer Relationship Management 6 are described in each area section. Most careers Job Skills 3–5.5 listed may require education beyond the associate Management and Team Building 12 degree level. Real Estate Salesperson 9–10 Program Learning Outcomes 3 Recordkeeping for a Small Business 9 Sports Management Students who complete the program will be able to: Starting and Managing a Small Business 9 • Analyze, organize, and compose various types of 4 Tax Preparer written and oral business communications. 2–5 VITA Tax Preparation Training 6–12 Working Education Develop clear, concise, and persuasive letters, • 6 Writing and Computational Skills for Business memorandum, and reports. Certificate of Achievement: • Understand the legal system and apply laws that Small Business Management Entrepreneur 18 govern business in America: including judicial 24–25 Real Estate Broker and administrative systems, ethics, contracts, torts, bankruptcy, agency, business organizations, Associate of Science Degree: security regulations, regulation of property, and Business Administration 36* protection of intellectual property interest-to Real Estate 50–51* evaluate legal solutions to various business Small Business Accounting 55* situations. 36* Small Business Management Entrepreneur Analyze and solve business problems using • * and courses to meet graduation requirements, computers and software packages including data general education and electives as needed to meet processing systems, decision support systems, the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. and systems analysis. Associate in Science for Transfer Degree: Study macro-economic situations and analyze • 27 Business Administration how changes in income levels, employment and output, economic stability and growth, fiscal Description and monetary policy affect decision-making in A wide variety of programs are offered for both business organizations. transfer and career-focused students. Employment • Articulate, analyze, and evaluate their own certificates of performance, certificates of beliefs/positions in the context of meaningful achievement and associate degree programs are philosophical inquiry and use these beliefs to available to students interested in entry-level successfully manage a business organization. employment or in upgrading business skills. Develop entry-level job skill sets in one or more • Program Emphasis areas – tax preparation, bookkeeping, owning and operating a small business, managing in a The Business Studies department offers five program retail environment, or real estate sales person. areas. These include the Business Studies Transfer area and four areas with entry level vocational • Develop critical thinking skills required for coursework: Small Business Accounting, Small transfer in business administration, accounting, Business Management and Real Estate. There are economics, finance, or real estate. many certificates in each area that students may take an D iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 171 S C

172 ENGL 101 3 Reading and Composition Telephone Office Faculty Business Law & the Legal BUSE 140 Leroy Brady BT-203B 619-388-3999 Environment 3 Business Studies Shana Carr 619-388-3110 BT-210F CISC 181 Principles of Information Systems 4 3 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON 120 Nancy Fredericks BT-314A 619-388-4338 PHIL 102B Introduction to Philosophy: Values 3 619-388-3665 BT-314B Alex Obiya Additional Courses Required BT-314C Tania Serhan 619-388-3573 Financial Accounting ACCT 116A 4 ACCT 116B Managerial Accounting 4 Academic Programs ECON 121 Principles of Microeconomics 3 The associate degree in Business Studies requires MATH 119 Elementary Statistics 3 completion of the courses listed in each degree Basic Techniques of Applied MATH 121 emphasis. Additional general education and 3 Calculus I graduation requirements for the associate degree Total Units = 36 are listed in the Academic Requirements section of the catalog. The Business Studies Transfer area Transfer Information provides lower division transfer preparation for the Common university majors related to the field School of Business Administration at San Diego of Business include: Accounting, Agricultural State University. The associate degree requires a Business, Apparel Design and Merchandising, minimum of 60 units. Business Administration, Business Economics, Business Information Systems, Business Law, Construction Management, E-Business, Economics, Core Curriculum Entrepreneurship, Finance/Financial Services, Health The Business Studies Core Curriculum is required for Administration, Hospitality Management, Human the associate degree in all Business Studies areas. Resources, Industrial Engineering and Technology, For a current list of articulated courses to CSU or UC International Business, Management, Marketing, . business major visit www.assist.org Public Administration, Real Estate, Transportation. Courses: Units Course Requirements for Transfer Students Business Communications 3 *BUSE 119 Students who plan to transfer to a four year college ENGL 101 Reading and Composition 3 or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this BUSE 140 Business Law & the Legal discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Environment 3 Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate CISC 181 Principles of Information Systems 4 major preparation courses for their specific transfer ECON 120 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 institution and major. PHIL 102B Introduction to Philosophy: Values 3 Total Units = 19 Associate in Science in Business Administration for Transfer Degree: *Business 119 is required for San Diego State University School of Business Administration Program Description: degrees in Finance, Information Decision Systems, The Associate in Science in Business Administration Management, and Marketing. for Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or a related major in the California Transfer State University (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. Students who complete Associate of Science Degree: this degree and transfer to a participating CSU Business Studies campus will be required to complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. Business Administration It may not be appropriate preparation for students Courses Required for the Major: Units transferring to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this Core degree should consult a counselor for additional 3 Business Communications BUSE 119 C ollege C iego D an S • 2018–2019 172 ity

173 Program Learning Outcomes information about participating CSU campuses as Students who complete the certificate will be able well as university admission, degree and transfer to: requirements. • Accurately prepare and organize accounting Award Notes: records and produce financial statements for a The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: small business. • Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. No more than 60 units are required. • Accurately prepare all the state and federal payroll tax forms required by a small business in Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least • California. 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a Business Studies Courses: Units minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses and majors may require a higher Small Business Accounting – ACCT 128A GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. 1.5 Recordkeeping ACCT 128B Small Business Accounting – Payroll 1.5 • Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units Total Units = 3 in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in the major must be completed with a *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental grade of “C” or better. award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the Certified completion of the California State • San Diego Community College District. University General Education-Breadth pattern (CSU GE; see page 126 for more information); OR This program is not eligible for federal Note: the Intersegmental General Education Transfer financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more information). Certificate of Performance: Career Options: Bookkeeping for a Small Business* Careers related to this field typically require Program Learning Outcomes education beyond the associate degree level and Students who complete the certificate will be able some may require a graduate degree. to: Units Courses Required for the Major: • Accurately complete an accounting cycle: Financial Accounting ACCT 116A 4 preparing journal entries; posting to the general Managerial Accounting ACCT 116B 4 ledger; and preparing a worksheet, financial BUSE 140 Business Law and the Legal statement, adjusting and closing entries and post 3 Environment closing trial balance. 4 Principles of Information Systems CISC 181 Accurately complete an accounting cycle using a • Principles of Macroeconomics 3 ECON 120 computerized accounting program. 3 Principles of Microeconomics ECON 121 MATH 119 Elementary Statistics 3 Courses: Units MATH 121 Basic Techniques of Applied Calculus I 3 Basic Accounting ACCT 102 3 Total Units = 27 3 ACCT 150 Computer Accounting Applications Total Units = 6 Small Business Accounting *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the Certificate of Performance: San Diego Community College District. Recordkeeping for a Small Business* Note: This program is not eligible for federal financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. The Record Keeping for a Small Business certificate prepares a small business owner to organize business records and accurately prepare payroll. an iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 173 S D

174 advanced level of VITA and IRS tax preparation upon Certificate of Performance: completion of this program. Tax Preparer* Business Studies Program Learning Outcomes Program Goals Students who complete the certificate will be able The goal of this program is to provide accelerated to: training and on-the-job experience in tax preparation for students exploring a career in • Accurately prepare current Federal and State tax accounting. Students are trained in tax preparation returns. and customer service. Students complete volunteer California Tax Education Council (CTEC) experience working with the community preparing taxes. The program provides employment San Diego City College is approved by the preparation in various accounting fields such California Tax Education Council (CTEC) to provide as tax preparation, bookkeeping, and financial tax preparation courses that comply with current specialization. professional tax education standards. San Diego City College’s CTEC provider number is 2006. Students Career Options interested in obtaining a California Tax Preparer • Tax Preparer certificate must complete Accounting 120 and Accounting 121 at San Diego City College, and • Bookkeeper Completion courses must be taken face-to-face. Financial Specialists • of the two classes with a grade of “C” or better, provides the student with 60 hours (45 hours of • Accounting fields Federal credit and 15 hours of California credit). Courses: Units Students will not be issued a certificate nor have 1 Internal Revenue Service Tax Training ACCT 132 hours count towards a certificate if courses are taken Accounting Internship / Work ACCT 270 online or at other colleges, including Mesa College Experience 1–4 or Miramar College, that offer Accounting 120 and Total Units = 2–5 Accounting 121. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Courses: Units award that does not appear on the student’s 3 Federal Income Tax ACCT 120 transcript. All courses must be completed within the ACCT 121 California Income Tax 1 San Diego Community College District. Total Units = 4 This program is not eligible for federal Note: *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the Certificate of Performance: San Diego Community College District. Certified Public Accountant This program is not eligible for federal Note: Preparatory Program* financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. This program provides an in-depth exploration of government and nonprofit accounting, ethics, and Certificate of Performance: auditing. Students learn about government and VITA Tax Preparation Training* nonprofit specific accounting practices as well as This program provides an in-depth exploration of auditing techniques used in the accounting field. tax preparation and community outreach. Students Accounting-specific ethical business practices are trained in tax preparation methods through the are discussed. Emphasis is placed on careers in Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). the accounting field and preparation for students VITA provides free tax preparation services to low- interested in earning the California Certified Public income households in the community. Students Accountant License. are trained to prepare taxes for these households Award Notes: through the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax The goal of this program is to provide students software. Students may be certified at a basic and with the skills and experience necessary to obtain iego D an S ity C ollege • 2018–2019 174 C

175 employment in the accounting industry. Another Courses: Units goal is to prepare students interested in obtaining 3 Accounting Ethics ACCT 119 the California Certified Public Accountant License, Government & Not-for-Profit ACCT 125 to meet some of the educational requirements. Accounting 3 Students explore government and not-for-profit ACCT 135 Principles of Auditing 3 specific accounting practices, ethical standards Total Units = 9 and auditing techniques used in the accounting *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental field. There is an increasing demand for qualified award that does not appear on the student’s individuals in the niche government and nonprofit transcript. All courses must be completed within the accounting sector and not currently enough job- San Diego Community College District. Business Studies ready individuals to fill those openings. Students who successfully complete this Certificate of This program is not eligible for federal Note: Performance will be able to understand the financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. qualifications required to enter into an accounting profession and submit coursework to fulfill some Associate of Science Degree: educational requirements for Certified Public Business Studies Accountant licensing. Program SLO: Analyze and evaluate government, not-for-profit, auditing and Small Business Accounting ethic-specific accounting functions. The Small Business Accounting associate degree This is a department award in recognition of prepares for entry-level positions as bookkeepers, information on the transcript and does not imply account clerks, accounting technicians, tax aides or meeting a graduation requirement. accounting trainees. Program Goals: Courses Required for the Major Units The goal of this program is to provide students Core with the skills and experience necessary to obtain 3 Business Communications BUSE 119 employment in the accounting industry. Another 3 Reading and Composition ENGL 101 goal is to prepare students interested in obtaining Business Law & the Legal BUSE 140 the California Certified Public Accountant License, Environment 3 to meet some of the educational requirements. 4 Principles of Information Systems CISC 181 Students explore government and not-for-profit 3 ECON 120 Principles of Macroeconomics specific accounting practices, ethical standards PHIL 102B Introduction to Philosophy: Values 3 and auditing techniques used in the accounting field. There is an increasing demand for qualified Additional Courses Required individuals in the niche government and nonprofit Basic Accounting ACCT 102 3 accounting sector and not currently enough job- Financial Accounting 4 ACCT 116A ready individuals to fill those openings. Students 4 Managerial Accounting ACCT 116B who successfully complete this Certificate of 3 ACCT 120 Federal Income Tax Performance will be able to understand the 1 California Income Tax ACCT 121 qualifications required to enter into an accounting Small Business Accounting – Record ACCT 128A profession and submit coursework to fulfill some Keeping 1.5 educational requirements for Certified Public ACCT 128B Small Business Accounting – Payroll 1.5 Accountant licensing. Program SLO: Analyze and Computer Accounting Applications 3 ACCT 150 evaluate government, not-for-profit, auditing and BIOL 101 Issues in Environmental Science & ethic-specific accounting functions. Sustainability 4 Business Mathematics BUSE 101 3 Career Options: Beginning Microsoft Excel 2 CBTE 140 Students who successfully complete the Certified COMS 180 Intercultural Communication 3 Public Accountant Preparatory Program Certificate of Performance are prepared for the following Complete 3 units from: positions: Bookkeeper, Accounting Clerk, Accounting BUSE 245C Small Business Internship – Assistant, Fund Manager and Auditor. Accounting 3 BUSE 277C Service Learning – Community 1–3 Total Units = 55 C ollege S 175 an D iego C ity • 2018–2019

176 BUSE 150 Human Relations in Business 3 Additional general education and graduation MARK 100 Principles of Marketing 3 requirements for the associate degree are listed in the Academic Requirements section of the catalog. Business Studies Total Units = 12 Students interested in careers as professional Note: The Business Department recommends accountants should select the Business Studies that students planning to transfer select BUSE 119 San Diego State University Transfer Option. The instead of BUSE 92. associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Small Business transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. Management Entrepreneur This program is not eligible for federal Note: The Small Business Management area prepares financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. individuals for a variety of employment opportunities in business. Coursework includes Certificate of Performance: starting and managing a small business, entry level Sports Management* positions in the financial services industry, and the development and management of community This program provides an in-depth exploration of service projects. the sports industry, focusing on sports management and business communication methods. Students Certificate of Performance: learn about sports management topics including Management and Team Building* sales, marketing, game operations, finances, public relations, communications, and customer service. This certificate is designed for persons who currently Emphasis is placed on careers in the sports industry. own, operate or work for a small business and want to strengthen business skills. Program Goals The goal of this program is to provide students Program Learning Outcomes with the skills and experience necessary to obtain Students who complete the certificate will be able employment in the sports industry. Students explore to: sports-specific management, communication, • Analyze, organize, and compose various types of and customer relation topics to better prepare written and oral business communications. them for this hybrid business profession. There is an increasing demand for qualified individuals Apply human resource management techniques, • in the sports business sector and not currently marketing for a small business, and knowledge enough job-ready individuals to fill those openings. of current legal issues to successfully own or Students who successfully complete this Certificate operate a small business. of Performance will be able to understand the • Develop leadership, decision-making, qualifications required to enter into a sports-related communication, motivation, and personnel profession. Students will be able to produce specific management skills and techniques necessary to sports selling techniques to service customers. own or operate a small business. Students will be able to properly communicate with customers in a professional manner. • Develop marketing strategies including product planning, development, pricing, distribution, and Career Options promotion necessary to operate and own a small • Customer service representative business. Sports sales representative • Courses: Units • Sports marketing coordinator BUSE 155 3 Managing the Small Business Introduction to Business BUSE 92 • Community relations assistant or Communication Volunteer relations assistant • 3 BUSE 119 Business Communications • Event relations assistant ity C iego D an S ollege • 2018–2019 176 C

177 Game-day operations assistant BUSE 157 Developing a Plan for the • 3 Small Business Press office assistant • Principles of Marketing MARK 100 3 • Sponsorship representative Total Units = 9 Courses: Units *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s 3 BUSE 122 Sports Management transcript. All courses must be completed within the 3 Sports Sales BUSE 124 San Diego Community College District. Select one course from the following: Note: This program is not eligible for federal BUSE 92 Introduction to Business Business Studies financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Communication or BUSE 119 Business Communications 3 BUSE 102 3 Introduction to Customer Service Certificate of Performance: 3 MARK 105 Professional Selling Business Communications and Total Units = 9 Cultural Competence* The Business Department recommends that Note: The Certificate of Performance in Business students planning to transfer select BUSE 119 instead Communications and Cultural Competence is of BUSE 92. designed to develop students’ leadership, decision- making, cross-cultural communication, motivational, *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental and personal management skills for use in business award that does not appear on the student’s environments. transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. Program Learning Outcomes Students who complete the certificate will be able This program is not eligible for federal Note: to: financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Develop leadership, decision-making, • Certificate of Performance: communication, motivation, and personal management skills and techniques necessary to Starting and Managing a Small own or operate a small business. Business* • Learn the relationship between culture and The Certificate of Performance in Starting and communication emphasizing social psychological Managing a Small Business provides students variables, verbal and nonverbal language systems, with the skills and knowledge required to start cross-cultural communication breakdowns and and manage a small business of their own or as an conflict resolution. employee of a start-up company. Courses: Units Program Learning Outcomes 3 Human Relations in Business Students who complete the certificate will be able BUSE 150 to: COMS 180 Intercultural Communication 3 Total Units = 6 Apply human resource management techniques, • marketing for a small business, and knowledge *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental of current legal issues to successfully own or award that does not appear on the student’s operate a small business. transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. • Develop a business plan for a small business. This program is not eligible for federal Note: • Develop marketing strategies including product financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. planning, development, pricing, distribution, and promotion necessary to operate a small business. Courses: Units 3 BUSE 155 Managing the Small Business C iego D an ity C ollege 177 S • 2018–2019

178 persuasive speaking; speaker credibility; and Certificate of Performance: effective use of language. Writing and Computational Skills Business Studies Courses: Units for Business* 3 CBTE 180 Microsoft Office The Certificate of Performance in Writing and Oral Communication COMS 103 or Computational Skills for Business is designed 3 Small Group Communication COMS 170 to provide students with the fundamental Total Units = 6 computational and writing skills required in an office environment. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Program Learning Outcomes transcript. All courses must be completed within the Students who complete the certificate will be able San Diego Community College District. to: Note: This program is not eligible for federal • Analyze, organize, and compose various types of financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. written and oral business communications. Learn basic mathematics and the mathematics • Certificate of Performance: used in business. Customer Relationship Courses: Units Management* Introduction to Business BUSE 92 This program provides an in-depth exploration of or Communication customer relationship management. Students study Business Communications 3 BUSE 119 customer service and professional selling practices BUSE 101 Business Mathematics 3 used in customer relationship management. Total Units = 6 Emphasis is placed on careers in customer service and sales fields. Note: The Business Department recommends that students planning to transfer select BUSE 119 instead Award Notes of BUSE 92. The goal of this program is to introduce students to customer service techniques, client communication *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental processes, and the stages of professional selling award that does not appear on the student’s to increase their opportunities for employment transcript. All courses must be completed within the in the customer relationship management sector. San Diego Community College District. Students who successfully complete this Certificate Note: This program is not eligible for federal of Performance will be able to practice and enhance financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. their customer listening and communication skills, customer service and problem solving, and sales Certificate of Performance: presentation knowledge. Program SLO: Analyze, Business Presentations* organize, and compose various types of written and oral business communications. This certificate is designed for persons who want to This is a department award in recognition of improve their verbal, written, and computer skills. information on the transcript and does not imply Program Learning Outcomes meeting a graduation requirement. Students who complete the certificate will be able Career Options to: Upon successful completion of this certificate, Learn to use Microsoft Office Professional Suite • students will have career options as: and how to integrate data within and between • Customer Service Representatives word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentations. Client Service Representatives • Learn to choose a topic and specific purpose; • Product Demonstrators • outlining, listening, organizing a speech; delivery; Reception, Front Office Worker • small group communication; informative and • Sales Associates an S iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 178 D

179 BUSE 119 3 Business Communications Courses: Units BUSE 100 Introduction to Business 3 Introduction to Customer Service BUSE 102 3 BUSE 102 Introduction to Customer Service 3 MARK 105 Professional Selling 3 BUSE 155 Managing the Small Business 3 Total Units = 6 Developing a Plan for the Small BUSE 157 *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental 3 Business award that does not appear on the student’s Professional Selling MARK 105 3 transcript. All courses must be completed within the Total Units = 18 San Diego Community College District. Note: The Business Department recommends that Note: This program is not eligible for federal students planning to transfer select BUSE 119 instead Business Studies financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. of BUSE 92. Certificate of Achievement: Associate of Science Degree: Business Studies Business Studies Small Business Management Small Business Management Entrepreneur Entrepreneur The Small Business Management Certificate of The Small Business Management Entrepreneur Achievement prepares individuals for a variety of Associate of Science degree is designed for employment opportunities in business. Coursework individuals planning to start, operate or work in a includes starting and managing a small business, small business. Emphasis is placed on starting and entry level positions in the financial services managing a small business as well as on day-to-day industry, and the development and management of decision making in key areas, such as management, community services projects. Specializations focus marketing, finance and communication. on both starting and managing a small business. Units Courses Required for the Major Award Notes ACCT 128A Small Business Accounting - 1.5 The goal of the Small Business Management Recordkeeping ACCT 128B 1.5 Entrepreneur Certificate of Achievement is to Small Business Accounting - Payroll 3 BUSE 101 Business Mathematics provide students the opportunity to do the Introduction to Customer Service 3 BUSE 102 following: Introduction to Business BUSE 092 Gain an understanding of the pros and cons of • Communication or different business models. BUSE 119 Business Communications 3 • 3 Human Relations in Business BUSE 150 Explore decision making processes used when owning or managing a small business. Managing the Small Business BUSE 155 3 Developing a Plan for the Small BUSE 157 • Build skills and knowledge in business planning, Business 3 communication, and financial management. MARK 100 3 Principles of Marketing Career Options Select one course from the following Introduction to Business 3 The Small Business Management Entrepreneur BUSE 100 ECON 120 3 Certificate of Achievement prepares students for Principles of Macroeconomics self-employment and/or expands their career Select one course from the following options by qualifying them to work and collaborate BUSE 201 Business Organization and in a variety of small business environments. This 3 Management degree prepares students currently working in a Professional Selling MARK 105 3 small business for advancement into supervisory 3 Advertising Principles MARK 130 positions. Select 6 units from the following Courses Required for the Major Units Business Internship / Work BUSE 270 Introduction to Business BUSE 92 Experience 1–6 Communication or or C ity C D S • 2018–2019 179 an iego ollege

180 Students purchase and control inventory for a small Small Business Internship - Marketing BUSE 245A business. City has two student run businesses: or a la cart and the Business Resource Center. Small Business Internship - Operations BUSE 245B Business Studies or Courses: Units BUSE 245C Small Business Internship - Accounting Complete 6 through 12 units from: or Small Business Internship – Marketing BUSE 245A 3 BUSE 245D Small Business Internship - Buying and Small Business Internship – BUSE 245B 3 Inventory Operations 3 Total Units = 36 BUSE 245C Small Business Internship – Business 100. Recommended Electives: Accounting 3 BUSE 245D Small Business Internship – Buying Additional general education and graduation and Inventory 3 requirements for the associate degree are listed in BUSE 245E 1 Small Business Internship – Marketing the Academic Requirements section of the catalog. BUSE 245F Small Business Internship – Students who plan to transfer to a four-year college Operations 1 or university should select the Business Studies BUSE 245G Small Business Internship – The San Diego State University Transfer option. Accounting 1 associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. BUSE 245H Small Business Internship – Buying 1 and Inventory Total Units = 6–12 Small Business *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Management Community award that does not appear on the student’s Service transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. Certificate of Performance: This program is not eligible for federal Note: Working Education* financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. This certificate is designed for persons who want actual job experience running a small business. Certificate of Performance: Areas of specialization include marketing, Job Skills* operations, accounting, and buying and inventory. This certificate concentrates on developing and Program Learning Outcomes understanding skills necessary to secure and keep Students who complete the certificate will be able a job such as preparing for interviews and writing to: resumes. Learning techniques for time management and organization are also taught. • Develop marketing strategies for an on-campus student run small business. City has Program Learning Outcomes two student run businesses – a la cart and the Students who complete the certificate will be able Business Resource Center. to: Manage the operations and human resource • Graduate from Garfield and transfer. • functions of a student owned and operated small Courses: Units business. City has two student run businesses – a Select all BUSE 90 courses (5.5 units) OR 3 units in la cart and the Business Resource Center. BUSE 277C • Develop practical accounting processes for Learning Skills 1.5 BUSE 90A owning and operating a small business. City has and two student run businesses – a la cart and the Work Success 1.5 BUSE 90B Business Resource Center. and Business Internship Seminars BUSE 90C 1 Purchase and control supplies and merchandise • and for a Student Business on campus. BUSE 90D Workplace Competencies 1.5 or ollege S 180 an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

181 Service Learning – Community about DRE licensure requirements, contact the DRE 3 BUSE 277C . at 619-525-4192 or www.dre.ca.gov Total Units = 3–5.5 Program Learning Outcomes *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Students who complete the certificate will be able award that does not appear on the student’s to: transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. Analyze the fundamentals of the economics of • land ownership and use and the responsibility Note: This program is not eligible for federal of broker, owner and purchaser; terminology financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. and definitions and the varied vocational Business Studies opportunities in the field. Real Estate • Learn the day-to-day operations in a real estate office including listings, valuations, prospecting, Description: selling, financing, exchanges, taxation and The real estate program is designed for those specialized brokerage operations. interested in careers in real estate or for professionals wishing to upgrade their skills. The program offers Courses: Units certificates for Real Estate Salesperson, Real Estate REAL 101 Real Estate Principles 3 Broker, and Real Estate Appraisal, as well as an REAL 120 3 Real Estate Practice Associate of Science Degree in Real Estate. The Certificate of Completion: Real Estate Salesperson Select 3 to 4 units from the following: provides students with the coursework required Basic Accounting 3 ACCT 102 by the California Department of Real Estate (DRE) Financial Accounting ACCT 116A 4 for qualification to take the real estate salesperson BUSE 140 Business Law & the Legal license examination. Completion of the Certificate of Environment 3 Achievement: Real Estate Broker and the Real Estate 3 REAL 105 Legal Aspects of Real Estate I Associate of Science Degree provide coursework REAL 110 3 Principles of Real Estate Appraisal I that meets the DRE’s educational requirements for REAL 115 Real Estate Finance I 3 real estate broker licensure in California. Completion 3 REAL 125 Real Estate Economics of the courses for the Certificate of Completion: Real REAL 130 3 Real Property Management Estate Appraisal fulfills the educational requirements REAL 151 Real Estate Computer Applications 3 of the Office of Real Estate Appraisers (OREA) for Total Units = 9–10 appraisal licensure. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental See individual certificates and degrees for additional award that does not appear on the student’s information. transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. Goals: Give students greater choice of electives in the real Note: This program is not eligible for federal estate business. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Emphasis: Certificate of Achievement: Emphasis is placed on preparing students to become real estate brokers in California. Real Estate Broker Career Options: The Real Estate Broker Certificate of Achievement Real estate sales and appraisal; Real estate broker. meets the educational requirements for the Department of Real Estate (DRE) broker’s licence in California. An applicant for the broker licensure Certificate of Performance: examination must have completed eight college Real Estate Salesperson* level courses in addition to fulfilling the experience This certificate is designed for students interested requirement of two years full-time real estate sales in exploring a career in real estate sales. Real Estate work in the last five years or the equivalent outlined 101, Real Estate 120, and one additional course from in the California DRE “Instructions to License the elective list are required to take the Real Estate Applicants.” For questions about DRE licensure Salesperson’s License Examination. For questions 181 D iego C an ity C ollege • 2018–2019 S

182 6 to 7 units selected from the following: requirements contact the DRE at 619-525-4192 or at . www.dre.ca.gov Basic Accounting ACCT 102 3 ACCT 116A Financial Accounting 4 Business Studies Program Learning Outcomes Business Law and the Legal BUSE 140 Students who complete the certificate will be able Environment 3 to: 3 Escrow Procedures – Beginning ESCR 101 • Analyze the fundamentals of the economics of 3 Real Property Management REAL 130 REAL 151 land ownership and use and the responsibility 3 Real Estate Computer Applications Common Interest Development of broker, owner and purchaser; terminology REAL 166 3 and definitions and the varied vocational Total Units = 24–25 opportunities in the field. Associate of Science Degree: • Learn practical application of the law to legal Real Estate problems arising from real estate transactions, statutory enactment and case law, legal Units Courses Required for the Major instruments, zoning ordinances, and city and Core county planning decisions. Business Communications BUSE 119 3 Learn the Uniform Standards of Professional • ENGL 101 Reading and Composition 3 Appraisal Practice (USPAP), USPAP rules and BUSE 140 Business Law & the Legal standards, a general understanding of The Environment 3 Appraisal Foundation (TAF), the Appraisal 4 CISC 181 Principles of Information Systems Standards Board (ASB), the Appraisal Principles of Macroeconomics ECON 120 3 Qualifications Board (AQB), and the Appraisal PHIL 102B 3 Introduction to Philosophy: Values Subcommittee (ASC). Additional Real Estate Courses Required: • Learn types of financing sources; loans and Real Estate Principles 3 REAL 101 loan processing; government loans, methods of REAL 105 Legal Aspects of Real Estate I 3 financing residential properties; with an overview 3 Principles of Real Estate Appraisal I REAL 110 of financing business, income, commercial and Real Estate Finance I 3 REAL 115 industrial properties; and the property appraisal 3 Real Estate Practice REAL 120 and taxation. Real Estate Economics REAL 125 3 • Learn the day-to-day operations in a real estate 6 to 7 units selected from the following: office including listings, valuations, prospecting, Basic Accounting 3 ACCT 102 selling, financing, exchanges, taxation and 4 Financial Accounting ACCT 116A specialized brokerage operations. ESCR 101 Escrow Procedures – Beginning 3 Real Property Management 3 REAL 130 • Evaluate the trends and factors that affect the REAL 151 Real Estate Computer Applications 3 value of real estate; the nature and classification REAL 166 Common Interest Development 3 of land economics; the development of property, construction and subdivision, economic values Additional courses required: and real estate evaluation; real estate cycles and BIOL 101 Issues in Environmental Science & business fluctuations; residential market trends; Sustainability 4 real property and special purpose property COMS 180 Intercultural Communication 3 trends. Total Units = 50–51 Courses Required for the Major: Units Business 101. Recommended electives: REAL 101 Real Estate Principles 3 3 REAL 105 Legal Aspects of Real Estate I REAL 110 3 Principles of Real Estate Appraisal I 3 REAL 115 Real Estate Finance I REAL 120 Real Estate Practice 3 Real Estate Economics 3 REAL 125 • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an 182 ity

183 Faculty Office Telephone Chemistry 619-388-3355 James Covalt S-211A Units Award Type 619-388-3641 S-211G Ram Gurumurthy Associate of Science Degree: 619-388-3742 S-211D M. Shane Haggard Chemistry 48* S-211I Robert Kojima 619-388-4419 * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Chemistry general education and electives as needed to meet Academic Programs the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. The associate degrees in Physical and Earth Sciences, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geography, Geology and Description Physics, require completion of the courses listed Earth and physical sciences, including astronomy, for each degree. Additional general education and chemistry, geography, geographic information graduation requirements for the associate degree systems, geology, and physics are disciplines are listed in the catalog. The associate degree classified as natural sciences. They generally requires a minimum of 60 units. involve nonliving materials and the principles of fundamental relationships and laws in the universe. Associate of Science Degree: Physical and Earth Sciences Program Emphasis These programs are designed to prepare students Chemistry with basic concepts in astronomy, chemistry, Courses Required for the Major: Units geography, geology and physics which provide CHEM 200 General Chemistry I – Lecture 3 the foundation for upper division study in a CHEM 200L 2 General Chemistry I – Laboratory baccalaureate institution and also satisfy general CHEM 201 3 General Chemistry II – Lecture education requirements. CHEM 201L General Chemistry II – Laboratory 2 3 CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry I – Lecture Career Options Organic Chemistry I – Laboratory CHEM 231L 2 Most careers in earth and physical sciences fields Quantitative Analytical Chemistry 5 CHEM 251 require education beyond the associate degree MATH 150 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 5 and many require a graduate degree. A brief list 4 MATH 151 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II of career options in the physical sciences includes: 4 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III MATH 252 astronomer, biophysicist, biochemist, chemist, earth PHYS 195 Mechanics 5 scientist, environmentalist, geographer, geologist, 5 PHYS 196 Electricity and Magnetism geophysicist, meteorologist, oceanographer, PHYS 197 Waves, Optics and Modern Physics 5 paleontologist, physicist and physical science Total Units = 48 instructor. Chemistry 233, 233L, 290, Recommended electives: Program Learning Outcomes 296; Physics 125, 126. Upon successful completion students will be able to: Transfer Information • Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation Common university majors related to the field of of the scientific method. Chemistry include: Chemical Engineering, Chemical • Communicate an understanding of the Physics, Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, connections between science and other human Physical Sciences. activities. Course Requirements for Transfer Students Examine the universe in a variety of courses. • Students who plan to transfer to a four year college or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this • Utilize critical thinking skills in a variety of discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the scientific applications. Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate major preparation courses for their specific transfer institution and major. Transfer students may also • 2018–2019 ollege C ity 183 iego D an S C

184 history, anthropology, ethnology, sociology, earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts psychology, social sciences, political sciences, and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may be individually tailored to each student’s specific law, social work, business, the arts, and public Chicana and Chicano Studies administration. transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on Program Learning Outcomes transfer programs and procedures is available in the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Upon active engagement in course activities and processes the successful student will be able to: Attend and analyze educational, cultural, or • Chicana and political activities related to the Chicano/a Latino/a community’s social issues. Chicano Studies Express in a written, oral or artistic way the • significance of the Chicana/o and Mexican Award Type Units experience. Associate of Arts Degree: Chicana and Chicano Studies 20* Express in a written, oral or artistic way some of • the major obstacles that the Indigenous cultures * and courses to meet graduation requirements, of Mexico have faced since having contact with general education and electives as needed to meet European cultures. the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. • Express in a written, oral or artistic way some Description of the contributions that women have made to the development of the Mexican and The Department of Chicana and Chicano Mexican-American experience. Studies offers a dynamic, innovative program that emphasizes an interdisciplinary and Faculty Office Telephone comparative approach to understanding the Enrique Davalos MS-440M 619-388-3634 historical experiences, contemporary social status, challenges, and accomplishments of Mexican, MS-440K Justin Akers Chacon 619-388-3181 Mexican American, and Latino populations in the United States. Critical thinking and effective oral Academic Programs and written communication skills are integrated The associate degree in Chicana and Chicano across the curriculum, which incorporates the arts Studies requires completion of the courses listed and literature, cultural studies, history, the social below. Additional general education and graduation sciences, policy studies, service learning, and active requirements for the associate degree are listed participation for social justice. in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Program Emphasis The department emphasizes the study of the Associate of Arts Degree: international border between Mexico and the Chicana and Chicano Studies United States. Due to its geographic location, the department also offers a focus on the relationship Units Courses Required for the Major: between the communities of southern California and CHIC 110A Introduction to Chicano Studies 3 Baja California. United States History from a Chicano CHIC 141A Perspective 3 Career Options United States History from a Chicano CHIC 141B As a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary field, Perspective 3 Chicana/o Studies contributes to all fields in the SPAN 201 Third Course in Spanish 5 humanities and social sciences. The curriculum Select two of the following courses: prepares students at the undergraduate level for Introduction to Chicano Studies 3 CHIC 110B a multitude of career options. Students earning a Mexican Literature in Translation CHIC 130 3 degree in Chicana and Chicano Studies may pursue Chicana/o Literature CHIC 135 3 careers in areas such as education, humanities, iego S an D 184 C ity ollege C • 2018–2019

185 Literature of La Raza in Latin America CHIC 138 Child Development in Translation 3 History of Mexico 3 CHIC 150 Award Type Units CHIC 170 La Chicana 3 CHIC 201 The Indigenous Tradition of Mexico Certificate of Performance: and Ancient Mesoamerica 3 School Age Child Care 12 CHIC 210 3 Chicano Culture Certificate of Achievement: 3 Chicano Art CHIC 230 18–19 Associate Teacher Total Units = 20 Teacher 26–29 Note: The department recommends that students Master Teacher 36–40 planning to transfer to the Chicana and Chicano Child Development Associate of Science Degree: Studies major at SDSU select CHIC 170. Child Development 26–29* Site Supervisor 35–38* Transfer Information * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Common university majors related to the field general education and electives as needed to meet Chicana of Chicana and Chicano Studies include: the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. and Chicano Studies, Ethnic Studies, Latin American Studies, Mexican-American Studies, Raza Studies. Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: 48–60 Elementary Teacher Education Course Requirements for Transfer Students Students who plan to transfer to a four year college Description or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Child Development offers programs for career Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate and transfer students. Certificates of Performance, major preparation courses for their specific transfer Certificates of Achievement and Associate Degree institution and major. Transfer students may also programs are available to students interested in a earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts range of child development opportunities and in and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may meeting the requirements for the State of California be individually tailored to each student’s specific Child Development Permits and the California State transfer requirements in order to provide the most Department of Social Services, Title 22, Community efficient path to transfer. More information on Care Licensing. transfer programs and procedures is available in the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Program Emphasis The Child Development program offers course work, training and supervised practicum experiences to meet state licensing requirements for working in centers, schools, child care homes and service related agencies. The skills and knowledge gained in beginning courses provide the framework and foundation for more specialized courses. Career Options The San Diego Community College District offers certificates, degrees and transfer options in the field of Child Development/Early Childhood Education. The School Age Child Care Certificate of Performance offered at City provides training for working with school age children. The Certificate of Achievement options, Associate Teacher, Teacher, and Master Teacher, prepare individuals for higher level instructional and ity S 185 • 2018–2019 ollege an D iego C C

186 Provide safe and healthy environments and • service-oriented positions. The Associate Teacher, positive guidance; Teacher, and Master Teacher certificates meet the requirements for the State of California Child Child Development Facilitate conflict resolution skills among children; • Development Permits. The Child Development • Associate of Science Degrees prepare for teacher, Identify and apply theories of child growth and development in a practicum setting. master teacher, director, and site supervisory positions. Career Options Students who successfully complete the School Age Program Learning Outcomes Child Care Certificate of Performance are prepared Students who complete the program will be able to: for entry level positions as before- and after-school care providers, recreation leaders, and camp • Interpret the processes of child growth and counselors. development. Courses: Units Examine practices that respect and support • Human Growth and Development CHIL 101 3 inclusion. CHIL 152 School Age Program Planning 3 • Plan and demonstrate curriculum based on Select six units from the following: developmentally appropriate practices. 2 EDUC 200 Teaching as a Profession • Model ethical practices with children, families, and colleagues and communities as stated in the Field Experience for Prospective EDUC 203 NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct. Teachers 1 MATH 210A Concepts of Elementary School Telephone Faculty Office Mathematics I 3 Denise Blaha MS-436 619-388-4003 Music for Elementary School Teachers 3 MUSI 110 619-388-3877 Child Development Berta Harris EXSC 240 Physical Education in the Elementary 619-388-3205 Center F-Building 3 Schools Total Units = 12 619-388-3579 MS-434 Rebecca Collins- This program is not eligible for federal Note: Bernardino financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Certificates of Performance* Certificate of Achievement: Child Development *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award in recognition of information on the transcript Associate Teacher and does not imply that a graduation requirement has been met. This certificate prepares students to provide instruction to children and supervise Assistant Teachers. Child Development courses must be Certificate of Performance: completed with a grade of “C” or better. School Age Child Care* Units Courses Required for the Major: Description 3 Human Growth and Development CHIL 101 The School Age Child Care Certificate of Performance The Child, Family and Community 3 CHIL 141 prepares students to provide developmentally CHIL 180 Nutrition, Health & Safety for appropriate curriculum and environments for Children 3 school-age children. Select two courses from: Goals Curriculum: Music/Motor Skills 3 CHIL 111 Students who successfully complete the School Age CHIL 121 3 Creative Art Child Care Certificate of Performance will: CHIL 131 Curriculum: Language/Science 3 • Create and implement developmentally CHIL 153 Techniques of Teaching Using the appropriate curriculum; 3 Reggio Emilia Approach ollege S 186 an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

187 Select three or more units from: Certificate of Achievement Observing and Understanding CHIL 160 Child Development Children 2 Master Teacher CHIL 161 Observations and Issues in Child Development 2 The Master Teacher Certificate of Achievement CHIL 270 1–4 Work Experience prepares students to provide instruction to children CHIL 291 Child Development Lab Practicum 1–4 and to supervise Teachers, and to coordinate staff CHIL 291A Child Development Center Practicum 1 development and curriculum. CHIL 291B Child Development Center Practicum 1 Program Goals CHIL 291C Child Development Center Practicum 1 CHIL 291D Child Development Center Practicum 1 • Students who successfully complete the Master Child Development Total Units = 18–19 Teacher Certificate of Achievement will: • Create and implement developmentally Certificate of Achievement: appropriate curriculum; Child Development • Provide safe and healthy environments and Teacher positive guidance; This certificate prepares students to provide • Facilitate conflict resolution skills among children; instruction to children and supervise Assistant and Associate Teachers. Child Development courses must Identify community resources to support healthy • families in a diverse society; be completed with a grade of “C” or better. Identify and apply theories of child growth and • Courses Required for the Major: Units development in a practicum setting; Human Growth and Development 3 CHIL 101 CHIL 111 3 Curriculum: Music/Motor Skills Supervise teachers and mentor students. • Creative Art CHIL 121 3 Career Options 3 Curriculum: Language/Science CHIL 131 The Child, Family and Community CHIL 141 3 Students who successfully complete the Master 3 CHIL 180 Nutrition, Health & Safety for Children Teacher Certificate of Achievement meet the CHIL 151 Program Planning 3 educational requirements for the State of California Master Teacher Permit that allows them to work and concurrent enrollment in: in Master Teacher positions in state and federally CHIL 270 Work Experience 2–4 funded programs. or 2–3 Supervised Field Study CHIL 275 Units Courses Required for the Major: Human Growth and Development CHIL 101 3 Select one of the following three options: CHIL 141 3 The Child, Family and Community Observing & Understanding Children 2 CHIL 160 CHIL 151 Program Planning 3 and Supervised Field Study Seminar CHIL 155 1 CHIL 161 Observation & Issues in Child Nutrition, Health & Safety for Children CHIL 180 3 2 Development Adult Supervision and Mentoring in CHIL 215 or Early Childhood Settings 3 Children with Special Needs 3 CHIL 165 CHIL 270 Work Experience 2–4 or or Infant-Toddler Growth and CHIL 175 CHIL 151, 155 and 270 must be taken Note: Development 3 concurrently Total Units = 26–29 Select three of the following courses: CHIL 111 3 Curriculum: Music/Motor Skills 3 Creative Art CHIL 121 3 Curriculum: Language and Literature CHIL 133 3 Curriculum: Science and Math CHIL 135 D S 187 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego an

188 CHIL 165 Children With Special Needs 3 Select one of the following specializations (6–7 or units): CHIL 175 Infant-Toddler Growth and Child Development Guiding Young Children Development 3 CHIL 160 2 Observing & Understanding Children Total Units = 36–40 CHIL 161 Observation & Issues in Child Development 2 Associate of Science Degree: 3 Observing and Guiding Child Behavior CHIL 162 Child Development or This degree prepares students to provide Family Life instruction to children and supervise Assistant 2 CHIL 160 Observing & Understanding Children and Associate Teachers. Child Development CHIL 161 Observation & Issues in Child courses must be completed with a grade of “C” 2 Development or better. Additional general education and Violence in the Lives of Children and CHIL 188 graduation requirements are listed in the Academic Families 3 Requirements section of this catalog. The Associate or Degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Special Needs Units Courses Required for the Major Children with Special Needs CHIL 165 3 Special Needs Curriculum 3 CHIL 166 CHIL 101 Human Growth and Development 3 or Curriculum: Music/Motor Skills CHIL 111 3 3 CHIL 121 Creative Art Infant/Toddler CHIL 131 Curriculum: Language/Science 3 Infant-Toddler Growth and CHIL 175 3 Child, Family and Community CHIL 141 Development 3 CHIL 180 Nutrition, Health & Safety for Children 3 CHIL 176 Principles of Infant/Toddler Program Planning CHIL 151 3 Caregiving 3 or and concurrent enrollment in: 2–4 CHIL 270 Work Experience School Age or School-Age Program Planning CHIL 152 3 Supervised Field Study 2–3 CHIL 275 and Concepts of Elementary School MATH 210A Select one of the following three options: Mathematics 3 CHIL 160 Observing and Understanding or 2 Children MUSI 110 Music for the Elementary School and Teachers 3 CHIL 161 Observation and Issues in Child or Development 2 EXSC 240 Physical Education in the Elementary or School 3 CHIL 165 3 Children with Special Needs Students must select CHIL 152 and one of the Note: or other three courses Infant-Toddler Growth and CHIL 175 Development 3 Select one of the following three options outside Total Units = 26–29 of your specialization: Observing and Understanding CHIL 160 Associate in Arts in Elementary 2 Children and Teacher Education for Transfer Observations and Issues in Child CHIL 161 Degree: Development 2 The Associate in Arts in Elementary Teacher or Education for Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Teacher Education or a related major in the California State University (CSU) system. It D an S iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 188 C

189 (CSU GE; see page 126 for more information); OR is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Students who complete this degree and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be required to Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 117 for more information). complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate Program Goals: preparation for students transferring to a CSU The purpose of the Associate in Arts in Elementary campus that does not accept the degree. Students Teacher Education for Transfer degree is to offer an who plan to complete this degree should consult organized course of study that will prepare students a counselor for additional information about intending to major in Elementary Teacher Education participating CSU campuses as well as university at the California State University (CSU). It is accepted admission, degree and transfer requirements. by some but not all CSU campuses. Students who Child Development Students intending to transfer into this major NOTE: complete this degree and transfer to a participating at a CSU should consult with a counselor and visit CSU campus will be required to complete no more www.assist.org than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s for guidance on appropriate transfer coursework. degree. It may not be appropriate preparation for students transferring to a CSU campus that does not Award Notes: accept the degree. Students who plan to complete In addition to the courses listed General Education: this degree should consult a counselor for additional above, students must complete one of the following information about participating CSU campuses as general education options: well as university admission, degree and transfer The IGETC pattern (page 117 ) is accepted by requirements. • all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and Career Options: majors. It is also accepted by some private/ Careers related to this field typically require independent or out of state universities. education beyond the associate degree level and some may require a graduate degree. ) is accepted by all The CSU GE pattern (page 126 • CSU campuses and some private/independent or Units Courses Required for the major out of state universities. It is not accepted by the EDUC 200 Teaching as a Profession 2 UC system. Field Experience for Prospective EDUC 203 It is strongly recommended that students consult Teachers 1 with a counselor to determine which general Human Growth and Development 3 CHIL 101 education option is most appropriate for their BIOL 107 General Biology – Lecture and individual educational goals. Laboratory 4 PHYN 100 Survey of Physical Science 3 Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 CSU- PHYN 101 Survey of Physical Science Laboratory 1 transferable units required for the degree. GEOL 104 Earth Science 3 The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T Earth Science Laboratory GEOL 120 1 degrees: MATH 210A Concepts of Elementary School 3 Mathematics I Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. 3 Oral Communication COMS 103 No more than 60 units are required. Reading and Composition 3 ENGL 101 Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature 3 all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum 3 GEOG 104 World Regional Geography of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses 3 HIST 100 World History I and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a History of the United States I HIST 109 3 counselor for more information. 3 POLI 102 The American Political System Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an List A: Select one (3 units) “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in Critical Thinking and Intermediate ENGL 205 the major must be completed with a grade of C or Composition 3 bet ter. PHIL 205 Critical Thinking and Writing in Philosophy 3 Certified completion of the California State University General Education-Breadth pattern 189 • 2018–2019 ollege C an C iego D S ity

190 and List B: Select one (3 units) Observation & Issues in Child Art Orientation ARTF 100 3 CHIL 161 DRAM 105 Introduction to Dramatic Arts 2 Development 3 Child Development or Introduction to Music MUSI 100 3 Children with Special Needs CHIL 165 List C: Select any course(s) not already selected or from the above (0–12 additional units) CHIL 175 Infant-Toddler Growth and 3 Art Orientation ARTF 100 Development 3 3 Introduction to Dramatic Arts DRAM 105 Total Units = 35–38 Physical Education in the Elementary EXSC 240 3 Schools Recommended electives: (select from courses not 2 Health Education For Teachers HEAL 195 already taken): Child Development 100, 152, 160, 161, Concepts of Elementary School MATH 210B 162, 165, 166, 175, 176, 188, 202, 210, 215, 270, 275, 3 Mathematics II 290, 291, 291A, 291B, 291C, 291D. Children’s Mathematical Thinking 1 MATH 212 3 Introduction to Music MUSI 100 Transfer Information 3 MUSI 110 Music for Elementary School Teachers Common university majors related to the field of Total Units = 48–60 Child Development include: Child Development, Family and Consumer Studies and Sciences, Associate of Science Degree: Gerontology, Human Development, and Liberal Child Development Studies. Site Supervisor Course Requirements for Transfer Students Students who plan to transfer to a four year college This degree prepares students to supervise single or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this site programs, provide instruction to children and discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the coordinate curriculum and staff development. Child Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Development courses must be completed with a major preparation courses for their specific transfer grade of “C” or better. Additional general education institution and major. Transfer students may also and graduation requirements are listed in the earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts Academic Requirements section of this catalog. The and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Associate Degree requires a minimum of 60 units. be individually tailored to each student’s specific Courses Required for the Major Units transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on Human Growth and Development CHIL 101 3 transfer programs and procedures is available in the CHIL 111 Curriculum: Music/Motor Skills 3 Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Creative Art 3 CHIL 121 3 CHIL 131 Curriculum: Language/Science CHIL 141 Child, Family and Community 3 CHIL 151 Program Planning 3 and concurrent enrollment in: Work Experience CHIL 270 2–4 or 2–3 CHIL 275 Supervised Field Study Nutrition, Health & Safety for Children CHIL 180 3 CHIL 202 Administration of Early Childhood Programs 3 CHIL 210 Supervision of Early Childhood Programs 3 CHIL 215 Adult Supervision and Mentoring in 3 Early Childhood Settings Select one of the following three options: 2 CHIL 160 Observing & Understanding Children • 2018–2019 ollege 190 ity C iego D an S C

191 • Analyze the audience’s backgrounds, motives Communication and attitudes. • Design effective communication in order to Studies facilitate understanding and cooperation. Units Award Type • Develop effective verbal and presentational skills for a variety of communication situations. Certificate of Performance: 9 Communication Studies Research, organize, and present a developed • viewpoint. Associate of Arts Degree: Communication Studies 18* Faculty Telephone Office * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Erin Engstrom AH-513C 619-388-3183 general education and electives as needed to meet Deanna Shelton AH-511C 619-388-3182 Communication Studies the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: Academic Programs Communication Studies 18–21 The Communication Studies Certificate of Performance and the associate degree in Description Communication Studies require completion of The Communication Studies programs provide courses listed below. students the opportunity to gain effective communication skills which are essential and highly Certificate of Performance: demanded in educational, professional and social Communication Studies* settings. Through critical thinking, observation, and Courses: Units performance, students recognize the importance of messages in an interconnected multicultural 3 Oral Communication COMS 103 community. The Associate of Arts or Certificate Select 6 units from: of Performance in Communication Studies offer 3 Voice and Articulation COMS 101 students enhancement of self-development and 3 COMS 104 Advanced Public Communication foundational tools for relational success. COMS 111 3 Oral Interpretation 3 COMS 135 Interpersonal Communication Program Emphasis COMS 160 3 Argumentation The Communication Studies program emphasizes Small Group Communication COMS 170 3 proficiency in public speaking, interpersonal Intercultural Communication 3 COMS 180 communication, intercultural communication, voice Total Units = 9 and articulation, small group communication, and *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental argumentation. award that does not appear on the student’s Career Options transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. The career opportunities related to Communication Studies are vast and usually require associate or Note: This program is not eligible for federal advanced degrees. Some communication career financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. fields include: advertising and public relations, community service, counseling, education, human Associate of Arts Degree: resources, journalism, management, marketing, Communication Studies performing arts, politics, and radio/television/film. Courses Required for the Major: Units Program Learning Outcomes Oral Communication COMS 103 3 Upon successful completion of the Communication Select 15 units from: Studies program the student should be able to: 3 Voice and Articulation COMS 101 3 Advanced Public Communication COMS 104 Evaluate the speaker’s backgrounds, motives and • 3 COMS 135 Interpersonal Communication attitudes. • 2018–2019 ollege C S C iego D an 191 ity

192 3 Argumentation COMS 160 education option is most appropriate for their Small Group Communication 3 COMS 170 individual educational goals. Intercultural Communication 3 COMS 180 Communication Studies Program Learning Outcomes: Total Units = 18 Upon successful completion of the Communication Additional general education and graduation Studies program the student should be able to: requirements for the associate degree are listed • Evaluate the speaker’s backgrounds, motives and The associate degree requires a in the catalog. attitudes. minimum of 60 units. Analyze the audience’s backgrounds, motives • Recommended electives: Anthropology 103; and attitudes. Communication Studies 111. • Design effective communication in order to Transfer Information facilitate understanding and cooperation. Common university majors related to the field of • Develop effective verbal and presentational skills Communication, Communication Studies include: for a variety of communication situations. Communicative Disorders, Graphic Communications, Journalism, Marketing, Public Relations. • Research, organize, and present a developed viewpoint. Course Requirements for Transfer Students Students who plan to transfer to a four year college Note: Students intending to transfer to a CSU should or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this consult a counselor and visit www.assist.org for discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the guidance on appropriate transfer coursework. Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Courses Required for the major Units major preparation courses for their specific transfer Oral Communication* COMS 103 3 institution and major. Transfer students may also earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts Select two of the following courses: and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may COMS 160 Argumentation* 3 be individually tailored to each student’s specific Interpersonal Communication* COMS 135 3 transfer requirements in order to provide the most COMS 170 3 Small Group Communication* efficient path to transfer. More information on Select two of the following courses (not selected transfer programs and procedures is available in the above) to meet the lower division preparation for Transfer Programs section of the catalog. the major to your transfer university: JOUR 202 Introduction to Mass Communication* 3 Associate in Arts in Communication JOUR 210A Newspaper Production 1 (3 unit Studies for Transfer Degree: option only) 3 MATH 119 Elementary Statistics* or The Associate of Arts in Communication Studies for PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics* 3 Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan PSYC 101 General Psychology* 3 to complete a bachelor’s degree in Communication COMS 101 Voice and Articulation 3 Studies or a related major in the California State Advanced Public Communication 3 COMS 104 University (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but COMS 111 3 Oral Interpretation not all CSU campuses. Students who complete this 3 Interpersonal Communication* COMS 135 degree and transfer to a participating CSU campus 3 Argumentation* COMS 160 will be required to complete no more than 60 units Small Group Communication* COMS 170 3 after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not COMS 180 3 Intercultural Communication* be appropriate preparation for students transferring to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. If needed to total 18 units, select one of the Students who plan to complete this degree should following courses (not selected above) to meet consult a counselor for additional information about the lower division preparation for the major participating CSU campuses as well as university to your transfer university: admission, degree and transfer requirements. Introduction to Physical ANTH 102 3 Anthropology* It is strongly recommended that students consult with a counselor to determine which general • 2018–2019 an iego 192 S ollege C ity C D

193 ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Computer Business 3 Anthropology* Reading and Composition* ENGL 101 or Technology or ENGL 105 Composition and Literature* ENGL 205 Critical Thinking* 3 Award Type Units ENGL 210 American Literature I* 3 3 ENGL 211 American Literature II* Certificate of Performance: ENGL 215 3 English Literature I: 800–1799* Computer Literacy 7 ENGL 216 English Literature II: 1800–Present* 3 5.5 Intro to Business Information Worker FREN 201 Third Course in French* 5 Office Support Basics 11 3 GEOL 100 Physical Geology* Certificate of Achievement: GEOL 101 Physical Geology Laboratory* 1 27 Administrative Assistant 5 GERM 201 Third Course in German* Administrative Office Management 27 3 Introduction to Western Civilization I* HIST 105 Business Information Worker 16–17 3 Introduction to Western Civilization II* HIST 106 JOUR 200 Introduction to Newswriting and Description Reporting 3 Computer Business Technology JOUR 201 Advanced Newswriting and Reporting 3 Computer Business Technology programs are JOUR 202 Introduction to Mass Communication* 3 offered for both transfer and career-oriented Newspaper Production 1 (3 unit JOUR 210A students. Certificates of Performance, Certificates option only) 3 of Achievement, and Associate of Science Degrees or Elementary Statistics* MATH 119 are available to students interested in upgrading Behavioral Science Statistics* PSYC 258 3 computer skills for college success and/or 3 Contemporary Philosophy* PHIL 205 employment in business office environments. PSYC 101 General Psychology* 3 Career Options: 3 Principles of Sociology* SOCO 101 5 Third Course in Spanish* SPAN 201 Career/job opportunities available upon completion COMS 101 3 Voice and Articulation of each Computer Business Technology option are Advanced Public Communication 3 COMS 104 described in each curriculum section. Some career 3 Oral Interpretation COMS 111 options may require education beyond the associate COMS 135 3 Interpersonal Communication* degree or certificate. COMS 160 Argumentation* 3 COMS 170 Small Group Communication* 3 Program Learning Outcomes Intercultural Communication* 3 COMS 180 Students who complete the program will be able to: Total Units = 18–21 • Identify computer operating systems functions; *Course also fulfills general education requirements define key features of different software for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. applications; and demonstrate how to use a Web In addition to the courses listed General Education: browser, and conduct an Internet search. above, students must complete one of the following • Create office documents utilizing the Microsoft general education options: Office Suite programs (i.e. Word, Excel, Access, • ) is accepted by The IGETC pattern (page 117 PowerPoint, Outlook, and Publisher). all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and • Analyze work environments, labor force, and majors. It is also accepted by some private/ organizational types and structures. independent or out of state universities. • Employ critical thinking as a basis for continual • ) is accepted by all The CSU GE pattern (page 126 learning and problem solving. CSU campuses and some private/independent or out of state universities. It is not accepted by the Demonstrate interpersonal skills (soft • UC system. skills) such as leadership, delegation of authority, accountability, consensus building, Electives as needed to meet maximum of 60 communication, conflict resolution, and CSU-transferable units required for the degree. teambuilding. an D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 193 S

194 Students who successfully complete the Intro to Telephone Faculty Office Business Worker Certificate of Performance will be 619-388-3107 BT-210B Barbara Riva able to: Computer Business Technology BT-210A Theresa Savarese 619-388-3367 • Learn basic keyboarding and proofreading skills; • Build skills in oral and written business Certificate of Performance: communication; and Computer Literacy* • Work in teams analyzing and solving problems. The Certificate of Completion in Computer Literacy is designed to prepare students with basic Career Options computer skills required for advanced course work Students who successfully complete the Intro in Computer Business Technology that may lead to Business Information Worker Certificate of to entry level employment in a variety of office Performance are prepared for entry-level positions environments. in general office environments, such as general Courses Units office clerks, customer service representatives, and receptionists. Basic Computer Skills 2 CBTE 52 Introduction to Computer Keyboarding CBTE 94 Note: or Students must complete all required courses within CBTE 95 1 Keyboarding Skill Development three (3) years in order to receive the Certificate of 1 CBTE 114 Introduction to Microsoft Windows Performance in Intro to Business Information Worker. Microsoft Office 3 CBTE 180 Total Units = 7 Units Courses Required for the Major: *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental 1.5 Learning Skills BUSE 90A award that does not appear on the student’s Introduction to Business BUSE 92 transcript. All courses must be completed within the Communication 3 San Diego Community College District. CBTE 94 Introduction to Computer Keyboarding 1 This program is not eligible for federal Note: Total Units = 5.5 financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Certificate of Performance: award that does not appear on student’s transcript. Intro to Business Information All courses must be completed within the San Diego Worker* Community College District. The Business Information Worker Certificate of Note: This program is not eligible for federal Performance is designed to introduce students with financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. the learning skills necessary to continue towards the Business Information Worker certificates and/or Certificate of Performance: associate degree. Office Support Basics* Program Goals The Office Support Basics Certificate of Performance is designed to provide students with a hands-on, The goal of the Intro to Business Information Worker practical overview of word processing, spreadsheet, Certificate of Performance is to introduce students presentation and calendar management to basic oral and written business communications, software used in both professional and academic basic keyboarding skills, and critical thinking and environments. problem solving skills needed for future entry-level employment. Units Courses Required for the Major: Program Emphasis Introduction to Computer Keyboarding CBTE 94 or The emphasis of the Intro to Business Information CBTE 95 1 Keyboarding Skill Development Worker Certificate of Performance is to introduce CBTE 114 Introduction to Microsoft Windows 1 students to a broad range of skills and applications. Beginning Microsoft Word CBTE 120 2 an D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 194 S

195 CBTE 114 1 Introduction to Microsoft Windows CBTE 127 Beginning Microsoft PowerPoint 2 2 Beginning Microsoft Excel CBTE 140 CBTE 120 Beginning Microsoft Word 2 3 CBTE 122 CBTE 152 Beginning Microsoft Access 2 Intermediate Microsoft Word 2 Introduction to Microsoft Outlook 1 CBTE 127 Introduction to PowerPoint CBTE 164 CBTE 140 Microsoft Excel 2 Total Units = 11 2 CBTE 152 Beginning Microsoft Access *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental CBTE 162 Web Page Creation 2 award that does not appear on student’s transcript. CBTE 205 or Records Management All courses must be completed within the San Diego 3 Electronic Records Management CBTE 206 Community College District. Computers in Business CBTE 210 or 3 Office Administration CBTE 211 This program is not eligible for federal Note: BUSE 101 3 Business Mathematics financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. BUSE 092 Introduction to Business Communication or Administrative Assistant BUSE 119 Business Communications 3 Program Description: Total Units = 27 The Administrative Assistant program is designed Computer Business Technology to provide students with the skills and knowledge Certificate of Achievement: required for employment as an Administrative Computer Business Technology Assistant. Administrative Office Management Program Goals: To prepare students in the fundamentals of word • The Certificate of Achievement in Administrative processing, data management, presentation skills, Office Management is designed to prepare students and basic webpage creation. for employment in management and/or supervisory level positions in variety of office environments. • To prepare students in the fundamentals of records management, office management and Program Goals: office administration. To prepare students in communication skills, • problem solving, and computational skills • To prepare students in communication skills, required in business and office environments. problem solving, and computational skills required in business environments. • To prepare students to manage an office or small business. Program Emphasis: The Administrative Assistant program emphasizes • To develop students’ interpersonal skills computer and software skills as well as business (soft skills) such as leadership, delegation of communication and computational skills. authority, accountability, consensus building, communication, conflict resolution, and Career Options: teambuilding. The Administrative Assistant program prepares students for employment in business or civil service Career Options: as a general office clerk, clerk-typist, file clerk, Students who successfully complete the receptionist, cashier, word processor, machine Certificate of Achievement in Administrative Office transcriptionist, or other positions not requiring Management may find employment in management stenography. and/or supervisory level positions in variety of office environments. Certificate of Achievement: Units Courses Required for the Major: Computer Business Technology Introduction to Computer Keyboarding CBTE 94 or Administrative Assistant 1 Keyboarding Skill Development CBTE 95 Units Courses Required for the Major: CBTE 114 1 Introduction to Microsoft Windows Introduction to Computer Keyboarding CBTE 094 Introduction to Microsoft Outlook 1 CBTE 164 or 3 CBTE 180 Microsoft Office 1 Keyboarding Skill Development CBTE 095 CBTE 205 Records Management or ity C ollege D 195 S an iego C • 2018–2019

196 representatives, receptionists, and information 3 CBTE 206 Electronic Records Management Computers in Business CBTE 210 clerks. or 3 Office Administration CBTE 211 Computer Business Technology Units Courses Required for the Major: Computer Accounting Applications ACCT 150 3 BUSE 92 Introduction to Business BUSE 101 Business Mathematics 3 Communication or BUSE 092 Introduction to Business BUSE 119 3 Business Communications or Communication BUSE 150 3 Human Relations in Business BUSE 119 3 Business Communications CBTE 94 Introduction to Computer 3 Human Relations in Business BUSE 150 Keyboarding 1 3 Managing the Small Business BUSE 155 or Total Units = 27 CBTE 95 Keyboarding Skill Development 1 CBTE 114 1 Introduction to Microsoft Windows Certificate of Achievement: 2 Beginning Microsoft Word CBTE 120 Computer Business Technology CBTE 140 2 Beginning Microsoft Excel CBTE 164 1 Introduction to Microsoft Outlook Business Information Worker CISC 150 Introduction to Computer and The Business Information Worker Certificate of Information Sciences 3 Achievement is designed to prepare students for or entry-level office and administrative support in a CISC 181 4 Principles of Information Systems variety of fields or businesses. Total Units = 16–17 Program Goals: Note: The Computer Business Technoloy The goal of the Business Information Workers Departmenbt requires students to complete all CBTE Certificate of Achievement is to prepare students requirements for the certificate within five years. for entry-level office and administrative support in the following areas: Basic oral and written business communications; basic computer application skills, including beginning Excel, Word, and Outlook; the fundamentals of computer systems; and critical thinking and problem solving. Program Emphasis: The emphasis of the Business Information Worker Certificate of Achievement is to prepare students in a broad range of entry-level office skills and applications in order to prepare them for further on the job training specific to each work environment. Students who successfully complete the Business Worker Certificate of Achievement will be able to: • Improve keyboarding and proofreading skills; • Determine the most appropriate software for a specific project or task; and • Work in teams analyzing and solving business problems. Career Options: Students who successfully complete the Business Information Worker Certificate of Achievement are prepared for entry-level positions in general office environments in a variety of fields, such as general office clerks, retail salespersons, customer service • 2018–2019 ollege C 196 C iego D an S ity

197 Career Options Computer Some careers in the Information Technology field require education beyond the associate degree in Information Systems either Business, Computer Information Systems, Information Technology, Electronics, or Computer Units Award Type and Information Sciences. Careers in the Information Certificate of Performance: Technology field include: computer consultant, Cybersecurity Specialist 10 help desk technician, instructional lab technician, 11 Cyber Incident Response sales specialist in computer hardware and software, 8 Introduction to C++ support technician, computer assembler, systems Intermediate C++ 8 integrator, network administrator, network specialist, 7 Desktop Support Technician systems engineer, systems administrator, database Microsoft Technology Specialist 16.5 professionals, and web designers. Most careers in 7 Network Security the field of Information Decision Systems require 6 Project Management for Information Technology education beyond the associate degree. Careers include: applications programmer, computer Certificate of Achievement: Computer Information Systems operator, database administrator, maintenance 27 Information Technology Management programmer, programmer/analyst, and systems Associate of Science Degree: analyst. Information Technology Management 27* Faculty Office Telephone * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet BT-210G 619-388-3666 Larry Forman the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. David Kennemer BT-103 I 619-388-3011 619-388-3113 Richard Pelletier BT-210D Description City College offers transfer and certification Academic Programs programs in the Computer Information Systems The programs that follow, Certificates of (Information Technology) field. These programs Performance, Certificate of Achievement and include computer literacy; application, web, and Associate Degree for preparation for transfer, require database programming; database administration; completion of the courses listed below. and a variety of vendor specific and vendor neutral industry-standard certification training. The roles of the various information system professionals Certificate of Performance: are to design, implement, operate, and maintain Cybersecurity Specialist* a computer information system. This system can This certificate provides an intermediate to advanced be based on a large central mainframe computer level study of cybersecurity methodologies through serving hundreds of users or a small personal courses focusing on industry standard certifications microcomputer on a desk. These professionals also in information security and assurance. Curriculum provide services in the networking areas such as follows industry standard methodologies in systems engineers, systems administrators, and enterprise security, including securing information networks specialists. and technology assets, research and analysis, and Program Goals technical integration of enterprise components. The Information Technology department’s goals Career Options: includes transfer and vocational programs including Careers in the cybersecurity or information industry standard certifications. assurance field include: information security consultant, security administrator, security analyst, Program Emphasis security engineer, security auditor, incident The Information Technology department offers responder, penetration tester, vulnerability assessor, Certificates of Performance, a Certificate of support technician, systems administrator, network Achievement and an Associate Degree option. administrator, and network specialist. iego D an ity C ollege • 2018–2019 197 S C

198 INWT 205 CompTIA Advanced Security Note: Upon successful completion of the Certificate Practitioner (CASP) Certification of Performance in Cybersecurity Specialist, students Training 4 will be able to design, implement, and maintain a Computer Information Systems complete enterprise security strategy for various Introduction to Computer Forensics INWT 210 3 endpoints, cloud technology, and wired and wireless Investigation networks. Total Units = 11 Courses: Units *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s 3 Security+ Certification Training INWT 140 transcript. All courses must be completed within the INWT 170 Cybersecurity Analyst+ (CSA+) San Diego Community College District. 3 Certification Training INWT 205 CompTIA Advanced Security This program is not eligible for federal Note: Practitioner (CASP) Certification financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. 4 Training Total Units = 10 Certificate of Performance: *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Introduction to C++* award that does not appear on the student’s Courses: Units transcript. All courses must be completed within the CISC 187 4 Data Structures in C++ San Diego Community College District. CISC 192 4 C/C++ Programming This program is not eligible for federal Note: Total Units = 8 financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Certificate of Performance: transcript. All courses must be completed within the Cyber Incident Response* San Diego Community College District. This certificate provides an intermediate to advanced Note: This program is not eligible for federal level study of cybersecurity methodologies through financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. courses focusing industry standard certifications in information security and assurance. Curriculum Certificate of Performance: follows industry standard methodologies in Intermediate C++* identifying system vulnerabilities, managing risk, and responding to cyber incidents. Courses: Units Career Options: CISC 201 Advanced C++ Programming 4 Object Oriented Programming using CISC 205 Careers in the cybersecurity or information C++ 4 assurance field include: information security Total Units = 8 consultant, security administrator, security analyst, security engineer, security auditor, incident *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental responder, penetration tester, vulnerability assessor, award that does not appear on the student’s support technician, systems administrator, network transcript. All courses must be completed within the administrator, and network specialist. San Diego Community College District. Upon successful completion of the Certificate Note: Note: This program is not eligible for federal of Performance in Cyber Incident Response, students financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. will be able to communicate and understand the history of computer forensics and cybercrime Certificate of Performance: in order to establish procedures for identifying, Desktop Support Technician* acquiring, and handling digital evidence in the event of a computer or network related incident or crime. Program Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion the student will be able Courses: Units to: INWT 200 Certified Ethical Hacking (CEH) Recognize, identify, and assess the features of • 4 Certification Training current Desktop Operating Systems. C ity ollege iego D an S • 2018–2019 198 C

199 Support Specialists. Careers in the Information Apply customer service principles to the Help • Technology field include: computer consultant, help Desk and Desktop Support field. desk technician, and sales specialist in computer • Diagnose and repair desktop operating systems hardware and software. problems. Courses: Units • Apply Desktop and Help Desk principles in 4 Survey of Operating Systems INWT 100 Desktop Certification exams. Desktop Support Technician I INWT 110 3 Program Description Total Units = 7 The Internet Networking Web Technologies *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental (INWT) program at San Diego City College strongly award that does not appear on the student’s advocates for the inclusion of a Certificate of transcript. All courses must be completed within the Performance in Desktop Support Technician I, under San Diego Community College District. the umbrella of the Computer and Information Sciences Department. As part of our college This program is not eligible for federal Note: mission, we seek to prepare students for entry-level financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. employment in high-demand Career Technical (CTE) fields, such as Desktop Support. To this end, the Computer Information Systems Certificate of Performance: INWT program has designed the Desktop Support Microsoft Technology Specialist* Technician I Certificate of Performance to provide students with practical, career-oriented skills in Program Learning Outcomes professional desktop support using current industry Upon successful completion the student will be able technologies. Students receive hands-on experience to: in operating systems fundamentals as well as • Recognize, identify, and assess the features of Windows specific instruction in installation. current Desktop and Network Operating Systems. Program Goals Apply customer service principles to the Help • Upon successful completion of the Certificate Desk, Desktop Support, and Network Support of Performance in Desktop Support Technician field. I, students will be able to: install, configure, and troubleshoot different operating systems, including Diagnose and repair desktop and network • the Windows operating system; and configure, set operating systems problems. up and manage an office network. Compare, contrast, and design simple network • Program Emphasis topologies. The Certificate of Performance in Desktop Support Identify, review, and evaluate network security • Technician I is designed to prepare students threats and the corresponding prevention for employment in the Information Technology principles and practices. field in Business, Computer Information Systems, Information Technology, Electronics, or Computer Apply Desktop, Help Desk, Networking, and • and Information Science. This Certificate of Security principles in Desktop, Networking, and Performance is followed by the Certificate of Network Security Certification exams. Achievement in Desktop Support Technician Units Courses: II, which is an award that offers students an Survey of Operating Systems 4 INWT 100 introductory survey of operating systems and 3 INWT 111 Windows Desktop Professional desktop support technician skillset, as well as Windows Server Professional 3 INWT 112 Windows specific instruction in installation, Designing and Deploying Microsoft INWT 113 file management, storage configuration and Exchange Server 2.5 troubleshooting, and network configuration, 4 INWT 145 Linux+ Certification Training management and security. Total Units = 16.5 Career Options *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental After successful completion of the Certificate of award that does not appear on the student’s Performance in Desktop Support Technician I, students are prepared for employment as Computer D iego C ity an ollege • 2018–2019 199 S C

200 INWT 200 transcript. All courses must be completed within the Certified Ethical Hacking (CEH) Certification Training 4 San Diego Community College District. Computer Information Systems Total Units = 7 This program is not eligible for federal Note: financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Program Learning Outcomes transcript. All courses must be completed within the Upon successful completion the student will be able San Diego Community College District. to: Note: This program is not eligible for federal • Recognize, identify, and assess the features of financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. current Desktop and Network Operating Systems. Apply customer service principles to the Help • Certificate of Performance: Desk, Desktop Support, and Network Support Project Management for field. Information Technology* • Diagnose and repair desktop and network Courses: Units operating systems problems. 2 Microsoft Project CBTE 154 • Compare, contrast, and design simple network 4 Project+ Certification Training INWT 105 topologies. Total Units = 6 Identify, review, and evaluate network security • *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental threats and the corresponding prevention award that does not appear on the student’s principles and practices. transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. Apply Desktop, Help Desk, Networking, and • Security principles in Desktop, Networking, and This program is not eligible for federal Note: Network Security Certification exams. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Apply Business Communication principles to • the Help Desk, Desktop Support, and Network Certificate of Achievement: Support field to create technology proposals and Information Technology presentations. Management • Identify and apply current project management Courses Required for the Major: Units principles to technology projects. INWT 100 Survey of Operating Systems 4 3 INWT 111 Windows Desktop Professional Certificate of Performance: 3 Windows Server Professional INWT 112 Network Security* INWT 120 4 Network+ Certification Training INWT 140 Security+ Certification Training 3 This certificate provides students with a CBTE 180 Microsoft Office 3 cybersecurity foundation through courses BUSE 092 Introduction to Business focusing on industry standard certifications in or Communication Information Security. The courses offered to obtain Business Communications 3 BUSE 119 this certificate provide students the entry-level skills to set-up a secure computer network and Select one course from the following: network security knowledge including Windows INWT 105 4 Project+ Certification Training security, Firewalls, Intrusion Detection Systems and Linux+ Certification Training INWT 145 4 Intrusion Prevention Systems, Security policies and INWT 200 Certified Ethical Hacking (CEH) procedures, e-mail security and wireless security 4 Certification Training principles and best implementation practices. Total Units = 27 Courses: Units Recommended Electives: Business Studies 155. Certified Secure Computer User INWT 135 3 (CSCU) D iego C 200 ollege S an ity C • 2018–2019

201 Associate of Science Degree: Computer Technical Information Technology Management Illustration Units Courses Required for the Major: Award Type Units INWT 100 Survey of Operating Systems 4 Certificate of Performance: INWT 111 Windows Desktop Professional 3 8 Computer Technical Illustration 3 INWT 112 Windows Server Professional 4 Network+ Certification Training INWT 120 Certificate of Achievement: INWT 140 Security+ Certification Training 3 23 Computer Technical Illustration 3 Microsoft Office CBTE 180 Associate of Science Degree: Introduction to Business BUSE 092 Computer Technical Illustration 26* or Communication Engineering Emphasis 34* BUSE 119 Business Communications 3 * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Select one course from the following: general education and electives as needed to meet INWT 105 Project+ Certification Training 4 Computer Technical Illustration the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. 4 INWT 145 Linux+ Certification Training Certified Ethical Hacking (CEH) INWT 200 Description 4 Certification Training Total Units = 27 Provides an opportunity to develop the theory and techniques necessary for employment as a Recommended Electives: Business Studies 155. technical illustrator in the fields of engineering, manufacturing, publishing and scientific industries. Transfer Information Students will plan and produce drawings from Common university majors related to the field specific data, blueprints and prototypes. Production of Computer Information Systems include: methods, visual skills, technical documentation Bioinformatics, Business Information Systems, procedures and developments, as they apply to the Cognitive Science, Computer Science and technical illustration industry, will be studied. Engineering, Geographic Information Systems, Graphic Communications, Information Systems. Career Options Course Requirements for Transfer Students Technical Illustrator, graphic specialist, technical Students who plan to transfer to a four year college publications specialist, manager technical or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this publications, CAD drafter, CAD illustrator, discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the CAD designer, engineering technician, computer Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate graphics specialist. major preparation courses for their specific transfer Program Learning Outcomes institution and major. Transfer students may also earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts Students who complete the program will be able to: and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may • Plan and produce drawings from specific data, be individually tailored to each student’s specific blueprints and prototypes. transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on • Construct two and three-dimensional models transfer programs and procedures is available in the of an engineering design using available Transfer Programs section of the catalog. engineering software. • Demonstrate knowledge of print reading and symbology. an D iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 201 S C

202 Associate of Science Degree: Telephone Office Faculty Computer Technical Illustration S-311L Fred Julian 619-388-3720 Computer Technical Illustration Prepares students for entry level positions in Farnaz Khoromi 619-388-3527 S-311N Technical Illustration, Technical Publications with Academic Programs emphasis in technical illustrating, technical writing and graphic design. Additional general education and graduation requirements for the associate degree are listed Units Courses Required for the Major: in the catalog. The associate degree requires a TECI 101 3 Basic Technical Illustration minimum of 60 units. TECI 102 Advanced Technical Illustration 3 Digital Media ARTG 125 3 Certificate of Performance: ARTG 120 Illustration 3 Computer Technical Illustration* Reading and Composition ENGL 101 3 ENGE 111 Introduction to Computer-Aided Prepares students with drafting and Computer Design 3 Aided Design (CAD) experience to obtain entry-level MATH 96 Intermediate Algebra and Geometry 5 Technical Illustration positions. 3 MFET 105 Print Reading and Symbology Courses: Units Total Units = 26 ENGE 151 Engineering Drawing 2 Additional general education and graduation 3 ENGE 152 Engineering Design requirements for the associate degree are listed ARTG 100 or Basic Graphic Design The associate degree requires a in the catalog. ARTF 155A Freehand Drawing I 3 minimum of 60 units . Total Units = 8 *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Associate of Science Degree: award that does not appear on the student’s Computer Technical Illustration transcript. All courses must be completed within the Engineering Emphasis San Diego Community College District. Prepares students for entry level positions in Note: This program is not eligible for federal Technical Illustration with emphasis in engineering, financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. graphics, engineering design including CAD. Certificate of Achievement: Courses Required for the Major: Units Computer Technical Illustration TECI 101 Basic Technical Illustration 3 3 Advanced Technical Illustration TECI 102 Prepares students for entry-level positions in 3 Digital Media ARTG 125 Technical Publications with emphasis on graphic Illustration ARTG 120 3 design. 3 ENGL 101 Reading and Composition Courses Required for the Major: Units ENGE 111 Introduction to Computer-Aided 3 Design TECI 101 3 Basic Technical Illustration Engineering Drawing ENGE 151 2 Advanced Technical Illustration TECI 102 3 3 Engineering Design ENGE 152 3 ENGL 101 Reading and Composition ENGE 198 Computer Applications in 3 Illustration ARTG 120 Engineering 3 ENGE 111 Introduction to Computer-Aided 5 Intermediate Algebra and Geometry MATH 96 Design 3 3 Print Reading and Symbology MFET 105 MATH 96 5 Intermediate Algebra and Geometry MFET 105 Print Reading and Symbology 3 Total Units = 34 Total Units = 23 Additional general education and graduation requirements for the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. : Mathematics 104, 116. Recommended electives ollege 202 S an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

203 • Gain interpersonal awareness / knowledge of Conflict Resolution cultural differences and diverse perspectives. • Learn about different forms of conflicts cross Units Award Type culturally and the methods to resolve those Certificate of Performance: conflicts. Conflict Resolution and Mediation 15 • Participate in opportunities to apply conflict Certificate of Achievement: resolution and mediation theory in a field Conflict Resolution and Mediation 18 experience. Description: Career Options: Conflict Resolution The Conflict Resolution and Mediation Certificate The Certificate of Achievement prepares students offers an interdisciplinary, theoretical, philosophical to enter into the academic and professional field of and applied approach for students to enter into Conflict Resolution and Mediation. Upon completion the academic and/or professional fields related of the Certificate, students may secure employment to Conflict Resolution and Mediation. Students at an entry-level position or a more senior level explore the impacts of culture, intra and inter- depending on the students’ experience and group communication, conflict resolution and education. Available career tracks include working mediation. Students gain theory and practice for public institutions, governmental agencies, to address conflicts in a personal, local, national academia, non-profits, or for a non-governmental and international level. The Conflict Resolution organization depending upon the student’s interest and Mediation program allows students access and desired academic and professional path. Some to professional experience with an organization career paths include: working within a related field through participation • Conflict Resolution Practitioner in the required Field Work course. • Mediator Program Goals: • Social Worker Upon successful completion of the Conflict • Legal Assistant Resolution and Mediation program, students are able to: • Community Organizer Contemplate, analyze, and discuss issues related • • Peacebuilder to the role of culture in conflict resolution and • Educator mediation. • Human Resources Manager • Think about their role in society through the use of conflict resolution and mediation. Restorative Justice Case Coordinator • Critically think about their own values, individual • • Youth Worker biases, and personal conflict resolution style. Facilitator • • Discover the art and science of conflict resolution • Anthropologist and mediation. • Counselor • Learn and understand the core principles, values, and application of conflict resolution and mediation. Certificate of Performance: Conflict Resolution and Mediation* • Develop and enhance skills related to communication, listening and problem solving. Courses: Units Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ANTH 103 Program Emphasis: or The Conflict Resolution and Mediation program 3 Diversity and Cultural Competency HUMS 118 allows students to: PSYC 130 Introduction to Community Psychology or iego C ity an ollege • 2018–2019 203 S D C

204 PSYC 166 Introduction to Social Psychology 3 Construction Trades 3 Nonviolence and Conflict Resolution PEAC 102 3 Conflict Resolution and Mediation CRES 101 Construction Trades Units Award Type 3 Mediation Skills CRES 102 Total Units = 15 Certificate of Achievement: Electrical Trade Option 24 *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Pipefitting Trade Option 21 award that does not appear on the student’s Plumbing Trade Option 24 transcript. All courses must be completed within the Sheet Metal Trade Option 21 San Diego Community College District. Associate of Science Degree: This program is not eligible for federal Note: 24* Electrical Trade Option financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. 21* Pipefitting Trade Option Plumbing Trade Option 24* Certificate of Achievement: 21* Sheet Metal Trade Option Conflict Resolution and Mediation * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Courses Required for the Major: Units general education and electives as needed to meet ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. or HUMS 118 3 Diversity and Cultural Competency Description PSYC 130 Introduction to Community This program is designed for the student who is Psychology 3 interested in a construction-related career. The or specialized trade options of Electrical, Plumbing, Introduction to Social Psychology 3 PSYC 166 and Sheet Metal are offered parallel to the PEAC 102 Nonviolence and Conflict Resolution 3 apprenticeship related instructional programs. Each Conflict Resolution and Mediation CRES 101 3 option provides in-depth information and a working Mediation Skills 3 CRES 102 knowledge of tools, materials and techniques used CRES 276 Field Work in Conflict Resolution and in the industry. These courses are not designed for Mediation 3 the handyman, but for the individual pursuing a Total Units = 18 career in a related field. Program planning should occur with the assistance of a department member. All courses have been designed to be taken sequentially. Program Learning Outcomes Through the process of engagement with combined lecture, related curriculum on theory and hands-on lab practice, the student will be able to: Demonstrate preparedness for successful • transition into the construction trade specialty area with a demonstrated understanding of theory and practice required by the workforce professional. Duplicate procedures for trade and • industry-specific practices in use of tools, techniques and hands-on skills with related competencies for the construction trade specialty area. Identify and use equipment and related • components of the construction trade specialty an 204 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego S D

205 3 PLBG 170B area to meet standards for measurement, Advanced Plumbing II Plumbing Construction Specialties 3 PLBG 175A calibration and best practices. 3 Plumbing Code PLBG 175B • Read, comprehend and apply construction trade Total Units = 24 specialty area instructions and design standards for outcomes as required by construction Certificate of Achievement: specialty practices and regulations. Construction Trades Certificate of Achievement: Sheet Metal Trade Option Construction Trades (Non-apprentice) Electrical Trade Option (Non-apprentice) Courses Required for the Major: Units Construction Trades SHEE 60A 3 Level I Sheet Metal/HVAC Courses Required for the Major: Units Level I Sheet Metal/HVAC SHEE 60B 3 ELEC 160A Introduction to Electrical 3 SHEE 65A Level II Sheet Metal/HVAC Construction I 3 SHEE 65B 3 Level II Sheet Metal/HVAC ELEC 160B Introduction to Electrical 3 Level III Sheet Metal/HVAC SHEE 70A 3 Construction II 3 SHEE 70B Level III Sheet Metal/HVAC ELEC 165A Intermediate Electrical 3 SHEE 75A Level IV Sheet Metal/HVAC 3 Construction I Total Units = 21 ELEC 165B Intermediate Electrical Construction II 3 Associate of Science Degree: 3 ELEC 170A Advanced Electrical Construction I Advanced Electrical Construction II 3 ELEC 170B Construction Trades 3 Electrical Construction Specialties I ELEC 175A Electrical Trade Option (Non-apprentice) Electrical Construction Specialties II 3 ELEC 175B Total Units = 24 Courses Required for the Major: Units Introduction to Electrical ELEC 160A Certificate of Achievement: Construction I 3 Introduction to Electrical ELEC 160B Construction Trades Construction II 3 Pipefitting Trade Option Intermediate Electrical ELEC 165A (Non-apprentice) 3 Construction I Intermediate Electrical ELEC 165B Courses Required for the Major: Units 3 Construction II PLBG 160A Introduction to Plumbing I 3 ELEC 170A Advanced Electrical Construction I 3 PLBG 160B 3 Introduction to Plumbing II 3 ELEC 170B Advanced Electrical Construction II Intermediate Plumbing I 3 PLBG 165A Electrical Construction Specialties I 3 ELEC 175A PLBG 165B Intermediate Plumbing II 3 ELEC 175B 3 Electrical Construction Specialties II Pipefitting I 3 PLPF 180 Total Units = 24 PLPF 185 Pipefitting III 3 PLPF 190 Pipefitting IV 3 Additional general education and graduation Total Units = 21 requirements for the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Certificate of Achievement: Construction Trades Associate of Science Degree: Plumbing Trade Option (Non-apprentice) Construction Trades Units Courses Required for the Major: Pipefitting Trade Option 3 Introduction to Plumbing I PLBG 160A (Non-apprentice) Introduction to Plumbing II PLBG 160B 3 Units Courses Required for the Major: Intermediate Plumbing I 3 PLBG 165A 3 Intermediate Plumbing II PLBG 165B 3 Introduction to Plumbing I PLBG 160A PLBG 170A 3 Advanced Plumbing I • 2018–2019 C ity C iego D an 205 S ollege

206 3 Introduction to Plumbing II PLBG 160B Cosmetology 3 Intermediate Plumbing I PLBG 165A 3 Intermediate Plumbing II PLBG 165B Cosmetology Units Award Type PLPF 180 Pipefitting I 3 PLPF 185 Pipefitting III 3 Certificate of Performance: PLPF 190 3 Pipefitting IV Nail Technician 11 Total Units = 21 Certificate of Achievement: Additional general education and graduation Cosmetology 42.5 requirements for the associate degree are listed Esthetician 18 The associate degree requires a in the catalog. Associate of Science Degree: minimum of 60 units. Cosmetology 49.5* * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Associate of Science Degree: general education and electives as needed to meet Construction Trades the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Plumbing Trade Option (Non-apprentice) Description Courses Required for the Major: Units The Cosmetology program is designed to provide PLBG 160A Introduction to Plumbing I 3 entry level skills to students interested in a career 3 PLBG 160B Introduction to Plumbing II in the cosmetology and esthetician professions. PLBG 165A Intermediate Plumbing I 3 California State law requires that persons enrolling 3 PLBG 165B Intermediate Plumbing II in Cosmetology courses must be at least sixteen 3 Advanced Plumbing I PLBG 170A years of age. Students in the Cosmetology program PLBG 170B Advanced Plumbing II 3 are required to comply with and maintain standards Plumbing Construction Specialties PLBG 175A 3 of dress and grooming. Excessive absences may 3 Plumbing Code PLBG 175B result in exclusion from the program. All prospective Total Units = 24 students are required to attend an orientation Additional general education and graduation program. requirements for the associate degree are listed This program is approved by Board of Barbering in the catalog. The associate degree requires a and Cosmetology, 2420 Del Paseo Road Suite minimum of 60 units. 100, Sacramento, CA 94244-2260. Associate of Science Degree: Orientation Construction Trades Orientation is mandatory prior to registration. Sheet Metal Trade Option Contact Cosmetology Department Chair (Non-apprentice) for schedule of days and times. It is highly recommended that a student complete the Courses Required for the Major: Units placement exams in order to meet the reading and 3 SHEE 60A Level I Sheet Metal/HVAC writing advisories. Students should bring a copy of SHEE 60B Level I Sheet Metal/HVAC 3 placement test scores to orientation. SHEE 65A 3 Level II Sheet Metal/HVAC Level II Sheet Metal/HVAC SHEE 65B 3 Program Enrollment Level III Sheet Metal/HVAC 3 SHEE 70A Program add codes (permission numbers) are Level III Sheet Metal/HVAC 3 SHEE 70B required for continuing students for Spring, SHEE 75A 3 Level IV Sheet Metal/HVAC Summer and Fall semesters. Course work from other Total Units = 21 Cosmetology programs will not clear City College Additional general education and graduation course work. New students can start mid semester requirements for the associate degree are listed every fall, spring, summer. Program vacancies are The associate degree requires a in the catalog. filled by students from a waiting list. Students minimum of 60 units. are required to purchase all textbooks, uniforms, iego C ity an ollege • 2018–2019 206 S D C

207 practical kits, tools and small manually handled Faculty Office Telephone equipment. BT-314D Sudabeh Phillips 619-388-3613 Program Hours Career Options Cosmetology courses are offered during the day and Some careers in cosmetology require education evening. beyond the associate degree. Examples of careers in cosmetology include: salon owner/manager, Full-Time Program: cosmetologist (salon services), platform stylist Cosmetology The schedule of lecture and lab hours varies per (demonstrates products and techniques for semester. manufacturer), competition stylist, cosmetology instructor, technical writer for trade magazine, An eight-week summer session is offered. NOTE: seminar/demonstration speaker and education State Board Verification specialist (for a manufacturer). Students with previous course hours in Cosmetology Examples of careers as an esthetician include: Salon from another community college program must or Spa Esthetician, Spa Esthetic Consultant, cosmetic provide written State Board documentation. consultant, makeup artist for theatre, film and/or These courses cannot be used for the major. The television, medical esthetic assistant, manufacturer California State Board of Barbering and Cosmetology representative for skin care, cosmetics or esthetic requires 1600 hours of instruction for Cosmetology equipment. or 600 hours of instruction for Esthetics, both Program Learning Outcomes careers require a passing score on the State Board examination to become licensed and eligible for Upon successful completion of the Cosmetology employment. Students participate in practical and program the student will be able to: theoretical training under the supervision of a • Apply cosmetology concepts, procedures and State-licensed and community-college-credentialed practices to successfully pass the State Board instructor at all times while enrolled in the program. Examination. Program Emphasis Practice safety, health, and sanitation procedures • Students are expected to learn fundamental as set forth by the California Bureau of practices and procedures of cosmetology or Cosmetology. esthetician services. This includes laboratory • Utilize professional practice terminology and instruction in client cosmetology or esthetician techniques as required by the California Bureau services. Instructional opportunities provide the of Cosmetology examination. student with salon site visitation, guest speakers, exposure to the cosmetology industry, small Perform all practical applications required for the • business concepts and current changes in the field state board examination/state licensure. of cosmetology which lead to career opportunities • Explain basic cosmetology concepts, terms and and advancement. Students are provided with definitions. opportunities to develop skills in sales, community and client relations, care of skin, hair and nails, as • Compare and contrast cosmetology procedures well as salon management. A grade of “C” or better and practices. must be maintained in order to advance in the Apply cosmetology products and procedures in • course sequence. providing services to clients. Faculty Telephone Office Academic Programs 619-388-3284 Constance Calhoun The associate degree in Cosmetology require 619-388-3283 Kim Czerwonka completion of the courses listed below. Additional 619-388-3296 Patricia Grooms- general education and graduation requirements for Jones the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Sylvia Leon 619-388-3660 BT-103K • 2018–2019 ollege 207 ity C iego D an S C

208 COSM 60LB Intermediate Cosmetology Lab IB 3 Certificate of Performance: COSM 60 Resolution of Skin Diseases and Nail Technician* Disorders 2.5 Cosmetology The Nail Technician Certificate of Performance or COSM 70L Intermediate Cosmetology Lab II prepares students for the California Board of 3 Intermediate Cosmetology Lab IIA COSM 70LA Barbering and Cosmetology Nail Technician and exam and employment in a nail salon, nail salon COSM 70LB Intermediate Cosmetology Lab IIB 3 management, and/or ownership of a nail salon. 2.5 COSM 70 Chemistry and Chemical Services Advanced Cosmetology Lab IA COSM 80L or Goals: 3 COSM 80LA Advanced Cosmetology Lab IA and The goal of the Nail Technician Certificate of COSM 80LB Advanced Lab IB 3 Performance is to prepare students for success as an 2.5 Basic Business Practices COSM 81 employee, manager, and/or owner of a nail salon. Advanced Cosmetology Lab II or COSM 90L The curriculum emphasizes sanitation, disinfection, COSM 90LA 3 Advanced Lab IIA and sterilization of the nail salon and nail technician 3 Advanced Lab IIB COSM 90LB tools and health and safety in the nail salon, as well State Board Review 2.5 COSM 95 as the basic anatomy of the hand and foot, nail Total Units = 42.5 diseases and disorders, manicuring, pedicuring, massage, reflexology, nail wraps, nail tips, nail design, chemistry for the nail technicians, and salon Certificate of Achievement: management. Esthetician Career Options: Courses Required for the Major: Units COSM 55 Introductory Esthetician 2.5 Students who successfully complete the Nail Introductory Esthetician Lab 6.5 COSM 55L Technician Certificate of Performance are prepared 2.5 Advanced Esthetician COSM 65 for employment as nail technicians, podiatrist Advanced Esthetician Lab 6.5 COSM 65L assistants, nail salon managers, and/or nail salon Total Units = 18 owners. Recommended electives: Cosmetology 93. Courses Required for the Major: Units 5.5 COSM 85 Nail Technician I Associate of Science Degree: COSM 86 Nail Technician II 5.5 Cosmetology Total Units = 11 Courses Required for the Major: Units *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Fundamentals of Cosmetology or COSM 50L transcript. All courses must be completed within the 3 Fundamentals of Cosmetology I COSM 50LA San Diego Community College District. and 3 Fundamentals of Cosmetology II COSM 50LB This program is not eligible for federal Note: COSM 50 2.5 Rules, Regulations, and Physiology financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. or COSM 60L Intermediate Cosmetology Lab I 3 COSM 60LA Intermediate Cosmetology Lab IA Certificate of Achievement: and Cosmetology Intermediate Cosmetology Lab IB COSM 60LB 3 COSM 60 Resolution of Skin Diseases and Units Courses Required for the Major: Disorders 2.5 or COSM 50L Fundamentals of Cosmetology or Intermediate Cosmetology Lab II COSM 70L 3 COSM 50LA Fundamentals of Cosmetology I 3 Intermediate Cosmetology Lab IIA COSM 70LA and and COSM 50LB Fundamentals of Cosmetology II 3 3 Intermediate Cosmetology Lab IIB COSM 70LB Rules, Regulations, and Physiology COSM 50 2.5 2.5 Chemistry and Chemical Services COSM 70 COSM 60L Intermediate Cosmetology Lab I or or Advanced Cosmetology Lab IA COSM 80L 3 COSM 60LA Intermediate Cosmetology Lab IA 3 Advanced Cosmetology Lab IA COSM 80LA and C ity S iego D 208 an ollege • 2018–2019 C

209 and Program Emphasis Advanced Lab IB COSM 80LB 3 The focus of the Dance program at San Diego City 2.5 Basic Business Practices COSM 81 College is on modern, ethnic dance forms and body Advanced Cosmetology Lab II COSM 90L or modalities. Courses in choreography, dance history, COSM 90LA Advanced Lab IIA 3 dance performance and improvisation are among Dance and those required for the Associate of Arts Degree in Advanced Lab IIB COSM 90LB 3 Dance. Dance students will work closely with the City COSM 95 State Board Review 2.5 College Theatre and Musical Theatre departments in Complete the following additional courses production for public performance. required for the major: Office Faculty Telephone BUSE 100 Introduction to Business 3 Fundamentals of Chemistry 3 CHEM 100 Alicia Rincon 619-388-3563 C-202A 1 CHEM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry Lab 619-388-3555 Terry Wilson C-202B Total Units = 49.5 Career Options Additional general education and graduation requirements for the associate degree are listed Most careers related to Dance and other performing in the catalog. The associate degree requires a arts require education beyond the associate degree. minimum of 60 units. Program Learning Outcomes Recommended electives: Cosmetology 92, 290. Upon completion of a Certificate of Dance, a student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of: Dance The history of dance as it relates to western • culture, including Ballet, Modern, Jazz, Broadway/ Award Type Units Musical Theatre, and Ethnic forms of dance. Certificate of Performance: • Aesthetic perception of various dance forms, and Dance 17 critical analysis and response to performance. 17 Musical Theatre Dance An understanding of choreographic, technical • Associate of Arts Degree: and improvisational elements of dance. Dance 26.5* Academic Programs * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet The associate degree in Dance requires completion the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. of the courses listed for the degree. Additional general education and graduation requirements for Description the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Dance is a vigorous and specialized area in the performing arts, and is unique in its ability to convey Certificate of Performance: emotional and cultural values. Dance is physically demanding and requires a thorough understanding Dance* of aesthetic values. The Dance major at San Diego This certificate prepares the dance student with a City College is one of six options in the Visual and solid foundation of kinesthetic training in one or Performing Arts Division. This program is primarily more idioms, principles of choreography, movement designed for the student who intends to transfer to education, along with the process of performance. San Diego State University, or to other universities Graduates will be qualified to work in regional dance that offer baccalaureate preparation in Dance. theatre; as a professional dancer in industrial work in Additionally, the program provides an excellent areas such as Los Angeles, and as a certified dance foundation in dance for students interested in instructor or independent choreographer. other performing arts fields or entry level into the workforce. Courses: Units 2 Ethnic Dance Forms DANC 111 an D iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 209 S C

210 DANC 177B 1.5 Dance Improvisation II Certificate of Performance: DANC 181 History of Dance 3 Musical Theatre Dance* DANC 253 Choreography 2 Dance The Musical Theatre Dance Certificate prepares Select 4.5 units from the following Dance courses: students to develop and understand the skills DANC 110A Ballet I 1 – 1.5 and expectations required of professional musical 1.5 Ballet II DANC 110B theatre performers. Graduates will be qualified to Ballet III DANC 110C 1.5 perform in regional theatres, national tours, cruise DANC 110D Ballet IV 1.5 ships, theme parks and on Broadway. 1 – 1.5 Tap I DANC 115A Courses: Units Tap Dance II 1 – 1.5 DANC 115B 1 – 1.5 Tap Dance III DANC 115C Musical Theatre Dance III DRAM 241C 2 1 – 1.5 DANC 115D Tap Dance IV DRAM 241D Musical Theatre Dance IV 2 1 – 1.5 Hip Hop I DANC 120A DRAM 242A Rehearsal and Performance I 3 1.5 Hip Hop II DANC 120B Select 6 units from the following courses: DANC 120C Hip Hop III 1.5 DANC 110A Ballet I 1.5 DANC 120D 1.5 Hip Hop IV 1.5 Ballet II DANC 110B DANC 135A Jazz Dance I 1 – 1.5 Ballet III 1.5 DANC 110C 1.5 DANC 135B Jazz Dance II DANC 110D 1.5 Ballet IV DANC 135C Jazz Dance III 1.5 DANC 115A 1.5 Tap I Jazz Dance IV 1.5 DANC 135D 1.5 DANC 115B Tap Dance II DANC 140A Modern Dance I 1 – 1.5 DANC 115C 1.5 Tap Dance III DANC 140B 1.5 Modern Dance II DANC 115D 1.5 Tap Dance IV 1.5 DANC 140C Modern Dance III DANC 120A Hip Hop I 1.5 DANC 140D Modern Dance IV 1.5 1.5 Hip Hop II DANC 120B DANC 180A Advanced Contemporary Dance I 1.5 1.5 Hip Hop III DANC 120C 1.5 Advanced Contemporary Dance II DANC 180B 1.5 Hip Hop IV DANC 120D Select 4 units from the following Dance courses: 1.5 DANC 135A Jazz Dance I DANC 177A Dance Improvisation 1.5 DANC 135B Jazz Dance II 1.5 1 DANC 150A Dance Making: Ballet DANC 135C 1.5 Jazz Dance III 1 Dance Making: Jazz DANC 151A Jazz Dance IV 1.5 DANC 135D 1 Dance Making: Modern DANC 152A Modern Dance I DANC 140A 1.5 DANC 153A Dance Making: Dance Theatre 1 DANC 140B Modern Dance II 1.5 Dance Performance I 2 DANC 261A DANC 178A Advanced Commercial Dance I 1.5 Dance Performance II 2 DANC 261B Advanced Commercial Dance II DANC 178B 1.5 DANC 261C Dance Performance III 2 Select 4 units from the following courses: DANC 261D Dance Performance IV 2 DANC 111 2 Ethnic Dance Forms Stage Costuming for Dance 2 DANC 271A DANC 130A Dance Repertoire 1 2 Makeup for Dance Productions DANC 271B Dance Performance I DANC 261A 2 DANC 271C Lighting Design for Dance Production 2 Dance Performance II 2 DANC 261B Sound Design for Dance Production DANC 271D 2 2 DANC 261C Dance Performance III Music for Dance 2 DANC 183 DANC 261D Dance Performance IV 2 Total Units = 17 DANC 271A Stage Costuming for Dance 2 *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Makeup for Dance Productions 2 DANC 271B award that does not appear on the student’s DANC 271C 2 Lighting Design for Dance Production transcript. All courses must be completed within the Sound Design for Dance Production 2 DANC 271D San Diego Community College District. Musical Theatre Dance I 2 DRAM 241A Musical Theatre Dance II 2 DRAM 241B This program is not eligible for federal Note: Total Units = 17 financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s D iego C ity an ollege • 2018–2019 210 S C

211 Recommended Electives: Dance 127, 178A, 178B, transcript. All courses must be completed within the 179A, 179B; Dramatic Arts 241A, 241B, 242A, 242B. San Diego Community College District. This program is not eligible for federal Note: Transfer Information financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Common university majors related to the field Dance, Dance and Performance of Dance include: Studies, Kinesiology, Liberal Studies, Physical Associate of Arts Degree: Education, Theatre Arts, Visual and Performing Arts. Visual and Performing Arts Course Requirements for Transfer Students Dance Students who plan to transfer to a four year college Courses Required for the Major: Units or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this Digital Journalism discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the DANC 110C Ballet III 1.5 Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate DANC 110D Ballet IV 1.5 major preparation courses for their specific transfer Ethnic Dance Forms DANC 111 2 institution and major. Transfer students may also 1.5 DANC 140C Modern Dance III earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts DANC 140D Modern Dance IV 1.5 and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Dance Improvisation II DANC 177B 1.5 be individually tailored to each student’s specific DANC 181 History of Dance 3 transfer requirements in order to provide the most DANC 183 Music for Dance 2 efficient path to transfer. More information on Choreography 2 DANC 253 transfer programs and procedures is available in the Select 6 units from the following Dance courses: Transfer Programs section of the catalog. DANC 110A Ballet I 1.5 1.5 Ballet II DANC 110B 1.5 Hip Hop I DANC 120A Digital Journalism DANC 120B Hip Hop II 1.5 1.5 DANC 120C Hip Hop III Units Award Type DANC 120D Hip Hop IV 1.5 DANC 130A 1 Dance Repertoire Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: Jazz Dance I DANC 135A 1.5 Journalism 18–20 1.5 DANC 135B Jazz Dance II Jazz Dance III 1.5 DANC 135C Description Jazz Dance IV 1.5 DANC 135D The Associate in Arts in Journalism for Transfer DANC 140A 1.5 Modern Dance I is intended for students who plan to complete a Modern Dance II DANC 140B 1.5 bachelor’s degree in Journalism or a related major Modern Dance III 1.5 DANC 140C in the California State University (CSU) system. It 1.5 DANC 140D Modern Dance IV is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. 1 Dance Making: Ballet DANC 150A Students who complete this degree and transfer 1 Dance Making: Jazz DANC 151A to a participating CSU campus will be required to 1 Dance Making: Modern DANC 152A complete no more than 60 units after transfer to DANC 153A Dance Making: Dance Theatre 1 earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate DANC 177A Dance Improvisation 1 – 1.5 preparation for students transferring to a CSU Complete two of the following courses (4 units campus that does not accept the degree. Students total): who plan to complete this degree should consult Dance Performance I 2 DANC 261A a counselor for additional information about DANC 261B Dance Performance II 2 participating CSU campuses as well as university Dance Performance III DANC 261C 2 admission, degree and transfer requirements. Dance Performance IV 2 DANC 261D It is strongly recommended that students consult Stage Costuming for Dance DANC 271A 2 with a counselor to determine which general DANC 271B Makeup for Dance Productions 2 education option is most appropriate for their Lighting Design for Dance Production 2 DANC 271C individual educational goals. DANC 271D Sound Design for Dance Production 2 Total Units = 26.5 D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 211 S an

212 Program Goals Award Notes Students intending to transfer into this NOTE: The Associate in Arts in Journalism for Transfer Digital Journalism is intended for students who plan to complete a major at a CSU should consult a counselor and visit www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate bachelor’s degree in Journalism or a related major coursework. in the California State University (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. Additional Notes: Students who complete this degree and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be required to * This course also fulfills general education complete no more than 60 units after transfer to requirements for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate General Education: In addition to the courses listed preparation for students transferring to a CSU above, students must complete one of the following campus that does not accept the degree. Students general education options: who plan to complete this degree should consult ) is accepted by a counselor for additional information about • The IGETC pattern (page 118 all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and participating CSU campuses as well as university majors. It is also accepted by some private/ admission, degree and transfer requirements. independent or out-of-state universities. It is strongly recommended that students consult • The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all with a counselor to determine which general education option is most appropriate for their CSU campuses and some private/independent or individual educational goals. out-of-state universities. It is not accepted by the UC system. Career Options It is strongly recommended that students consult Careers related to this field typically require with a counselor to determine which general education beyond the associate degree level and education option is most appropriate for their some may require a graduate degree. individual educational goals. Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 Associate in Arts in Journalism for CSU-transferable units required for the degree. Transfer Degree: The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: Courses Required for the Major: Units Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. 3 DJRN 100 Mass Media in the Digital Age No more than 60 units are required. DJRN 200 Newswriting for Multimedia 3 DJRN 210 News Reporting and Editing for Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in 3 Publication all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses 3 units (one course) from the following: and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a DJRN 205 Community Journalism for Multimedia 3 counselor for more information. 3 DJRN 211 Online News Concepts for Publication DJRN 215 Photo Journalism and Documentary Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in Photography 3 “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of “C” or 6 units (two courses) from the following: bet ter. 4 American Sign Language Level I AMSL 115 American Sign Language Level II AMSL 116 4 Certified completion of the California State ARTF 150B 3 Beginning Graphic Design University-General Education-Breadth pattern COMS 103 Oral Communication 3 (CSU-GE; see page 126 for more information); Or 3 Interpersonal Communication COMS 135 the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Argumentation 3 COMS 160 Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more 3 Small Group Communication COMS 170 information). or Principles of Macroeconomics ECON 120 ECON 121 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ENGL 205 Critical Thinking and Intermediate 3 Composition S • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an 212

213 or Elementary Statistics MATH 119 Award Notes: 3 PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics General Education: In addition to the courses listed Intro to Black & White Photography PHOT 100 or below, students must complete one of the following Introduction to Photography 3 PHOT 105 general education options: PHOT 102 Directed Photo Lab Studies 1 or PHIL 100 Logic and Critical Thinking The IGETC pattern (page 118 ) is accepted by all CSU Symbolic Logic 3 PHIL 101 campuses and most UC campuses and majors. It is Economics PHIL 205 Critical Thinking and Writing in also accepted by some private/independent or out Philosophy 3 of state universities. 3 Introduction to Political Science POLI 101 The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all The American Political System 3 POLI 102 CSU campuses and some private/independent or 3 POLI 103 Comparative Politics out of state universities. It is not accepted by the UC 3 RTVF 100 Introduction to Electronic Media system. RTVF 110 Introduction to Scriptwriting 3 Radio and TV Newswriting 3 RTVF 140 It is strongly recommended that students consult Introduction to Cinema RTVF 160 3 with a counselor to determine which general Total Units = 18–20 education option is most appropriate for their individual educational goals. Dramatic Arts Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 CSU- See “Theatre” on page 306. transferable units required for the degree. The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. Economics No more than 60 units are required. Award Type Units Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum 18–21 Economics of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a Description counselor for more information. The Associate in Arts in Economics for Transfer Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an Degree is intended for students who plan to “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in complete a bachelor’s degree in Economics or the major must be completed with a grade of C or a related major in the California State University bet ter. (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all Certified completion of the California State CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree University General Education-Breadth pattern and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be for more information); OR (CSU GE; see page 126 required to complete no more than 60 units after the Intersegmental General Education Transfer transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be for more Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 appropriate preparation for students transferring information). to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should Program Goals: consult a counselor for additional information about The purpose of the Associate in Arts in Economics participating CSU campuses as well as university for Transfer degree is to offer an organized course admission, degree and transfer requirements. of study that will prepare students intending to Students intending to transfer into this major NOTE: major in Economics at the California State University at a CSU should consult with a counselor and visit (CSU). It is accepted by some but not all CSU for guidance on appropriate transfer www.assist.org campuses. Students who complete this degree coursework. and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be required to complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate preparation for students transferring an D iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 213 S C

214 to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Electricity Students who plan to complete this degree should consult a counselor for additional information about Electricity Units Award Type participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. Certificate of Performance: Electrical Recertification Preparation 9 Program Emphasis: Certificate of Achievement: Careers related to this field typically require 25 Electrical Control Systems Option education beyond the associate degree level and Electricity 20 some may require a graduate degree. Lineman 30 Associate in Arts in Economics for Associate of Science Degree: Transfer Degree: Electricity 20* Lineman 30* Units Courses Required for the Major: * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Principles of Macroeconomics ECON 120 3 general education and electives as needed to meet Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECON 121 the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. 3 Elementary Statistics MATH 119 Basic Techniques of Applied Calculus I 3 MATH 121 Description Select one of the following courses (3–5 units): The electricity program is designed to provide the 4 Financial Accounting ACCT 116A student with an opportunity to master the skills 4 Managerial Accounting ACCT 116B required for success in the electrical trades. Prior 3 BUSE 119 Business Communications knowledge of the electrical trade is not required. CISC 181 Principles of Information Systems 4 Students in the program learn skills and knowledge 3 MATH 116 College and Matrix Algebra needed to install, maintain and troubleshoot a 3 Basic Techniques of Calculus II MATH 122 variety of electrical systems, residential as well as Calculus with Analytic Geometry I MATH 150 5 commercial and industrial facilities, while adhering MATH 151 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 4 to the National Electrical Code (NEC), specifications Select one of the following courses not already and blueprints. The two-year curriculum leads to a selected above (3–4 units): Certificate of Achievement or an Associate of Science Financial Accounting 4 ACCT 116A Degree. Recommended electives are designed to 4 ACCT 116B Managerial Accounting introduce additional areas in the electrical field to 3 BUSE 119 Business Communications students or working electricians. These courses 4 Principles of Information Systems CISC 181 may also be used to satisfy the State of California College and Matrix Algebra MATH 116 3 re-certification requirements for electricians. 3 Basic Techniques of Calculus II MATH 122 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 4 MATH 151 Program Goals Total Units = 18–21 The goal and objective of this program is to provide students with hands-on skills and theoretical knowledge needed to meet the demands of an electrician entering the field. Program Emphasis The program begins with an introduction to basic electrical theory and continues through advanced electrical theory, installation and maintenance of industrial equipment, familiarization with electrical codes and blueprints, and the characteristics and uses of motor controls. Emphasis is also placed on electrical safety and application of the National Electric Code to residential and commercial S an D C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 214 iego

215 electrical installations. The program also offers Academic Programs courses intended to satisfy the State of California The Certificates of Achievement and Associate re-certification requirements for electricians working degree, Electricity, require completion of the courses for or as a C-10 Electrical Contractor. listed below. Career Options Certificate of Performance: Employment may be found as an electrician, Electricity Electrical Recertification electric lineman, maintenance electrician, electrical Preparation* helper, electrical motor repairer, appliance repairer, or protective signal installer and repairer. Courses: Units Industries that hire electricians range from city and ELCT 20 3 Blueprint Reading for Electricians government agencies to commercial firms as well as ELCT 30 Modern Commercial Wiring 3 homeowners. Data, Voice and Video Cabling for ELCT 40 Students interested in an Electrical Apprenticeship 3 Electricians with Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Total Units = 9 Electric Meter Tester or Substation Electrician with *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental SDG&E, are directed to Apprenticeship Information award that does not appear on the student’s in this Catalog (see Index). The Electricity Program transcript. All courses must be completed within the offers Electrician Trainees who have taken courses San Diego Community College District. for the ABC Apprenticeship Program the opportunity to apply their courses toward earning a certificate or Note: This program is not eligible for federal an associate degree in Electricity. (See the Professor financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. in charge of the Electricity Program.) Certificate of Achievement: Faculty Office Telephone Electricity Mike Brown T-205 619-388-3111 Courses Required for the Major: Units Career Options ELCT 111 Electrical Theory I 3 ELCT 111L 2 Electrical Laboratory I Employment may be found as an electrician, electric 3 ELCT 121 Electrical Theory II lineman, maintenance electrician, electrical helper, ELCT 121L Electrical Laboratory II 2 electrical motor repairer, appliance repairer, or 3 ELCT 131 Electrical Theory III protective signal installer and repairer. 2 Electrical Laboratory III ELCT 131L 3 ELCT 141 Electrical Theory IV Program Learning Outcomes 2 Electrical Laboratory IV ELCT 141L Students who complete the program will be able to: Total Units = 20 • Demonstrate knowledge of electrical codes and blueprints. Certificate of Achievement: Electricity • Discuss and demonstrate knowledge of safety in the electrical field. Lineman Evaluate electrical wiring diagrams as they relate • Completion of this program will not guarantee to implementation. employment as a Lineman with San Diego Gas and Electric Company. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of generators • and motors. Units Courses Required for the Major: • Prepare and apply to take the State of California ELCT 190 5 Electric Lineman IA electrician certification exam. ELCT 191 5 Electric Lineman IB 5 Electric Lineman IIA ELCT 192 5 Electric Lineman IIB ELCT 193 5 Electric Lineman IIIA ELCT 194 ollege D S an iego C ity 215 • 2018–2019 C

216 5 Electric Lineman IIIB ELCT 195 Associate of Science Degree: Total Units = 30 Electricity Electricity Lineman Certificate of Achievement: Electricity Completion of this program will not guarantee employment as a Lineman with San Diego Gas and Electrical Control Systems Option Electric Company. Electrical Control Systems Option emphasizes the Courses Required for the Major: Units study of electrical control system theory including ELCT 190 Electric Lineman IA 5 standard motor controls, transducers, static control ELCT 191 5 Electric Lineman IB devices, programmed controllers, and remote 5 ELCT 192 Electric Lineman IIA electronic controls. ELCT 193 5 Electric Lineman IIB Courses Required for the Major: Units 5 Electric Lineman IIIA ELCT 194 Electric Lineman IIIB ELCT 195 5 3 ELCT 111 Electrical Theory I ELCT 111L Electrical Laboratory I 2 Total Units = 30 ELCT 121 Electrical Theory II 3 Complete the Certificate of Achievement, Electricity. 2 Electrical Laboratory II ELCT 121L Additional general education and graduation 3 ELCT 131 Electrical Theory III requirements for the associate degree are listed ELCT 131L 2 Electrical Laboratory III in the catalog. The associate degree requires a ELCT 141 3 Electrical Theory IV minimum of 60 units. ELCT 141L Electrical Laboratory IV 2 3 ELCT 200 Electrical Control Systems Recommended elective : Electricity 270. 2 Electrical Control Systems Laboratory ELCT 200L Total Units = 25 Transfer Information Common university majors related to the field of Recommended electives : Electricity 20, 30, 40, 270. Electricity include: Industrial Engineering, Industrial Technology. Associate of Science Degree: Electricity Course Requirements for Transfer Students Students who plan to transfer to a four year college Courses Required for the Major: Units or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this 3 ELCT 111 Electrical Theory I discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the ELCT 111L Electrical Laboratory I 2 Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Electrical Theory II 3 ELCT 121 major preparation courses for their specific transfer ELCT 121L Electrical Laboratory II 2 institution and major. Transfer students may also Electrical Theory III 3 ELCT 131 earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts ELCT 131L Electrical Laboratory III 2 and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Electrical Theory IV ELCT 141 3 be individually tailored to each student’s specific Electrical Laboratory IV 2 ELCT 141L transfer requirements in order to provide the most Total Units = 20 efficient path to transfer. More information on transfer programs and procedures is available in the Additional general education and graduation Transfer Programs section of the catalog. requirements for the associate degree are listed The associate degree requires a in the catalog. minimum of 60 units. : Electricity 270. Recommended elective D an S iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 216

217 bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, and Electromechanical integrated circuits. • Demonstrate proficiency in at least one three- Engineering dimensional engineering design software. Technology Certificate of Performance: Electromechanical Technology* Units Award Type Certificate of Performance: Courses: Units 15 Electromechanical Technology ELDT 123 Introduction to Digital Circuits 3 Advanced Electromechanical Technology 12 1 Digital Circuits Laboratory ELDT 123L Basic DC Electronics 4 ELDT 124 Description ELDT 124L Basic DC Laboratory 1 2 Engineering Drawing ENGE 151 The Electromechanical Engineering Technology 4 Introductory Physics PHYS 100 course of study provides a comprehensive or learning environment of both electronic and CHEM 100 3 Fundamentals of Chemistry mechanical principles. Learning emphasis is placed and upon the hands-on application and design of CHEM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry electromechanical systems that include analog Laboratory 1 & digital electronics, engineering design, and Total Units = 15 computer controlled mechanical systems. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Electromechanical Engineering Technology Program Emphasis award that does not appear on the student’s The curriculum is based on integrated technical transcript. All courses must be completed within the and core competencies (electronics, engineering San Diego Community College District. design, engineering sciences), and it emphasizes This program is not eligible for federal Note: a project-based learning format. Students work in financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. teams to learn concepts, solve problems and make discoveries in a workplace-related environment. Certificate of Performance: Students use traditional, Internet resources, and Advanced Electromechanical industry supplied data as sources of information. Technology* Faculty Office Telephone Courses: Units Robert Pruitt S-311H 619-388-3875 3 ELDT 143 Semiconductor Devices Fred Julian S-311L 619-388-3720 1.5 ELDT 143L Semiconductor Devices Laboratory 3 Microprocessor Design ELDT 224 Career Options ELDT 224L 1.5 Microprocessor Design Laboratory Engineering Design ENGE 152 3 Design-Development Technician, Automation Total Units = 12 Technician, Instrumentation Technician, Electromechanical Technician, Engineering Aide *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Program Learning Outcomes transcript. All courses must be completed within the Students who complete the program will be able to: San Diego Community College District. • Demonstrate the proper use of basic electronics Note: This program is not eligible for federal test instrumentation including an oscilloscope, a financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. digital volt-ohm meter, a signal generator and a Transfer Information dual power supply. Common university majors related to the field of Identify standard electronic components • Electromechanical Technology include: including resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, an D C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 217 S iego

218 Industrial Engineering, Electromechanical technician in the student’s desired area of focus. Technology, Engineering Technology. The successful student is proficient with basic electronics measurement instrumentation and Electronics Course Requirements for Transfer Students understands basic electronics circuitry. In addition Students who plan to transfer to a four year college to courses and labs, the Electronics Program or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this provides an opportunity for interested students discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the to take Electronics Technician Association Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate (ETA) and International Association for Radio, major preparation courses for their specific transfer Telecommunication and Electromagnetics (iNARTE) institution and major. Transfer students may also Certification tests. earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Program Emphasis be individually tailored to each student’s specific The Electronics Program emphasis is on providing transfer requirements in order to provide the most the fundamental knowledge needed by a general efficient path to transfer. More information on electronics technician. Ample opportunity for transfer programs and procedures is available in the electronics skill development is provided in Transfer Programs section of the catalog. laboratory courses. Two major areas of emphasis are currently available to electronics students: microcontroller/microprocessor technology and Electronics electronic communication technology. Units Award Type Career Options Certificate of Performance: Electronics Technician, Biomedical Electronics Electronics Technician Level I 14 Technician, Electronics/Computer Technician, Electronics Technician-General Electronics Certificate of Achievement: Manufacturing, Consumer Electronics Technician, Electronics 27 Design-Development Technician, Automation Electronic Communication Systems Option 39 Technician, Instrumentation Technician, Electronic Microprocessor/Microcontroller Electro-mechanical Technician, Engineering Aide, 38.5 Design Option Research Technician, or Robotics Technician. Discuss Associate of Science Degree: other options with an Electronics Professor. Electronic Communication Systems Option 39* Electronic Microprocessor/Microcontroller Office Telephone Faculty Design Option 38.5* Robert Pruitt S-311H 619-388-3875 * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Fred Julian 619-388-3720 S-311L general education and electives as needed to meet Farnaz Khoromi S-311N 619-388-3527 the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Program Learning Outcomes Description Students who complete the program will be able to: Electronics is a field of technology that is concerned with the installation, operation, repair, maintenance, Demonstrate the proper use of basic electronic • calibration, modification and service of electronic test instrumentation including an oscilloscope, a circuitry, components and systems. Technicians digital volt-ohm meter, a signal generator, and a are also trained to diagnose problems arising from dual power supply. electro-mechanical malfunctions and to assist • Analyze and explain basic electronic theory engineers or technologists in preparing prototypes including Ohm’s Law, the power formula, and of electronic units or systems. calculation of voltage gain and power gain. Program Goals Identify standard electronic components • The Electronics Program aids students in including resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, developing the knowledge, skills and abilities bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, and needed in order to become a proficient electronics integrated circuits. C ity ollege iego D an S • 2018–2019 218 C

219 Demonstrate the ability to prepare reports that • Certificate of Achievement: include text, tables, and spreadsheets using Electronics productivity software on a computer. Electronic Communication Systems Option Certificate of Performance: Electronics Technician Level I* This program introduces students to communication theory/circuitry, and reception of AM and FM Certificate of Performance for entry level electronics Electronics digital signals. It finishes with communications links technician. and lasers/fiber optics. Local, metropolitan and Units Courses Required for the Major: wide-area networks are also reviewed. Introduction to Digital Circuits 3 ELDT 123 Courses Required for the Major: Units Digital Circuits Laboratory 1 ELDT 123L ELDT 123 Introduction to Digital Circuits 3 4 Basic DC Electronics ELDT 124 1 ELDT 123L Digital Circuits Laboratory ELDT 124L 1 Basic DC Laboratory 4 Basic DC Electronics ELDT 124 ELDT 125 4 AC Circuit Analysis 1 Basic DC Laboratory ELDT 124L ELDT 125L DC/AC Circuit Analysis Laboratory AC Circuit Analysis ELDT 125 4 1 with Pspice ELDT 125L DC/AC Circuit Analysis Laboratory Total Units = 14 1 with Pspice *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental 3 ELDT 126 Using C AND C++ for Technology award that does not appear on the student’s ELDT 126L Using C and C++ for Technology transcript. All courses must be completed within the 1 Laboratory San Diego Community College District. Semiconductor Devices 3 ELDT 143 ELDT 143L Semiconductor Devices Laboratory 1.5 This program is not eligible for federal Note: 3 ELDT 144 OP-AMPS, Sensors and Computers financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. ELDT 144L OP-AMPS and Sensors Laboratory 1.5 Complete the following additional courses Certificate of Achievement: required for the major: Electronics Introduction to Laser and Fiber ELDT 227 This certificate of achievement provides basic Optics 3 preparation for electronic technicians. Lasers and Fiberoptics Laboratory ELDT 227L 1 ELDT 228 Communication Circuits 3 Courses Required for the Major: Units Communication Circuits and ELDT 228L ELDT 123 3 Introduction to Digital Circuits 1 Certification Laboratory 1 Digital Circuits Laboratory ELDT 123L ELDT 229 Advanced Telecommunications ELDT 124 Basic DC Electronics 4 Networks 3 ELDT 124L 1 Basic DC Laboratory Advanced Telecommunications ELDT 229L ELDT 125 AC Circuit Analysis 4 1 Networks Laboratory ELDT 125L DC/AC Circuit Analysis Laboratory Total Units = 39 with Pspice 1 ELDT 126 Using C AND C++ for Technology 3 Certificate of Achievement: ELDT 126L Using C AND C++ for Technology Laboratory 1 Electronics Semiconductor Devices 3 ELDT 143 Electronic Microprocessor/ EDLT 143L 1.5 Semiconductor Devices Laboratory Microcontroller Design Option ELDT 144 OP-AMPS, Sensors & Computers 3 ELDT 144L OP-AMPS, Sensors & Computers This program provides basic preparation in the Laboratory 1.5 electronic microprocessor and/or microcontroller Total Units = 27 occupation. Units Courses Required for the Major: 3 Introduction to Digital Circuits ELDT 123 1 Digital Circuits Laboratory ELDT 123L D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 219 S an

220 ELDT 228L Communication Circuits and ELDT 124 Basic DC Electronics 4 Certification Laboratory 1 ELDT 124L Basic DC Laboratory 1 4 ELDT 229 Advanced Telecommunications ELDT 125 AC Circuit Analysis Electronics DC/AC Circuit Analysis Laboratory ELDT 125L Networks 3 with Pspice 1 ELDT 229L Advanced Telecommunications Networks Laboratory ELDT 126 Using C AND C++ for Technology 3 1 Using C AND C++ for Technology ELDT 126L Total Units = 39 1 Laboratory Electronic Systems 198, Recommended electives: ELDT 143 3 Semiconductor Devices 230, 230L, 231, 270, 290. Semiconductor Devices Laboratory EDLT 143L 1.5 3 ELDT 144 OP-AMPS, Sensors & Computers Associate of Science Degree: OP-AMPS, Sensors & Computers ELDT 144L Electronics Laboratory 1.5 Electronic Microprocessor/ Complete the following additional courses required for the major: Microcontroller Design Option 3 ELDT 224 Microprocessor Design An Associate of Science Degree may be earned in Microprocessor Design Laboratory 1.5 ELDT 224L Electronic Microprocessor/Microcontroller Design 3 ELDT 230 Advanced Computer Designs Option. Complete the appropriate Certificate ELDT 230L Advanced Computer Designs of Achievement in Electronic Systems and add: Laboratory 1 Electronic Systems 230, 230L, 231. Advanced System Interfacing 3 ELDT 231 Total Units = 38.5 Courses Required for the Major: Units Introduction to Digital Circuits 3 ELDT 123 Associate of Science Degree: ELDT 123L Digital Circuits Laboratory 1 4 Basic DC Electronics ELDT 124 Electronics 1 ELDT 124L Basic DC Laboratory Electronic Communication Systems ELDT 125 4 AC Circuit Analysis Option ELDT 125L DC/AC Circuit Analysis Laboratory 1 with Pspice An Associate of Science Degree may be earned in 3 ELDT 126 Using C AND C++ for Technology Electronic Communication Systems after completion ELDT 126L Using C and C++ for Technology of the appropriate certificate. Laboratory 1 Courses Required for the Major: Units 3 ELDT 143 Semiconductor Devices 1.5 Introduction to Digital Circuits 3 ELDT 143L Semiconductor Devices Laboratory ELDT 123 OP-AMPS, Sensors and Computers ELDT 144 ELDT 123L Digital Circuits Laboratory 3 1 ELDT 124 ELDT 144L OP-AMPS and Sensors Laboratory 4 Basic DC Electronics 1.5 ELDT 124L ELDT 224 3 Microprocessor Design Basic DC Laboratory 1 Microprocessor Design Laboratory 4 1.5 AC Circuit Analysis ELDT 224L ELDT 125 3 Advanced Computer Designs ELDT 125L ELDT 230 DC/AC Circuit Analysis Laboratory 1 ELDT 230L Advanced Computer Designs with Pspice ELDT 126 Using C AND C++ for Technology 1 Laboratory 3 ELDT 126L Using C and C++ for Technology ELDT 231 Advanced System Interfacing 3 1 Laboratory Total Units = 38.5 Semiconductor Devices 3 ELDT 143 Additional general education and graduation Semiconductor Devices Laboratory 1.5 ELDT 143L requirements for the associate degree are listed in 3 ELDT 144 OP-AMPS, Sensors and Computers the catalog ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS section. The 1.5 ELDT 144L OP-AMPS and Sensors Laboratory associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. ELDT 227 Introduction to Lasers and Fiber Optics 3 Electronic Systems 198, Recommended electives: 1 ELDT 227L Lasers and Fiber Optics Laboratory 270, 290. 3 Communication Circuits ELDT 228 iego D an S C ity C ollege 220 • 2018–2019

221 Courses offered in the San Diego City College Transfer Information Engineering program meet basic requirements for Common university majors related to the field lower division preparation for California universities. Industrial Engineering, of Electronics include: Some universities may also require engineering Industrial Technology. courses as preparation for specific engineering Course Requirements for Transfer Students majors. The Engineering program is designed to Students who plan to transfer to a four year college prepare students for transfer to California State University and University of California institutions. or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this Engineering discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Faculty Telephone Office Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate major preparation courses for their specific transfer 619-388-3720 S-311L Fred Julian institution and major. Transfer students may also 619-388-3527 S-311N Farnaz Khoromi earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts 619-388-3875 S-311H Robert Pruitt and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may be individually tailored to each student’s specific Career Options transfer requirements in order to provide the most Most careers in engineering require education efficient path to transfer. More information on beyond the associate degree. A list of career options transfer programs and procedures is available in the available to persons with baccalaureate engineering Transfer Programs section of the catalog. preparation include: aerospace, agricultural, architectural, biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, environmental, industrial, mechanical and Engineering nuclear engineering. Award Type Units Academic Programs Certificate of Performance: The associate degree in engineering requires 13–16 Pre-Engineering Technology completion of the courses listed below. Additional Robotics Engineering Project Team Level 1 4.5 general education and graduation requirements for Certificate of Achievement: the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The 19 Drafting Option associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Associate of Science Degree: Certificate of Achievement: Engineering 36* Engineering * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet Drafting Option the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Program Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion, the student will be able Description to: The engineering curriculum is heavily based on • Demonstrate skill in engineering drawing. mathematics and physical sciences. Students benefit by having access to state-of-the-art CAD/ • Demonstrate proficiency in at least one CAM facilities as well as to a high technology center three-dimensional engineering design software. that is at the cutting edge of new technologies, Prepare reports using software tools. • thereby enhancing career choices and rewards. This pre-engineering preparation provides an excellent Units Courses Required for the Major foundation for transfer to a four-year university as an 3 Dimensioning and Tolerancing ENGE 108 engineering major. ENGE 111 Introduction to Computer Aided Design 3 Program Emphasis 2 Engineering Drawing ENGE 151 University schools of engineering have similar Engineering Design ENGE 152 3 science and mathematics requirements but may 5 Intermediate Algebra with Geometry MATH 96 differ in preparation for various engineering options. ENGL 101 3 Reading and Composition Total Units = 19 • 2018–2019 an D iego S C ity C ollege 221

222 Certificate of Performance: Associate of Science Degree: Pre-Engineering Technology* Engineering Engineering Program Learning Outcomes Courses: Units Students who complete the program will be able to: PHYS 100 Introductory Physics 4 5 Intermediate Algebra and Geometry MATH 96 Demonstrate proficiency in analytical problem • or solving skills. MATH 98 Technical Intermediate Algebra and Describe the engineering field from a general • 4 Geometry perspective. Introduction to Technical Writing TEHW 101 3 or Courses Required for the Major Units 3 Oral Communication COMS 103 CHEM 200 General Chemistry I 3 CHEM 200L General Chemistry I Laboratory 2 Note: A more advanced course may be substituted MATH 150 for a lower level course. 5 Calculus Analytic Geometry I MATH 151 Calculus Analytic Geometry II 4 and select one course from: MATH 252 4 Calculus Analytic Geometry III ENGE 151 Engineering Drawing 2 MATH 255 3 Differential Equations or 5 Mechanics PHYS 195 ENGE 111 Introduction to Computer-Aided Electricity and Magnetism 5 PHYS 196 Design 3 PHYS 197 Waves, Optics, and Modern Physics 5 or Total Units = 36 MACT 150 Intro/Computer Numerical Control 4 (CNC) Recommended electives: Engineering 198, 200, 210, 240, 250, 260, 290. Total Units = 13–16 *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Pre-Engineering Technology award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the Description San Diego Community College District. The Certificate of Performance in Pre-Engineering Technology prepares students for entry level This program is not eligible for federal Note: positions in engineering and technology areas. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Courses in this certificate provide basic skills in math, technical writing, science for technical applications Robotics Engineering and drafting used in most engineering and Description technology related fields. These foundation courses Robotics in an engineering field that includes will prepare students for the more academically the electronic, mechanical and computer rigorous engineering technology programs. science disciplines. Students also participate in documentation, web design, construction, testing Faculty Office Telephone and deployment of an autonomous underwater Fred Julian 619-388-3720 S-311L vehicle for competition. The competition is Farnaz Khoromi S-311N 619-388-3527 sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems 619-388-3875 S-311H Robert Pruitt International (AUVSI). Career Options Goals Entry level engineering drafting and design; Entry To increase interest and skill level in robotic level technical writing; Entry level technician. engineering and serve the needs of engineering firms by offering a short term introductory robotic Academic Programs engineering certificate. The Pre-Engineering Technology Certificate of Performance requires completion of the courses Emphasis listed below. Students completing the certificate will have an entry level understanding of the interpersonal skills needed to work with engineers from a variety of D an S C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 222 iego

223 transfer programs and procedures is available in the disciplines, and the engineering skills needed to Transfer Programs section of the catalog. produce a design within a fixed time frame. Career Options Robotic engineering. English English Certificate of Performance: Units Award Type Robotics Engineering Project Team Certificate of Performance: Level 1* 15 Creative Writing Courses: Units Associate of Arts Degree: Introduction to Robotics Team ENGE 50A English 18* Project Design 1.5 * and courses to meet graduation requirements, ENGE 50B Introduction to Robotics Team general education and electives as needed to meet Project Construction 1.5 the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. ENGE 50C Introduction to Robotics Team 1.5 Project Testing and Deployment Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: Total Units = 4.5 English 18–20 *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Description transcript. All courses must be completed within the The English program provides a breadth of course San Diego Community College District. work designed to improve reading, writing, listening, This program is not eligible for federal Note: speaking, and critical thinking skills. Reading financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. courses focus on academic reading and study skills. Writing classes range from developmental writing to transfer-level courses in reading and Transfer Information composition, composition and literature, and Common university majors related to the field intermediate composition and critical thinking, as Agricultural Engineering, of Engineering include: well as a two-semester sequence in creative writing. Architectural Engineering, Aviation and Aerospace Literature offerings include an introductory course Engineering, Bioengineering and Technology, and specialized courses such as British and American Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Literature and women in literature. Humanities Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, courses explore cultural achievements of world Construction Management, Electrical Engineering, civilizations. English department courses meet Engineering, Engineering Physics, Engineering English Composition requirements for the associate Technology, Environmental Engineering, Industrial degree and for University of California, and California Engineering and Technology, Manufacturing State University, Communications in the English Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Language and Critical Thinking requirements. Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Literature courses may also meet general education, Structural Engineering. humanities, multicultural studies requirements and Course Requirements for Transfer Students preparation for transfer. Students who plan to transfer to a four year college Program Emphasis or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the The English major at the lower-division level Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate emphasizes learning to read more critically and to major preparation courses for their specific transfer write more effectively using strategies of narration, institution and major. Transfer students may also exposition and argument. The English major earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts primarily serves students transferring to colleges and and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may universities where the focus is on academic writing, be individually tailored to each student’s specific research and criticism. transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on D an iego C ity ollege • 2018–2019 223 S C

224 and use critical thinking to evaluate a variety of Telephone Office Faculty writing. 619-388-3607 AH-515F Paul Alexander English • Organize ideas and information and express Christy Ball AH-515B 619-388-3306 them clearly and effectively in writing for both 619-388-3633 L-209 Chris Baron academic and workplace contexts for different communicative purposes. Audrey Breay AH-515E 619-388-3144 Jennifer Boots AH-517C 619-388-3264 • Apply appropriate research strategies and citation formats. AH-517F 619-388-4371 Michelle Chan Virginia Escalante AH-513A 619-388-3596 Describe, explain and analyze multiple • perspectives on issues in ways that demonstrate 619-388-4336 Mona Alsoraimi- AH-515G global awareness and appreciation of diversity in Espiritu its many manifestations. Aileen Gum 619-388-3610 AH-515C Apply strategies both inside and outside the • 619-388-3962 Jan Jarrell AH-513E classroom that reflect an understanding of AH-517F 619-388-4368 Manuel Paul Lopez the reading and writing processes in order to Nadia Mandilawi AH-515D 619-388-3420 become life-long learners, critical thinkers, and active citizens. 619-388-3585 AH-517B Hector Martinez AH-513F 619-388-3876 Patricia McGhee Students will be assessed through a combination of evaluations which may include projects, written 619-388-3136 AH-517D Kelly Mayhew assignments, presentations, tests, quizzes, and Elizabeth Meehan BT-103G 619-388-3509 group or collaborative activities. 619-388-3554 AH-517G Jim Miller Oscar Preciado 619-388-3186 AH-515B Certificate of Performance: Creative Writing* AH-511E 619-388-3695 Anna Rogers AH-517E Elva Salinas 619-388-3411 Courses: Units Ebony Tyree 619-388-3084 AH-511B ENGL 249A Introduction to Creative Writing I 3 Koralijka Zunic AH-513B 619-388-3470 Select two courses from the following: ENGL 249B Introduction to Creative Writing II 3 Career Options ENGL 245A 3 Writing Creative Nonfiction 3 Advanced Creative Nonfiction ENGL 245B Most careers require education beyond the associate Writing Seminar – Poetry 3 ENGL 247A degree. Strong linguistic, analytical and imaginative 3 ENGL 252A Fundamentals of Fiction Writing skills developed in English help to prepare students 3 Intermediate Fiction Writing ENGL 252B for employment in many fields including law, Playwriting DRAM 108 3 education, communications, governmental affairs or RTVF 110 Introduction to Scriptwriting 3 business. Select two courses from the following: Academic Programs 3 ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature ENGL 210 3 American Literature I The associate degree in English requires completion ENGL 211 American Literature II 3 of the courses listed for the degree. Additional English Literature I: 800–1799 ENGL 215 3 general education and graduation requirements for ENGL 216 3 English Literature II: 1800 – Present the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The ENGL 220 Masterpieces of World Literature I: associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. 1500 BCE – 1600 CE 3 Program Learning Outcomes ENGL 221 Masterpieces of World Literature II: 1600 – Present 3 Students who complete the program will be able to: 3 ENGL 240 Shakespeare • Read and comprehend texts, recognize author BLAS 155 African American Literature 3 strategies, purpose, perspective and argument, CHIC 135 Chicana/o Literature 3 Total Units = 15 C ity C an • 2018–2019 224 S D iego ollege

225 Transferable Units as Prep for the Major at SDSU English 36. Recommended Electives: SDSU will accept a total of 12 units of literature and *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental creative writing as preparation for the English Major. award that does not appear on the student’s This includes any combination of lower division transcript. All courses must be completed within the literature courses and up to six units of creative San Diego Community College District. writing courses. English Associate of Arts Degree: Associate in Arts in English for English Transfer Degree: Courses Required for the Major: Units Description ENGL 101 or Reading and Composition The Associate in Arts in English for Transfer Degree 3 Composition and Literature ENGL 105 is intended for students who plan to complete Critical Thinking and Intermediate *ENGL 205 a bachelor’s degree in English or a related major Composition 3 in the California State University (CSU) system. It 3 **ENGL 215 English Literature I: 800–1799 is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. 3 **ENGL 216 English Literature II: 1800 – Present Students who complete this degree and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be required to Select 3 units from the following (recommended complete no more than 60 units after transfer to sequence for UC Transfer): earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate 3 ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature preparation for students transferring to a CSU Masterpieces of World Literature I: ENGL 220 campus that does not accept the degree. Students 3 1500 BCE – 1600 CE who plan to complete this degree should consult ENGL 221 Masterpieces of World Literature II: a counselor for additional information about 3 1600 – Present participating CSU campuses as well as university Select 3 units from the following (recommended admission, degree and transfer requirements. sequence for UC Transfer): It is strongly recommended that students consult American Literature I 3 **ENGL 210 with a counselor to determine which general American Literature II 3 **ENGL 211 education option is most appropriate for their ENGL 245A Writing Creative Nonfiction 3 individual educational goals. Writing Seminar – Poetry ENGL 247A 3 3 Introduction to Creative Writing I ENGL 249A NOTE: Students intending to transfer into this 3 Intermediate Fiction Writing ENGL 252B major at any CSU should consult a counselor and Total Units = 18 visit www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate coursework. *Meets SDSU/CSU critical thinking requirement. Additional Notes: **Recommended sequences for UC transfer. * This course also fulfills general education Note: English 205 meets SDSU/CSU critical thinking requirements for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. requirement. In addition to the courses listed General Education: Note : English 215 and 216 are required by SDSU and above, students must complete one of the following UCSD. Other course electives are available at Mesa general education options: and Miramar Colleges. The IGETC pattern (page 118 ) is accepted by • For graduation requirements see Requirements for all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and the Associate Degree on page 93 . majors. It is also accepted by some private/ Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 units independent or out of state universities. required for the degree. • ) is accepted by all The CSU GE pattern (page 126 Recommended Electives: English 202, 209, 238, CSU campuses and some private/independent or 240, 245A, 247, 249, 252A, 252B; Humanities 101, 102, out of state universities. It is not accepted by the 201, 202; Journalism 200, 210A, 210B, 210C, 210D. UC system. Courses designed to support this and other ELAC 15, 25, 23, 35, 33, 45. majors: an D iego C ity ollege • 2018–2019 225 S C

226 Courses Required for the Major: Units It is strongly recommended that students consult with a counselor to determine which general ENGL 205 Critical Thinking and Intermediate education option is most appropriate for their English 3 Composition individual educational goals. 3 ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 Select two of the following courses: CSU-transferable units required for the degree. 3 ENGL 210 American Literature I ENGL 211 American Literature II 3 The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: ENGL 215 English Literature I: 800–1799 3 Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. ENGL 216 English Literature II: 1800 – Present 3 No more than 60 units are required. ENGL 220 Masterpieces of World Literature I: 3 1500 BCE – 1600 CE Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in ENGL 221 Masterpieces of World Literature II: all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum 1600 – Present 3 of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a Select one of the following courses (not selected counselor for more information. above) to meet the lower division preparation for the major to your transfer university: Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an Reading and Composition 3 ENGL 101 “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in ENGL 105 Composition and Literature 3 the major must be completed with a grade of “C” or ENGL 210 3 American Literature I bet ter. 3 ENGL 211 American Literature II Certified completion of the California State 3 ENGL 215 English Literature I: 800–1799 University General Education-Breadth pattern English Literature II: 1800 – Present 3 ENGL 216 (CSU GE; see page 126 for more information); OR Masterpieces of World Literature I: ENGL 220 the Intersegmental General Education Transfer 1500 BCE – 1600 CE 3 Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more Masterpieces of World Literature II: ENGL 221 information). 1600 – Present 3 3 ENGL 240 Shakespeare Program Goals Writing Creative Nonfiction ENGL 245A 3 The Associate in Arts in English for Transfer Degree ENGL 245B 3 Advanced Creative Nonfiction is intended for students who plan to complete ENGL 247A Writing Seminar – Poetry 3 a bachelor’s degree in English or a related major ENGL 249A Introduction to Creative Writing I 3 in the California State University (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. Select one of the following courses (not selected Students who complete this degree and transfer above) to meet the lower division preparation for to a participating CSU campus will be required to the major to your transfer university : complete no more than 60 units after transfer to American Sign Language Level I AMSL 115 4 earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate AMSL 116 4 American Sign Language Level II preparation for students transferring to a CSU 4 AMSL 215 American Sign Language Level III campus that does not accept the degree. Students 4 American Sign Language Level IV AMSL 216 who plan to complete this degree should consult 5 First Course in Arabic ARAB 101 a counselor for additional information about Second Course in Arabic ARAB 102 5 participating CSU campuses as well as university 3 Mexican Literature in Translation CHIC 130 admission, degree and transfer requirements. Reading and Composition ENGL 101 3 ENGL 105 3 Composition and Literature It is strongly recommended that students consult American Literature I ENGL 210 3 with a counselor to determine which general American Literature II 3 ENGL 211 education option is most appropriate for their ENGL 215 English Literature I: 800–1799 3 individual educational goals. ENGL 216 English Literature II: 1800 – Present 3 Career Options ENGL 220 Masterpieces of World Literature I: Careers related to this field typically require 3 1500 BCE – 1600 CE education beyond the associate degree level and ENGL 221 Masterpieces of World Literature II: some may require graduate work. 3 1600 – Present an D iego C S C ollege • 2018–2019 226 ity

227 Shakespeare 3 ENGL 240 English Language ENGL 245A Writing Creative Nonfiction 3 3 ENGL 245B Advanced Creative Nonfiction Acquisition ENGL 247A Writing Seminar – Poetry 3 3 Fundamentals of Fiction Writing ENGL 252A Formerly known as English for Speakers of Other 3 ENGL 252B Intermediate Fiction Writing Languages (ESOL) Introduction to Creative Writing I ENGL 249A 3 FREN 101 First Course in French 5 Award Type Units FREN 102 5 Second Course in French Certificate of Performance: FREN 201 Third Course In French 5 English Language Acquisition 9 FREN 202 Fourth Course in French 5 First Course in German GERM 101 5 GERM 102 Second Course in German 5 Certificate of Performance: 5 Third Course in German GERM 201 English Language Acquisition First Course in Italian 5 ITAL 101 The English Language Acquisition (ELAC) Certificate ITAL 102 Second Course in Italian 5 of Performance recognizes an advanced level of English Language Acquisition 5 ITAL 201 Third Course in Italian English language achievement for students whose First Course in Russian RUSS 101 5 first language is not English. Students who earn this SPAN 101 5 First Course in Spanish certificate have successfully completed advanced Second Course in Spanish 5 SPAN 102 ELAC coursework in grammar, writing conventions, 5 Third Course in Spanish SPAN 201 reading skills, and critical thinking. 5 Fourth Course in Spanish SPAN 202 Spanish for Spanish Speakers I 5 SPAN 215 Note: Upon successful completion of the Certificate SPAN 216 Spanish for Spanish Speakers II 5 of Performance, students should be able to: Total Units = 18–20 Analyze and synthesize the written works of others Requirements for For graduation requirements see and compose an organized, multi-paragraph piece on page 93 the Associate Degree . in response. Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 units Revise and reflect on own written work that required for the degree: demonstrates an advanced level of reading, writing, and critical thinking. Transfer Information Career Options Common university majors related to the field Ability to understand and use English as necessary of English include: Creative Writing, Comparative for success in such careers as education, writing, Literature, English, Humanities, Language Studies, advertising, sales, journalism, law, business, and Linguistics, Literature. government. Course Requirements for Transfer Students Units Courses Required for the Major: Students who plan to transfer to a four year college ELAC 45 Integrated Reading, Writing, and or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this 6 Grammar III discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Select three units from the following: major preparation courses for their specific transfer English Language Grammar - High- ELAC 5B institution and major. Transfer students may also 1–2 Intermediate/Advanced earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts English Pronunciation 1–2 ELAC 7 and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may ELAC 33 3 Academic Listening and Speaking II be individually tailored to each student’s specific Total Units = 9 transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental transfer programs and procedures is available in the award that does not appear on the student’s Transfer Programs section of the catalog. transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. an iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 227 S D

228 • Physical This program is not eligible for federal Note: financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. • Spiritual Exercise Science Emotional • Exercise Science Cognitive • Social • Award Type Units Environmental • Certificate of Performance: 10–12 Health and Wellness Coaching Exercise Science ( formerly Physical Education ) Upon successful completion the student will Certificate of Achievement: improve in one or more of the following fitness 19–22 Fitness Specialist components: Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: Cardio-respiratory endurance • Kinesiology 22 Muscular endurance • Telephone Office Faculty • Muscular strength P3-203 Dede Bodnar 619-388-3544 Flexibility • P208 619-388-3705 Christopher Brown • Body composition 619-388-3703 Mitch Charlens P3-204 619-388-3706 P215 Aaron Detty Fitness Specialist Upon successful completion the student will be P209 Gabriela Hogan 619-388-3422 able to: FTCTR Paul Greer 619-388-3704 Demonstrate the ability to prescribe safe and • Kathy McGinnis V312L 619-388-3884 effective exercise. Andrea Milburn P207 619-388-3121 • Develop and implement group and individual 619-388-3890 LeeAnn Taylor P204 exercise programs. Ellen Turkel 619-388-3127 P202 Possess an applied understanding of human • Program Learning Outcomes anatomy, physiology and nutrition as it applies to physical fitness. Athletics Upon successful completion the student/athlete will • Develop specialized fitness programs to meet be able to: the needs of the targeted individual. Create an Educational Plan with the Athletic • Health and Wellness Coaching Counselor. Program Description Develop a greater skill level in their sport. • The Certificate of Performance in Health and Exhibit the qualities of teamwork as it relates to • Wellness Coaching is designed to prepare students their sport. for careers in health and wellness coaching. Emphasis is placed on providing students with Develop a player profile to be used as a recruiting • effective communication strategies for explaining tool for four year institutions. and applying the basic principles of physiology Increase their levels of physical fitness. • and nutrition, as well as emotional, spiritual, social, cognitive, and environmental health. Students Health create and implement safe and effective healthy Upon successful completion the student will be able eating strategies and exercise plans based on to: client assessment data. Students also demonstrate • Learn that life is a balancing act and identify how effective approaches to modifying behavior-change the following components of wellness will aid in programs to promote program adherence based on successfully navigating one’s life. client needs. S an D iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 228 C

229 EXSC 127D Cardio Kickboxing IV – Advanced Program Goals Level Upon successful completion of this program, the 0.5–1 EXSC 129A Step Aerobics I–Fundamentals student is able to apply knowledge and skill in 0.5–1 communication, behavior change, nutrition, weight EXSC 129B 0.5–1 Step Aerobics II – Beginning Level Step Aerobics III – Intermediate management, exercise program development, EXSC 129C exercise leadership, and disease/injury prevention to 0.5–1 Level Step Aerobics IV – Advanced EXSC 129D health and wellness coaching clients. Level 0.5–1 Career Options Adapted Weight Training EXSC 134 0.5–1 Some careers in the health and wellness field Individual Conditioning I – EXSC 135A include health coach, health and wellness coach, life Exercise Science 0.5–1 Fundamentals coach, family coach, pregnant and nursing moms EXSC 135B Individual Conditioning II – coach, adult and seniors coach, weight loss coach, Beginning 0.5–1 nutritional health coach and EXSC 135C Individual Conditioning III – behavior change coach. Intermediate 0.5–1 These careers can be found in fitness centers and EXSC 135D Individual Conditioning IV – health clubs, corporations and businesses, hospitals, Advanced 0.5–1 health clinics, and doctor’s offices. 0.5–1 Weight Training I EXSC 139A Weight Training II 0.5–1 EXSC 139B Certificate of Performance: Weight Training III EXSC 139C 0.5–1 Health and Wellness Coaching EXSC 139D Weight Training IV 0.5–1 The Health and Wellness Coaching certificate 0.5–1 Yoga I–Fundamentals of Yoga EXSC 145A prepares the student for the American Council on Yoga II–Beginning Yoga 0.5–1 EXSC 145B Exercise’s (ACE) national certification examination EXSC 145C Yoga III–Intermediate 0.5–1 for health coaching. This is a valuable supplemental 0.5–1 EXSC 145D Yoga IV – Advanced Level certificate to a personal training or group exercise 0.5–1 EXSC 147A Kickboxing I–Fundamental certification. Health coaching is a growing field. 0.5–1 Kickboxing II–Beginning EXSC 147B 0.5–1 Kickboxing III–Intermediate EXSC 147C Courses Required for the Major: Units 0.5–1 Kickboxing IV–Advanced EXSC 147D 3 Health and Wellness Coaching EXSC 294 EXSC 148A Martial Arts I–Fundamental 0.5–1 EXSC 284 Fitness and Sports Nutrition 2 0.5–1 EXSC 148B Martial Arts II–Beginning or 0.5–1 EXSC 148C Martial Arts III–Intermediate NUTR 170 Nutrition and Fitness 3 0.5–1 Martial Arts IV–Advanced EXSC 148D HEAL 101 Health and Life-Style 3 Total Units = 10–12 Personal Trainer Internship / Work EXSC 270 Experience 1–2 Award Notes: Complete one unit from the following courses: A “C” or better must be achieved in all required Adapted Physical Fitness 0.5–1 EXSC 123 courses and electives in this program to receive the 0.5–1 EXSC 125A Aerobic Dance I certificate of performance. EXSC 125B Aerobic Dance II 0.5–1 To be eligible to take the American Council on 0.5–1 Aerobic Dance III EXSC 125C Exercise National Certification Examination in Health Aerobic Dance IV EXSC 125D 0.5–1 Coaching, students need to have completed one of EXSC 126A 0.5–1 Cardio Conditioning I the following: EXSC 126B Cardio Conditioning II 0.5–1 Cardio Conditioning III 0.5–1 EXSC 126C * Pass an accredited certification exam thorough • 0.5–1 EXSC 126D Cardio Conditioning IV the National Commission for Certifying Agencies EXSC 127A Cardio Kickboxing I – (NCCA); Fundamentals 0.5–1 • * Obtain a license in fitness, nutrition, health care, EXSC 127B Cardio Kickboxing II – Beginning wellness, human resources or a related field; Level 0.5–1 EXSC 127C Cardio Kickboxing III – * Earn an associate’s degree or higher from • Intermediate Level 0.5–1 an accredited college or university in fitness, an D C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 229 S iego

230 Exercise and Fitness Assessment exercise science, nutrition, health care, wellness, EXSC 283 2 2 EXSC 284 human resources or a related field; Fitness and Sports Nutrition 2 EXSC 285 Exercise for Special Populations Exercise Science • * Complete at least two years of comparable work 2 Techniques of Exercise Leadership EXSC 286 experience in any of the industries specified EXSC 288 Fitness Specialist Internship Lecture 1 above. Personal Trainer Internship/ Work EXSC 270 Experience 1–4 *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Total Units = 19–22 transcript. All courses must be completed within the This program prepares candidates for American San Diego Community College District. College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) or American This program is not eligible for federal Note: Council of Exercise (ACE) certification exams. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Exercise Science (formerly Physical Education) Classes/Intercollegiate Sports Disclaimer Fitness Specialist Participation in all sports and exercise science Certificate Program Description ( formerly Physical Education ) activities involves Students in this program will be trained to be group certain inherent risks. Risks may include, but are not exercise leaders and personal trainers. Students limited to, neck and spinal injuries that may result will learn the principles of exercise and physical in paralysis or brain injury, injury to bones, joints, conditioning, techniques of leading individual and ligaments, muscles, tendons and other aspects of group exercise classes, appropriate methods to the muscular skeleton system, and serious injury, establishing healthy behavior and the designing of or impairment, to other aspects of the body and personalized exercise prescriptions. They will be able general health, including death. The San Diego to develop safe, effective exercise plans for a variety Community College District, its officers, agents and of clients. employees are not responsible for the inherent risks associated with participation in exercise science Program Emphasis formerly Physical Education ( ) classes/intercollegiate The Fitness Specialist certificate program trains sports. students for positions, entry-level or higher, in the growing fitness industry. Students are strongly advised to consult a physician prior to participating in any exercise science ( formerly Career Options Physical Education ) activity. Graduates will be qualified to be exercise testing technicians, fitness instructors, strength training Associate in Arts in Kinesiology for instructors, aerobic instructors, and personal fitness trainers. Transfer Degree: The fitness industry continued to experience growth The Associate in Arts in Kinesiology for Transfer and has an ongoing need for trained instructors and Degree is intended for students who plan to trainers in health clubs, fitness centers, and sports complete a bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology or medicine clinics. a related major in the California State University (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all Please note that students enrolled in an occupational CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree program must earn a grade of “C” or better in and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be courses required for the major. required to complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be Certificate of Achievement: appropriate preparation for students transferring Exercise Science to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should Fitness Specialist consult a counselor for additional information about Units Courses Required for the Major: participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. EXSC 242B Care and Prevention of Injuries 3 EXSC 280 Applied Exercise Physiology 2 NOTE: Students intending to transfer into this major 2 Applied Kinesiology EXSC 281 at any CSU should consult with a counselor and visit 2 Techniques of Weight Training EXSC 282 D • 2018–2019 S ollege 230 C ity C iego an

231 CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree for guidance on appropriate transfer www.assist.org and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be coursework. required to complete no more than 60 units after In addition to the courses listed General Education: transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be above, students must complete one of the following appropriate preparation for students transferring general education options: to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should ) is accepted by • The IGETC pattern (page 118 consult a counselor for additional information about all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and majors. It is also accepted by some private/ participating CSU campuses as well as university independent or out of state universities. admission, degree and transfer requirements. Exercise Science The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all Career Options • CSU campuses and some private/independent or Careers related to this field typically require out of state universities. It is not accepted by the education beyond the associate degree level and UC system. some may require a graduate degree. It is strongly recommended that students consult Courses Required for the Major: Units with a counselor to determine which general BIOL 230 Human Anatomy* 4 education option is most appropriate for their 4 Human Physiology* BIOL 235 individual educational goals. Introduction to Kinesiology 3 EXSC 241B Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 Select a minimum of one course from any three of CSU-transferable units required for the degree. the following areas for a maximum of 3 units: * Course also fulfills general education requirements Combatives for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. 1 Kickboxing I – Fundamental EXSC 147A EXSC 148A Martial Arts I – Fundamental 1 The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: Fitness Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester • EXSC 125A Aerobic Dance I 1 units. No more than 60 units are required. 1 EXSC 125B Aerobic Dance II • Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 1 EXSC 125C Aerobic Dance III 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a EXSC 125D Aerobic Dance IV 1 minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some EXSC 127A Cardio Kickboxing I – Fundamentals 1 CSU campuses and majors may require a higher 1 Step Aerobics I – Fundamentals EXSC 129A GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. EXSC 135A Individual Conditioning I – 1 Fundamentals • Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units Weight Training I EXSC 139A 1 in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All EXSC 139B 1 Weight Training II courses in the major must be completed with a EXSC 139C Weight Training III 1 grade of “C” or better. Weight Training IV EXSC 139D 1 Certified completion of the California State • EXSC 145A Yoga I – Fundamentals of Yoga 1 University General Education-Breadth pattern Individual Sports (CSU GE; see page 126 for more information); OR EXSC 154A 1 Badminton I the Intersegmental General Education Transfer 1 EXSC 166A Golf I for more Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 Tennis I EXSC 178A 1 information). Team Sports Electives as needed to meet maximum of 60 EXSC 158A Basketball I 1 CSU-transferable units required for the degree. Soccer I EXSC 174A 1 Goals 1 EXSC 176A Softball I The Associate in Arts in Kinesiology for Transfer EXSC 182A 1 Volleyball I Degree is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology or a related major in the California State University (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all ollege 231 • 2018–2019 an C ity C iego D S

232 Select two of the following courses (minimum 8 Career Options units) Knowledge of another language is required or highly 3 General Chemistry I – Lecture CHEM 200 French desirable for consular and junior foreign service, and import, export, and international business and travel, 2 CHEM 200L General Chemistry I – Laboratory health and missionary fields, overseas teaching, MATH 119 Elementary Statistics or translating and interpreting, and travel and tourism PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics 3 industries. Learning another language is an asset in Total Units = 22 broadening communication skills and in the travel Requirements for For graduation requirements see and tourism industry. on page 93 the Associate Degree . Program Learning Outcomes Students who complete the program will be able to: French • Demonstrate preparedness for successful transition to the language program of four year Award Type Units institutions. Associate of Arts Degree: Demonstrate accurate foreign language grammar • French 26* including writing, speaking, and listening in the * and courses to meet graduation requirements, target language. general education and electives as needed to meet Discuss the social and cultural life of Foreign • the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Language speakers in the target language. Description • Read and analyze writings in Foreign Language target areas. The study of languages provides communication skills, provides exposure to the richness of cultural Accept and value other peoples. • variety, increases transfer options to universities Academic Programs with language requirements, opens new career opportunities, enriches global travel, and provides The associate degree in French, German, Italian, or personal enrichment. The program is designed to Spanish requires completion of the courses listed prepare students for transfer to a baccalaureate below. Additional general education and graduation institution and for proficiency in a language in a requirements for the associate degree are listed variety of settings. in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Program Emphasis The Language program provides transfer level Associate of Arts Degree: courses in Arabic, French, German, Italian, Languages Spanish and Russian. Students develop skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing, French culture and increase familiarity with basic features of Units Courses Required for the Major: the English language. They also have opportunities 5 First Course in French FREN 101 to become acquainted with the literature, culture, Second Course in French 5 FREN 102 history and current events of other countries Third Course in French 5 FREN 201 through films, videotapes, field trips and campus FREN 202 Fourth Course in French 5 and community international events. Conversation and Composition in FREN 210 3 French I Office Telephone Faculty FREN 211 Conversation and Composition 619-388-3591 Philippe Patto AH-518C 3 French II 619-388-3295 Rosalinda AH-518B Total Units = 26 Sandoval D • 2018–2019 C iego C an S 232 ollege ity

233 Identify and explore just, equitable and • Transfer Information sustainable solutions to social, environmental, Common university majors related to the field political and economic issues. of French include: French, Language Studies, Literature, Modern Languages, Translation and Program Emphasis Interpretation. A focus is placed upon the interdisciplinary nature of Course Requirements for Transfer Students the application of Futures Studies to anthropology, Students who plan to transfer to a four year college political science, sociology, technology and or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this computer science, economics and environmental discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Futures Studies science. Students will be encouraged to think Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate critically about the future in a responsible manner major preparation courses for their specific transfer taking into consideration just and equitable institution and major. Transfer students may also solutions to challenges facing the world. earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Office Faculty Telephone be individually tailored to each student’s specific 619-388-3666 A-17-F Larry Forman transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on Career Options transfer programs and procedures is available in the This Certificate prepares students to enter into Transfer Programs section of the catalog. academic and professional fields related to Futures Studies. Available career tracks include working as a strategic planner, demographer, futurist, sociologist, Futures Studies pollster, researcher, political analyst, educator, anthropologist, industrial psychologist, business Units Award Type leader, consultant or a change agent. Certificate of Performance: 15–16 Futures Studies Certificate Certificate of Performance: Associate of Arts Degree: Futures Studies Certificate* Futures Studies 23–25* The Futures Studies certificate will provide students the tools to identify and analyze trends that impact Description the future of our world on a social, cultural, political, The Futures Studies program offers practical skills, economic and environmental level. theory and methods to strategically identify and Courses: Units analyze trends that affect the world on a social, 3 Introduction to Futures Studies FUTR 101 cultural, political, economic and environmental ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural level. Through Futures Studies theory and methods, 3 Anthropology students learn to postulate possible, probable and 3 Globalization and Social Change SOCO 223 preferable futures. 3 Comparative Politics POLI 103 Program Goals 4 Principles of Information Systems CISC 181 or Students will learn to: Emerging Technologies 3 FUTR 103 • Envision possible, probable and preferable Total Units = 15–16 futures. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental • Apply methods of visioning, strategic planning award that does not appear on the student’s and simulations to case studies. transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. • Assess and evaluate trends forecasted on a national and international level. This program is not eligible for federal Note: financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Critically analyze positive and negative factors • that may influence the future of the world. ollege ity C D • 2018–2019 S an iego C 233

234 3 Philosophy of Women PHIL 125 Associate of Arts Degree: Introduction to Philosophy of PHIL 126 Futures Studies 3 Contemporary Gender Issues Futures Studies This Associate Degree will provide students the tools Recommended electives for students interested to identify and analyze trends that impact the future in a cultural perspective: of our world on a social, cultural, political, economic ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 and environmental level. ANTH 210 3 Introduction to California Indians Required Courses: Units Contemporary Social Problems SOCO 110 3 3 BLAS 100 Introduction to Black Studies 3 Introduction to Futures Studies FUTR 101 BLAS 104 Black Psychology 3 Creating Futures: Methods and Tools 3 FUTR 102 3 Introduction to Chicano Studies CHIC 110A 3 FUTR 103 Emerging Technologies CHIC 210 Chicano Culture 3 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 ANTH 103 COMS 180 Intercultural Communication 3 3 POLI 103 Comparative Politics 3 Cultural Geography GEOG 102 4 Principles of Information Systems CISC 181 3 Globalization and Social Change SOCO 223 Recommended electives for students interested 1–3 FUTR 250 Field Experience in Futures Studies in a technological perspective: Total Units = 23–25 CISC 114 Introduction to Computer Graphics and Web Media 2 The following groups are recommended electives Introduction to Computer and CISC 150 and will not lead to an individual certificate or 3 Information Sciences emphasis but may meet the required 60 units for Fundamentals of Computer Game CISC 220 the Associate Degree in Futures Studies. Programming 4 ENGE 101 1.5 Introduction to Engineering Recommended electives for students interested Introduction to Applied Biology 5 BIOL 109 in an environmental perspective: Introduction to Electronic Media 3 RTVF 100 BIOL 101 Issues in Environmental Science & 3 DMPR 151 Introduction to Multimedia Sustainability 4 Game Design 3 DMPR 154 3 Introduction to Sustainability SUST 101 DMPR 157 Advanced Multimedia Production 3 Environmental Sustainability, Justice PEAC 201 3 and Ethics Recommended electives for students interested 3 Earth Science GEOL 104 in a business perspective: BUSE 100 Introduction to Business 3 Recommended electives for students interested 3 BUSE 158C enactus – Community Projects in a political perspective: Principles of Macroeconomics 3 ECON 120 POLI 101 3 Introduction to Political Science 3 Principles of Marketing MARK 100 The American Political System POLI 102 3 3 POLI 140 Contemporary International Politics Recommended electives for students interested Introduction to Black Politics 3 BLAS 135 in visual arts: 3 ARTF 151 Three-Dimensional Design Recommended electives for students interested Basic Graphic Design 3 ARTG 100 in peace studies: ARTG 120 Illustration 3 Introduction to Peace Studies 3 PEAC 101 Digital Media ARTG 125 3 Nonviolence and Conflict Resolution PEAC 102 3 ARTG 144 Web Page Graphic Design 2 PEAC 201 Environmental Sustainability, Justice PHOT 180 Photo Editing: Lightroom 3 3 and Ethics POLI 140 Contemporary International Politics 3 Recommended electives for students interested in performing arts: Recommended electives for students interested DRAM 103 Acting for Non-majors 3 in a gender perspective: DRAM 108 3 Playwriting Introduction to Gender Studies 3 GEND 101 DRAM 109 3 Theatre and Social Issues Black Women in Literature, Film and the BLAS 150 Introduction to Music 3 MUSI 100 3 Media 3 La Chicana CHIC 170 Women in Literature 3 ENGL 237 ollege S an 234 D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

235 catalog. IGETC is accepted by all CSU campuses and General Education most UC campuses and majors. It is also accepted by some private / independent or out of state Award Type Units universities. Total Units = 37–40 Certificate of Performance: 17 Honors Global Competencies Certificate Honors Global Competencies Certificate of Achievement: Certificate General Education CSU Transfer Pattern 39–40 General Education Intersegmental General Description Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) 37–40 The Honors Global Competencies Certificate General Education provides an interdisciplinary and systemic approach The Certificate of Achievement in CSU General in order to prepare students for the highly diverse, Education - Breadth and the Certificate of technologically-rich, and multilingual global society Achievement in Intersegmental General Education in which we live. The Certificate offers students Transfer (IGETC) are designed for students who the opportunity to gain a global perspective intend to complete university general education through completion of coursework in intercultural requirements prior to transfer to a California State competencies, communication skills, technology University (CSU) or University of California (UC) skills, and coping skills. This certificate helps campus. students to transfer to four-year institutions in concert with the Honors designation. It prepares General education (GE) is a set of courses from a students for study and work in the world as a whole variety of different subject areas that every student in professional fields such as international studies, must complete in order to earn a degree, regardless intercultural studies, language studies, international of major. The goal is to provide a well-rounded or business, international law, political science, “liberal” education and to develop the knowledge, comparative literature, environmental studies, skills, and attitudes that together help make up history, technology, social sciences, humanities, an educated person. The completion of GE prior teaching, and more. to transfer is not required for admission to most universities. However, it is usually in the students’ Program Emphasis best interest to complete an appropriate transfer GE The Honors Global Competencies certificate has an pattern at the community college. This is because GE international emphasis. requirements that are not fulfilled prior to transfer Career Options must be completed later at the university, which The Honors Global Competencies certificate might often extends the time and expense of a university lead to careers in the following areas: International education. relations, international business, politics, international law, technology professions, teaching, Certificate of Achievement: translating, travel and tourism, and intercultural CSU General Education – Breadth communications, among others. The student will select courses that fulfill the CSU GE certification pattern detailed on page 126 of this Certificate of Performance: catalog. CSU GE is accepted by all CSU campuses Honors Global Competencies and some private / independent or out of state Certificate* universities. CSU GE is not accepted by the UC system. The Honors Global Competencies Certificate offers Total Units = 39–40 you the opportunity to gain a global perspective through completion of coursework in intercultural competencies, communication skills, technology Certificate of Achievement: skills, and coping skills. Intersegmental General Education Transfer (IGETC) Courses: Units ENGL 205 Critical Thinking and Intermediate The student will select courses that fulfill the IGETC Composition 3 certification pattern detailed on page 118 of this D an iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 235 S C

236 discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Select 5 units from the following introductory or Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate higher level foreign languages: major preparation courses for their specific transfer 5 First Course in Arabic ARAB 101 Geography FREN 101 First Course in French 5 institution and major. Transfer students may also earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts GERM 101 First Course in German 5 ITAL 101 First Course in Italian 5 and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may RUSS 101 5 be individually tailored to each student’s specific First Course in Russian First Course in Spanish 5 transfer requirements in order to provide the most SPAN 101 efficient path to transfer. More information on Select 6 units from the following: transfer programs and procedures is available in the Introduction to Physical Anthropology ANTH 102 3 Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 ANTH 103 ARTF 110 Art History: Prehistoric to Gothic 3 Art History: Renaissance to Modern ARTF 111 3 Geography 3 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON 120 Reading and Composition ENGL 101 3 Units Award Type ENGL 105 Composition and Literature 3 Masterpieces of World Literature I: ENGL 220 Associate of Science Degree: 1500 BCE – 1600 CE 3 Geography 21* ENGL 221 Masterpieces of World Literature II: * and courses to meet graduation requirements, 1600 – Present 3 general education and electives as needed to meet Introduction to the Humanities I 3 HUMA 101 the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. 3 HUMA 102 Introduction to the Humanities II 3 World History I HIST 100 Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: 3 World History II HIST 101 19–23 Geography MUSI 109 3 World Music 3 Intercultural Communication COMS 180 Description 3 Asian Philosophy PHIL 106 Earth and physical sciences, including astronomy, Philosophy of Women 3 PHIL 125 chemistry, geography, geographic information Introduction to Political Science 3 POLI 101 systems, geology, and physics are disciplines 3 Comparative Politics POLI 103 classified as natural sciences. They generally 3 POLI 140 Contemporary International Politics involve nonliving materials and the principles of Select 3 units from the following: fundamental relationships and laws in the universe. Human Growth and Development 3 CHIL 101 3 Cultural Geography GEOG 102 Program Emphasis 3 HEAL 101 Health and Life-Style These programs are designed to prepare students 3 PSYC 101 General Psychology with basic concepts in astronomy, chemistry, Total Units = 17 geography, geology and physics which provide the foundation for upper division study in a This certificate will be offered through the Honors baccalaureate institution and also satisfy general Programs at City, Mesa, and Miramar Colleges. All education requirements. coursework except for foreign language must be done as an honors class or as an honors contract. Office Telephone Faculty *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental S-211K 619-388-4421 Lisa Chaddock award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the Career Options San Diego Community College District. Most careers in earth and physical sciences fields Note: This program is not eligible for federal require education beyond the associate degree financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. and many require a graduate degree. A brief list Course Requirements for Transfer Students of career options in the physical sciences includes: Students who plan to transfer to a four year college astronomer, biophysicist, biochemist, chemist, earth or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this scientist, environmentalist, geographer, geologist, S an D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 236

237 geophysicist, meteorologist, oceanographer, Associate of Science Degree: paleontologist, physicist and physical science Physical and Earth Sciences instructor. Geography Program Learning Outcomes Courses Required for the Major: Units Upon successful completion students will be able to: GEOG 101 Physical Geography 3 • Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation Physical Geography Laboratory 1 GEOG 101L Geography of the scientific method. GEOG 102 Cultural Geography 3 3 ECON 120 Principles of Macroeconomics Communicate an understanding of the • ECON 121 Principles of Microeconomics 3 connections between science and other human activities. Select 8 units from: BIOL 107 General Biology – Lecture and Examine the universe in a variety of courses. • Laboratory 4 • Utilize critical thinking skills in a variety of 3 CHEM 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry scientific applications. CHEM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry Laboratory 1 Academic Programs General Chemistry I – Lecture CHEM 200 3 General Chemistry I – Laboratory 2 CHEM 200L The associate degrees in Physical and Earth Sciences, Introduction to Scientific MATH 107 Astronomy, Chemistry, Geography, Geology and Programming 3 Physics, require completion of the courses listed MATH 107L Introduction to Scientific for each degree. Additional general education and 1 Programming Lab graduation requirements for the associate degree MATH 119 Elementary Statistics 3 The associate degree are listed in the catalog. MATH 121 Basic Techniques of Applied requires a minimum of 60 units. Calculus I 3 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I MATH 150 5 Transfer Information POLI 102 The American Political System 3 Common university majors related to the field of 3 PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics Astronomy, Physical and Earth Sciences include: Total Units = 21 Biochemistry, Chemical Engineering, Chemical Recommended electives: Geography 290, 296; Physics, Chemistry, Earth Studies and Sciences, Physical Science 100, 101. Environmental Chemistry, Geographic Information Systems, Geography, Geology, Hydrologic Science, Meteorology and Oceanography, Physical Sciences, Associate in Arts in Geography for Physics. Transfer Degree: Course Requirements for Transfer Students Program Description: Students who plan to transfer to a four year college The Associate in Arts in Geography for Transfer or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this Degree is intended for students who plan to discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the complete a bachelor’s degree in Geography or Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate a related major in the California State University major preparation courses for their specific transfer (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all institution and major. Transfer students may also CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may required to complete no more than 60 units after be individually tailored to each student’s specific transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be transfer requirements in order to provide the most appropriate preparation for students transferring efficient path to transfer. More information on to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. transfer programs and procedures is available in the Students who plan to complete this degree should Transfer Programs section of the catalog. consult a counselor for additional information about participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. an 237 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D S

238 CHEM 200L General Chemistry I – Laboratory 2 Award Notes: CHEM 201 General Chemistry II – Lecture 3 The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: and Geology Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester • 2 General Chemistry II – Laboratory CHEM 201L units. No more than 60 units are required. Physical Geology GEOL 100 3 Physical Geology Laboratory 1 Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least • GEOL 101 Elementary Statistics 3 MATH 119 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some PHYS 125 General Physics 5 General Physics II CSU campuses and majors may require a higher 5 PHYS 126 GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. Total Units = 19–23 • Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list above). All Geology courses in the major must be completed with a grade of “C” or better. Award Type Units Certified completion of the California State • Associate of Science Degree: University General Education-Breadth pattern 33–38* Geology for more information); OR (CSU GE; see page 126 the Intersegmental General Education Transfer * and courses to meet graduation requirements, for more Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 general education and electives as needed to meet information). the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Career Options: Associate in Science for Transfer Degree: Careers related to this field typically require Geology 27 education beyond the associate degree level and some may require a graduate degree. Description Courses Required for the Major: Units Earth and physical sciences, including astronomy, 3 GEOG 101 Physical Geography chemistry, geography, geographic information and systems, geology, and physics are disciplines Physical Geography Laboratory GEOG 101L 1 classified as natural sciences. They generally 3 Cultural Geography GEOG 102 involve nonliving materials and the principles of fundamental relationships and laws in the universe. Select two courses (6 semester units): It is recommended that students select courses that ( Program Emphasis meet lower division major preparation requirements for These programs are designed to prepare students their transfer university). with basic concepts in astronomy, chemistry, GEOG 104 World Regional Geography 3 geography, geology and physics which provide Introduction to Mapping and GISG 110 the foundation for upper division study in a Geographic Information Systems or baccalaureate institution and also satisfy general Geographic Information Science and GISG 104 education requirements. Spatial Reasoning 3 Career Options Select two of the following courses if not selected above (minimum 6 semester units): Most careers in earth and physical sciences fields (It is recommended that students select courses that require education beyond the associate degree meet lower division major preparation requirements for and many require a graduate degree. A brief list their transfer university). of career options in the physical sciences includes: astronomer, biophysicist, biochemist, chemist, earth 3 ANTH 102 Introduction to Physical Anthropology scientist, environmentalist, geographer, geologist, 3 ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology geophysicist, meteorologist, oceanographer, General Biology – Lecture and BIOL 107 paleontologist, physicist and physical science Laboratory 4 instructor. General Chemistry I – Lecture CHEM 200 3 and ity C iego D an S C ollege 238 • 2018–2019

239 Program Learning Outcomes Associate of Science Degree: Physical and Earth Sciences Upon successful completion students will be able to: Geology Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation • of the scientific method. Units Courses Required for the Major: Communicate an understanding of the • Physical Geology GEOL 100 3 Geology connections between science and other human 1 GEOL 101 Physical Geology Laboratory activities. General Biology – Lecture and BIOL 107 Laboratory 4 Examine the universe in a variety of courses. • CHEM 200 General Chemistry I – Lecture 3 Utilize critical thinking skills in a variety of • General Chemistry I – Laboratory 2 CHEM 200L scientific applications. CHEM 201 General Chemistry II – Lecture 3 General Chemistry II – Laboratory CHEM 201L 2 Academic Programs 5 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I MATH 150 4 General Physics I PHYS 180A The associate degrees in Physical and Earth Sciences, and Astronomy, Chemistry, Geography, Geology and General Physics Lab I PHYS 181A 1 Physics, require completion of the courses listed and for each degree. Additional general education and 4 PHYS 180B General Physics II graduation requirements for the associate degree and The associate degree are listed in the catalog. 1 PHYS 181B General Physics Lab II requires a minimum of 60 units. or 5 Mechanics PHYS 195 Transfer Information and Common university majors related to the field of 5 PHYS 196 Electricity and Magnetism Physical and Earth Sciences include: Astronomy, and Biochemistry, Chemical Engineering, Chemical PHYS 197 Waves, Optics and Modern Physics 5 Physics, Chemistry, Earth Studies and Sciences, Total Units = 33–38 Environmental Chemistry, Geographic Information Systems, Geography, Geology, Hydrologic Science, Geology 290; Recommended electives: Meteorology and Oceanography, Physical Sciences, Mathematics 107, 107L, 151, 252; a foreign language; Physics. and a course in mechanical drawing. Course Requirements for Transfer Students Associate in Science in Geology for Students who plan to transfer to a four year college Transfer Degree: or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the The Associate in Science in Geology for Transfer Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Degree is intended for students who plan to major preparation courses for their specific transfer complete a bachelor’s degree in Geology or a institution and major. Transfer students may also related major in the California State University earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree be individually tailored to each student’s specific and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be transfer requirements in order to provide the most required to complete no more than 60 units after efficient path to transfer. More information on transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be transfer programs and procedures is available in the appropriate preparation for students transferring Transfer Programs section of the catalog. to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should consult a counselor for additional information about participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. 239 D an • 2018–2019 S ollege C ity C iego

240 and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be Students intending to transfer into this major NOTE: required to complete no more than 60 units after at a CSU should consult with a counselor and visit transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate transfer Global Development Studies coursework. appropriate preparation for students transferring to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Award Notes: Students who plan to complete this degree should General Education: In addition to the courses listed consult a counselor for additional information about above, students must complete one of the following participating CSU campuses as well as university general education options: admission, degree and transfer requirements. The IGETC pattern (page 118 ) is accepted by • Career Options: all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and Careers related to this field typically require majors. It is also accepted by some private/ education beyond the associate degree level and independent or out of state universities. some may require a graduate degree. • The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all Courses Required for the Major: Units CSU campuses and some private/independent or GEOL 100 Physical Geology 3 out of state universities. It is not accepted by the Physical Geology Laboratory GEOL 101 1 UC system. 4 GEOL 111 The Earth Through Time It is strongly recommended that students consult General Chemistry I – Lecture CHEM 200 3 with a counselor to determine which general 2 CHEM 200L General Chemistry I – Laboratory education option is most appropriate for their General Chemistry II – Lecture CHEM 201 3 individual educational goals. 2 CHEM 201L General Chemistry II – Laboratory Calculus with Analytic Geometry I MATH 150 5 Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 CSU- 4 MATH 151 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II transferable units required for the degree. Total Units = 27 The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. Global Development No more than 60 units are required. Studies Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum Award Type Units of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses Certificate of Performance: and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a Global Development Studies 15 counselor for more information. Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an Description “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in This interdisciplinary program provides an overview the major must be completed with a grade of C or of the field of global development studies and bet ter. includes a historical analysis of the making of the Certified completion of the California State inequalities at the national and international levels. University General Education–Breadth pattern Students are introduced to various theoretical for more information); OR (CSU GE; see page 126 ideas and intellectual traditions, current issues the Intersegmental General Education Transfer and empirical studies in the field of development Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more studies from throughout the world. The global information). development studies program draws upon various disciplines, including, but not limited to, political Program Goals: science, anthropology, sociology, economics, history The purpose of the Associate in Science in Geology and philosophy in an effort to offer students a more for Transfer degree is to offer an organized course holistic perspective of the various theories, issues, of study that will prepare students intending to and actors related to the field. major in Geology at the California State University (CSU). It is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree • 2018–2019 ollege C 240 C iego D an S ity

241 Program Emphasis: German A focus is placed upon the interdisciplinary nature of the application of global development studies. Award Type Units Students are encouraged to think critically about the Associate of Arts Degree: issues related to global development studies. German 21* German Career Options: * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet This degree prepares students to enter into the minimum of 60 units required for the degree.. academic and professional fields related to global development. Development professionals generally Description work in the areas of social development (e.g., human rights, education), man made or natural The study of languages provides communication disaster relief and recovery, economics, micro- skills, provides exposure to the richness of cultural enterprise, public health, urban planning, health, variety, increases transfer options to universities environment, urban development, and private with language requirements, opens new career sector development, among others. Available career opportunities, enriches global travel, and provides tracks include working as a Development Specialist, personal enrichment. The program is designed to Planner in Management Development, Educator, prepare students for transfer to a baccalaureate Researcher, Research Assistant, Program Officer, institution and for proficiency in a language in a Field worker, Aid worker, Community Engagement variety of settings. Coordinator, Microloans program officer, Community Health Worker, and others. Some of Program Emphasis the aforementioned positions may require degrees The Language program provides transfer level beyond the AA. courses in Arabic, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Russian. Students develop skills of Program Learning Outcomes: understanding, speaking, reading and writing, Students who complete the program will be able to: culture and increase familiarity with basic features of the English language. They also have opportunities • Apply an interdisciplinary approach to to become acquainted with the literature, culture, understanding development history and current events of other countries • Critically assess theories on development. through films, videotapes, field trips and campus and community international events. Certificate of Performance: Office Telephone Faculty Global Development Studies Rosalinda Sandoval AH-518B 619-388-3295 Units Courses Required for the Major: Introduction to Global Development GDEV 101 Career Options 3 Studies ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 Knowledge of another language is required or highly 3 SOCO 223 Globalization and Social Change desirable for consular and junior foreign service, ECON 120 Principles of Macroeconomics or import, export, and international business and travel, 3 ECON 121 Principles of Microeconomics health and missionary fields, overseas teaching, Contemporary International Politics 3 POLI 140 translating and interpreting, and travel and tourism industries. Learning another language is an asset in Total Units = 15 broadening communication skills and in the travel *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental and tourism industry. award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the Program Learning Outcomes San Diego Community College District. Students who complete the program will be able to: This program is not eligible for federal Note: • Demonstrate preparedness for successful financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. transition to the language program of four year institutions. an D iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 241 S C

242 Demonstrate accurate foreign language grammar • History including writing, speaking, and listening in the target language. History Units Award Type • Discuss the social and cultural life of Foreign Associate of Arts Degree: Language speakers in the target language. History 18* • Read and analyze writings in Foreign Language * and courses to meet graduation requirements, target areas. general education and electives as needed to meet Accept and value other peoples. • the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Academic Programs Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: History 18–20 The associate degree in French, German, Italian, or Spanish requires completion of the courses listed Description below. Additional general education and graduation requirements for the associate degree are listed History is the study of human experience from in the catalog. The associate degree requires a the dawn of time to the present. It examines minimum of 60 units. people, institutions, ideas and events of the past and the present. The primary objectives of the Associate of Arts Degree: History program are: to meet general education requirements for American Institutions, Humanities Languages and Social Sciences; completion of the Associate German of Arts degree; and preparation for transfer to a four-year institution and completion of general Courses Required for the Major: Units education requirements for the student enrolled in a First Course in German GERM 101 5 four-year institution. Second Course in German 5 GERM 102 GERM 201 Third Course in German 5 Program Emphasis The Grammar of Spoken German I GERM 210 3 The study of history develops cultural literacy, 3 The Grammar of Spoken German II GERM 211 critical thinking, and other useful skills. San Diego Total Units = 21 City College offers the two-semester World History survey sequence along with the two-semester Transfer Information American History survey sequence. Completion Common university majors related to the field of these two sequences provides the student with German, Language Studies, of German include: the necessary lower division preparation for a Literature, Modern Languages, Translation and baccalaureate degree in History at San Diego State Interpretation. University. Course Requirements for Transfer Students Telephone Office Faculty Students who plan to transfer to a four year college MS-440F 619-388-3095 Peter Haro or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Susan MS-440H 619-388-3370 Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Hasegawa major preparation courses for their specific transfer Sofia Laurein 619-388-3092 MS-437 institution and major. Transfer students may also earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts Career Options and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may be individually tailored to each student’s specific Most careers in history require education beyond transfer requirements in order to provide the most the associate degree and some require a graduate efficient path to transfer. More information on degree. This is not a comprehensive list but some transfer programs and procedures is available in the of the most common career options with history Transfer Programs section of the catalog. preparation include: archivist, business person, diplomatic corps, historian, journalist, lawyer, S an D C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 242 iego

243 HIST 109 3 History of the United States I librarian, museum curator, park historian, professor, and teacher and writer. HIST 123 U.S. History from the Asian Pacific Program Learning Outcomes 3 American Perspective Total Units = 18 Students who complete the program will be able to: History History 290, 296. Recommended electives: • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources in college-level essays, written assignments, and research papers. Associate in Arts in History for Transfer Degree: Identify and describe historic periods, • movements, trends, people, and events Program Description: important in the study of World, U.S., Asian and The Associate in Arts in History for Transfer Degree Latin American history, and Western Civilization. is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in History or a related major Academic Programs in the California State University (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. The associate degree in History requires completion Students who complete this degree and transfer of three of the four course sequences in History to a participating CSU campus will be required to listed for the degree. Additional general education complete no more than 60 units after transfer to and graduation requirements for the associate earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree preparation for students transferring to a CSU requires a minimum of 60 units. campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should consult Associate of Arts Degree: a counselor for additional information about History participating CSU campuses as well as university Courses Required for the Major: Units admission, degree and transfer requirements. Select three of the 6-unit course sequences or 18 It is strongly recommended that students consult units with a counselor to determine which general 3 HIST 100 World History I education option is most appropriate for their and individual educational goals. HIST 101 World History II 3 It is recommended that students intending to Note: or transfer to San Diego State University (SDSU) in the HIST 105 Introduction to Western History major should complete the courses marked Civilization I 3 with a “#”. Students intending to transfer into this and major at other CSUs should consult a counselor and HIST 106 Introduction to Western for guidance on appropriate visit www.assist.org 3 Civilization II coursework. or HIST 109 3 History of the United States I *Course also fulfills general education requirements and for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. 3 HIST 110 History of the United States II # This course fulfills SDSU’s lower division or preparation for the major in History under the TMC. 3 History of the Americas I HIST 115A and ## It is recommended that students intending to History of the Americas II 3 HIST 115B transfer to SDSU should complete the third level of or a foreign language as part of their AA-T in History HIST 120 3 Introduction to Asian Civilization degree. and In addition to the courses listed General Education: 3 HIST 121 Asian Civilization in Modern Times above, students must complete one of the following or general education options: iego D an C ity C ollege 243 S • 2018–2019

244 The IGETC pattern (page 118 ITAL 101 5 ) is accepted by First Course in Italian * • 5 Second Course in Italian * ITAL 102 all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and majors. It is also accepted by some private/ ITAL 201 Third Course in Italian *## 5 History independent or out of state universities. 3 Comparative Politics * POLI 103 3 Contemporary International Politics * POLI 140 The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all • SPAN 101 First Course in Spanish * 5 CSU campuses and some private/independent or 5 SPAN 102 Second Course in Spanish * out of state universities. It is not accepted by the SPAN 201 Third Course in Spanish *## 5 UC system. 5 Fourth Course in Spanish *## SPAN 202 Electives as needed to meet maximum of 60 SPAN 215 5 Spanish for Spanish Speakers I * Spanish for Spanish Speakers II * SPAN 216 CSU-transferable units required for the degree. 5 Select one of the following courses if not Career Options: selected above: (It is recommended that students Careers related to this field typically require select courses that meet lower division major education beyond the associate degree level and preparation requirements for their transfer some may require a graduate degree. university.) Units Courses Required for the Major: World History I * HIST 100 3 3 History of the United States I #* HIST 109 HIST 101 World History II * 3 HIST 110 History of the United States II #* 3 HIST 105 Introduction to Western 3 Civilization I *# Select two of the following courses: (It is HIST 106 Introduction to Western recommended that students select courses Civilization II *# 3 that meet lower division major preparation History of the Americas I * 3 HIST 115A requirements for their transfer university.) 3 History of the Americas II * HIST 115B HIST 100 or World History I #* 3 HIST 120 Introduction to Asian Civilizations * HIST 105 Introduction to Western Civilization I * 3 3 HIST 121 Asian Civilizations in Modern Times * World History II #* or HIST 101 U.S. History from the Asian Pacific HIST 123 HIST 106 Introduction to Western Civilization II * 3 American Perspective * 3 Select one of the following courses if not 3 ECON 120 Principles of Macroeconomics * selected above: (It is recommended that students Principles of Microeconomics * ECON 121 3 select courses that meet lower division major GEOG 102 3 Cultural Geography * preparation requirements for their transfer POLI 102 The American Political System * 3 university.) 3 POLI 103 Comparative Politics * World History I * HIST 100 3 Contemporary International Politics * 3 POLI 140 HIST 101 World History II * 3 Total Units = 18–20 3 History of the Americas I * HIST 115A 3 History of the Americas II * HIST 115B Transfer Information HIST 120 Introduction to Asian Civilizations * 3 Common university majors related to the field of 3 HIST 121 Asian Civilizations in Modern Times * History include: Art History, History, International AMSL 115 American Sign Language Level I * 4 Studies, Liberal Studies, Social and Behavioral AMSL 116 American Sign Language Level II * 4 Studies, World Cultures and History. AMSL 215 American Sign Language Level III * 4 AMSL 216 American Sign Language Level IV *## 4 Course Requirements for Transfer Students 3 Introduction to African History * BLAS 145A Students who plan to transfer to a four year college Introduction to African History * 3 BLAS 145B or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this First Course in French * 5 FREN 101 discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the 5 FREN 102 Second Course in French * Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate 5 FREN 201 Third Course In French *## major preparation courses for their specific transfer 5 Fourth Course in French *## FREN 202 institution and major. Transfer students may also 3 Cultural Geography * GEOG 102 earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts First Course in German * 5 GERM 101 and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may 5 Second Course in German * GERM 102 be individually tailored to each student’s specific 5 GERM 201 Third Course in German *## transfer requirements in order to provide the most ollege ity C iego D an S • 2018–2019 244 C

245 process, etc.) affecting optimal aging and older efficient path to transfer. More information on adulthood functioning. transfer programs and procedures is available in the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Identify and compare the various public benefits • available through local, state, federal, public assistance programs. Human Services • Identify and make referral to appropriate services. Units Award Type • Recognize and identify risk of caregiver stress, particularly in caring for indiduals suffering from Certificate of Performance: Human Services Alzheimer’s and other dementia. Community Health Work 9 Youth Development Work 15 • Make a report of an incident or suspected incident of an abuse/neglect of dependent adults Community Health Work and elders. Description Certificate of Performance: The Certificate of Performance in Community Health Work is designed to introduce current and Behavioral Sciences* potential Community Health Workers (CHWs) to Community Health Work core concepts in the field of community health. This program prepares students to work in a variety The Community Health Work Certificate Program of health settings that utilize entry level front line provides students who work in, or plan to work health workers. These settings may include public in, the field of Community Health Work with a and private health and human service institutions, fundamental academic and practical base for success especially those that address undeserved in the field. communities. Courses: Units Program Emphasis HUMS 103 Introduction to Community Program emphasis is placed on providing students Health Work 3 with both vocational and academic aspects of Introduction to Chronic Disease HUMS 111 3 Community Health Work through a combination of HUMS 112 Community Service Practicum 3 coursework and practical experience. Total Units = 9 Faculty Telephone Office *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Kirin Macapugay MS-535 619-388-3562 transcript. All courses must be completed within the 619-388-3238 Veronica Ortega MS-540H San Diego Community College District. Career Options This program is not eligible for federal Note: Career options for students completing the financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Certificate of Performance in Community Health Work include Health Educator, Information Resource Transfer Information personnel for health facilities and the community, Common university majors related to the field Organizer, Interpreter, and Health Advocate. In of Human Services include: Human Development, addition, this program includes core academic Child Development, Gerontology, Social Work. courses that provide a basis for continued formal academic pursuits in the field of Health, Human Youth Development Work Services, or Behavioral Sciences. Description Program Learning Outcomes The Youth Development Work Certificate of Students who complete the program will be able to: Completion is designed to offer certification to current and potential front-line community youth Recognize, Identify, assess, and address key • development workers working in a variety of concepts in aging (e.g., physical and mental settings, including public and private after school health, exercise, nutrition, the normal aging programs, service related agencies, recreational programs and job development centers. This C ity ollege iego D an • 2018–2019 245 S C

246 program is both vocational and academic, offering Italian courses in theoretical and practical topics related to youth development. Italian Award Type Units Program Emphasis Associate of Arts Degree: Emphasis is placed on providing students with Italian 21* a balance of vocational training and academic instruction in the area of Youth Development. * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet Career Options the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Career options include employment in public and private after school programs, service Description related agencies, recreational programs and job development centers. In addition, the coursework The study of languages provides communication provides the foundation for pursuing more skills, provides exposure to the richness of cultural advanced work in behavioral science, human service, variety, increases transfer options to universities social work or public health. with language requirements, opens new career opportunities, enriches global travel, and provides Certificate of Performance: personal enrichment. The program is designed to prepare students for transfer to a baccalaureate Behavioral Sciences* institution and for proficiency in a language in a Youth Development Work variety of settings. Units Courses Required Program Emphasis Introduction to Youth Development HUMS 106 The Language program provides transfer level Work 3 courses in Arabic, French, German, Italian, HUMS 112 3 Community Service Practicum Spanish and Russian. Students develop skills of HUMS 114 Introduction to Restorative Justice: understanding, speaking, reading and writing, 3 Concepts, Theory and Philosophy culture and increase familiarity with basic features of HUMS 118 Diversity and Cultural Competency 3 the English language. They also have opportunities 3 PSYC 123 Adolescent Psychology to become acquainted with the literature, culture, Total Units = 15 history and current events of other countries *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental through films, videotapes, field trips and campus award that does not appear on the student’s and community international events. transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. Office Faculty Telephone Rosalinda AH-518B 619-388-3295 This program is not eligible for federal Note: Sandoval financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Course Requirements for Transfer Students Career Options Students who plan to transfer to a four year college or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this Knowledge of another language is required or highly discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the desirable for consular and junior foreign service, Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate import, export, and international business and travel, major preparation courses for their specific transfer health and missionary fields, overseas teaching, institution and major. Transfer students may also translating and interpreting, and travel and tourism earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts industries. Learning another language is an asset in and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may broadening communication skills and in the travel be individually tailored to each student’s specific and tourism industry. transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on transfer programs and procedures is available in the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. an S D iego C ity ollege • 2018–2019 246 C

247 transfer requirements in order to provide the most Program Learning Outcomes efficient path to transfer. More information on Students who complete the program will be able to: transfer programs and procedures is available in the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. • Demonstrate preparedness for successful transition to the language program of four year Journalism institutions. See “Digital Journalism” on page 211 • Demonstrate accurate foreign language grammar including writing, speaking, and listening in the Labor Studies target language. Labor Studies • Discuss the social and cultural life of Foreign Language speakers in the target language. Units Award Type Certificate of Performance: Read and analyze writings in Foreign Language • 6 History and Politics of American Labor target areas. Certificate of Achievement: Accept and value other peoples. • Labor Studies 18 Academic Programs Associate of Science Degree: The associate degree in French, German, Italian, or Labor Studies 24* Spanish requires completion of the courses listed * and courses to meet graduation requirements, below. Additional general education and graduation general education and electives as needed to meet requirements for the associate degree are listed the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Description The Labor Studies program provides students a Associate of Arts Degree: sound foundation in the law, history, culture, politics, Languages institutions, and contemporary issues of American Italian work life. Students will gain a comprehensive introduction to the role and contributions of Units Courses Required for the Major: organized labor to American society, a thorough ITAL 101 First Course in Italian 5 grounding in the rights of employees on the job, and Second Course in Italian ITAL 102 5 specialized training in the skills necessary to be an ITAL 201 Third Course in Italian 5 effective leader in labor unions or in other contexts ITAL 210 The Grammar of Spoken Italian I 3 for labor-management relations. ITAL 211 3 The Grammar of Spoken Italian II Total Units = 21 Program Emphasis The Labor Studies program offers a Certificate of Transfer Information Achievement in Labor Studies which provides shop Common university majors related to the field of stewards as well as union organizers and officers Italian, Language Studies, Literature, Italian include: the skills needed to qualify for and to be effective Modern Languages, Translation and Interpretation. in their positions. Students can also pursue the Associate of Science degree in Labor Studies. Course Requirements for Transfer Students Students who plan to transfer to a four year college Office Telephone Faculty or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this Kelly Mayhew 619-388-3136 AH-517D discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Jim Miller 619-388-3554 AH-517G major preparation courses for their specific transfer Career Options institution and major. Transfer students may also earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts The program is designed to train union and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may representatives, members of unions, labor leaders, be individually tailored to each student’s specific an D C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 247 S iego

248 LABR 122A 1 Shop Steward, Level I industry coordinators and others interested in Shop Steward, Level II pursuing a career in labor relations. LABR 122B 1 Occupational Safety and Health 1.5 LABR 123A Labor Studies 1 California Labor Law LABR 124 Certificate of Performance: 1 Labor Law for the Public Sector LABR 127 History and Politics of American Total Units = 24 Labor* Additional general education and graduation Courses: Units requirements for the associate degree are listed in American Labor Movement LABR 100 3 the Academic Requirements section of the catalog. LABR 108 3 Labor and Politics The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 Total Units = 6 units. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Transfer Information award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the Common university majors related to the field of San Diego Community College District. Labor Studies include: Labor Studies. Note: This program is not eligible for federal Course Requirements for Transfer Students financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Students who plan to transfer to a four year college or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this Certificate of Achievement: discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Labor Studies major preparation courses for their specific transfer Courses Required for the Major: Units institution and major. Transfer students may also American Labor Movement LABR 100 3 earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts LABR 102 Labor Law 3 and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Collective Bargaining 3 LABR 104 be individually tailored to each student’s specific LABR 106A 3 Grievance Handling transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on Select 6 units from: transfer programs and procedures is available in the Arbitration Procedure LABR 106B 3 Transfer Programs section of the catalog. LABR 108 3 Labor and Politics LABR 110 Administrative Practices 3 California Workers Compensation 3 LABR 112 LABR 122A 1 Shop Steward, Level I LABR 122B Shop Steward, Level II 1 LABR 123A Occupational Safety and Health 1.5 LABR 124 California Labor Law 1 LABR 127 1 Labor Law for the Public Sector Total Units = 18 Associate of Science Degree: Labor Studies Courses Required for the Major: Units LABR 100 American Labor Movement 3 LABR 102 Labor Law 3 3 LABR 104 Collective Bargaining Grievance Handling LABR 106A 3 Labor and Politics LABR 108 3 LABR 110 3 Administrative Practices Select 6 units from: 3 LABR 106B Arbitration Procedure California Workers Compensation LABR 112 3 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an S 248

249 San Diego Community College District • Liberal Arts and General Education and additional courses needed to meet all lower division general Sciences education requirements of an accredited U.S. postsecondary institution which awards the Units Award Type baccalaureate degree, as detailed in an inter- Associate of Arts Degree: institutional articulation or transfer agreement Biological Science Specialization 18* and certified by a City counselor. (See City Elementary Multiple Subject Teaching College Catalog page 99.) Preparation 33* A minimum of 18 units in an Area of Emphasis or 2. Language Arts and Humanities 18* Specialization. These include: 18* Mathematics and Pre-Engineering Specialization 18* Physical and Earth Sciences Specialization • Visual and Performing Arts 18* Social and Behavioral Sciences • Language Arts and Humanities Liberal Arts and Sciences Visual and Performing Arts 18* • Scientific Studies: * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet Biological Science Specialization • the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Mathematics and Pre-Engineering • Specialization Description • Physical and Earth Sciences Specialization The Liberal Arts and Sciences Degree is designed to enable students to complete the requirements for an • Elementary Multiple Subject Teaching Associate of Arts Degree with a minimum of 18 units Preparation in an area of emphasis and transfer to a University • Social and Behavioral Sciences of California, a California State University or an independent/private college and university. 3. A minimum of 60 transferable units to a University of California, a California State To meet the Liberal Arts and Sciences Degree University or an independent/private college requirements a student must complete the and university. following: This degree is designed to accommodate the 1. One of the following four general education differing requirements of a wide variety of options transfer institutions and major options. Because • San Diego Community College District admission and major preparation requirements General Education and District Requirements. vary at each transfer institution, courses used This GE pattern may fulfill all lower division to complete this degree should be selected general education requirements at an with the assistance of a City College counselor. independent/private college or university. Completion of the Liberal Arts and Sciences (See City College catalog page 94.) Degree does not guarantee acceptance into a four year institution nor into a major. CSU General Education - Breadth (CSU • GE Pattern). This GE pattern will fulfill Visual and Performing Arts: all lower division general education requirements at all CSU campuses. (See City These courses emphasize the study of artistic College catalog page 126.) activities and artistic expression of human beings. Students evaluate and interpret the ways in which • Intersegmental General Education Transfer people through the ages in different cultures have Curriculum (IGETC) pattern. This GE pattern responded to themselves and the world around will fulfill all lower-division general education them in artistic and cultural creation. Students requirements at all CSU campuses, most UC also learn to value aesthetic understanding and campuses/majors and some independent/ incorporate these concepts when constructing value private colleges and universities. (See City judgments. College catalog page 117.) C C iego D an ollege • 2018–2019 249 S ity

250 DANC 111 2 Ethnic Dance Forms Common university majors in this emphasis DANC 127 Movement for Wellness 2 include: Applied Design, Art, Art History, Arts and 1 Crafts, Dance, Drama, Graphic Communications, Dance Repertoire DANC 130A Liberal Arts and Sciences DANC 179 Graphic Design, Industrial Arts, Painting and 1 Advanced Classical Dance DANC 181 3 Printmaking, Photography, Sculpture, Studio Arts, History of Dance 2 DANC 183 Music for Dance Theatre Arts, Performing Arts. 2 DANC 253 Choreography This degree is designed to accommodate the Dance Production DANC 271 1–2 differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer DRAM 105 Introduction to Dramatic Arts 3 institutions and major options. Because admission DRAM 108 Playwriting 3 and major preparation requirements vary at each Theatre and Social Issues 3 DRAM 109 transfer institution, courses used to complete this DRAM 122 Makeup for the Stage 2 major should be selected with the assistance of a Beginning Stagecraft DRAM 123 3 San Diego City College counselor. Advanced Stagecraft DRAM 126 3 3 DRAM 132 Beginning Acting Associate of Arts Degree: 3 DRAM 133 Intermediate Acting Liberal Arts and Sciences: Visual DRAM 134 Beginning Voice for Actors 3 History of Canonized Theatre–Ancient DRAM 136 and Performing Arts 3 Greece to the Restoration Students should complete a minimum of 18 units in DRAM 137 History of Canonized Western Visual and Performing Arts courses. Courses can only 3 Theatre–Restoration to the Present be counted once toward the major. 3 DRAM 143 Beginning Costuming DRAM 165 3 Introduction to Stage Movement Courses Required for the Major: 3 MUSI 100 Introduction to Music Students should complete a minimum of 18 units 3 World Music MUSI 109 including in Visual and Performing Arts course. 3 The Business of Music MUSI 108 Courses can only be counted once toward the MUSI 111 Jazz – History and Development 3 major: 1 MUSI 115A Class Piano I ARTF 100 Art Orientation 3 1 Class Piano II MUSI 115B ARTF 109 Modern Art 3 2 MUSI 120 Beginning Voice Class 3 ARTF 110 Art History: Prehistoric to Gothic MUSI 121 2 Intermediate Voice ARTF 111 Art History: Renaissance to Modern 3 MUSI 130A College Chorus I 1.5 ARTF 115 3 African Art College Chorus II MUSI 130B 1.5 3 ARTF 150A Two-Dimensional Design Basic Musicianship 3 MUSI 150A Beginning Graphic Design ARTF 150B 3 The Electronic Music Studio MUSI 190 3 3 Three-Dimensional Design ARTF 151 Recording Arts MUSI 201 3 Freehand Drawing I 3 ARTF 155A MUSI 202 3 Computer Music 3 ARTF 155B Freehand Drawing II Class Piano III 1 MUSI 215A ARTF 165A 3 Composition in Painting I MUSI 215B Class Piano IV 1 3 ARTF 165B Composition in Painting II 1 MUSI 230A Jazz Improvisation Contemporary Crafts I ARTF 170A 3 1 MUSI 230B Jazz Improvisation ARTF 170B 3 Contemporary Crafts II 1 MUSI 230C Jazz Improvisation Sculpture I ARTF 175A 3 PHOT 100 Intro to Black & White Photography 3 ARTF 175B Sculpture II 3 1 PHOT 102 Directed Photo Lab Studies ARTF 195A Ceramics I 3 3 Introduction to Photography PHOT 105 ARTF 195B Ceramics II 3 Intermediate Black & White PHOT 135 ARTF 197A Handbuilding Ceramics I 3 Photography 3 ARTF 197B Handbuilding Ceramics II 3 3 Introduction to Digital Photography PHOT 143 ARTF 210A Life Drawing I 3 History of Photography 3 PHOT 150 3 ARTF 210B Life Drawing II 3 Landscape and Nature Photography PHOT 245 Basic Graphic Design 3 ARTG 100 Musical Theater Repertoire DRAM 240A 4 ARTG 106 Typography 3 DRAM 240B Musical Theatre Repertoire II 4 3 Graphic Design History ARTG 118 DRAM 240C 4 Musical Theatre Repertoire III 3 Digital Media ARTG 125 ollege C C an • 2018–2019 250 D iego S ity

251 4 Musical Theatre Repertoire IV DRAM 240D Language 3 Rehearsal and Performance I DRAM 242A Arts and Humanities: DRAM 242B Rehearsal and Performance II 3 3 DRAM 242C Rehearsal and Performance III These courses emphasize the study of cultural, DRAM 242D Rehearsal and Performance IV 3 literary, and humanistic activities of human beings. DANC 110A 1–1.5 Ballet I Students evaluate and interpret the ways in which 1.5 Ballet II DANC 110B people through the ages in different cultures have DANC 110C Ballet III 1.5 responded to themselves and the world around DANC 110D Ballet IV 1.5 them in cultural creation. Students also learn to DANC 115A Tap I 1–1.5 value aesthetic understanding and incorporate these DANC 115B Tap Dance II 1–1.5 concepts when constructing value judgments. DANC 115C 1–1.5 Tap Dance III Common university majors in this emphasis DANC 115D Tap Dance IV 1–1.5 include: Advertising, American Studies, Broadcast Hip Hop I 1–1.5 DANC 120A Media, Classics, Communication, Comparative Liberal Arts and Sciences DANC 120B Hip Hop II 1.5 Literature, Creative Writing, English, Ethics, Foreign 1.5 DANC 120C Hip Hop III Languages, Humanities, Journalism, Language Hip Hop IV 1.5 DANC 120D Studies, Linguistics, Literature, Media Studies, Mass 1–1.5 Jazz Dance I DANC 135A Communications, Philosophy, Public Relations, DANC 135B Jazz Dance II 1.5 Religious Studies, Speech Communication, Television Jazz Dance III 1.5 DANC 135C and Film, Women’s Studies. 1.5 DANC 135D Jazz Dance IV Modern Dance I 1–1.5 DANC 140A This degree is designed to accommodate the DANC 140B Modern Dance II 1.5 differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer Modern Dance III DANC 140C 1.5 institutions and major options. Because admission DANC 140D 1.5 Modern Dance IV and major preparation requirements vary at each Ballroom Dance I DANC 145A 1–1.5 transfer institution, courses used to complete this Ballroom Dance II 1–1.5 DANC 145B major should be selected with the assistance of a 1 DANC 150A Dance Making: Ballet San Diego City College counselor. Dance Making: Jazz DANC 151A 1 Dance Making: Modern DANC 152A 1 Associate of Arts Degree: Liberal DANC 153A Dance Making: Dance Theatre 1 Arts and Sciences: Language Arts 1–1.5 DANC 177A Dance Improvisation and Humanities 1–1.5 Dance Improvisation II DANC 177B 1.5 DANC 178A Advanced Commercial Dance I Description DANC 178B Advanced Commercial Dance II 1.5 These courses emphasize the study of cultural, DANC 179A Advanced Classical Dance I 1.5 literary, and humanistic activities of human beings. DANC 179B Advanced Classical Dance II 1.5 Students evaluate and interpret the ways in which 1.5 Advanced Contemporary Dance I DANC 180A people through the ages in different cultures have DANC 180B Advanced Contemporary Dance II 1.5 responded to themselves and the world around DANC 261A Dance Performance I 2 them in cultural creation. Students also learn to Dance Performance II 2 DANC 261B value aesthetic understanding and incorporate these DANC 261C Dance Performance III 2 concepts when constructing value judgments. DANC 261D 2 Dance Performance IV Common university majors in this emphasis DANC 271A Stage Costuming for Dance 1–2 include: Advertising, American Studies, Broadcast Makeup for Dance Productions 1–2 DANC 271B Media, Classics, Communication, Comparative Lighting Design for Dance DANC 271C Literature, Creative Writing, English, Ethics, Foreign 1–2 Production Languages, Humanities, Journalism, Language DANC 271D Sound Design for Dance Studies, Linguistics, Literature, Media Studies, Mass 1–2 Production Communications, Philosophy, Public Relations, Total Units = 18 Religious Studies, Speech Communication, Television and Film, Women’s Studies. an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019 251 S ollege

252 3 This degree is designed to accommodate the ENGL 245A Writing Creative Nonfiction Writing Seminar - Poetry ENGL 247A 3 differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer 3 ENGL 249A institutions and major options. Because admission Introduction to Creative Writing I Liberal Arts and Sciences 3 ENGL 252A Fundamentals of Fiction Writing and major preparation requirements vary at each 5 First Course in French transfer institution, courses used to complete this FREN 101 major should be selected with the assistance of a FREN 102 Second Course in French 5 FREN 201 San Diego City College counselor. Third Course In French 5 FREN 202 Fourth Course in French 5 Courses Required for the Major: 5 First Course in German GERM 101 Students should complete a minimum of 18 units 5 GERM 102 Second Course in German in Arts and Humanities courses: GERM 201 Third Course in German 5 AMSL 115 American Sign Language Level I 4 3 World History I HIST 100 American Sign Language Level II AMSL 116 4 HIST 101 World History II 3 AMSL 215 4 American Sign Language Level III Introduction to Western Civilization I HIST 105 3 AMSL 216 4 American Sign Language Level IV HIST 106 Introduction to Western Civilization II 3 3 ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology HIST 120 Introduction to Asian Civilizations 3 ARAB 101 5 First Course in Arabic HIST 121 Asian Civilizations in Modern Times 3 5 Second Course in Arabic ARAB 102 HUMA 101 Introduction to the Humanities I 3 Elementary Spoken Egyptian Arabic 3 ARAB 105 HUMA 102 Introduction to the Humanities II 3 3 BLAS 110 African American Art HUMA 103 Introduction to the New Testament 3 3 BLAS 120 Black Music World Religions HUMA 106 3 BLAS 155 3 African American Literature 5 First Course in Italian ITAL 101 Web Page Creation CBTE 162 2 HUMA 201 Mythology 3 CHIC 130 3 Mexican Literature in Translation Second Course in Italian ITAL 102 5 CHIC 135 Chicana/o Literature 3 Third Course in Italian 5 ITAL 201 CHIC 190 Chicano Images in Film 3 JOUR 200 Introduction to Newswriting and CHIC 210 Chicano Culture 3 3 Reporting 3 Voice and Articulation COMS 101 JOUR 201 Advanced Newswriting and Reporting 3 Oral Communication COMS 103 3 JOUR 202 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 3 Advanced Public Communication COMS 104 JOUR 205 3 Editing for Print Journalism 3 Oral Interpretation COMS 111 JOUR 206 3 Online Journalism COMS 135 3 Interpersonal Communication JOUR 210A Newspaper Production 1 2–3 COMS 160 3 Argumentation JOUR 210B 2–3 Newspaper Production 2 COMS 170 3 Small Group Communication JOUR 210C Newspaper Production 3 2–3 Intercultural Communication 3 COMS 180 JOUR 210D 2–3 Newspaper Production 4 3 Reading and Composition ENGL 101 LABR 100 American Labor Movement 3 3 Composition and Literature ENGL 105 LIBS 101 Information Literacy and Research ENGL 202 3 Introduction to Linguistics Skills 1 ENGL 205 Critical Thinking and Intermediate or MATH 119 Elementary Statistics Composition 3 PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics 3 ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature 3 3 PHIL 100 Logic and Critical Thinking ENGL 209 Literary Approaches to Film 3 Symbolic Logic PHIL 101 3 3 American Literature I ENGL 210 PHIL 102A Introduction To Philosophy: Reality American Literature II ENGL 211 3 and Knowledge 3 3 ENGL 215 English Literature I: 800–1799 PHIL 102B 3 Introduction To Philosophy: Values ENGL 216 English Literature II: 1800–Present 3 PHIL 104A 3 History Of Western Philosophy ENGL 220 Masterpieces of World Literature I: History of Western Philosophy PHIL 104B 3 1500 BCE–1600 CE 3 3 Contemporary Philosophy PHIL 105 Masterpieces of World Literature II: ENGL 221 3 Asian Philosophy PHIL 106 1600–Present 3 PHIL 107 3 Reflections on Human Nature ENGL 237 Women in Literature 3 PHIL 108 Perspectives on Human Nature and 3 Evaluating Children’s Literature ENGL 238 3 Society Shakespeare 3 ENGL 240 3 Philosophy In Literature PHIL 111 S an D 252 iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019

253 degree at a transfer institution in a biology-related 3 Philosophy of Women PHIL 125 major. Introduction to Philosophy of PHIL 126 3 Contemporary Gender Issues Common university majors in this field include: PHIL 130 3 Philosophy of Art and Music Agricultural Science, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, PHOT 215 Photo Journalism and Documentary Bioinformatics, Biological Sciences, Biophysics, 3 Photography Biotechnology, Botany, Cell Biology, Conservation, POLI 101 Introduction to Political Science 3 Developmental Biology, Ecology, Entomology, Life POLI 102 3 The American Political System Science, Genetics, Marine Biology, Medical Sciences, 3 PSYC 101 General Psychology Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Natural Sciences, 3 Introduction to Electronic Media RTVF 100 Neuroscience, Psychobiology, Toxicology, and Media Performance 3 RTVF 105 Zoology/Animal Sciences. RTVF 107 Audio Production 3 3 Introduction to Scriptwriting RTVF 110 This degree is designed to accommodate the RTVF 115 Radio and Television Management differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer Liberal Arts and Sciences Principles 3 institutions and major options. Because admission 3 RTVF 118 Television Studio Operations and major preparation requirements vary at each Television Production 3 transfer institution, courses used to complete this RTVF 122 3 major should be selected with the assistance of a RTVF 124 Single Camera Production San Diego City College counselor. 3 Art Direction for Film and Television RTVF 126 3 Lighting for Television and Film RTVF 128 Courses Required for the Major: Radio and TV Newswriting RTVF 140 3 Students should complete a minimum of 18 units 3 Introduction to Cinema RTVF 160 in Biological Science courses: 3 RTVF 167 Motion Picture Production BIOL 101 Issues in Environmental Science & RTVF 247A Radio Broadcasting Workshop Sustainability (C) 4 1 Production BIOL 107 General Biology – Lecture and Radio Broadcasting Workshop - News 1 RTVF 247B Laboratory 4 First Course in Russian 5 RUSS 101 BIOL 110 Introduction to Oceanography (C, M) 3 First Course in Spanish 5 SPAN 101 BIOL 111 Cancer Biology 3 SPAN 102 Second Course in Spanish 5 4 Marine Biology BIOL 115 5 Third Course in Spanish SPAN 201 3 BIOL 130 Human Heredity Fourth Course in Spanish 5 SPAN 202 BIOL 135 Biology of Human Nutrition 3 5 Spanish for Spanish Speakers I SPAN 215 3 Plants and People BIOL 180 5 SPAN 216 Spanish for Spanish Speakers II or Biological Statistics (C, M) BIOL 200 Total Units= 18 or MATH 119 Elementary Statistics Behavioral Science Statistics PSYC 258 3 Scientific Studies: 5 General Microbiology BIOL 205 These courses emphasize the study of mathematical Introduction to the Biological BIOL 210A and quantitative reasoning skills and impart 4 Sciences I knowledge of the facts and principles that Introduction to the Biological BIOL 210B form the foundations of living and non-living Sciences II 4 systems. Students recognize and appreciate 4 BIOL 215 Introduction to Zoology the methodologies of science as investigative Human Anatomy 4 BIOL 230 tools, as well as the limitations of scientific Human Physiology 4 BIOL 235 endeavors. This area is divided into the following 3 General Chemistry I – Lecture CHEM 200 specializations: Biological Science, Mathematics and 2 General Chemistry I – Laboratory CHEM 200L Pre-engineering, Physical and Earth Sciences. 3 CHEM 201 General Chemistry II Lecture 2 General Chemistry II Laboratory CHEM 201L Associate of Arts Degree: 4 CISC 190 Java Programming CISC 192 4 C/C++ Programming Scientific Liberal Arts and Sciences: PHYS 125 General Physics 5 Studies Biological Science Specialization 5 PHYS 126 General Physics II The specialization in Biological Science is intended 4 General Physics I PHYS 180A for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s an iego C ity D ollege • 2018–2019 253 S C

254 PHYS 180B CISC 150 4 General Physics II Introduction to Computer and Information Sciences 3 PHYS 181A General Physics Lab I 1 4 1 CISC 181 Principles of Information Systems PHYS 181B General Physics Lab II Liberal Arts and Sciences Visual Basic Programming 5 CISC 186 Mechanics 4 PHYS 195 PHYS 196 Electricity and Magnetism 5 4 Data Structures in C++ CISC 187 Java Programming Waves, Optics and Modern Physics 5 4 PHYS 197 CISC 190 CISC 192 C/C++ Programming 4 Total Units = 18 CISC 205 Object Oriented Programming using 4 C++ Associate of Arts Degree: Fundamentals of Computer Game CISC 220 Scientific Liberal Arts and Sciences: Programming 4 Studies Mathematics and Pre- ELCT 111 Electrical Theory I 3 Engineering Specialization ELCT 111L 2 Electrical Laboratory I 3 ELCT 121 Electrical Theory II The specialization in Mathematics and ELCT 121L Electrical Laboratory II 2 Pre-Engineering is intended for students who plan to Basic DC Electronics ELDT 124 4 complete a bachelor’s degree at a transfer institution 1 ELDT 124L Basic DC Laboratory in a mathematical, computer science or engineering AC Circuit Analysis 4 ELDT 125 related major. DC/AC Circuit Analysis Laboratory ELDT 125L Common university majors in this field include: with Pspice 1 Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, ELDT 230 Advanced Computer Designs 3 Civil Engineering, Cognitive Science, Computer 1.5 Introduction to Engineering ENGE 101 Engineering, Computer Science, Construction ELDT 230L Advanced Computer Designs Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, 1 Laboratory Engineering Technology, Environmental ENGE 116 Computational Methods in Engineering, Industrial Engineering Technology, Engineering 3 Information Systems, Manufacturing Engineering, Engineering Drawing 2 ENGE 151 Materials Science, Mathematics, and Statistics, 3 ENGE 200 Statics Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, and 3 ENGE 152 Engineering Design Structural Engineering. ENGE 240 3 Digital Systems Dynamics 3 ENGE 250 This degree is designed to accommodate the 3 Electric Circuits ENGE 260 differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer ENGN 110 4 Science for Technical Applications institutions and major options. Because admission INWT 120 Network+ Certification Training 4 and major preparation requirements vary at each Trigonometry MATH 104 3 transfer institution, courses used to complete this MATH 107 Introduction to Scientific major should be selected with the assistance of a 3 Programming San Diego City College counselor. MATH 107L Introduction to Scientific Courses Required for the Major: 1 Programming Lab Students should complete a minimum of 18 units 4 Gateway to Experimental Statistics MATH 115 including both Mathematics and Pre-Engineering MATH 116 3 College and Matrix Algebra courses: 3 MATH 118 A Survey of Modern Mathematics Biological Statistics or BIOL 200 Basic Techniques of Applied Calculus I MATH 121 3 or Elementary Statistics MATH 119 MATH 122 3 Basic Techniques of Calculus II Behavioral Science Statistics PSYC 258 3 MATH 141 5 Precalculus 1 Introduction to Microsoft Windows CBTE 114 MATH 150 5 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I CBTE 162 Web Page Creation 2 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 4 MATH 151 1 CBTE 164 Introduction to Microsoft Outlook MATH 245 Discrete Mathematics 3 CBTE 180 Microsoft Office 3 MATH 252 4 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III Computers in Business CBTE 210 3 Introduction to Linear Algebra MATH 254 3 CHEM 200 3 General Chemistry I – Lecture Differential Equations MATH 255 3 General Chemistry I – Laboratory 2 CHEM 200L Introduction to Manufacturing MFET 101 General Chemistry II – Lecture 3 CHEM 201 3 Engineering Technology D iego C 254 C ollege • 2018–2019 S an ity

255 Introduction to Manufacturing I CHEM 100 1 3 MFET 101A Fundamentals of Chemistry Industrial Safety 2 Fundamentals of Chemistry CHEM 100L MFET 110 1 MFET 120 Manufacturing Processes 4 Laboratory Statistical Process Control MFET 210 CHEM 111 3 3 Chemistry in Society PHYS 180A 4 1 Chemistry and Society Laboratory CHEM 111L General Physics I PHYS 181A 1 General Physics Laboratory I CHEM 130 Introduction to Organic and Biological 5 Mechanics PHYS 195 Chemistry 3 5 PHYS 196 Electricity and Magnetism CHEM 130L Introduction to Organic and Biological Waves, Optics and Modern Physics Chemistry Laboratory PHYS 197 1 5 CHEM 152 Introduction to General Chemistry 3 Introduction to Technical Writing TEHW 101 3 CHEM 152L Introduction to General Chemistry Total Units = 18 Laboratory 1 General Chemistry I – Lecture 3 CHEM 200 Physical and Earth Sciences: 2 CHEM 200L General Chemistry I – Laboratory Liberal Arts and Sciences The specialization in Physical and Earth Sciences CHEM 201 3 General Chemistry II – Lecture is intended for students who plan to complete CHEM 201L General Chemistry II – Laboratory 2 a bachelor’s degree at a transfer institution in a CHEM 231L Organic Chemistry I – Laboratory 2 physical and earth science-related major. CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry I – Lecture 3 CHEM 233 Organic Chemistry II – Lecture 3 Common university majors in this field Organic Chemistry II – Laboratory CHEM 233L 2 Astronomy, Astrophysics, Biochemistry, include: Quantitative Analytical Chemistry CHEM 251 5 Biophysics, Chemical Engineering, Chemical 4 CISC 181 Principles of Information Systems Physics, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Environmental 4 CISC 190 Java Programming Chemistry, Environmental Sciences, Engineering 4 C/C++ Programming CISC 192 Physics, Geographic Information Science, Geology, GEOG 101 3 Physical Geography Hydrologic Sciences, Meteorology, Natural Sciences, GEOG 101L Physical Geography Laboratory 1 Oceanography, Physical Geography, Physical Science 3 GEOG 102 Cultural Geography and Physics. 3 World Regional Geography GEOG 104 Physical Geology GEOL 100 3 This degree is designed to accommodate the Physical Geology Laboratory 1 GEOL 101 differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer GEOL 104 Earth Science 3 institutions and major options. Because admission GISG 104 Geographic Information Science and and major preparation requirements vary at each 3 Spatial Reasoning transfer institution, courses used to complete this GISG 110 Introduction to Mapping and major should be selected with the assistance of a Geographic Information Systems 3 San Diego City College counselor. 5 MATH 150 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I MATH 151 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 4 Associate of Arts Degree: MATH 252 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III 4 Liberal Arts and Sciences: Scientific Survey of Physical Science PHYN 100 3 PHYN 101 Survey of Physical Science Laboratory 1 Studies Physical and Earth Sciences PHYS 100 Introductory Physics 4 Specialization 5 General Physics PHYS 125 Courses Required for the Major: 5 General Physics II PHYS 126 Students should complete a minimum of 18 PHYS 180A General Physics I 4 units including both Physical and Earth Science PHYS 180B 4 General Physics II courses: PHYS 181A General Physics Laboratory I 1 3 Principles of Sustainable Agriculture AGRI 100 1 PHYS 181B General Physics Laboratory II Descriptive Astronomy 3 ASTR 101 5 Mechanics PHYS 195 1 ASTR 109 Practice in Observing PHYS 196 5 Electricity and Magnetism Astronomy Laboratory 1 ASTR 111 PHYS 197 5 Waves, Optics and Modern Physics Biological Statistics or BIOL 200 3 Introduction to Sustainability SUST 101 or MATH 119 Elementary Statistics SUST 102 3 Environmental Ethics 3 PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics Total Units = 18 • 2018–2019 S an ollege C ity 255 iego D C

256 ENGL 208 Introduction to Literature 3 Elementary Multiple Subject ENGL 220 Masterpieces of World Literature I: Teaching Preparation: 1500 BCE–1600 CE 3 Liberal Arts and Sciences ENGL 221 Masterpieces of World Literature II: These courses are intended for students who plan to 1600–Present 3 complete a bachelor’s degree at a transfer institution FREN 102 5 Second Course in French in preparation for a California Multiple Subject 3 GEOG 104 World Regional Geography Teaching Credential. Most students pursue this GEOL 101 1 Physical Geology Laboratory credential with the goal of becoming an elementary Earth Science GEOL 104 3 school or special education teacher. GERM 102 Second Course in German 5 Common university majors in this field Health Education For Teachers HEAL 195 2 Liberal Studies, Human Development, include: HIST 100 3 World History I Interdisciplinary Studies, and Teacher Preparation. 3 World History II HIST 101 History of the United States I 3 HIST 109 This degree is designed to accommodate the History of the United States II 3 HIST 110 differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer 3 HUMA 106 World Religions institutions and major options. Because admission 5 Second Course in Italian ITAL 102 and major preparation requirements vary at each LIBS 101 Information Literacy and Research transfer institution, courses used to complete this Skills 1 major should be selected with the assistance of a Concepts of Elementary School MATH 210A San Diego City College counselor. Mathematics I 3 Concepts of Elementary School MATH 210B Associate of Arts Degree: Liberal 3 Mathematics II Elementary Arts and Sciences: 1 MATH 212 Children’s Mathematical Thinking Multiple Subject Teaching Preparation MUSI 100 Introduction to Music 3 3 The Business of Music MUSI 108 Courses Required for the Major: World Music 3 MUSI 109 Students should complete a minimum of 33 MUSI 110 Music for Elementary School Teachers 3 units in Elementary (Multiple Subject) Teaching Jazz - History and Development MUSI 111 3 Preparation courses: PHIL 100 3 Logic and Critical Thinking American Sign Language Level II 4 AMSL 116 PHIL 102A Introduction To Philosophy: Reality 5 Second Course in Arabic ARAB 102 and Knowledge 3 ARTF 100 Art Orientation 3 3 PHIL 104A History Of Western Philosophy General Biology – Lecture and BIOL 107 3 PHIL 102B Introduction To Philosophy: Values Laboratory 4 3 History of Western Philosophy PHIL 104B Introduction to the Biological BIOL 210A PHIL 205 Critical Thinking and Writing in 4 Sciences I 3 Philosophy History of the U.S., Black Perspectives BLAS 140A 3 Survey of Physical Science 3 PHYN 100 History of the U.S, Black Perspectives 3 BLAS 140B EXSC 240 Physical Education in the Elementary CHIC 141A United States History from a Chicano Schools 3 3 Perspective PHYN 101 Survey of Physical Science Laboratory 1 United States History from a Chicano CHIC 141B 3 POLI 102 The American Political System Perspective 3 3 PSYC 101 General Psychology Human Growth and Development CHIL 101 3 PSYC 230 Psychology of Lifespan Development 3 DANC 181 History of Dance 3 5 SPAN 101 First Course in Spanish Acting for Non-majors DRAM 103 3 SPAN 102 5 Second Course in Spanish DRAM 105 Introduction to Dramatic Arts 3 Oral Communication 3 COMS 103 Teaching as a Profession 2 EDUC 200 3 Interpersonal Communication COMS 135 Field Experience for Prospective EDUC 203 3 COMS 160 Argumentation Teachers 1 3 Small Group Communication COMS 170 3 Reading and Composition ENGL 101 Total Units = 33 Composition and Literature ENGL 105 3 Critical Thinking and Intermediate ENGL 205 3 Composition • 2018–2019 ollege 256 an D iego C ity S C

257 ANTH 215 3 Cultures of Latin America Social and Behavioral Sciences: BIOL 200 Biological Statistics or These courses emphasize a multidisciplinary or MATH 119 Elementary Statistics approach to the understanding and study of human 3 Behavioral Science Statistics PSYC 258 behavior. Students evaluate and interpret human Introduction to Black Studies BLAS 100 3 societies; the institutions, organizations and groups BLAS 104 Black Psychology 3 that compose them; and the way individuals and 3 Sociology from a Black Perspective BLAS 115 groups relate to one another. Students develop BLAS 116 Contemporary Social Problems from a an appreciation of the various approaches and Black Perspective 3 methodologies of the disciplines. BLAS 120 3 Black Music 3 The Black Family BLAS 130 The area of Social and Behavioral Science is intended Introduction to Black Politics BLAS 135 3 for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s BLAS 140A History of the U.S., Black Perspectives 3 degree at a transfer institution in a social and BLAS 140B History of the U.S., Black Perspectives 3 behavioral science-related major. Liberal Arts and Sciences BLAS 145A Introduction to African History 3 Common university majors in this field include: Introduction to African History BLAS 145B 3 Afro American Studies, Anthropology, Archeology, BLAS 150 Black Women in Literature, Film and Behavioral Science, Black Studies, Chicano Studies, the Media 3 Child Development, Cognitive Science, Community 3 BLAS 155 African American Literature Studies, Criminal Justice/Justice Studies, Cultural 3 BLAS 165 Sexuality and Black Culture Geography, Developmental Studies, Ethnic Studies, 3 CHIC 110A Introduction to Chicano Studies Family and Consumer Studies, Gerontology, Global CHIC 110B Introduction to Chicano Studies 3 Studies, History, Human Services, International Mexican Literature in Translation CHIC 130 3 Relations, Law, Peace and Conflict Studies, Chicana/o Literature 3 CHIC 135 Policy Analysis, Political Science, Psychobiology, CHIC 138 Literature of La Raza in Latin America Psychology, Public Administration, Social Work, in Translation 3 Social Science, Sociology. CHIC 141A United States History from a Chicano 3 Perspective This degree is designed to accommodate the United States History from a Chicano CHIC 141B differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer Perspective 3 institutions and major options. Because admission History of Mexico CHIC 150 3 and major preparation requirements vary at each CHIC 170 La Chicana 3 transfer institution, courses used to complete this CHIC 190 Chicano Images in Film 3 major should be selected with the assistance of a CHIC 201 The Indigenous Tradition of Mexico San Diego City College counselor. 3 and Ancient Mesoamerica CHIC 210 3 Chicano Culture Associate of Arts Degree: Liberal CHIL 101 3 Human Growth and Development Arts and Sciences: Social and Creative Art CHIL 121 3 Behavioral Sciences CHIL 133 Curriculum: Language and Literature 3 Curriculum: Science and Math CHIL 135 3 Courses Required for the Major: CHIL 141 3 The Child, Family and Community Students should complete a minimum of 18 units 3 Program Planning CHIL 151 including both Social and Behavioral Science CHIL 152 School Age Program Planning 3 courses: Observing and Understanding CHIL 160 Introduction to Administration of ADJU 101 Children 2 Justice 3 Observations and Issues in Child CHIL 161 ADJU 102 Criminal Law I 3 Development 2 3 ANTH 102 Introduction to Physical Anthropology Observing and Guiding Child Behavior CHIL 162 3 ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 Children With Special Needs CHIL 165 3 ANTH 104 Laboratory in Physical Anthropology 1 CHIL 175 Infant–Toddler Growth and ANTH 107 Introduction to Archaeology 3 3 Development Introduction to Archaeological Field ANTH 115 Principles of Infant/Toddler Caregiving CHIL 176 3 4 Work ANTH 210 Introduction to California Indians 3 257 S D • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego an

258 SOCO 150 3 Sociology of Latinos/Latinas Nutrition, Health and Safety for CHIL 180 SOCO 201 Advanced Principles of Sociology 3 3 Children 3 Globalization and Social Change SOCO 223 Machine Technology CHIL 202 Administration of Early Childhood SPAN 201 Third Course in Spanish 5 3 Programs CHIL 210 Supervision of Early Childhood Total Units = 18 3 Programs 4 Principles of Information Systems CISC 181 Java Programming 4 CISC 190 Machine Technology 3 FUTR 101 Introduction to Futures Studies Introduction to Gender Studies GEND 101 3 Units Award Type Cultural Geography 3 GEOG 102 Certificate of Performance: 3 GEOG 104 World Regional Geography Computer Aided Manufacturing 12 HIST 100 World History I 3 16 C.N.C. Operator HIST 101 World History II 3 C.N.C. Technology 12 HIST 105 Introduction to Western Civilization I 3 Introduction to Western Civilization II 3 HIST 106 Certificate of Achievement: 3 HIST 109 History of the United States I Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Technology HIST 110 History of the United States II 3 20 Option 3 HIST 115A History of the Americas I 32 Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) Option HIST 115B History of the Americas II 3 Associate of Science Degree: 3 HIST 120 Introduction to Asian Civilizations Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) Option 32* Asian Civilizations in Modern Times HIST 121 3 HIST 123 U.S. History from the Asian Pacific * and courses to meet graduation requirements, American Perspective 3 general education and electives as needed to meet HUMS 101 Introduction to Human Aging 3 the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. 3 Social Work Fields of Service HUMS 110 HUMS 120 Introduction to Social Work 3 Description LIBS 101 Information Literacy and The Machine Technology program offers a variety of Research Skills 1 instruction in the process of modern manufacturing. PEAC 101 Introduction to Peace Studies 3 Emphasis is placed on CAD/CAM and C.N.C. 3 Nonviolence and Conflict Resolution PEAC 102 technology. Environmental Sustainability, Justice PEAC 201 and Ethics 3 Program Emphasis 3 Introduction to Political Science POLI 101 The Machine Technology program prepares students 3 POLI 102 The American Political System for C.N.C. machining and is also ideal for students 3 Comparative Politics POLI 103 who need to upgrade prior machine shop training to 3 POLI 140 Contemporary International Politics comply with the current needs of industry. PSYC 101 General Psychology 3 PSYC 135 Marriage and Family Relations 3 Faculty Office Telephone Human Sexual Behavior PSYC 137 3 Introduction to Personality PSYC 155 3 John Bollinger T-195C 619-388-3659 PSYC 161 Introduction to Counseling 3 Career Options 3 PSYC 166 Introduction to Social Psychology PSYC 211 3 Learning CAD/CAM technician, C.N.C. machining technician PSYC 230 Psychology of Lifespan Development 3 3 Abnormal Psychology PSYC 245 Program Learning Outcomes Introduction to Psychological PSYC 255 Students who complete the program will be able to: 3 Research Introduction to Physiological PSYC 260 • Demonstrate an understanding of common 3 Psychology safety policies used in modern machining 3 SOCO 101 Principles of Sociology facilities. SOCO 110 Contemporary Social Problems 3 Utilize common measuring instruments to ensure • 3 SOCO 125 Sociology of the Family projects are within given specifications. S 258 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an

259 MACT 171 • Solve common machining problems using Application of CNC Controlled Vertical various mathematical equations. Machining and CNC Controlled Turning Centers I 2 • Demonstrate knowledge of print reading and Application of CNC Controlled Vertical MACT 172 symbology. Machining and CNC Controlled Turning 2 Centers II • Setup machine tools to specification in a given time period. Total Units = 16 Machine projects to specifications using both • *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental conventional, and C.N.C. machines Create C.N.C. award that does not appear on the student’s program using both “hand coding” and CAD/ transcript. All courses must be completed within the CAM software. San Diego Community College District. Machine Technology This program is not eligible for federal Note: • Create designs, both basic an advance using CAD/ financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. CAM software. • Complete necessary documentation and Certificate of Performance: inspection forms as required. C.N.C. Technology Option* Academic Programs Courses: Units MACT 140 Machine Technology 4 The certificates of performance and achievement Intro/Computer Numerical Control MACT 150 and the associate degrees in Machine Technology (CNC) 4 require completion of the courses listed below. 4 MACT 160M Introduction to CAD/CAM Total Units = 12 Certificate of Performance: Computer Aided Manufacturing* *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Courses: Units transcript. All courses must be completed within the MACT 160M Introduction to CAD/CAM 4 San Diego Community College District. MACT 170 Introduction to CNC Controlled This program is not eligible for federal Note: Vertical Machining 4 financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Advanced CAD/CAM MACT 180M 4 Total Units = 12 Certificate of Achievement: Note: This is a two semester certificate. The Machine Technology department suggest students take MACT 160M first semester toward this certificate. Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Technology Option *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Courses Required for the Major: Units transcript. All courses must be completed within the 4 MACT 140 Machine Technology San Diego Community College District. MACT 150 Intro/Computer Numerical Control Note: This program is not eligible for federal (CNC) 4 financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Introduction to CNC Controlled MACT 170 Vertical Machining 4 MACT 171 Application of CNC Controlled Vertical Certificate of Performance: Machining and CNC Controlled Turning C.N.C. Operator Option* Centers I 2 Courses: Units Application of CNC Controlled Vertical MACT 172 Machine Technology 4 MACT 140 Machining and CNC Controlled Turning MACT 150 Intro/Computer Numerical Control 2 Centers II 4 (CNC) MACT 170 Introduction to CNC Controlled 4 Vertical Machining 259 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D an ollege

260 Complete the following additional course Associate of Science Degree: required for the major: Machine Technology MACT 160M Introduction to CAD/CAM 4 Machine Technology Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) Total Units = 20 Option Recommended First Semester Enrollment: An Associate of Science Degree may be earned in MACT 140, Machine Technology Computer Aided Manufacturing Option. Complete MACT 150, Intro to CNC & EDM the Computer Aided Manufacturing Option MACT 160M, Intro to CAD/CAM MACT 161M, Applications of CAD/CAM I Certificate of Achievement as specified above (32 units). Certificate of Achievement: Courses required for the Major: Units Machine Technology 4 Machine Technology MACT 140 Intro/Computer Numerical Control MACT 150 Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) (CNC) 4 Option Introduction to CNC Controlled MACT 170 Units Courses required for the Major: 4 Vertical Machining Machine Technology Application of CNC Controlled Vertical MACT 171 4 MACT 140 MACT 150 Intro/Computer Numerical Control Machining and CNC Controlled Turning 4 (CNC) 2 Centers I MACT 170 Introduction to CNC Controlled MACT 172 Application of CNC Controlled Vertical Machining and CNC Controlled Turning Vertical Machining 4 Application of CNC Controlled Vertical 2 MACT 171 Centers II Machining and CNC Controlled Turning Complete the following additional Computer 2 Centers I Aided Manufacturing Option certificate of Application of CNC Controlled Vertical MACT 172 achievement courses: Machining and CNC Controlled Turning MACT 161M Applications of CAD/CAM I 2 2 Centers II MACT 162M Applications of CAD/CAM II 2 4 Advanced CAD/CAM Complete the following additional courses MACT 180M MACT 181M 2 required for the major: Application in Advanced CAD/CAM I MACT 182M Application in Advanced CAD/CAM II 2 MACT 161M Applications of CAD/CAM I 2 MACT 162M Applications of CAD/CAM II 2 and the following C.N.C. Technology Option 4 MACT 180M Advanced CAD/CAM certificate of achievement course: MACT 181M Application in Advanced CAD/CAM I 2 Introduction to CAD/CAM MACT 160M 4 Application in Advanced CAD/CAM II MACT 182M 2 Total Units = 32 and the following C.N.C. Technology Option Recommended First Semester Enrollment: certificate of achievement course: MACT 140, Machine Technology MACT 160M Introduction to CAD/CAM 4 MACT 150, Intro to CNC & EDM Total Units = 32 MACT 160M, Intro to CAD/CAM MACT 161M, Applications of CAD/CAM I Recommended First Semester Enrollment: MACT 140, Machine Technology MACT 150, Intro to CNC & EDM MACT 160M, Intro to CAD/CAM MACT 161M, Applications of CAD/CAM I ollege ity C iego D an S • 2018–2019 260 C

261 development; (3) Identify and apply quality Manufacturing control tools used in electronics manufacturing industry; (4) Explain and apply the fundamentals Engineering of electronics applications and theory; (5) Describe different types of materials, process Technology flows, equipment and techniques used to manufacture electronics products. Award Type Units For the Fabrication Option: (1) Identify and B. Certificate of Performance: utilize CAD/CAM (Computer-Aided Design/ 11 Advanced Manufacturing Computer-Aided Manufacturing) applications 10 Advanced Mechanical Design in various manufacturing processes; 6 Introduction to Manufacturing (2) Explain product design to optimize Lean Six Sigma 9 manufacturingefficiency; (3) Identify and 13 Manufacturing Fundamentals apply quality control tools and instruments 13 Mechanical Design used in a manufacturing environment; (4) Demonstrate proficiency in programming Certificate of Achievement: and operation of NC/CNC (Numerical Control/ Electronics Manufacturing 28–31.5 Computer Numerical Control) equipment; (5) Fabrication Manufacturing 32–33.5 Describe different types of materials, process Associate of Science Degree: flows, equipment and techniques used in Manufacturing Engineering Technology manufacturing. Manufacturing Engineering Technology Option: Electronics 32* Manufacturing Engineering Technology Program Goals Option: Fabrication 36* The Manufacturing Engineering Technology (MFET) * and courses to meet graduation requirements, program is developed with two specific goals: general education and electives as needed to meet 1. To train students with a high level of technical the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. and non-technical skills, and prepare them for the highly competitive world of today’s Description manufacturing. Manufacturing Engineering Technology (MFET) To provide a continuous path for students 2. program provides students the opportunity to acquire a firm foundation of skills and to acquire highly valued skills in an innovative, knowledge in the field of manufacturing, hands-on learning environment. The program transfer successfully to a 4-year college or features integrating experiences through which university. students participate in all aspects of a manufacturing enterprise, from materials and processes to safety, Career Options design, automation, quality and lean manufacturing. Areas of employment include manufacturing Armed with these skills, MFET graduates can pursue engineering or engineering technician, rewarding, growth-oriented careers in such diverse manufacturing operation management, equipment industries as plastics, automotive, biomedical, maintenance and troubleshooting, quality and electronics, aerospace, machining and other production control, production planning, and high-value manufacturing sectors. automation. MFET graduates may also further their Program Emphasis education by transferring to a number of four-year colleges and universities. MFET program has two options: Electronics and Fabrication. Upon successful completion of the Program Learning Outcomes program, students will be able to: MFET Option 1: Electronics Manufacturing A. For the Electronics Option: (1) Utilize Upon successful completion of the Manufacturing and operate various test equipment; (2) Engineering Technology program with the option in Demonstrate the knowledge of design tools Electronics Manufacturing, the student will be able used in electronics industry for product to: D an iego C C ollege • 2018–2019 261 S ity

262 • Utilize, operate and measure the results of various Courses: Units test equipment to support product development. Introduction to Manufacturing MFET 101 Manufacturing Engineering Technology Engineering Technology 3 Demonstrate the knowledge of design tools used • Print Reading and Symbology 3 MFET 105 in electronics industry for product development. Total Units = 6 Identify and apply quality control tools used in • Note: MFET 101 and MFET 105 could be taken in the electronics manufacturing industry. same semester. Explain and apply the fundamentals of • Manufacturing Recommended Electives: electronics applications and theory. Engineering Technology 107. Describe different types of materials, process • *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental flows, equipment and techniques used to award that does not appear on the student’s manufacture electronics products. transcript. All courses must be completed within the MFET Option 2: Fabrication Manufacturing San Diego Community College District. Upon successful completion of the Manufacturing This program is not eligible for federal Note: Engineering Technology program with the option in financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Fabrication Manufacturing, the student will be able to: Certificate of Performance: Identify and utilize CAD/CAM applications in • Manufacturing Fundamentals* various manufacturing processes. The Certificate of Performance on Manufacturing • Explain product design to optimize Fundamentals provides fundamental knowledge for manufacturing efficiency. students to enter the workforce in a manufacturing field. • Identify and apply quality control tools and instruments used in a manufacturing Courses: Units environment. Introduction to Manufacturing MFET 101 3 Engineering Technology Demonstrate proficiency in programming and • MFET 105 Print Reading and Symbology 3 operation of NC/CNC equipment. MFET 115 3 Properties of Materials • Describe different types of materials, process MFET 120 Manufacturing Processes 4 flows, equipment and techniques used in Total Units = 13 manufacturing. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s Telephone Office Faculty transcript. All courses must be completed within the 619-388-3731 S-311J Kenneth San Diego Community College District. Heifner Note: This program is not eligible for federal Academic Programs financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. The certificates of performance and achievement Certificate of Performance: and associate degree require completion of the courses listed below. Additional general education Advanced Manufacturing* and graduation requirements for the associate The Certificate of Performance in Advanced The associate degree are listed in the catalog. Manufacturing furthers student’s knowledge with degree requires a minimum of 60 units. the innovative experience and exposure to modern manufacturing practices. Certificate of Performance: Courses: Units Introduction to Manufacturing* 2 MFET 110 Industrial Safety This certificate prepares students with necessary Manufacturing Automation MFET 150 3 skills, knowledge and experience to continue on with the coursework and projects in MFET program. • 2018–2019 ollege C ity 262 iego D an S C

263 MFET 230 3 Lean Manufacturing MFET 210 Statistical Process Control 3 3 Lean Manufacturing MFET 230 MFET 150 Manufacturing Automation 3 or Total Units = 11 Manufacturing Automation I MFET 150A 1.5 Note: It is recommended that MFET 150 and MFET and 210 be completed before taking MFET 230. MFET 150B Manufacturing Automation II 1.5 MFET 101 Introduction to Manufacturing *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Engineering Technology 3 award that does not appear on the student’s or transcript. All courses must be completed within the 1 Introduction to Manufacturing I MFET 101A San Diego Community College District. and This program is not eligible for federal Note: 1 Introduction to Manufacturing II MFET 101B financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. and 1 Introduction to Manufacturing III MFET 101C Certificate of Performance: Print Reading and Symbology 3 MFET 105 Lean Six Sigma* or MFET 105A Print Reading I 1.5 This certificate covers topics in quality, lean and six and sigma, with both theoretical and hands-on training MFET 105B 1.5 Print Reading II contents. The certificate prepares students for or quality-related jobs, and also for taking the six sigma 3 ENGN 130 Introduction to Engineering Design green belt or other quality-related certification. Manufacturing Engineering Technology and Courses: Units 1.5 Print Reading II MFET 105B Properties of Materials 3 MFET 115 3 MFET 210 Statistical Process Control Manufacturing Processes 4 MFET 120 MFET 230 3 Lean Manufacturing Electronics for Technology ENGN 128 3 Six Sigma and Lean Implementation MFET 240 3 and Total Units = 9 MFET 220 3 Programmable Logic Controllers *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental or award that does not appear on the student’s Introduction to Photovoltaic MFET 225 transcript. All courses must be completed within the 4 Manufacturing and Applications San Diego Community College District. Total Units = 28–31.5 Note: This program is not eligible for federal financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Certificate of Achievement: Manufacturing Engineering Certificate of Achievement: Technology Manufacturing Engineering Fabrication Manufacturing Technology The Certificate of Achievement in Fabrication Electronics Manufacturing Manufacturing focuses in the manufacturing of non-electronic devices and related products. The Certificate of Achievement in Electronics Manufacturing focuses on the manufacturing of Courses: Units electronic devices and related products. Industrial Safety 2 MFET 110 MFET 210 The courses for this certificate include the Statistical Process Control Note: 3 3 courses which make up the Certificate of Performance MFET 230 Lean Manufacturing 3 Manufacturing Automation MFET 150 in Advanced Manufacturing and the Certificate of or Performance in Manufacturing Fundamentals as well Manufacturing Automation I 1.5 as additional courses. MFET 150A and Required Courses: Manufacturing Automation II 1.5 MFET 150B 2 MFET 110 Industrial Safety Introduction to Manufacturing MFET 101 3 MFET 210 Statistical Process Control 3 Engineering Technology iego C ity C D • 2018–2019 263 S an ollege

264 PHYS 100 4 or Introductory Physics or MFET 101A Introduction to Manufacturing I 1 and CHEM 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry 3 Manufacturing Engineering Technology and 1 Introduction to Manufacturing II MFET 101B CHEM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry and MFET 101C 1 1 Introduction to Manufacturing III Laboratory 3 Print Reading and Symbology MFET 105 Total Units = 32 or Recommended Electives: Manufacturing Print Reading I 1.5 MFET 105A Engineering Technology 240, 250 or 270. and 1.5 Print Reading II MFET 105B Associate of Science Degree or Manufacturing Engineering Introduction to Engineering Design ENGN 130 3 and Technology – Option: Fabrication Print Reading II MFET 105B 1.5 The Associate of Science Degree in Manufacturing MFET 115 Properties of Materials 3 Engineering Technology with Fabrication Option MFET 120 Manufacturing Processes 4 prepares students with necessary skills, knowledge MACT 150 Intro/Computer Numerical Control and experience to take on important roles as team (CNC) 4 members or leaders in a fabrication manufacturing Introduction to CAD/CAM 4 MACT 160M enterprise. Total Units = 32–33.5 The courses for this degree/certificate include the courses which make up the Certificate of Associate of Science Degree: Performance in Advanced Manufacturing and Manufacturing Engineering the Certificate of Performance in Manufacturing Technology – Option: Electronics Fundamentals as well as additional courses. The Associate of Science Degree in Manufacturing Courses: Units Engineering Technology with Electronics Option MFET 101 Introduction to Manufacturing prepares students with necessary skills, knowledge Engineering Technology 3 and experience to take on important roles as team 3 Print Reading and Symbology MFET 105 members or leaders in an electronics manufacturing 2 Industrial Safety MFET 110 enterprise. 3 MFET 115 Properties of Materials Note: The courses for this degree include the courses 4 Manufacturing Processes MFET 120 which make up the Certificate of Performance in Manufacturing Automation MFET 150 3 Advanced Manufacturing and the Certificate of 3 MFET 210 Statistical Process Control Performance in Manufacturing Fundamentals as well MFET 230 Lean Manufacturing 3 as additional courses. MFET 110 Industrial Safety can Intro/Computer Num Control (CNC) MACT 150 be taken any semester available. Electronics course(s) 4 and Elec Dis Mach may be taken when offered. MACT 160M Introduction to CAD/CAM 4 Introductory Physics PHYS 100 4 Required Courses: or MFET 101 Introduction to Manufacturing 3 CHEM 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry Engineering Technology 3 and 3 Print Reading and Symbology MFET 105 Fundamentals of Chemistry CHEM 100L Industrial Safety MFET 110 2 Laboratory 1 Properties of Materials 3 MFET 115 Total Units = 36 MFET 120 Manufacturing Processes 4 MFET 150 Manufacturing Automation 3 Note: MFET 110 Industrial Safety can be taken any Statistical Process Control 3 MFET 210 semester available. Electronics course(s) may be MFET 230 Lean Manufacturing 3 taken when offered. Introduction to Digital Circuits 3 ELDT 123 and Digital Circuits Laboratory ELDT 123L 1 C ity C iego D an S ollege • 2018–2019 264

265 MACT 150 Intro/Computer Numerical Control Mechanical Design Technology (CNC) 4 Description: 2 Engineering Drawing ENGE 151 Mechanical Design Technology graduates pursue Total Units = 13 careers in industry in the areas of industrial *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental machinery, consumer products, construction, award that does not appear on the student’s automotive, power transmission, automation, and transcript. All courses must be completed within the other mechanical machinery related fields. Related San Diego Community College District. areas of employment include sales, manufacturing Mathematics and testing mechanical products. Graduates Note: This program is not eligible for federal create designs as well as analyze and specify financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. the components and systems of machinery and products. Certificate of Performance: Program Emphasis: Advanced Mechanical Design* The curriculum is based on integrated technical Courses: Units and core competencies (machine technology, Properties of Materials 3 MFET 115 engineering design, engineering sciences), and 4 MACT 160M Introduction to CAD/CAM it emphasizes a project-based learning format. 3 ENGE 152 Engineering Design Students work in teams to learn concepts, Total Units = 10 solve problems and make discoveries in a workplace-related environment. Students use *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental traditional, internet and industry supplied data as award that does not appear on the student’s sources of information. transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. Program Goals: Provide local and regional industry with skilled This program is not eligible for federal Note: workers in the field of Mechanical Design. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Faculty Office Telephone S-311L 619-388-3720 Fred Julian Mathematics Career Options: Award Type Units Mechanical Designer, CAD Designer, Machinery Field Technician, Tool and Die Designer Associate of Arts Degree: Mathematics 22–23* Program Learning Outcomes 23* Applied Mathematics Students who complete the program will be able to: * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet • Demonstrate knowledge of print reading and the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. symbology. Associate in Science for Transfer Degree: • Generate MasterCAM programs at a basic level 19–21 Mathematics for both the Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Mill and CNC Lathe. Description Use a three-dimensional software to develop a • Mathematics is the study of numbers, structures, and mechanical design. associated relationships using rigorously defined literal, numerical and operational symbols. Given Certificate of Performance: certain conditions about systems of numbers or Mechanical Design* other structures, mathematicians derive conclusions Courses: Units based on logical arguments. Basic mathematical skills enable a person to solve numerical problems Science for Technical Applications 4 ENGN 110 encountered in daily life, and more advanced skills 3 ENGE 108 Dimensioning and Tolerancing 265 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D an C

266 Math Transfer Program have numerous applications in the physical, social Students who complete the program will be able to: and life sciences. Mathematics • Analyze, model, and clearly and effectively Program Emphasis communicate a solution to a math problem. The mathematics curriculum includes courses Apply mathematical skills to solve real-world • that range from basic skills through differential situations relevant to their major. equations. The basic skills and associate degree level courses provide students with the mathematical Analyze functions by several means and • preparation necessary for study in other disciplines, incorporate these into the use of problem solving. as well as for degree and transfer requirements. Apply technology to enhance mathematical • Successful completion of a mathematics degree thinking and understanding and to solve will develop competence in mathematics through mathematical problems. differential and integral calculus, providing an adequate background for employment in many Telephone Office Faculty technological and scientific areas. Furthermore, it MS-332 Guillermo Alvarez 619-388-3646 provides a firm foundation for students planning to study mathematics, engineering, economics, Misael Camarena MS-333 619-388-3637 computer science, physical, social or life sciences. Brenda Long 619-388-3185 MS-332 Career Options MS-337 619-388-3350 Theresa Gallo MS-333 Christopher Godbout 619-388-3546 Most of these occupations require education beyond the associate degree, and some may 619-388-3362 Carlos de la Lama MS-340B require a graduate degree. The following list is MS-331 Lan Hong 619-388-3351 not intended as a comprehensive list of career 619-388-3638 MS-337 Jenny Kimm options in mathematics: actuary, appraiser, 619-388-3590 L-208D Tracey Kiser assessor, auditor, biometrician, budget analyst, controller, computer analyst, computer programmer, Robert Rubalcaba MS-331 619-388-3639 demographer, econometrician, engineering analyst, 619-388-3178 MS-335 Nick Slinglend epidemiologist, financial analyst, investment analyst, MS-335 Manfred C. Smith 619-388-3352 management scientist, operations researcher, research mathematician, statistician, surveyor, MS-340B 619-388-3363 Carolyn R. Thomas systems analyst, teacher, technical writer, and urban Paul Young MS-338 619-388-3251 planner. L-208 619-388-3580 Mathematics Center Program Learning Outcomes Academic Programs Math Developmental Program The associate degree in Mathematics requires Students who complete the program will be able to: completion of the courses listed below. Additional Provide examples of on-campus resources for • general education and graduation requirements for math support. the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. • Perform mathematical operations on various structures, including fractions, without the use of Associate of Arts Degree: technology. Mathematics • Translate word problems into mathematical expressions or equations. Units Courses Required for the Major: MATH 150 5 Calculus & Analytical Geometry I • Solve equations properly, logically and with Calculus & Analytical Geometry II 4 MATH 151 written explanations. MATH 245 Discrete Mathematics 3 MATH 252 Calculus & Analytical Geometry III 4 3 MATH 254 Introduction to Linear Algebra an S 266 D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019

267 participating CSU campuses as well as university Select 3–4 units from: admission, degree and transfer requirements. Introduction to Scientific MATH 107 Programming It is strongly recommended that students consult MATH 107L Introduction to Scientific with a counselor to determine which general Programming Lab education option is most appropriate for their MATH 119 Elementary Statistics individual educational goals. MATH 255 Differential Equations (for University Note: It is recommended that students intending of California transfer) PHIL 101 Symbolic Logic to transfer to San Diego State University (SDSU) Mathematics Mathematics, Emphasis in Science major should 3–4 complete the courses marked with a “#”. Students Total Units = 22–23 intending to transfer into this major at other CSUs Recommended electives: Mathematics 104, 116, should consult a counselor and visit www.assist.org 118, 121, 122, 141, 150L, 210A, 210B, 255. for guidance on appropriate coursework. Courses offered in Support of Other Majors: *Course also fulfills general education requirements Mathematics 42, 43, 46, 96. for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. ** Both courses must be completed prior to Associate of Arts Degree: completing the degree to receive credit for SDSU. Mathematics # This course fulfills SDSU’s lower division Applied Mathematics preparation for the major in Mathematics under the Courses Required for the Major: Units TMC. MATH 107 Introduction to Scientific General Education: In addition to the courses listed Programming 3 above, students must complete one of the following Introduction to Scientific MATH 107L general education options: 1 Programming Lab • ) is accepted by The IGETC pattern (page 118 5 MATH 150 Calculus & Analytical Geometry I all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and Calculus & Analytical Geometry II MATH 151 4 majors. It is also accepted by some private/ Discrete Mathematics 3 MATH 245 independent or out of state universities. 4 Calculus & Analytical Geometry III MATH 252 MATH 254 Introduction to Linear Algebra 3 • The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all Total Units = 23 CSU campuses and some private/independent or out of state universities. It is not accepted by the Mathematics 104, 116, Recommended electives: UC system. 118, 119, 121, 122, 141, 150L, 210A, 210B, 255, 290. Electives as needed to meet maximum of 60 Associate in Science in CSU-transferable units required for the degree. Mathematics for Transfer Degree: Career Options: Careers related to this field typically require Program Description: education beyond the associate degree level and The Associate in Science in Mathematics for some may require a graduate degree. Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in Mathematics Courses Required for the Major: Units or a related major in the California State University MATH 150 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I #* 5 (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all 4 MATH 151 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II #* CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree MATH 252 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III #* 4 and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be required to complete no more than 60 units after Select one of the following courses: transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be MATH 254 3 Introduction to Linear Algebra #* appropriate preparation for students transferring MATH 255 Differential Equations * 3 to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should consult a counselor for additional information about an D C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 267 S iego

268 Select one of the following courses if not selected Music above: (It is recommended that students select courses that meet lower division major preparation Music Units Award Type requirements for their transfer university.) Introduction to Scientific MATH 107 Certificate of Performance: Programming ** 3 Audio Production 12 and Certificate of Achievement: MATH 107L Introduction to Scientific Audio Production 22 1 Programming Lab ** or Elementary Statistics #* MATH 119 Associate of Science Degree: PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics *# 3 Digital Music Technology 25* 3 MATH 245 Discrete Mathematics *# * and courses to meet graduation requirements, 1 * or Introduction to Linear Algebra MATH 254 general education and electives as needed to meet 1 3 Differential Equations * MATH 255 the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. 4 CISC 186 Visual Basic Programming 4 CISC 190 Java Programming Visual and Performing Arts CISC 192 4 C/C++ Programming PHYS 195 5 Mechanics * Audio Production 1 MATH 254 or MATH 255 if not used in category A above. The Digital Music Technology program is designed Total Units = 19–21 to provide students with the practical career- oriented skills required to enter the commercial Course Requirements for Transfer Students music industry. Students receive hands-on Students who plan to transfer to a four year college experience in professional music production using or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this current music industry technologies. discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate Program Goals major preparation courses for their specific transfer To prepare students for entry-level positions in the institution and major. Transfer students may also commercial music industry. earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Career Options be individually tailored to each student’s specific transfer requirements in order to provide the most Employment options for graduates of the of efficient path to transfer. More information on Certificate programs include: recording studio transfer programs and procedures is available in the internship, internship at a commercial music house, Transfer Programs section of the catalog. internships for radio, TV, or film, and stage hand for live sound reinforcement. Office Telephone Faculty 619-388-3933 Robert Kostlan C-202C Certificate of Performance: Audio Production* The Certificate of Performance in Audio Production emphasizes basic musical fundamentals, live sound reinforcement, microphone and recording techniques, and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) sequencing and programming. Courses: Units Music Fundamentals for the Studio MUSC 50 3 Engineer Introduction to Digital Audio and MIDI MUSC 80 3 an 268 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego S D

269 include: recording studio engineer, commercial MUSC 82 Audio Recording 3 music producer or composer, sound designer for 3 Fundamentals of MIDI Production MUSC 84 gaming or TV/film, live sound engineer, synthesizer Total Units = 12 programmer, and retail sales of professional audio. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Employment options for graduates of the of award that does not appear on the student’s Certificate programs include: recording studio transcript. All courses must be completed within the internship, internship at a commercial music house, San Diego Community College District. internships for radio, TV, or film, and stage hand for Note: This program is not eligible for federal live sound reinforcement. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Courses Required for the Major: Units Nursing Education Certificate of Achievement: 3 The Business of Music MUSI 108 Audio Production MUSC 50 Music Fundamentals for the Studio Engineer 3 The Certificate of Achievement in Audio Production MUSC 70 Commercial Music Performance 1 emphasizes basic musical fundamentals, live Introduction to Digital Audio MUSC 80 sound reinforcement, microphone and recording and MIDI 3 techniques, mixing and mastering skills, MIDI MUSC 82 Audio Recording 3 (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) sequencing MUSC 84 Fundamentals of MIDI Production 3 and programming, and audio for multimedia. 3 MUSC 95 Advanced Topics in Music Production Courses: Units 3 Audio Production RTVF 107 MUSC 50 Music Fundamentals for the Studio DMPR 152 Sound Design and Digital Audio Post 3 Engineer 3 Production 1 MUSC 70 Commercial Music Performance Total Units = 25 3 Introduction to Digital Audio and MIDI MUSC 80 3 MUSC 82 Audio Recording MUSC 84 3 Fundamentals of MIDI Production Nursing Education MUSC 95 3 Advanced Topics in Music Production Audio Production RTVF 107 3 Award Type Units DMPR 152 Sound Design and Digital Audio Post 29 LVN – Thirty Unit Option Production 3 Total Units = 22 Associate of Science Degree: 62* Registered Nurse: Generic Licensed Vocational Nurse to Registered Nurse Associate of Science Degree: 45* (Advanced Placement) Digital Music Technology * and courses to meet graduation requirements, The Associate of Science Degree in Digital Music general education and electives as needed to meet Technology emphasizes basic musical fundamentals, the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. live sound reinforcement, microphone and recording techniques, mixing and mastering skills, MIDI Description (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) sequencing and programming, and self-promotion skills using Nursing is a profession which provides health care multimedia and social networking tools specific to to individuals of all ages. Nursing encompasses the music industry. many activities including health promotion, health maintenance, health care during illness and injury Program Goals: and rehabilitation. Nurses apply knowledge from the The goal of the Digital Music Technology Associate biological, physical, behavioral and nursing sciences in Science and Certificate programs is to prepare to care for clients in varied settings. The purpose of students for entry-level positions in the commercial the San Diego City College Nursing program is to music industry. provide an educational opportunity for qualified Career Options: individuals interested in a career in nursing. Career options for graduates of the Associate of Science degree in Digital Music Technology ollege • 2018–2019 ity C iego D an 269 S C

270 function as a client advocate, provide leadership, Admission to the program is by special application. manage resources, delegate and supervise within Information is available on the nursing website the legal scope of practice of the Registered Nurse. at: http://www.sdcity.edu/AcademicPrograms/ Nursing Education The student who completes the ADN program will ProgramsofInstruction/ NursingEducation.aspx . meet the standards of competency, delineated by Applications for the nursing program are the Board of Registered Nursing for the State of also available on the Nursing website at: California and adhere to all policies as written in the http://www.sdcity.edu/AcademicPrograms/ Nursing Student Handbook. ProgramsofInstruction/NursingEducation/ ApplicationProcedure . Prospective students are Career Options responsible for obtaining these materials in order to acquaint themselves with the admission policies The Registered Nurse cares for clients of all ages and and procedures. Information is also available at the may be employed at the entry level in a variety of Nursing workshops, held once a month. Schedule settings such as hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, found on Nursing website. clinics and home health agencies. Many careers in nursing require education beyond the associate The San Diego City College Nursing Education degree. program is fully approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) and the Accreditation Program Learning Outcomes Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). Students who complete the program will be able to: Inquiries regarding accreditation may be made by contacting the BRN at P.O. Box 944210, Sacramento, Apply concepts and skills to successfully pass the • CA 94244, 916-322-3350 or ACEN at 3343 Peachtree NCLEX-RN (National Council Licensure Exam for Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326, 404-975-5000. Registered Nurses) Directed Clinical Practice Requirement • Make clinical judgments and management decisions to ensure accurate and safe client care. Students accepted into this program will be required to successfully complete Directed Clinical Practice/ Practice within the ethical, legal and regulatory • clinically-based courses held in health care facilities. frameworks of professional nursing practice. These facilities require background checks and urine Use standards of nursing practice to perform and • drug screening as a condition of placement. evaluate client care in entry-level practice. Refusal to submit to a background check, or failure Participate in life-long learning. • to meet clearance criteria established by the health care facility, may prevent placement in the Directed Telephone Office Clinical Practice/clinically-based course and thus, it may not be possible to successfully progress in or Nursing Secretary 619-388-3441 V-312N complete the program. Nursing Counselor Health care facilities also require adherence to Laura Renker V-312O 619-388-3897 strict standards of conduct. Facilities may refuse Associate Dean & Director, Nursing Education educational access to any person who does not 619-388-3896 V-312C Raelene Brooks adhere to the facility’s standards of safety, health and ethical behavior. This may be cause for removal Faculty Office Telephone from the program. Dometrives 619-388-3762 V-312B Program Emphasis Armstrong Curriculum and course sequence progress from 619-388-3891 V-312P Petra Beals simple to complex knowledge and skills with J V-312 Sherry Cooper 619-388-3039 emphasis on nursing process, caring, problem 619-388-3228 Theresa Francis V-312M solving and critical thinking. The Associate Degree of Nursing graduate is prepared as a clinician to Anita Johnson V-312E 619-388-3789 think critically, using the nursing process, to safely 619-388-3811 Rhonna Porch V-312D perform nursing care, teach individuals, families, Samantha 619-388-3882 V-312I communities and members of the health care team, Sangsanoi S an D iego 270 C ity ollege C • 2018–2019

271 Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). Faculty Office Telephone Inquiries regarding accreditation may be made 619-388-3894 V-312A Catherine Shafer by contacting the BRN at 400 R Street, Suite 4030, 619-388-3882 V-312G Erelyn Vinegas Sacramento, CA 94244, (916) 322-3350 or ACEN at 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA Alison White V-312F 619-388-3439 30326, (404)975-5000 Academic Programs Award Notes: The Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) requires 6 The Associate of Science Degree in Nursing requires units of Communication, verbal, written and group; completion of the nursing courses. Additional satisfied by ENGL 101 and COMS 103; and 16 units of general education and graduation requirements for Natural, Behavioral and Social sciences; satisfied by the associate degree are listed in the catalog. Nursing Education the BIOL 205, 230 and 235 prerequisites, PSYC 101 & ANTH 103 or SOCO 101 or 110. Associate of Science Degree: Nursing Education This degree is designed to accommodate the differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer Registered Nurse: Generic institutions. Students interested in transfer should The Associate of Science Degree in Nursing (ADN) meet with the nursing education counselor. curriculum prepares entry-level Registered Nurses *It is strongly recommended that all of the general (RN) as providers of care across the health/illness education requirements (including 3 units of continuum and as members within the profession. Humanities and intermediate algebra or higher) The curriculum respects the individuality of the be completed prior to admission to the nursing student and aims to provide a positive, innovative education program or during summer sessions. learning model that fosters the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills Emphasis: so that the Registered Nurse is equipped to Curriculum and course sequence progress from deliver care to a culturally diverse population in a simple to complex knowledge and skills with variety of healthcare settings. Registered Nurses emphasis on nursing process, caring, problem collaborate with members of the health care solving and critical thinking. The ADN graduate team, are effective communicators, are politically is prepared as a clinician to think critically, using aware, and demonstrate a commitment to lifelong the nursing process, to safely perform nursing learning. Upon successful completion of program care, teach individuals, families, communities and requirements, graduates are eligible to take members of the health care team, function as a client the National Council Licensure Examination for advocate, provide leadership, manage resources, Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). delegate and supervise within the legal scope of practice of the Registered Nurse. The student Admission to the program is by special application. who completes the ADN program will meet the Information packets are available online at: standards of competency, delineated by the Board of http://www.sdcity.edu/nursingeducation. Registered Nursing for the State of California. Additional information is available on the nursing website at: http://www.sdcity.edu/ Career Options: AcademicPrograms/ProgramsofInstruction/ The Registered Nurse cares for clients of all ages and NursingEducation.aspx . Applications for the may be employed at the entry level in a variety of nursing program are also available on the Nursing settings such as hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, website at: http://www.sdcity.edu /Portals/0/ clinics and home health agencies. Many careers in AcademicPrograms/Nursing Education/sdcc RN nursing require education beyond the associate . Prospective students are application 5-29 -2013.pdf degree. responsible for obtaining these materials in order to Program Prerequisites: Units acquaint themselves with the admission policies and BIOL 205 5 General Microbiology procedures. BIOL 230 4 Human Anatomy The San Diego City College Nursing Education BIOL 235 Human Physiology 4 program is fully approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) and the Accreditation an iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 271 S D

272 Prospective students are responsible for obtaining Units Courses Required for the Major: these materials in order to acquaint themselves with 3 Reading and Composition ENGL 101 the admission policies and procedures. Nursing Education PSYC 101 General Psychology 3 COMS 103 Oral Communication or The San Diego City College Nursing Education COMS 135 3 Interpersonal Communication program is fully approved by the California Board ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural of Registered Nursing (BRN) and the Accreditation Anthropology or Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). SOCO 101 Principles of Sociology or Inquiries regarding accreditation may be made by SOCO 110 3 Contemporary Social Problems contacting the BRN at P.O. Box 944210, Sacramento, 4.5 Foundations of Nursing NRSE 140 CA 94244, 916-322-3350 or ACEN at 3343 Peachtree Pharmacology for Nursing 1 NRSE 141 Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326. 404-975-5000. NRSE 142 Medical Surgical Nursing I 4.5 Award Notes: 4.5 Medical Surgical Nursing II NRSE 144 The Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) requires 6 Maternal-Child Health Nursing 4.5 NRSE 146 units of Communication, verbal, written and group; NRSE 240 Medical/Surgical Nursing III 4.5 satisfied by ENGL 101 and COMS 103; and 16 units of Mental Health & Gerontological NRSE 242 Natural, Behavioral and Social sciences; satisfied by 4.5 Nursing the BIOL 205, 230 and 235 prerequisites, PSYC 101 & Medical Surgical Nursing IV NRSE 244 4.5 ANTH 103 or SOCO 101 or 110. 4.5 Leadership in Nursing NRSE 246 Total Units = 62 This degree is designed to accommodate the differing requirements of a wide variety of transfer Nursing 92, 121, 108, 143, Recommended electives: institutions. Students interested in transfer should 145, 147, 206, 208, 241, 243, 245, 270. meet with the nursing education counselor. Associate of Science Degree: *It is strongly recommended that part or all of the general education requirements (including 3 units Nursing Education of Humanities and intermediate algebra or higher) Licensed Vocational Nurse to Registered be completed prior to admission to the nursing Nurse (Advanced Placement) education program. The Associate of Science Degree in Nursing (ADN) Emphasis: LVN to RN step-up program curriculum prepares Curriculum and course sequence progress from entry-level Registered Nurses (RN) as providers of simple to complex knowledge and skills with care across the health/illness continuum and as emphasis on nursing process, caring, problem members within the profession. The curriculum solving and critical thinking. The ADN graduate respects the individuality of the student and aims is prepared as a clinician to think critically, using to provide a positive, innovative learning model the nursing process, to safely perform nursing that fosters the development of critical thinking care, teach individuals, families, communities and and problem solving skills so that the Registered members of the health care team, function as a client Nurse is equipped to deliver care to a culturally advocate, provide leadership, manage resources, diverse population in a variety of healthcare settings. delegate and supervise within the legal scope of Registered Nurses collaborate with members of the practice of the Registered Nurse. The student who health care team, are effective communicators, are completes the LVN to RN step-up ADN program politically aware, and demonstrate a commitment will meet the standards of competency, delineated to lifelong learning. Upon successful completion by the Board of Registered Nursing for the State of of program requirements, graduates are eligible to California. take the National Council Licensure Examination for Career Options: Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The Registered Nurse cares for clients of all ages and Admission to the program is by special application. may be employed at the entry level in a variety of Information packets are available online at: settings such as hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, http://www.sdcity.edu/nursingeducation. clinics and home health agencies. Many careers in nursing require education beyond the associate degree. S an D C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 272 iego

273 Admission to the program is by special application. Units Program Prerequisites: Information packets are available online at: BIOL 205 5 General Microbiology http://www.sdcity.edu/nursingeducation. Human Anatomy 4 BIOL 230 BIOL 235 4 Human Physiology Prospective students are responsible for obtaining these materials in order to acquaint themselves with Courses Required for the Major: Units the admission policies and procedures. 3 ENGL 101 Reading and Composition PSYC 101 3 General Psychology The San Diego City College Nursing Education COMS 103 Oral Communication or program is fully approved by the California Board COMS 135 Interpersonal Communication 3 of Registered Nursing (BRN) and the Accreditation ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). Nursing Education or Anthropology Inquiries regarding accreditation may be made by Principles of Sociology or SOCO 101 contacting the BRN at P.O. Box 944210, Sacramento, SOCO 110 Contemporary Social Problems 3 CA 94244, 916-322-3350 or ACEN at 3343 Peachtree 2 NRSE 235 LVN to RN Transition Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326. 404-975-5000. Medical/Surgical Nursing III NRSE 240 4.5 Award Notes: NRSE 242 Mental Health & Gerontological The Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) requires 6 4.5 Nursing units of Communication, verbal, written and group; 4.5 Medical Surgical Nursing IV NRSE 244 satisfied by ENGL 101 and COMS 103; and 16 units NRSE 246 4.5 Leadership in Nursing of Natural, Behavioral and Social Sciences; satisfied Total Units = 45 by the BIOL 205 and 235 prerequisites, PSYC 101 and Nursing 92, 108, 206, 208, Recommended Electives: ANTH 103 or SOCO 101 or 110. 241, 243, 245. *It is strongly recommended that all of the general education requirements be completed prior to Nursing Education admission to the nursing education program. Note: Other States may not recognize the LVN Licensed Vocational Nurse to to RN Thirty Unit Option as a method to satisfy Registered Nurse, Thirty-Unit the requirements for licensure as a Registered Option – Licensure Only (No paper Nurse. Interested candidates are urged to contact award given) the respective Boards of Nursing for additional information. The LVN to RN 30 Unit Option program curriculum prepares entry-level Registered Nurses (RN) Emphasis: as providers of care across the health/illness Curriculum and course sequence progress from continuum and as members within the profession. simple to complex knowledge and skills with The curriculum respects the individuality of the emphasis on nursing process, caring, problem student and aims to provide a positive, innovative solving and critical thinking. The person who learning model that fosters the development completes the LVN to RN 30 Unit Option is prepared of critical thinking and problem solving skills as a clinician to think critically, using the nursing so that the Registered Nurse is equipped to process, to safely perform nursing care, teach deliver care to a culturally diverse population in a individuals, families, communities and members of variety of healthcare settings. Registered Nurses the health care team, function as a client advocate, collaborate with members of the health care provide leadership, manage resources, delegate and team, are effective communicators, are politically supervise within the legal scope of practice of the aware, and demonstrate a commitment to lifelong Registered Nurse. The student who completes the learning. Upon successful completion of program LVN to RN 30 Unit Option will meet the standards of requirements, the person completing the LVN to RN competency, delineated by the Board of Registered 30 Unit Option will be eligible to take the National Nursing for the State of California. Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Career Options: (NCLEX-RN). The Registered Nurse cares for clients of all ages and may be employed at the entry level in a variety of settings such as hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, an D iego ity C ollege • 2018–2019 273 S C

274 clinics and home health agencies. Many careers in Peace Studies nursing require education beyond the associate degree. Peace Studies Units Award Type **Program Prerequisites: Units Certificate of Performance: General Microbiology 5 BIOL 205 16 Peace Studies BIOL 235 Human Physiology 4 Associate of Arts Degree: Courses Required for the Major: Units Peace Studies 26–28* LVN to RN Transition 2 NRSE 235 * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Medical/Surgical Nursing III 4.5 NRSE 240 general education and electives as needed to meet NRSE 242 Mental Health & Gerontological the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Nursing 4.5 NRSE 244 Medical Surgical Nursing IV 4.5 Description Leadership in Nursing 4.5 NRSE 246 Total Units = 29 The Peace Studies Certificate offers an interdisciplinary, theoretical, and practical approach Recommended Electives: Nursing 92, 206, 208, 241, for students to enter into the academic and/or 243, 245. professional field of Peace Studies. Students gain Transfer Information skills to critically analyze current affairs related to peace and conflict. Students evaluate global Common university majors related to the field of consequences of events leading to violent conflict to Nursing Nursing include: offer alternative solutions to create more peaceful, Course Requirements for Transfer Students just and equitable societies. Students who plan to transfer to a four year college or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this Program Goals discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the To provide the opportunity for the student Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate to contemplate, analyze, and discuss issues major preparation courses for their specific transfer related to peace and conflict on all levels; to institution and major. Transfer students may also apply theory in academic disciplines such as earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts literature, anthropology, environmental science and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may and philosophy to the field of peace studies; to be individually tailored to each student’s specific critically think about their role in the world and their transfer requirements in order to provide the most possible contributions to a more peaceful world; to efficient path to transfer. More information on demonstrate theories related to both positive and transfer programs and procedures is available in the negative peace; to gain an understanding of the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. role of human rights and other moral and ethical concepts. Program Emphasis The four main pillars of the Peace Studies program are human rights, conflict studies, peace processes and the concept of justice in relation to peace. The program explores issues related to these four pillars on an inter/intra personal, communal, and global level. An emphasis is placed upon 1) the interdisciplinary nature of addressing issues related to peace and conflict, 2) active participation and involvement in the service learning component of the required capstone course, and 3) affective and analytical responses to concepts related to the four pillars. D 274 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C S an iego

275 PHIL 102B Introduction To Philosophy: Values 3 Career Options: ENGL 101 Reading and Composition or This Associate Degree prepares students to enter Composition and Literature 3 ENGL 105 into academic and professional fields related to Total Units = 16 peace studies. Available career tracks include *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental working for non-profit agencies, international award that does not appear on the student’s organizations, governmental agencies, public transcript. All courses must be completed within the institutions and educational institutions. Students San Diego Community College District. may select a professional or academic focus Peace Studies such as peace building, conflict management, This program is not eligible for federal Note: mediation, international law, international relations, financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. political science, history, environmental science, anthropology, comparative literature, peace Associate of Arts: psychology or philosophy. Most career options Peace Studies directly related to Peace Studies require a four year degree; however, some examples of career options This Associate Degree provides students the tools to may include: Program Coordinator, Human Rights critically analyze issues related to peace, justice, and Advocate, Community Liaison, Relief/Aid Worker, conflict. Peace Activist, Mediator, Resource Developer, Courses Required for the Major: Units Educator, Philanthropist, Environmentalist, PEAC 101 Introduction to Peace Studies 3 Anthropologist, Event Coordinator, and Board 3 PEAC 102 Nonviolence and Conflict Resolution Member for a Non-Profit Organization. BIOL 101 Issues in Environmental Science & Program Learning Outcomes Sustainability 4 Introduction To Philosophy: Values PHIL 102B 3 Define and discuss positive peace, negative • ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 peace and structural violence. 3 POLI 140 Contemporary International Politics • Identify, apply and critically analyze, from an PEAC 201 Environmental Sustainability, Justice interdisciplinary perspective, theories related to 3 and Ethics Peace Studies per current events on a personal, 3 Introduction to Literature ENGL 208 communal, national and/or global level. PEAC 250 1–3 Field Experience In Peace Studies Total Units = 26–28 • Propose specific strategies to achieve positive peace appropriate to a current event on a person, The following groups are recommended electives communal, national and/or global scale. and will not lead to an individual certificate or emphasis but may meet the required 60 units for • Identify, discuss and critically analyze nonviolent the Associate Degree in Peace Studies. movements as a method of conflict resolution. Recommended electives for students interested Telephone Faculty Office in Gender Studies: Gender Studies 101; History 141 (Mesa, Miramar), 142 (Mesa, Miramar); Philosophy MS-540K 619-388-3606 Sarah Pitcher 125, 126; and English 237. Recommended electives for students interested in a Cultural Perspective: Anthropology 210, 215; Certificate of Performance: Black Studies 145A, 145B; Chicana and Chicano Peace Studies* Studies 141A, 141B; Geography 102, 104; and This certificate will provide students the tools to Communication Studies 180. critically analyze issues related to peace, justice, and Recommended electives for students interested conflict. in a Historical Perspective: History 100, 101, 120. Courses: Units Recommended electives for students interested PEAC 101 Introduction to Peace Studies 3 in Philosophy and Ethics: Humanities 106, 202; Issues in Environmental Science & BIOL 101 Philosophy 107, 108. Sustainability 4 ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 S 275 an ollege C ity C iego D • 2018–2019

276 Recommended electives for students interested Academic Programs in Environmental Science and Sustainability: The associate degree in philosophy requires Biology 180; Geographic Information Systems 104, Philosophy completion of the courses listed for the degree. 110; Sociology 223; and Futures Studies 101. Additional general education and graduation Recommended electives for students interested requirements for the associate degree are listed English 205, 220, 221, and 245A. in English: in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Program Learning Outcomes Philosophy • To increase the student’s critical thinking skills Units Award Type in considering fundamental philosophical concerns such as the nature of correct reasoning, Associate of Arts Degree: the scope and limits of human knowledge, Philosophy 18* characteristics of reality and questions of value * and courses to meet graduation requirements, and obligation. general education and electives as needed to meet the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Telephone Faculty Office Soon-Ah Fadness 619-388-4431 BT-103F Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: Philosophy 18–20 William Stewart BT-103H 619-388-3602 Description Associate of Arts: The first objective of the philosophy program is to Philosophy teach students how to think critically emphasizing Units Courses Required for the Major: analytic reasoning. In addition, students are PHIL 100 Logic and Critical Thinking 3 prepared for university-level philosophy courses. 3 PHIL 101 Symbolic Logic The study of philosophy acquaints students with the nature of philosophical activity and helps them Select one of the two-semester sequences: increase critical thinking skills about fundamental PHIL 102A Introduction To Philosophy: Reality philosophic concerns such as the nature of 3 and Knowledge correct reasoning, the scope and limits of human and knowledge, characteristics of reality and questions Introduction To Philosophy: Values 3 PHIL 102B of value and obligation. Philosophy relates to many or other academic disciplines and stresses systematic History Of Western Philosophy PHIL 104A 3 and abstract thought. and PHIL 104B History of Western Philosophy 3 Program Emphasis Select 6 units from: The Philosophy curriculum meets general education Introduction To Philosophy: Reality PHIL 102A Humanities requirements for both the associate and Knowledge 3 degree and universities, and prepares for transfer to 3 Introduction To Philosophy: Values PHIL 102B university majors History Of Western Philosophy PHIL 104A 3 History of Western Philosophy 3 PHIL 104B Career Options: PHIL 106 Asian Philosophy 3 Most careers in this list require education beyond PHIL 107 Reflections on Human Nature 3 the associate degree. A sample list of careers in 3 PHIL 110 Philosophy of Religion which background knowledge of philosophy is 3 Philosophy In Literature PHIL 111 appropriate include: education, human service Philosophy of Women PHIL 125 3 vocations, law, management, medicine, publishing, Independent Study 1–3 PHIL 290 scientific research, teaching, and theology. PHIL 296 Individualized Instruction in Philosophy 0.5 – 2 Total Units = 18 ity • 2018–2019 ollege S an 276 D iego C C

277 Recommended electives: majors. It is also accepted by some private/ Humanities 106; Philosophy 205. independent or out of state universities. ) is accepted by all • The CSU GE pattern (page 12 5 Transfer Information CSU campuses and some private/independent or Common university majors related to the field out of state universities. It is not accepted by the of Philosophy include: Human Communication, UC system. Liberal Studies, Philosophy, Religious Studies, It is strongly recommended that students consult Philosophy Pre-Law. with a counselor to determine which general Course Requirements for Transfer Students education option is most appropriate for their Students who plan to transfer to a four year college individual educational goals. or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 CSU- discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the transferable units required for the degree. Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate major preparation courses for their specific transfer The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T institution and major. Transfer students may also degrees: earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may No more than 60 units are required. be individually tailored to each student’s specific transfer requirements in order to provide the most Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in efficient path to transfer. More information on all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum transfer programs and procedures is available in the of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses Transfer Programs section of the catalog. and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. Associate in Arts in Philosophy for Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an Transfer Degree: “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of C or The Associate in Arts in Philosophy for Transfer bet ter. Degree is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy or Certified completion of the California State a related major in the California State University University General Education-Breadth pattern (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all (CSU GE; see page 12 5 for more information); OR CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree the Intersegmental General Education Transfer and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 117 for more required to complete no more than 60 units after information). transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be Program Goals: appropriate preparation for students transferring The purpose of the Associate in Arts in Philosophy to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. for Transfer degree is to offer an organized course Students who plan to complete this degree should of study that will prepare students intending to consult a counselor for additional information about major in Philosophy at the California State University participating CSU campuses as well as university (CSU). It is accepted by some but not all CSU admission, degree and transfer requirements. campuses. Students who complete this degree NOTE: Students intending to transfer into this major and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be at a CSU should consult with a counselor and visit required to complete no more than 60 units after for guidance on appropriate transfer www.assist.org transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be coursework. appropriate preparation for students transferring to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Award Notes: Students who plan to complete this degree should General Education: In addition to the courses listed consult a counselor for additional information about above, students must complete one of the following participating CSU campuses as well as university general education options: admission, degree and transfer requirements. The IGETC pattern (page 117 • ) is accepted by all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and • 2018–2019 C ity C iego D an 277 S ollege

278 SPAN 102 5 Second Course in Spanish Career Options: SPAN 201 Third Course in Spanish 5 Careers related to this field typically require 5 education beyond the associate degree level and Spanish for Spanish Speakers I SPAN 215 Photography some may require a graduate degree. Total Units = 18–20 Units Courses Required for the Major: or PHIL 100 Logic and Critical Thinking Photography 3 Symbolic Logic PHIL 101 Introduction To Philosophy: Reality PHIL 102A Units Award Type and Knowledge or Certificate of Performance: Introduction To Philosophy: Values PHIL 102B 3 Digital Photography 10 List A – Select one course from the following 11 Freelance Photography or any course not selected from the required Certificate of Achievement: courses (3 units): Photography 42 PHIL 104A History Of Western Philosophy 3 Associate of Arts Degree: History of Western Philosophy 3 PHIL 104B Photography 42* PHIL 105 3 Contemporary Philosophy 3 Asian Philosophy PHIL 106 * and courses to meet graduation requirements, PHIL 111 Philosophy In Literature 3 general education and electives as needed to meet PHIL 205 Critical Thinking and Writing in the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. 3 Philosophy ENGL 105 Composition and Literature 3 Description Critical Thinking and Intermediate ENGL 205 The photography program offers a wide range 3 Composition of theory, technique and skills course work from List B – Select two courses from the following or beginning through advanced levels. The program any course not selected from required courses or is structured to emphasize the development of List A (6 units): creative expression, visual awareness, and technical HIST 105 Introduction to Western Civilization I 3 skills required to enter the photography field or to 3 Introduction to Western Civilization II HIST 106 prepare for transfer to four-year institutions. PHIL 107 Reflections on Human Nature 3 PHIL 108 Perspectives on Human Nature and Program Emphasis 3 Society The certificate of achievement program and the List C – Select one course from the following or associate degree, Visual and Performing Arts, any course not already selected from required Photography Emphasis, is designed for students courses, List A or List B (3–5 units): seeking employment in the photography field. PHIL 125 3 Philosophy of Women Career Options PHIL 126 Introduction to Philosophy of Contemporary Gender Issues 3 This list is not all-inclusive. Some careers require Philosophy of Art and Music 3 PHIL 130 education beyond the associate degree: advertising Introduction to the Humanities I 3 HUMA 101 photographer, commercial photographer, fashion HUMA 102 Introduction to the Humanities II 3 photographer, food photographer, editorial HUMA 103 Introduction to the New Testament 3 photographer/journalist, industrial photographer, HUMA 106 World Religions 3 portrait/wedding photographer, photo researcher, HUMA 201 Mythology 3 photographic artist, photographic printer, SUST 102 3 Environmental Ethics photography instructor, photo laboratory technician, AMSL 116 American Sign Language Level II 4 stock photographer. American Sign Language Level III 4 AMSL 215 4 AMSL 216 American Sign Language Level IV Program Learning Outcomes 5 Second Course in Arabic ARAB 102 Upon successful completion students will be able to: ARAB 201A Third Course in Arabic 5 ITAL 102 Second Course in Italian 5 • Demonstrate competent use of reciprocal 5 Third Course in Italian ITAL 201 exposures utilizing shutter speeds and apertures. C ollege D 278 iego an S C ity • 2018–2019

279 Courses Required for the Major: • Utilize compositional elements in the creation of Units original photographs in various formats. PHOT 143 3 Introduction to Digital Photography 3 Photo Editing: Lightroom PHOT 180 Develop black and white film and make gelatin • PHOT 243 Advanced Digital Photography 3 silver prints in a traditional darkroom. PHOT 224 Color Management for Digital • Utilize Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop in digital Photography 1 color correction and image manipulation. Total Units = 10 Demonstrate an understanding of the history • Faculty recommend students complete classes Note: Photography of photography and the role of photographs in in the order presented. today’s society. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental • Illustrate abilities in various professional award that does not appear on the student’s presentation techniques utilizing archival transcript. All courses must be completed within the mounting and matting materials. San Diego Community College District. Apply theories and principles of photographic • This program is not eligible for federal Note: light and lighting control for both film and digital financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. capture. Certificate of Performance*: Create a marketing plan and business materials • such as letterhead and business cards. Freelance Photography Produce professional quality, colorcorrected • The Freelance Photography Certificate of photographs utilizing archival pigment and Performance prepares students for entry- chromogenic materials. level employment and/or self-employment in commercial photography. Emphasis is placed on the Produce professional portfolios suitable for • fundamentals of digital photography, photography sharing with potential clients or gradschool business best practices, image manipulation entrance. and retouching, and the award culminates in the development of a comprehensive online portfolio to Academic Programs showcase the technical and creative aspects of the The associate degree in Photography requires student’s work. completion of the courses listed below. Additional Units Courses Required for the Major: general education and graduation requirements for the associate degree are listed in the catalog. PHOT 125 Photo Business Operations 2 PHOT 143 Introduction to Digital Photography 3 The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 Photo Editing: Lightroom 3 PHOT 180 units. PHOT 165 Online Portfolio: Websites for Photographers 3 Faculty Office Telephone Total Units = 11 David Eichinger V-414C 619-388-3368 Note: Faculty recommend PHOT 143 be taken in the 619-388-3649 David King V-414B first semester. *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental Certificate of Performance*: award that does not appear on the student’s Digital Photography transcript. All courses must be completed within the The Digital Photography Certificate of Performance San Diego Community College District. prepares students for entry-level employment and/ This program is not eligible for federal Note: or self-employment in commercial photography. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of digital photography, including capture, image manipulation, retouching, and color management. Students develop a comprehensive portfolio to showcase the technical and creative aspects of their work. 279 • 2018–2019 S C ity C iego D an ollege

280 Associate of Arts Degree: Certificate of Achievement: Visual and Performing Arts Visual and Performing Arts Photography Photography Photography Courses Required for the Major: Units Units Courses Required for the Major: Intro to Black & White Photography 3 3 Intro to Black & White Photography PHOT 100 PHOT 100 Photographic Composition and Photographic Composition and PHOT 109 PHOT 109 Design 3 Design 3 2 Photo Business Operations PHOT 125 2 Photo Business Operations PHOT 125 3 PHOT 143 PHOT 143 Introduction to Digital Photography 3 Introduction to Digital Photography PHOT 150 History of Photography 3 PHOT 150 History of Photography 3 3 PHOT 180 PHOT 180 Photo Editing: Lightroom 3 Photo Editing: Lightroom Photographic Lighting Techniques 4 4 Photographic Lighting Techniques PHOT 200A PHOT 200A PHOT 259 3 The Photographic Portfolio 3 The Photographic Portfolio PHOT 259 Select a minimum of 6 units from: Select a minimum of 6 units from: PHOT 203 Intermediate Lighting Techniques 4 PHOT 203 4 Intermediate Lighting Techniques PHOT 220 Portraiture 3 Portraiture PHOT 220 3 3 3 PHOT 230 Advertising Photography PHOT 230 Advertising Photography PHOT 240 3 Large Format Photography 3 Large Format Photography PHOT 240 PHOT 250 Fashion Photography 3 Fashion Photography PHOT 250 3 Wedding and Event Photography 2 PHOT 257 2 Wedding and Event Photography PHOT 257 Select a minimum of 9 units from: Select a minimum of 9 units from: PHOT 135 Intermediate Black & White Intermediate Black & White PHOT 135 3 Photography Photography 3 PHOT 165 PHOT 165 Online Portfolio: Websites for Online Portfolio: Websites for Photographers 3 3 Photographers 3 Travel Photography Travel Photography PHOT 205 PHOT 205 3 Photo Journalism and Documentary PHOT 215 Photo Journalism and Documentary PHOT 215 Photography Photography 3 3 Advanced Black and White Advanced Black and White PHOT 235 PHOT 235 Photography 3 Photography 3 PHOT 243 Advanced Digital Photography 3 PHOT 243 Advanced Digital Photography 3 Landscape and Nature Photography 3 3 Landscape and Nature Photography PHOT 245 PHOT 245 Select a minimum of 3 units from: Select a minimum of 3 units from: 2 2 Legal Issues for Photographers PHOT 126 Legal Issues for Photographers PHOT 126 Self Promotion for Professional PHOT 127 PHOT 127 Self Promotion for Professional 2 2 Photographers Photographers PHOT 145 PHOT 145 2 2 Color Transparency Photography Color Transparency Photography 1.5 Book Publishing for Photographers PHOT 160 PHOT 160 Book Publishing for Photographers 1.5 PHOT 237 Historic & Alternative Photo Historic & Alternative Photo PHOT 237 Processes Processes 3 3 PHOT 258 Production for Commercial PHOT 258 Production for Commercial 2 Photography 2 Photography Freehand Drawing I 3 ARTF 155A ARTF 155A Freehand Drawing I 3 Total Units = 42 Total Units = 42 Recommended electives: Photography 102, 103, Suggested courses for Photography 270, 290, 296. PHOT 180, 181, 235, Fine Arts, Design Emphasis: Suggested courses for Photography Advertising, 240. Commercial Emphasis: PHOT 125, 220, 230, 240, 250. • 2018–2019 S an D iego C ity C ollege 280

281 Transfer Information Career Options Common university majors related to the field Most careers in earth and physical sciences fields Art, Art and Design, Art of Photography include: require education beyond the associate degree Photography, Communication, Film and Electronic and many require a graduate degree. A brief list Arts, Photography, Visual and Public Arts. of career options in the physical sciences includes: Physics astronomer, biophysicist, biochemist, chemist, earth Course Requirements for Transfer Students scientist, environmentalist, geographer, geologist, Students who plan to transfer to a four year college geophysicist, meteorologist, oceanographer, or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this paleontologist, physicist and physical science discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the instructor. Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate major preparation courses for their specific transfer Program Learning Outcomes institution and major. Transfer students may also earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts Upon successful completion students will be able to: and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation • be individually tailored to each student’s specific of the scientific method. transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on Communicate an understanding of the • transfer programs and procedures is available in the connections between science and other human Transfer Programs section of the catalog. activities. Examine the universe in a variety of courses. • Utilize critical thinking skills in a variety of • Physics scientific applications. Award Type Units Faculty Telephone Office Associate of Science Degree: Physics 38* Lorenza Levy S-211F 619-388-3713 619-388-3356 S-211E Gerardo Scappaticci * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet S-211C Lisa Will 619-388-3364 the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Academic Programs Associate in Science for Transfer Degree: Physics 28 The associate degrees in Physical and Earth Sciences, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geography, Geology and Description Physics, require completion of the courses listed for each degree. Additional general education and Earth and physical sciences, including astronomy, graduation requirements for the associate degree chemistry, geography, geographic information The associate degree are listed in the catalog. systems, geology, and physics are disciplines requires a minimum of 60 units. classified as natural sciences. They generally involve nonliving materials and the principles of Transfer Information fundamental relationships and laws in the universe. Common university majors related to the field of Program Emphasis Physical and Earth Sciences include: Astronomy, Biochemistry, Chemical Engineering, Chemical These programs are designed to prepare students Physics, Chemistry, Earth Studies and Sciences, with basic concepts in astronomy, chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, Geographic Information geography, geology and physics which provide Systems, Geography, Geology, Hydrologic Science, the foundation for upper division study in a Meteorology and Oceanography, Physical Sciences, baccalaureate institution and also satisfy general Physics. education requirements. Course Requirements for Transfer Students Students who plan to transfer to a four year college or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this • 2018–2019 an D iego S C ity C ollege 281

282 transfer that may be articulated prep for the major to discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the the transfer CSU. Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate major preparation courses for their specific transfer Physics It is strongly recommended that students consult institution and major. Transfer students may also with a counselor to determine which general earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts education option is most appropriate for their and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may individual educational goals. be individually tailored to each student’s specific transfer requirements in order to provide the most It is recommended that students intending Note: to transfer to San Diego State University (SDSU) BS efficient path to transfer. More information on in Physics, General Physics or BS in Physics, Modern transfer programs and procedures is available in the Optics should complete the courses marked with a Transfer Programs section of the catalog. “#”. Students intending to transfer into this major at other CSUs should consult a counselor and Associate of Science Degree: for guidance on appropriate visit www.assist.org Physical and Earth Sciences coursework. Physics *Course also fulfills general education requirements Units for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. Courses Required for the Major: CHEM 200 General Chemistry I – Lecture 3 # This course fulfills SDSU’s lower division 2 CHEM 200L General Chemistry I – Laboratory preparation for the major in BS in Physics, General 3 General Chemistry II – Lecture CHEM 201 Physics or the BS in Physics, Modern Optics, under General Chemistry II – Laboratory CHEM 201L 2 the TMC. 5 MATH 150 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I In addition to the courses listed General Education: 4 MATH 151 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II above, students must complete one of the following Calculus with Analytic Geometry III MATH 252 4 general education options: PHYS 195 Mechanics 5 Electricity and Magnetism 5 PHYS 196 • ) is accepted by The IGETC pattern (page 118 5 PHYS 197 Waves, Optics, and Modern Physics all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and Total Units = 38 majors. It is also accepted by some private/ independent or out of state universities. Recommended electives: Physics 125, 126, 290; Astronomy 101 and 109. ) is accepted by all • The CSU GE pattern (page 126 CSU campuses and some private/independent or Associate in Science in Physics for out of state universities. It is not accepted by the UC system. Transfer Degree: Electives as needed to meet maximum of 60 Program Description: CSU-transferable units required for the degree. The Associate in Science in Physics for Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan to Career Options: complete a bachelor’s degree in Physics or a related Careers related to this field typically require major in the California State University (CSU) system. education beyond the associate degree level and It is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. some may require a graduate degree. Students who complete this degree and transfer Courses Required for the Major: Units to a participating CSU campus will be required to complete no more than 60 units after transfer to PHYS 195 Mechanics *# 5 earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate 5 PHYS 196 Electricity and Magnetism *# preparation for students transferring to a CSU 5 PHYS 197 Waves, Optics and Modern Physics *# campus that does not accept the degree. Students 5 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I *# MATH 150 who plan to complete this degree should consult 4 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II *# MATH 151 a counselor for additional information about MATH 252 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III *# 4 participating CSU campuses as well as university Total Units = 28 admission, degree and transfer requirements. It is recommended to take additional courses prior to an D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 282 S

283 • Identify and describe main concepts in the study Political Science of political science including, but not limited to, political power, sovereignty, nation-state; Units Award Type legitimacy; authority, political culture, political socialization, political ideology; social contract; Associate of Arts Degree: separation of powers; federalism; unitary system; Political Science 18* rule of law and globalization. * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet Faculty Office Telephone the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. 619-388-3696 Nicholas Boushee MS-438 Political Science Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: 619-388-3747 Masahiro Omae MS-440J 18–19 Political Science Academic Programs Description The associate degree in Political Science requires completion of courses listed below. Additional The primary objectives of the Political Science general education and graduation requirements for program are to meet general education the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The requirements for American Institutions and Social associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Sciences for the associate degree and to complete general education requirements for baccalaureate degrees. Political science is the study of human Associate of Arts Degree: behavior as it relates to political situations. It involves Political Science the examination of institutions, processes, people, Courses Required for the Major: Units ideas and policies. The study of political science World History I 3 HIST 100 develops cultural literacy, critical thinking and other and useful skills. World History II HIST 101 3 Program Emphasis or Introduction to Western HIST 105 San Diego City College offers four courses in Political Civilization I 3 Science: Political Science 101, 102, 103 and 140. and Completion of Political Science 101, 102 and 103 Introduction to Western HIST 106 provides the student with lower division preparation 3 Civilization II for a baccalaureate degree in Political Science at San POLI 101 3 Introduction to Political Science Diego State University. The American Political System 3 POLI 102 3 Comparative Politics POLI 103 Career Options MATH 119 or Elementary Statistics Most careers in political science require education PSYC 258 3 Behavioral Science Statistics beyond the associate degree and some require Total Units = 18 a graduate degree. This is not a comprehensive Recommended electives: Political Science 140, 290, list but some of the most common career options 296. with political science preparation include: public administrator, budget analyst, city planner, diplomatic corps member, elected official, legislative Associate in Arts in Political Science aide, journalist, lawyer, lobbyist, political scientist, for Transfer Degree: public opinion surveyor, teacher and writer. Program Description: Program Learning Outcomes The Associate in Arts in Political Science for Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan to Upon successful completion the student will be able complete a bachelor’s degree in Political Science to: or a related major in the California State University • Critically analyze the study of human behavior (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all as it relates to political situations in college-level CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree essays, written assignments, and research papers. and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be D 283 • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C S iego an

284 Electives as needed to meet maximum of 60 required to complete no more than 60 units after CSU-transferable units required for the degree. transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate preparation for students transferring Political Science Career Options: to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Careers related to this field typically require Students who plan to complete this degree should education beyond the associate degree level and consult a counselor for additional information about some may require a graduate degree. participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. Courses Required for the Major: Units 3 The American Political System *# POLI 102 It is strongly recommended that students consult with a counselor to determine which general Select three courses (9 semester units) from the education option is most appropriate for their (It is recommended that students select following: individual educational goals. courses that meet lower division major preparation requirements for their transfer university.) Program Learning Outcomes: Introduction to Political Science *# POLI 101 3 Upon successful completion the student will be able POLI 103 Comparative Politics *# 3 to: 3 POLI 140 Contemporary International Politics *# PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics *# or • Critically analyze the study of human behavior Elementary Statistics *# 3 MATH 119 as it relates to political situations in college-level essays, written assignments, and research papers. Select two courses (6 semester units) if not (It is selected above from the following: • Identify and describe main concepts in the study recommended that students select courses that meet of political science including but not limited lower division major preparation requirements for their to political power, sovereignty, nation-state; transfer university.) legitimacy; authority, political culture, political Financial Accounting ACCT 116A 4 socialization, political ideology; social contract; ANTH 103 Introduction to Cultural separation of powers; federalism; unitary system; Anthropology * 3 rule of law and globalization. Business Law and the Legal BUSE 140 Note: It is recommended that students intending 3 Environment to transfer to San Diego State University (SDSU) ECON 120 Principles of Macroeconomics * 3 in Political Science should complete the courses ECON 121 Principles of Microeconomics * 3 marked with a “#”. Students intending to transfer 3 Composition and Literature * ENGL 105 into this major at other CSUs should consult a Critical Thinking and Intermediate ENGL 205 for guidance on counselor and visit www.assist.org 3 Composition * appropriate coursework. GEOG 102 3 Cultural Geography * World History II * 3 HIST 101 *Course also fulfills general education requirements Introduction to Western Civilization I * HIST 105 3 for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. 3 Introduction to Western Civilization II * HIST 106 # This course fulfills SDSU’s lower division PEAC 102 Nonviolence and Conflict Resolution * 3 preparation for the major in Political Science under 3 Introduction to Political Science *# POLI 101 the TMC. POLI 103 Comparative Politics * 3 3 POLI 140 Contemporary International Politics *# General Education: In addition to the courses listed or PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics *# above, students must complete one of the following 3 Elementary Statistics *# MATH 119 general education options: Total Units = 18–19 The IGETC pattern (page 118 • ) is accepted by Course Requirements for Transfer Students all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and Students who plan to transfer to a four year college majors. It is also accepted by some private/ or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this independent or out of state universities. discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the • The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate CSU campuses and some private/independent or major preparation courses for their specific transfer out of state universities. It is not accepted by the institution and major. Transfer students may also UC system. S ollege C ity • 2018–2019 iego D 284 an C

285 earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts Career Options and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Most career options directly related to psychology be individually tailored to each student’s specific require graduate level degrees. However, there are transfer requirements in order to provide the most several applied and paraprofessional occupations efficient path to transfer. More information on that may not require education beyond the associate transfer programs and procedures is available in the degree. The following is a sample of the many career Transfer Programs section of the catalog. options available with preparation in this major Psychology beyond the associate degree: advertising researcher, clinical psychologist, community college instructor, Psychology school counselor, counseling psychologist, drug abuse counselor, employment counselor, Award Type Units engineering psychologist, industrial psychologist, Certificate of Achievement: manager, marriage and family counselor, mental 19 Mental Health Work health worker, organizational psychologist, personnel analyst, probation officer, psychometrist, Associate of Arts Degree: and research psychologist. Psychology 18* Program Learning Outcomes * and courses to meet graduation requirements, general education and electives as needed to meet Students who complete the program will be able to: the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. • Describe the field of psychology including its Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: philosophical, theoretical, and scientific roots and Psychology 18–21 the multitude of professional options. Explain how the scientific method lends itself to • Description the goals of psychological research and statistical Psychology is a behavioral science that emphasizes analysis of research data. the understanding of behavior (feelings, actions, • Distinguish between various components of and thoughts) of individuals. It should be noted that the nervous system, and explain how they work psychology typically focuses on the study of humans together to influence behavior and mental health though psychologists have interests in other species. processes. Psychology as a science is most closely related to the biological sciences, although its application Analyze the influence of biological and • often involves personal and/or cultural philosophical environmental factors in the development of beliefs or values. Students who major in psychology psychological processes such as sensation & are expected to be able to think critically and perception, learning, memory, intelligence, scientifically about behavior, and be able to apply personality, emotion, motivation, sexuality, the principles of psychology to the understanding of mental health and social behavior. behavior. Telephone Office Faculty Program Emphasis MS-540J 619-388-3651 Kristen Cole The psychology program has two primary goals. 619-388-3238 Veronica Ortega MS-540H The first is to provide the basic science courses 619-388-3371 MS-533 Marie St. George that are foundations for further understanding of other courses in psychology and related fields as Kim Sweeney 619-388-3691 MS-532 well as preparation for transfer to other institutions for further study. The second goal is to provide Academic Programs courses that may include additional information The associate degree in Behavioral Sciences with an regarding psychology that are of general interest to emphasis in Psychology requires completion of the community college students or are applications of courses listed below. Additional general education psychological principles. and graduation requirements for the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. • 2018–2019 an D iego C ity S C ollege 285

286 PSYC 258 Behavioral Science Statistics or Certificate of Achievement: MATH 119 3 Elementary Statistics Behavioral Sciences PSYC 260 Introduction to Physiological Psychology 3 Psychology Mental Health Work Select two courses from the following: This certificate program is designed to prepare 3 PSYC 137 Human Sexual Behavior entry-level mental health workers for the workforce Introduction to Social Psychology PSYC 166 3 and to serve as a stepping stone toward higher 3 PSYC 211 Learning academic degrees in the field of mental health. 3 Psychology of Lifespan Development PSYC 230 Potential entry-level mental health work positions 3 Abnormal Psychology PSYC 245 include: mental health technician, social services Total Units = 18 assistant, residential home counselor, child care worker assistant, counselor aid, gerontology aid, : Current lower division psychology SDSU Note research assistant, youth counselor, foster care course requirements for San Diego State University worker, behavior analyst, case management aid, psychology majors are met by the City College family services aid, patient care specialist and patient Associate of Arts degree, Psychology Emphasis. advocate assistant. Consult with a counselor for other District requirements. Note: Students must complete all required courses within ten years in order to receive the Mental Health Transfer Information Work Certificate of Achievement. Common university majors related to the Career Options field of Psychology include: Behavioral Science, Employment options for students who complete Biopsychology, Clinical Psychology, Cognitive the Certificate of Achievment in Mental Health Work Psychology, Cognitive Science, Counseling, include Mental Health Worker/Counselor, Behavioral Developmental Psychology, Psychobiology, Health Technician/Educator, Peer Mentor, Residential Psychology, Social Psychology. Counselor, Outreach Worker and Patient Care Course Requirements for Transfer Students Specialist. Students who plan to transfer to a four year college Courses Required for the Major: Units or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this PSYC 101 3 General Psychology discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the PSYC 130 Introduction to Community Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate 3 Psychology major preparation courses for their specific transfer 3 Introduction to Counseling PSYC 161 institution and major. Transfer students may also PSYC 245 Abnormal Psychology 3 earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts HUMS 95 Public Assistance and Benefits and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Program 1 be individually tailored to each student’s specific HUMS 105 Family Support Model 3 transfer requirements in order to provide the most 3 Field Work in Psychological Services PSYC 276 efficient path to transfer. More information on Total Units = 19 transfer programs and procedures is available in the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Note: The Psychology Department recommends that students take PSYC 276 Field Work in Associate in Arts in Psychology for Psychological Services in their final semester. Transfer Degree: Associate of Arts Degree: The Associate in Arts in Psychology for Transfer Behavioral Sciences Degree is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in Psychology or Psychology a related major in the California State University Courses Required for the Major: Units (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree PSYC 101 General Psychology 3 and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be Introduction to Psychological PSYC 255 required to complete no more than 60 units after Research 3 ollege • 2018–2019 ity C iego D an S 286 C

287 Select one of the following courses (not selected transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be above) to meet the lower division preparation for appropriate preparation for students transferring the major to your transfer university : to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. BIOL 210A Introduction to the Biological Students who plan to complete this degree should consult a counselor for additional information about 4 Sciences I* BIOL 230 participating CSU campuses as well as university Human Anatomy* 4 CHEM 100 admission, degree and transfer requirements. Fundamentals of Chemistry* 3 CHEM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry Psychology It is strongly recommended that students consult 1 Laboratory* with a counselor to determine which general CHEM 130 Introduction to Organic and Biological education option is most appropriate for their Chemistry* 3 individual educational goals. Introduction to Organic and Biological CHEM 130L 1 Chemistry Laboratory* Program Learning Outcomes: Human Growth and Development* CHIL 101 Students who complete the program will be able to: 3 ENGL 105 Composition and Literature* 3 Describe the field of psychology including its • ENGL 205 Critical Thinking and Intermediate philosophical, theoretical, and scientific roots and 3 Composition* the multitude of professional options. MATH 104 Trigonometry* 3 College and Matrix Algebra* MATH 116 • Explain how the scientific method lends itself to 3 MATH 118 3 the goals of psychological research and statistical A Survey of Modern Math* Basic Techniques of Applied MATH 121 analysis of research data. 3 Calculus I* Distinguish between various components of • Precalculus* 5 MATH 141 the nervous system, and explain how they work 5 PHYS 125 General Physics* together to influence behavior and mental health PHYS 126 General Physics II* 5 processes. 4 PHYS 180A General Physics I* Analyze the influence of biological and • and 4 General Physics II* PHYS 180B environmental factors in the development of PHYS 181A 1 General Physics Laboratory I psychological processes such as sensation & perception, learning, memory, intelligence, and PHYS 181B personality, emotion, motivation, sexuality, General Physics Laboratory II* 1 3 mental health and social behavior. PSYC 155 Introduction to Personality* 3 PSYC 166 Introduction to Social Psychology* Note: Students intending to transfer into this Learning* PSYC 211 3 major at other CSUs should consult a counselor and Psychology of Lifespan Development* PSYC 230 3 visit www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate PSYC 260 Introduction to Physiological coursework. Psychology* 3 Units Courses Required for the Major: SOCO 101 3 Principles of Sociology* Contemporary Social Problems* 3 SOCO 110 3 General Psychology* PSYC 101 PSYC 255 Introduction to Psychological If needed to total 18 units, select one of the Research 3 following courses (not completed above) to meet or Elementary Statistics* MATH 119 the lower division preparation for the major Behavioral Science and Statistics* 3 PSYC 258 : to your transfer university Introduction to the Biological BIOL 210A Select one of the following courses: 4 Sciences I* General Biology – Lecture and BIOL 107 4 BIOL 230 Human Anatomy* Laboratory* 4 3 Fundamentals of Chemistry* CHEM 100 or Fundamentals of Chemistry CHEM 100L Introduction to Physiological PSYC 260 Laboratory* 1 Psychology* 3 Introduction to Organic and Biological CHEM 130 Chemistry* 3 Introduction to Organic and Biological CHEM 130L Chemistry Laboratory* 1 ity 287 • 2018–2019 ollege an S D iego C C

288 out of state universities. It is not accepted by the Human Growth and Development* CHIL 101 3 UC system. C/C++ Programming CISC 192 4 ENGL 105 Composition and Literature* 3 Radio, Television and Film It is strongly recommended that students consult ENGL 205 Critical Thinking * 3 with a counselor to determine which general MATH 104 Trigonometry* 3 education option is most appropriate for their MATH 116 College and Matrix Algebra* 3 individual educational goals. MATH 118 A Survey of Modern Math* 3 MATH 121 Basic Techniques of Applied Electives as needed to meet maximum of 60 3 CSU-transferable units required for the degree. Calculus I* 5 Precalculus* MATH 141 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I* 5 MATH 150 MATH 151 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II* 4 Radio, Television 3 PHIL 100 Logic and Critical Thinking* PHIL 205 Critical Thinking and Writing in and Film Philosophy* 3 General Physics* 5 PHYS 125 Units Award Type General Physics II* PHYS 126 5 Certificate of Performance: 4 PHYS 180A General Physics I* Broadcast News 9 and Digital Media Production 9 4 PHYS 180B General Physics II* Film Production 9 General Physics Laboratory I* 1 PHYS 181A Media, Management & Marketing 9 and Performance 9 1 General Physics Laboratory II* PHYS 181B Radio 9 PSYC 111 Psychological/Social Aspects of Aging, 9 Video Production Death and Dying* 3 Marriage and Family Relations* PSYC 135 3 Certificate of Achievement: Human Sexual Behavior* PSYC 137 3 Broadcast News 16 3 Introduction to Personality* PSYC 155 Digital Media Production 15 3 PSYC 161 Introduction to Counseling* 15 Film Production PSYC 165 Theories of Consciousness* 3 15 Media, Management & Marketing PSYC 166 Introduction to Social Psychology* 3 Radio 15 PSYC 211 Learning* 3 Video Production 15 PSYC 230 Psychology of Lifespan Development* 3 Associate of Science Degree: PSYC 245 Abnormal Psychology* 3 28* Broadcast News PSYC 260 Introduction to Physiological 27* Film Production Psychology* 3 Radio 25–26* Principles of Sociology* SOCO 101 3 27* Video Production 3 Contemporary Social Problems* SOCO 110 * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Total Units = 18–21 general education and electives as needed to meet the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. *Course also fulfills general education requirements for the CSU GE or IGETC pattern. Associate in Science for Transfer Degree: General Education: In addition to the courses listed Film, Television, and Electronic Media 18 above, students must complete one of the following general education options: Description • The IGETC pattern (page 118 ) is accepted by The Radio and Television program encompasses all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and the fields of broadcasting and cablecasting news, majors. It is also accepted by some private/ radio, television, film, multimedia, and concert independent or out of state universities. productions, along with the expanding area of industrial video applications. The field includes all • The CSU GE pattern (page 126 ) is accepted by all aspects of creation and production both behind and CSU campuses and some private/independent or in front of cameras and microphones on KSDS-FM S an D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 288

289 produce audio, video, film and or digital media and the television production facilities through projects, and direct or perform as voice over or on- theoretical and practical applications. The Radio and camera talent. Television Department seeks to prepare the student for transfer to four-year institutions or employment The Radio and Television Department seeks to in the field and facilitates training in television prepare the student for transfer to four-year production and performance. institutions and/or employment in the field. Program Emphasis Program Learning Outcomes In addition to the core courses, the Radio and Upon successful completion of one of the emphasis Television program offers six areas of specialization: in Radio/TV the student should be able to: Radio; Broadcast News; Video Production; • Documentary/Film; Media Management and Analyze media’s impact on the public. Marketing; and Digital Media Production. • Operate audio, video or film equipment. Prospective students are advised that proficiency Radio, Television and Film Produce audio, video, film or multimedia projects. • in English reading and writing skills is necessary for successful participation in the field. Students Direct or perform as voice or acting talent. • pursuing the Broadcast News specialty should take additional courses in social sciences or Office Faculty Telephone political science. Students interested in the Media 619-388-3043 Laura Castañeda C-205F Management and Marketing specialization are C-205E Chris Acedo 619-388-3042 advised to take business courses as electives. The Radio and Television Department offers “hands-on” C-205D 619-388-3041 Cy Kuckenbaker experience in all areas of the field. Through the use of the San Diego City College radio station, KSDS- Academic Programs FM, 88.3, and related facilities, students may focus The associate degrees in Radio and Television require on radio, news, management, sales performance completion of the courses listed below. Additional and production. The college’s television production general education and graduation requirements for studio provides state-of-the-art broadcast quality The the associate degree are listed in the catalog. equipment and facilities for training in production associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. and performance. STUDENTS MUST COMPLETE THE CORE AND ONE Career Options AREA OF SPECIALIZATION. Examples of employment options available in Certificate of Performance: entry level radio, television, and film production Broadcast News* after successful completion of the associate degree program include: on-air-personality, radio Courses: Units news reporter, radio and television program 3 RTVF 140 Radio and Television Newswriting writer/producer, television operations engineer, news photographer, audio engineer, director Select 6 units from: and videographer, and studio positions. Careers 4 Radio News Production RTVF 141 which require four-year degrees in radio and RTVF 145 4 Television News Production television include: motion picture writer/producer, RTVF 146 3 The TV News Field Report radio and television salesperson, manager, news 3 Television News Workshop- Producing RTVF 249A writer/reporter and news producer. Careers in RTVF 249B Television News Workshop- Tape multimedia and industrial/instructional video Coordinating 3 require an associate and often a four-year degree. Television News Workshop– RTVF 249C 3 Assignment Editing Program Goals Television News Workshop– RTVF 249D Reporting 3 Upon successful completion of one of the six areas Independent Study 1–3 RTVF 290 of specialization in Radio and Television, students Total Units = 9 should be able to: analyze the media’s impact on the public, operate audio, video or film equipment, iego 289 an D S C ity C ollege • 2018–2019

290 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing RTVF 153 3 *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental RTVF 167 Motion Picture Production 3 award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the Radio, Television and Film Total Units = 9 San Diego Community College District. *This is a department award in recognition of This program is not eligible for federal Note: information on the transcript and does not imply financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. that a graduation requirement has been met. \ Note: This program is not eligible for federal Certificate of Performance: financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Digital Media Production* Certificate of Performance: Courses: Units Media, Management & Marketing* 3 Introduction to Multimedia RTVF 151 Courses: Units Select 6 units from the following: Sound Design and Digital Audio Post DMPR 152 RTVF 115 Radio and Television Management Production 3 Principles 3 RTVF 153 3 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing Select 6 units from the following: 3 Advanced Multimedia Production DMPR 157 3 The Business of Media RTVF 174 3 Page Layout ARTG 124 RTVF 175 3 Radio and Television Sales RTVF 290 Independent Study 1–3 RTVF 176 Media Advertising Copy 1 Total Units = 9 BUSE 140 Business Law and the Legal 3 *This is a department award in recognition of Environment information on the transcript and does not imply Total Units = 9 that a graduation requirement has been met. *This is a department award in recognition of Note: This program is not eligible for federal information on the transcript and does not imply financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. that a graduation requirement has been met. Note: This program is not eligible for federal Certificate of Performance: financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Film Production* Certificate of Performance: The Certificate of Performance in Film Production offers study in the theory and practice of planning, Performance* writing, producing, directing and editing for Courses: Units motion picture film. The program emphasis is RTVF 105 Media Performance 3 placed on script writing, pre-producing, pre-visual development, camera operation, sound operation, Select 6 units from the following: and editing for both fiction and documentary film. Acting for Radio/Voice-Over RTVF 106 3 Other topics addressed include film distribution, Acting for Film and Television RTVF 119 3 copyright and career development in filmmaking. 3 RTVF 121 Performance for Television This program is designed for students interested in 1–3 Independent Study RTVF 290 enhancing their skills and knowledge of film making, Total Units = 9 students majoring in film production and for those *This is a department award in recognition of seeking entry-level employment in film production. information on the transcript and does not imply Courses: Units that a graduation requirement has been met. 3 Introduction to Cinema RTVF 160 This program is not eligible for federal Note: Select 6 units from the following: financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. 3 RTVF 110 Introduction to Scriptwriting RTVF 111 Producing for On Location Filming 3 3 Documentary Film Production RTVF 112 Art Direction for Film and Television 3 RTVF 126 3 Lighting for Television and Film RTVF 128 • 2018–2019 ollege 290 ity C iego D an S C

291 Courses: Units Certificate of Performance: RTVF 124 3 Single Camera Production Radio* Select 6 units from the following: Courses: Units RTVF 115 Radio and Television Management RTVF 105 Media Performance 3 Principles 3 Select 6 units from the following: Television Studio Operations RTVF 118 3 3 RTVF 106 Acting for Radio/Voice-Over RTVF 124 3 Single Camera Production RTVF 107 3 Audio Production 3 Art Direction for Film and Television RTVF 126 Radio and Television Management RTVF 115 Lighting for Television and Film RTVF 128 3 3 Principles 3 RTVF 146 The TV News Field Report Radio Programming 3 RTVF 130 Radio and Television Sales RTVF 175 3 RTVF 132 Radio Remote Concert Production 2 RTVF 153 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing 3 3 Radio and TV Newswriting RTVF 140 Total Units = 9 4 Radio News Production RTVF 141 Radio, Television and Film *This is a department award in recognition of RTVF 242A Radio Broadcast Concert Production information on the transcript and does not imply Workshop – Sound Mixing 1 that a graduation requirement has been met. Radio Broadcast Concert Production RTVF 242B or Workshop – Producing Note: This program is not eligible for federal RTVF 247A Radio Broadcasting Workshop – financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. or Production RTVF 247B Radio Broadcasting Workshop – Certificate of Achievement: News or Broadcast News RTVF 247C Radio Broadcasting Workshop – or Music Units Courses Required for the Major: Radio Broadcasting Workshop – RTVF 247D Radio and TV Newswriting RTVF 140 3 Programming 1 4 RTVF 145 Television News Production Total Units = 9 Select 9 units from the following: *This is a department award in recognition of 3 RTVF 124 Single Camera Production information on the transcript and does not imply Radio News Production 4 RTVF 141 that a graduation requirement has been met. The TV News Field Report 3 RTVF 146 Television Workshop RTVF 245 1–3 This program is not eligible for federal Note: Television News Workshop – RTVF 249A financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Producing 3 RTVF 249B Television News Workshop – Tape Certificate of Performance: 3 Coordinating Video Production* RTVF 249C Television News Workshop – The Certificate of Performance in Video Production Assignment Editing 3 offers hands-on study in the theory and practice Television News Workshop – RTVF 249D of planning, writing, producing, directing, editing Reporting 3 and business management for video production. RTVF 290 Independent Study 1–3 The program emphasis is placed on the theory and Total Units = 16 practice of project management, pre-producing, pre-visual development, scripting, camera operation, Certificate of Achievement: sound operation, and editing for client directed Digital Media Production video productions. Other topics addressed include copyright and career development in video Courses Required for the Major: Units production. This program is designed for students 3 RTVF 151 Introduction to Multimedia interested in enhancing their skills and knowledge 3 DMPR 157 Advanced Multimedia Production of video production, students majoring in electronic Select 9 units from the following: media production, film and or television; and for Sound Design and Digital Audio Post DMPR 152 those seeking entry-level employment in video Production 3 production. S D iego C an C ollege • 2018–2019 291 ity

292 directing, producing, film writing, video editing, 3 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing RTVF 153 DMPR 154 Game Design camera operation, sound technician, lighting 3 DMPR 155 Advanced Nonlinear Editing 3 and grip, production assistant, assistant director, Radio, Television and Film RTVF 290 Independent Study 1–3 marketing, social media management, video journalist, publicist, public relations, advertising, Total Units = 15 programming, teaching, sales and work in emergent Note: This program is not eligible for federal lens based arts. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Courses Required for the Major: Units RTVF 110 Introduction to Scriptwriting 3 Certificate of Achievement: 3 RTVF 160 Introduction to Cinema Film Production Choose nine units from the following: The Certificate of Achievement in Film Production 3 Producing for On Location Filming RTVF 111 offers study in the theory and practice of planning, 3 Documentary Film Production RTVF 112 writing, producing, directing and editing for 3 Single Camera Production RTVF 124 motion picture film. The program emphasis is 3 Art Direction for Film and Television RTVF 126 placed on script writing, pre-producing, pre-visual 3 RTVF 128 Lighting for Television and Film development, camera operation, sound operation, RTVF 153 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing 3 and editing for both fiction and documentary film. Motion Picture Production RTVF 167 3 Other topics addressed include film distribution, 1–3 RTVF 290 Independent Study copyright and career development in filmmaking. Total Units = 15 This program is designed for students interested in enhancing their skills and knowledge of film making, This program is not eligible for federal Note: students majoring in film production and for those financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. seeking entry-level employment in film production. Goals Certificate of Achievement: Upon successful completion of the program, Media, Management & Marketing students will be able to write scripts in multiple The Radio and Television program encompasses genres in the industry standard formats, have a the fields of radio and television broadcasting, basic understanding of story structure, operate documentary film, digital media, digital media audio and video recording equipment, edit video production, concert productions, and an expanding and distribute video on the internet. Students will area of industrial video production applications and have the opportunity to work with professional broadcast management. camera systems and edit on professional computer and software systems. The Radio, Television and The programs degrees and certificates include all Film Department seeks to prepare students for aspects of creation and production both behind employment in the field and prepare students for and in front of cameras and microphones. KSDS-FM transfer. and the television production facilities provide the student with theoretical and practical applications. Emphasis The Film Production program offers hands-on Program Goals: experience in all aspects of film production. Through Upon successful completion of one of the six areas the use of the department’s video camcorders, audio of specialization in Radio and Television, students tools and editing systems students have a unique should be able to: analyze the media’s impact on opportunity to write, produce and direct their own the public, operate audio, video or film equipment, fiction and non-fiction films. produce audio, video, film and or digital media projects, and direct or perform as voice over or on- Prospective students are advised that proficiency camera talent. in English reading and writing is necessary for successful participation in the program. The Radio and Television Department seeks to prepare the student for transfer to four-year Career Options institutions and/or employment in the field. The skills acquired with this certificate may lead to employment, freelance work or business ownership. Specific jobs include, but are not limited to: film • 2018–2019 ollege C 292 C iego D an S ity

293 Program Emphasis: RTVF 249A Television News Workshop – In addition to the core courses, the Radio and Producing 3 Business Law and the Legal BUSE 140 Television program offers six areas of specialization: Environment 3 Radio; Broadcast News; Video Production; Independent Study 1–3 RTVF 290 Documentary/Film; Media Management and Marketing; and Digital Media Production. Total Units = 15 Prospective students are advised that proficiency This program is not eligible for federal Note: in English reading and writing skills is necessary for financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. successful participation in the field. Certificate of Achievement: Students pursuing the Broadcast News specialty Radio should take additional courses in social sciences or political science. Students interested in the Media The Radio and Television program encompasses Management and Marketing specialization are the fields of radio and television broadcasting, advised to take business courses as electives. Radio, Television and Film documentary film, digital media, digital media production, concert productions, and an expanding The Radio and Television Department offers area of industrial video production applications and “hands-on” experience in all areas of the field. broadcast management. Through the use of the San Diego City College radio station, KSDS-FM, 88.3, and related facilities, The programs degrees and certificates include all students may focus on radio, news, management, aspects of creation and production both behind sales performance and production. The college’s and in front of cameras and microphones. KSDS-FM television production studio provides state-of-the- and the television production facilities provide the art broadcast quality equipment and facilities for student with theoretical and practical applications. training in production and performance. Program Goals: Career Options Upon successful completion of one of the six areas Examples of employment options available in of specialization in Radio and Television, students entry level radio, television, and film production should be able to: analyze the media’s impact on after successful completion of the associate degree the public, operate audio, video or film equipment, program include: on-air-personality, radio news produce audio, video, film and or digital media reporter, radio and television news writer/producer, projects, and direct or perform as voice over or on- television operations engineer, news photographer, camera talent. audio engineer, director, technical director, The Radio and Television Department seeks to videographer, Chyron operator, studio camera prepare the student for transfer to four-year operator, and floor director. institutions and/or employment in the field. Careers which require four-year degrees in radio and Program Emphasis: television include: motion picture writer/producer/ In addition to the core courses, the Radio and director, radio and television salesperson, manager, Television program offers six areas of specialization: news writer, reporter, news anchor, and news Radio; Broadcast News; Video Production; producer. Documentary/Film; Media Management and Careers in digital media production and video Marketing; and Digital Media Production. production positions require an associate and often Prospective students are advised that proficiency a four-year degree. in English reading and writing skills is necessary for Courses Required for the Major: Units successful participation in the field. RTVF 115 Radio and Television Management Students pursuing the Broadcast News specialty 3 Principles should take additional courses in social sciences or RTVF 174 3 The Business of Media political science. Students interested in the Media Select 9 units from the following: Management and Marketing specialization are 4 Radio News Production RTVF 141 advised to take business courses as electives. 3 Radio and Television Sales RTVF 175 RTVF 176 1 Media Advertising Copy • 2018–2019 ollege C ity C iego D an S 293

294 RTVF 247D Radio Broadcasting Workshop – The Radio and Television Department offers Programming 1 “hands-on” experience in all areas of the field. RTVF 290 Independent Study 1–3 Through the use of the San Diego City College Radio, Television and Film radio station, KSDS-FM, 88.3, and related facilities, Total Units = 15 students may focus on radio, news, management, Note: This program is not eligible for federal sales performance and production. The college’s financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. television production studio provides state-of-the- art broadcast quality equipment and facilities for Certificate of Achievement: training in production and performance. Video Production Career Options The Certificate of Achievement in Video Production Examples of employment options available in offers hands-on study in the theory and practice entry level radio, television, and film production of planning, writing, producing, directing, editing after successful completion of the associate degree and business management for video production. program include: on-air-personality, radio news The program emphasis is placed on the theory and reporter, radio and television news writer/producer, practice of project management, pre-producing, television operations engineer, news photographer, pre-visual development, scripting, camera operation, audio engineer, director, technical director, sound operation, and editing for client directed videographer, Chyron operator, studio camera video productions. Other topics addressed include operator, and floor director. copyright and career development in video Careers which require four-year degrees in radio and production. This program is designed for students television include: motion picture writer/producer/ interested in enhancing their skills and knowledge director, radio and television salesperson, manager, of video production, students majoring in electronic news writer, reporter, news anchor, and news media production, film and or television; and for producer. those seeking entry-level employment in video production. Careers in digital media production and video production positions require an associate and often Program Goals: a four-year degree. Upon successful completion of the Certificate of Achievement in Video Production, students should Courses Required for the Major: Units be able to: identify the goals and requirements RTVF 105 Media Performance 3 of a multimedia project, operate video and audio RTVF 130 Radio Programming 3 recording equipment; compare and analyze various Select 9 units from the following: digital media genres (e.g. broadcast news, narrative 3 Acting for Radio/Voice-Over RTVF 106 film, documentary production, entertainment RTVF 107 Audio Production 3 videos, and commercial/promotional presentations); RTVF 115 Radio and Television Management and develop, manage and execute digital media Principles 3 projects with specific messaging. 2 Radio Remote Concert Production RTVF 132 Program Emphasis: Radio and TV Newswriting 3 RTVF 140 The Video Production program offers hands-on Radio News Production 4 RTVF 141 experience in all aspects of video production. Radio Broadcast Concert Production RTVF 242A Through the use of the department’s video 1 Workshop - Sound Mixing camcorders, audio tools and editing systems RTVF 242B Radio Broadcast Concert Production students have a unique opportunity to produce Workshop - Producing 1 both self-directed and client-directed multimedia RTVF 247A Radio Broadcasting Workshop – projects. Production or Prospective students are advised that proficiency Radio Broadcasting Workshop – News RTVF 247B in English reading and writing is necessary for or successful participation in the program. RTVF 247C Radio Broadcasting Workshop – Music Career Options or The skills acquired with this certificate may lead to employment, freelance work or business ownership an S D iego C ity C ollege 294 • 2018–2019

295 RTVF 107 Audio Production 3 in one or more of the numerous genres of digital 3 RTVF 118 media production. These jobs include, but are not Television Studio Operations limited to: directing, producing, writing, video Performance for Television RTVF 121 editing, production management, camera operation, or sound technician, lighting and grip, production RTVF 128 3 Lighting for Television and Film Single Camera Production RTVF 124 3 assistant, public relations, corporate marketing and RTVF 140 Radio and TV Newswriting 3 advertising. RTVF 145 4 Television News Production Courses Required for the Major: Units 3 The TV News Field Report RTVF 146 Television Studio Operations RTVF 118 3 RTVF 153 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing 3 RTVF 124 Single Camera Production 3 Total Units = 28 Select nine units from the following: RTVF 115 Radio and Television Management Associate of Science Degree: 3 Principles Film Production Radio, Television and Film RTVF 125 Advanced Television and Video The AS Degree in Film Production offers study Production 3 in the theory and practice of planning, writing, RTVF 126 Art Direction for Film and Television 3 producing, directing and editing for motion picture RTVF 128 3 Lighting for Television and Film film. The program emphasis is placed on script RTVF 131 4 Advanced Radio Performance writing, pre-producing, pre-visual development, RTVF 146 The TV News Field Report 3 camera operation, sound operation, and editing Motion Picture Production RTVF 167 3 for both fiction and documentary film. Other topics 3 Radio and Television Sales RTVF 175 addressed include film distribution, copyright and 3 RTVF 153 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing career development in filmmaking. This program or is designed for students interested in enhancing RTVF 290 Independent Study 1–3 their skills and knowledge of film making, students Total Units = 15 majoring in film production and for those seeking Note: This program is not eligible for federal entry-level employment in film production. financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Program Goals Upon successful completion of the program, Associate of Science Degree: students will be able to write scripts in multiple Broadcast News genres in the industry standard formats, have a basic understanding of story structure, operate The A.S. Degree in Broadcast News offers hands-on audio and video recording equipment, edit video study in the theory and practice of planning, writing, and distribute video on the internet. Students will producing, directing and performing news for have the opportunity to work with professional electronic media. The program emphasis is placed camera systems and edit on professional computer on the practice of digital news writing, television and software systems. The Radio, Television and studio management and teamwork, performance Film Department seeks to prepare students for for television news, live television direction, lighting employment in the field and prepare students for and sound for television news, and electronic transfer. news distribution. Other topics addressed include television station promotion and television Program Emphasis: station administration. This program is designed The Film Production program offers hands-on for students interested in enhancing their skills experience in all aspects of film production. Through and knowledge of electronic news broadcasting, the use of the department’s video camcorders, audio students majoring in electronic media production tools and editing systems students have a unique and for those seeking entry-level employment in opportunity to write, produce and direct their own news broadcasting. fiction and non-fiction films. Courses Required for the Major: Units Prospective students are advised that proficiency RTVF 100 Introduction To Electronic Media in English reading and writing is necessary for or successful participation in the program. 3 Mass Media in the Digital Age DJRN 100 iego D an C ity C ollege 295 S • 2018–2019

296 employment in the field and prepare students for Students pursuing the Associates Degree in Film transfer. Production should take additional courses in social sciences and arts. Radio, Television and Film Emphasis The Radio program offers hands-on experience in all Career Options: aspects of performance and production in the field. The skills acquired with this degree may lead to Through the use of the department’s digital radio employment, freelance work or business ownership. facility, digital recording studio, and related facilities, Specific jobs include, but are not limited to: film students have a unique opportunity to produce and directing, producing, film writing, video editing, direct their own radio shows and programs. camera operation, sound technician, lighting and grip, production assistant, assistant director, Career Options marketing, social media management, video The skills acquired with this AS Degree may lead to journalist, publicist, public relations, advertising, employment, freelance work or business ownership. These jobs include, but are not limited to: production programming, teaching, sales and work in emergent assistant, on-air talent, digital content producer, lens based arts. audio board operator and assistant audio engineer. Courses Required for the Major: Units Courses Required for the Major: Units Introduction To Electronic Media 3 RTVF 100 Audio Production 3 RTVF 107 RTVF 100 Introduction To Electronic Media or 3 RTVF 110 Introduction to Scriptwriting Mass Media in the Digital Age DJRN 100 3 RTVF 111 Producing for On Location Filming 3 RTVF 105 Media Performance or RTVF 112 Documentary Film Production 3 Acting for Radio/Voice-Over RTVF 106 3 RTVF 126 Art Direction for Film and Television or 3 RTVF 107 Audio Production RTVF 128 Lighting for Television and Film 3 3 RTVF 118 Television Studio Operations 3 RTVF 153 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing RTVF 130 3 Radio Programming *Active* Introduction to Cinema 3 RTVF 160 or RTVF 167 Motion Picture Production 3 2 RTVF 132 Radio Remote Concert Production Advanced Radio Performance RTVF 131 4 Total Units = 27 RTVF 141 Radio News Production 4 Radio and TV Newswriting 3 RTVF 140 Associate of Science Degree: Total Units = 25–26 Radio The AS Degree in Radio offers hands-on study in the Associate of Science Degree: theory and practice of planning, writing, producing Video Production and performing for radio newscasts. The program emphasis is placed on radio announcing, advanced The AS Degree in Video Production offers hands- radio production (analog and digital), and copy on study in the theory and practice of planning, writing for broadcast announcements. Other topics writing, producing, directing, editing and business management for video production. The program addressed include radio station promotions, music emphasis is placed on project management, pre- library maintenance, and office administration. This program is designed for students interested producing, pre-visual development, scripting, camera operation, sound operation, and editing in enhancing their skills and knowledge of radio for client directed video productions. Other broadcasting, students majoring in Radio and for those seeking entry-level employment in radio. topics addressed include copyright and career development in video production. This program is Goals designed for students interested in enhancing their Upon successful completion of the program, skills and knowledge of video production, students students will be able to perform live concert majoring in electronic media production, film and productions, create radio announcements, produce or television; and for those seeking entry-level radio news pieces, and have a clear understanding employment in video production. of all aspects of radio program creation and production. Students will have opportunities to work Program Goals: Upon successful completion of the AS Degree in with professionals at KSDS-FM. The Radio, Television and Film Department seeks to prepare students for Video Production, students will be able to: identify ollege C ity • 2018–2019 iego D an S 296 C

297 Mass Communication, Radio and Television, the goals and requirements of a multimedia project, Television, Film and Media. operate video and audio recording equipment; compare and analyze various digital media genres Course Requirements for Transfer Students (e.g. broadcast news, narrative film, documentary Students who plan to transfer to a four year college production, entertainment videos, and commercial/ or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this promotional presentations); and develop, manage discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the and execute digital media projects with specific Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate messaging. major preparation courses for their specific transfer Program Emphasis: institution and major. Transfer students may also The Video Production program offers hands-on earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts experience in all aspects of video production. and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Through the use of the department’s video be individually tailored to each student’s specific camcorders, audio tools and editing systems transfer requirements in order to provide the most students have a unique opportunity to produce efficient path to transfer. More information on Radio, Television and Film transfer programs and procedures is available in the both self-directed and client-directed multimedia projects. Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Prospective students are advised that proficiency Associate in Science in Film, in English reading and writing is necessary for Television and Electronic Media for successful participation in the program. Transfer Degree: Career Options Description The skills acquired with this degree may lead to The Associate in Science in Radio, Film, and employment, freelance work or business ownership Electronic Media for Transfer Degree is intended in one or more of the numerous genres of digital for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s media production. These jobs include, but are not degree in Radio, Film, and Electronic Media or a limited to: directing, producing, writing, video editing, production management, camera operation, related major in the California State University sound technician, lighting and grip, production (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all assistant, public relations, corporate marketing and CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be advertising. required to complete no more than 60 units after Courses Required for the Major: Units transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be Introduction To Electronic Media RTVF 100 appropriate preparation for students transferring or to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Mass Media in the Digital Age 3 DJRN 100 Students who plan to complete this degree should RTVF 107 Audio Production 3 consult a counselor for additional information about or RTVF 110 Introduction to Scriptwriting participating CSU campuses as well as university Radio and TV Newswriting 3 RTVF 140 admission, degree and transfer requirements. RTVF 124 Single Camera Production 3 Students intending to transfer into this major NOTE: RTVF 125 Advanced Television and Video at a CSU should consult with a counselor and visit or Production www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate transfer RTVF 151 Introduction to Multimedia 3 coursework. 3 RTVF 146 The TV News Field Report Art Direction for Film and Television RTVF 126 3 Award Notes: RTVF 128 Lighting for Television and Film 3 General Education: In addition to the courses listed RTVF 153 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing 3 below, students must complete one of the following Total Units = 27 general education options: ) is accepted by The IGETC pattern (page 118 • Transfer Information all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and Common university majors related to the field of majors. It is also accepted by some private/ Communication, Film Radio and Television include: independent or out of state universities. and Electronic Arts, Film and Television, Journalism, an D iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 S 297

298 • Career Options: ) is accepted by all The CSU GE pattern (page 12 5 CSU campuses and some private/independent or Careers related to this field typically require out of state universities. It is not accepted by the education beyond the associate degree level and Selected Studies some may require a graduate degree. UC system. Units Courses required for the Major: It is strongly recommended that students consult with a counselor to determine which general or Introduction To Electronic Media RTVF 100 education option is most appropriate for their 3 Mass Media in the Digital Age DJRN 100 individual educational goals. 3 Audio Production RTVF 107 RTVF 110 Introduction to Scriptwriting or Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 CSU- Introduction to Cinema RTVF 160 3 transferable units required for the degree. Select one course from the following (3 units): The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: Television Studio Operations 3 RTVF 118 Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester • RTVF 124 Single Camera Production 3 units. No more than 60 units are required. Select one course from the following (3 units): Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least • RTVF 118 3 Television Studio Operations 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a RTVF 167 3 Motion Picture Production minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some Select one course from the following (3 units): CSU campuses and majors may require a higher 3 RTVF 112 Documentary Film Production GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. 3 Television Studio Operations RTVF 118 Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units • 3 RTVF 124 Single Camera Production in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All RTVF 151 Introduction to Multimedia 3 courses in the major must be completed with a RTVF 153 3 Introduction to Nonlinear Editing grade of C or better. RTVF 167 3 Motion Picture Production Total Units = 18 • Certified completion of the California State University General Education-Breadth pattern (CSU GE; see page 12 5 for more information); OR the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Selected Studies Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more information). Description Program Goals: Designed for students who are interested in a • The purpose of the Associate in Science in Radio, program of studies that will allow them to attain Film, and Electronic Media for Transfer degree educational or career goals that are not satisfied by is to offer an organized course of study that will associate degrees offered in Programs of Instructions prepare students intending to major in Film, listed in this catalog. Television, and Electronic Media at the California State University (CSU). It is accepted by some but Associate of Arts Degree: not all CSU campuses. Students who complete Selected Studies this degree and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be required to complete no more Courses Required for the Major: than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s The student must earn a minimum of 18 required degree. It may not be appropriate preparation for semester units in a single discipline or related students transferring to a CSU campus that does disciplines. The approved course of study represents not accept the degree. Students who plan to a cohesive and rigorous program of instruction complete this degree should consult a counselor related to a specific goal not met by other Programs for additional information about participating of Instruction as found in this catalog. The student CSU campuses as well as university admission, and a counselor will develop a Selected Studies degree and transfer requirements. program to be submitted to an academic standards committee for review and approval. The student is encouraged to meet with the counselor early in his or her educational career to review the student’s ity C • 2018–2019 298 D an ollege S C iego

299 to provide students with general knowledge related statement of justification for the Associate of to the behavioral sciences that complements their Arts Degree: Selected Studies and to develop an education plan. interests in the field of Social Work. Students must fulfill additional requirements for the Career Options Associate Degree as listed in this catalog. Most career options directly related to professional Requirements for For graduation requirements see (licensed) social work require graduate level degrees. on page 93 . the Associate Degree However, there are applied and paraprofessional Social Work occupations that value the associate degree. Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 units Social services departments, hospitals, academic required for the degree. and community mental health facilities, child care Recommended Electives: Electives are particularly programs, services for the aged, alcohol and other important in this program. They may be used by the drug treatment programs, family services agencies, student to strengthen the major, explore new fields and other community organizations are all examples of interest, and satisfy graduation requirements at a of settings which employ both professional and four-year institution. paraprofessional social service providers. Education at each academic level enhances skills, knowledge, The student who plans carefully may fulfill the and employability. requirements for the A.A. Degree and also complete most lower division requirements at the four-year Office Faculty Telephone institution of his/her choice in the major area and Kirin Macapugay 619-388-3562 MS-535 in general education. See generalized guide for transfer student located in this catalog. Academic Programs The associate degree in social work requires completion of the courses listed for the degree. Social Work Additional general education and graduation requirements for the associate degree are listed Award Type Units in the catalog. The associate degree requires a Associate of Arts Degree: minimum of 60 units. 28* Social Work * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Associate of Arts Degree: general education and electives as needed to meet Behavioral Sciences the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Social Work Description Units Courses Required for the Major: Social Work is an applied behavioral science that 3 Social Work Fields of Service HUMS 110 emphasizes the application of behavioral science Introduction to Social Work HUMS 120 3 principles in a variety of cultural contexts. Social General Biology – Lecture and BIOL 107 Work students are expected to think critically and Laboratory 4 scientifically about behavior, to apply the principles ECON 120 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 of the behavioral sciences, and to understand 3 PSYC 101 General Psychology the role of values in diverse cultural settings. As or Behavioral Science Statistics PSYC 258 a profession, social work focuses on methods for 3 Elementary Statistics MATH 119 helping people from many different social groups to 3 SOCO 101 Principles of Sociology improve the quality of their lives. Select two courses from the following: PSYC 161 3 Introduction to Counseling Program Goals Psychology of Lifespan Development PSYC 230 3 The Social Work program has two primary goals. The PSYC 245 Abnormal Psychology 3 first is to provide students with the basic science and Contemporary Social Problems SOCO 110 3 social work courses that prepare them for entry-level Total Units = 28 work in the field and/or transfer to four-year colleges, universities or other institutions. The second goal is ity D iego C S C ollege • 2018–2019 an 299

300 the principles of sociology to an understanding of Transfer Information behavior. Common university majors related to the field of Sociology Social Work include: Counseling, Social Work. Program Emphasis Course Requirements for Transfer Students The sociology program has two goals. The first Students who plan to transfer to a four year college goal is to provide basic sociology courses that are or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this foundations for further understanding of other discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the courses in sociology and related fields and to Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate prepare for transfer to baccalaureate institutions for major preparation courses for their specific transfer further study. The second goal is to offer courses institution and major. Transfer students may also that may provide additional information regarding earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts sociology of interest to community college students, and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may or that are applications of sociological principles. be individually tailored to each student’s specific Career Options transfer requirements in order to provide the most efficient path to transfer. More information on Most career options directly related to sociology transfer programs and procedures is available in the require graduate level degrees. However, there are Transfer Programs section of the catalog. several applied and paraprofessional occupations that may not require education beyond the associate degree. The following list includes some of the Sociology many career options available with preparation in sociology beyond the associate degree: advertising Units Award Type researcher, community college or university professor, criminologist, manager, probation officer Associate of Arts Degree: and social services professional. Sociology 18* * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Program Learning Outcomes general education and electives as needed to meet Students who complete the program will be able to: the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. • Apply the sociological imagination and be able to Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: differentiate between sociology and other social Sociology 18 sciences. • Analyze critical inquiry of personal Description experience, over-generalization, and simplistic Sociology is a behavioral science that emphasizes understandings of human behavior through the relationships among people from simple application of various sociological theories. face-to-face relationships through formal • Propose critical questions and issues facing organizations to whole societies. Sociology’s subject our society today, particularly the US role in a matter ranges from the intimate family to the globalized world. hostile mob, from crime to religion, from divisions of race and social class to the shared beliefs of a • Critically assess how the theoretical common culture, from the sociology of work to the underpinnings of sociology explicitly challenge sociology of sports. Sociologists seek to understand the dominant ideologies in US society and the interaction of individuals with institutions and role of sociology to produce social change. social organizations and the norms, values, beliefs, and traditions that make social life possible and Faculty Telephone Office meaningful. It stresses how behavior is influenced by 619-388-3739 Marilyn Espitia MS-531 societal structures and how consensus (agreement) and conflict (disagreement) among groups 619-388-3606 MS-540K Sarah Pitcher affects society. Sociology students are expected to be able to think critically and scientifically about human behavior, and to be able to apply C ity ollege iego D an S • 2018–2019 300 C

301 related major in the California State University Academic Programs (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all The associate degree with a major in Behavioral CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree Sciences with an emphasis in Sociology requires and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be completion of the courses listed below. Additional required to complete no more than 60 units after general education and graduation requirements for transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The appropriate preparation for students transferring Sociology associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should Associate of Arts Degree: consult a counselor for additional information about Behavioral Sciences participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. Sociology Emphasis Students intending to transfer into this major NOTE: Units Courses Required for the Major: at a CSU should consult with a counselor and visit 3 Principles of Sociology SOCO 101 www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate transfer 3 SOCO 110 Contemporary Social Problems coursework. or Behavioral Statistics PSYC 258 Award Notes: 3 Elementary Statistics MATH 119 Electives – transferable, general education 9 General Education: In addition to the courses listed Total Units = 18 below, students must complete one of the following general education options: Recommended electives: Sociology 290; transferable computer, mathematics and philosophy The IGETC pattern (page 118 ) is accepted by all CSU courses. campuses and most UC campuses and majors. It is also accepted by some private/independent or out Transfer Information of state universities. Common university majors related to the field of ) is accepted by all The CSU GE pattern (page 126 Behavioral Science, Community Sociology include: CSU campuses and some private/independent or Studies, Gerontology, Law, Policy Analysis, Social out of state universities. It is not accepted by the UC Ecology, Social Science, Sociology, Social Work, system. Counseling. It is strongly recommended that students consult Course Requirements for Transfer Students with a counselor to determine which general Students who plan to transfer to a four year college education option is most appropriate for their or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this individual educational goals. discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Electives as needed to meet minimum of 60 CSU- Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate transferable units required for the degree. major preparation courses for their specific transfer institution and major. Transfer students may also The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may No more than 60 units are required. be individually tailored to each student’s specific transfer requirements in order to provide the most Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in efficient path to transfer. More information on all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum transfer programs and procedures is available in the of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses Transfer Programs section of the catalog. and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. Associate in Arts in Sociology for Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an Transfer Degree: “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of C or Description bet ter. The Associate in Arts in Sociology for Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor’s degree in Sociology or a an D iego C ity ollege • 2018–2019 301 S C

302 or Introduction to Gender Studies GEND 101 Certified completion of the California State Advanced Principles of Sociology 3 University General Education-Breadth pattern SOCO 201 for more information); OR (CSU GE; see page 126 Spanish Select one course not selected above from the the Intersegmental General Education Transfer following (3 units): Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more Introduction to Gender Studies GEND 101 3 information). Sociology of the Family 3 SOCO 125 Program Goals: 3 Health and Society SOCO 145 SOCO 150 Sociology of Latinos/Latinas 3 Students who complete the program will be able to: 3 Advanced Principles of Sociology SOCO 201 • Apply the sociological imagination and be able to SOCO 223 3 Globalization and Social Change differentiate between sociology and other social Total Units = 18 sciences. • Analyze critical inquiry of personal experience, over-generalization, and simplistic Spanish understandings of human behavior through the application of various sociological theories. Units Award Type Propose critical questions and issues facing our • Associate of Arts Degree: society today, particularly the role of the United Spanish 26* States in a globalized world. * and courses to meet graduation requirements, Critically assess how the theoretical • general education and electives as needed to meet underpinnings of sociology explicitly challenge the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. the dominant ideologies in U.S. society and the Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: role of sociology to produce social change. Spanish 23 Program Emphasis: The purpose of the Associate in Arts in Sociology Description for Transfer degree is to offer an organized course The study of languages provides communication of study that will prepare students intending to skills, provides exposure to the richness of cultural major in Sociology at the California State University variety, increases transfer options to universities (CSU). It is accepted by some but not all CSU with language requirements, opens new career campuses. Students who complete this degree opportunities, enriches global travel, and provides and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be personal enrichment. The program is designed to required to complete no more than 60 units after prepare students for transfer to a baccalaureate transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be institution and for proficiency in a language in a appropriate preparation for students transferring variety of settings. to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. Students who plan to complete this degree should Program Emphasis consult a counselor for additional information about participating CSU campuses as well as university The Language program provides transfer level admission, degree and transfer requirements. courses in Arabic, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Russian. Students develop skills of Career Options: understanding, speaking, reading and writing, Careers related to this field typically require culture and increase familiarity with basic features of education beyond the associate degree level and the English language. They also have opportunities some may require a graduate degree. to become acquainted with the literature, culture, Courses required for the Major: Units history and current events of other countries through films, videotapes, field trips and campus 3 SOCO 101 Principles of Sociology and community international events. 3 Contemporary Social Problems SOCO 110 3 Behavioral Science Statistics PSYC 258 Career Options Introduction to Research Methods in SOCO 220 3 Sociology Knowledge of another language is required or highly Sociology of the Family SOCO 125 or desirable for consular and junior foreign service, ollege • 2018–2019 ity C iego D an S 302 C

303 Courses Offered in Support of Other Majors: import, export, and international business and travel, Spanish 85. health and missionary fields, overseas teaching, translating and interpreting, and travel and tourism industries. Learning another language is an asset in Associate in Arts in Spanish for broadening communication skills and in the travel Transfer Degree: and tourism industry. Spanish Program Description: Program Learning Outcomes The Associate in Arts in Spanish for Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan to complete a Students who complete the program will be able to: bachelor’s degree in Spanish or a related major • Accurately use the language mechanics in the in the California State University (CSU) system. It five spheres of Foreign Language learning. is accepted by some but not all CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree and transfer Apply critical thinking skills. • to a participating CSU campus will be required to Develop writing processes in Spanish. • complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate • Demonstrate intermediate–high comprehension preparation for students transferring to a CSU and language production. campus that does not accept the degree. Students Demonstrate cultural fluency and awareness. • who plan to complete this degree should consult a counselor for additional information about Telephone Faculty Office participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. 619-388-3369 Juan Bernal AH-517H 619-388-3785 AH-518D Jaime Estrada-Olalde Award Notes: The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees: Philippe Patto AH-518C 619-388-3591 Rosalinda Sandoval 619-388-3295 AH-518B • Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. No more than 60 units are required. Academic Programs • Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in all CSU-transferable coursework. While a The associate degree in French, German, Italian, or minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some Spanish requires completion of the courses listed CSU campuses and majors may require a higher below. Additional general education and graduation GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. requirements for the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units • minimum of 60 units. in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list above). All courses in the major must be completed with a Associate of Arts Degree: grade of “C” or better. Languages • Certified completion of the California State Spanish University General Education–Breadth pattern (CSU GE; see page 126 for more information); OR Units Courses Required for the Major: the Intersegmental General Education Transfer SPAN 101 5 First Course in Spanish for more Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 Second Course in Spanish 5 SPAN 102 information). 5 SPAN 201 Third Course in Spanish Career Options: SPAN 202 Fourth Course in Spanish 5 Careers related to this field typically require SPAN 210 Conversation & Composition education beyond the associate degree level and Spanish I 3 some may require a graduate degree. Conversation & Composition SPAN 211 3 Spanish II Units Courses Required for the Major: Total Units = 26 First Course in Spanish SPAN 101 5 Recommended electives: American Sign Language SPAN 102 Second Course in Spanish 5 115, 116, 215, 216; Arabic 101, 102, 296; French 290, 5 Third Course in Spanish SPAN 201 296; German 290, 296; Italian 296; Spanish 290, 296. Fourth Course in Spanish SPAN 202 5 an iego C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 303 S D

304 Select one of the following: are offered each year, allowing students to develop Conversation and Composition SPAN 210 practical skills and talents while earning college 3 Spanish I credit for transfer to universities. Theatre SPAN 211 Conversation and Composition Program Learning Outcomes 3 Spanish II Total Units = 23 Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to: Transfer Information Effectively practice the theatre arts through • Common university majors related to the field involvement in the creation and presentation of Language Studies, Literature, of Spanish include: public performances in theatre. Modern Languages, Spanish, Translation and Develop a structural approach to interpretation • Interpretation. of language in dramatic text. Course Requirements for Transfer Students • Explain and practice basic production Students who plan to transfer to a four year college processes such as acting, scenic, costume, and or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this make-up design, and technical operation related discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the to production. Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate major preparation courses for their specific transfer • Identify the historical and cultural dimension institution and major. Transfer students may also of theatre, including the works of leading earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts playwrights, actors, directors, and designers. and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may Acquire inter-cultural and multi-cultural • be individually tailored to each student’s specific understanding, as well as perception of the transfer requirements in order to provide the most universal and timeless human conflicts presented efficient path to transfer. More information on in dramatic works. transfer programs and procedures is available in the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Augment the discipline, cooperation, • accountability, and perseverance necessary for positive self-identification and success in life. Theatre Faculty Office Telephone Award Type Units 619-388-3594 Duane Gardella C-106A Certificate of Performance: C-106B Katherine Rodda 619-388-3088 Special Effects (FX) Makeup 9 Andrea Singer 619-388-3417 AH-405B Technical Theatre 15 Theatrical Glamour for Media and Performance 9 Certificate of Performance: Technical Theatre Associate of Arts Degree: 23* Theatre This is a certificate in Technical Theatre which the Musical Theatre 19–20* student will put into practice the skills necessary in scenery construction, scene painting, costume, and * and courses to meet graduation requirements, makeup in order to pursue a professional career in general education and electives as needed to meet theatre, film, television, music, and/or dance. the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Associate of Arts Degree: Visual and Associate in Arts for Transfer Degree: Performing Arts, Theatre Theatre Arts 18 The theatre program offers transfer courses in Program Description preparation for university theatre majors as well as fundamental skills in acting and play production The Theatre Arts program provides an opportunity useful for employment or for participation in to gain practical experience in professional and community theatre productions. community theatre work and to prepare for continued higher education. Theatre productions ity C iego D an S ollege • 2018–2019 304 C

305 The department suggests that students take Note: Student will be assessed through a combination of DRAM 124 prior to enrolling in DRAM 144A and performance evaluations, written assignments, and DRAM 146A. written tests and quizzes. Recommended Electives: Dramatic Arts 144B, 146B. Academic Programs *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental The associate degree in Theatre requires completion Theatre award that does not appear on the student’s of the courses listed for the degree. Additional transcript. All courses must be completed within the general education and graduation requirements for San Diego Community College District. the associate degree are listed in the catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. This program is not eligible for federal Note: financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Certificate of Performance: Special Effects (FX) Makeup* Certificate of Performance: Technical Theatre* The Certificate of Performance in Special Effects (FX) Makeup provides students with the skills and hands- Description on experience required for entry-level employment The Certificate of Performance in Technical Theatre in the special effects makeup industry. Emphasis is provides students with the knowledge and skills placed on the design, development, and application required to gain entry-level work in all aspects of process for character and creature prosthetics technical theatre production, including stage design, for stage, film, and television. Students develop a scenery construction and painting, makeup design portfolio of work to industry standards. and application, and lighting and sound production. Program Goals This is a department award in recognition Note: * The goal of the Certificate of Performance in Special of information on the transcript and does not imply Effects (FX) Makeup is to provide skills and hands-on that a graduation requirement has been met. experience required to produce a portfolio of work Program Goals for employment in the FX industry. Students who successfully complete the Certificate Students who successfully complete this certificate of Performance in Technical Theatre will be able to: will be able to: Design and implement stage scenery, lighting • Research and design creatures and characters for • and sound equipment; stage, film, and television; Organize the technical operations of stage • • Construct a variety of prosthetics, including facial productions; features, wounds, and injuries; and • Create original makeup designs and apply • Apply prosthetics, out-of-the-kit wounds, and makeup for original characters; makeup/painting. Design and paint small and large scale scenery • Career Options for the stage. Upon successful completion of the Certificate of Career Options Performance in Special Effects (FX) Makeup, students A partial list of possible career options follows: set will be prepared for entry-level positions, such as designer, model builder, makeup artist, lighting FX Lab Technician, FX Lab Sculptor, FX Lab Creative designer, stage manager, scenic artist, set builder, Designer, FX Lab Mold Maker, On-site FX Makeup set carpenter, set painter, stage technician, sound Artist, Freelance FX Makeup Artist. technician, prop maker, lighting operator. Courses: Units Courses: Units Makeup for the Stage DRAM 124 3 Beginning Stagecraft DRAM 123 3 DRAM 144A Beginning Special Effects Makeup for 3 DRAM 124 Makeup for the Stage Stage and Film 3 DRAM 126 Advanced Stagecraft 3 DRAM 146A Beginning Special Effects Makeup 3 DRAM 143 Beginning Costuming 3 Practicum:Character or Beginning Scene Painting DRAM 129A Total Units = 9 ollege C ity S iego D an • 2018–2019 305 C

306 The department suggests that students take Note: 3 Intermediate Scene Painting DRAM 129B DRAM 124 prior to enrolling in DRAM 144A and Total Units = 15 DRAM 146A. Theatre *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental *A Certificate of Performance is a departmental award that does not appear on the student’s award that does not appear on the student’s transcript. All courses must be completed within the transcript. All courses must be completed within the San Diego Community College District. San Diego Community College District. Note: This program is not eligible for federal financial aid in accordance with Federal regulations. Associate of Arts Degree: Visual and Performing Arts Certificate of Performance: Theatre Theatrical Glamour for Media and Performance* The theatre program offers transfer courses in preparation for university theatre majors as well as The Certificate of Performance in Theatrical Glamour fundamental skills in acting and play production Makeup provides students with the skills and hands- useful for employment or for participation in on experience required for entry-level employment community theatre productions. in theatrical glamour theme/collection development, and technical makeup application for stage, film, and Student will be assessed through a combination of television. Students develop a portfolio of work to performance evaluations, written assignments, and industry standards. written tests and quizzes. Program Goals Units Courses Required for the Major: The goal of the Certificate of Performance in 3 Introduction to Dramatic Arts DRAM 105 Theatrical Glamour Makeup is to provide skills and Makeup for the Stage DRAM 122 2 hands-on experience required to produce a portfolio DRAM 123 3 Beginning Stagecraft of work for employment in the industry. 3 DRAM 132 Beginning Acting 3 DRAM 133 Intermediate Acting Students who successfully complete this certificate 3 Beginning Voice for Actors DRAM 134 will be able to: 3 Introduction to Stage Movement DRAM 165 Research and design makeup for a theme on the • Select 3 units from the following: runway, the stage, film, and television; DRAM 107 3 Study of Filmed Plays • Execute a variety of 2-D and 3-D glamour 3 Playwriting DRAM 108 makeup looks, including; air brushing techniques, 3 DRAM 109 Theatre and Social Issues transfers, masks, head pieces and costumes. 3 DRAM 129A Beginning Scene Painting 3 DRAM 129B Intermediate Scene Painting Career Options Total Units = 23 Upon successful completion of the Certificate Transfer Information of Performance in Theatrical Glamour Makeup, Common university majors related to the field students will be prepared for entry-level positions, Drama, Liberal Studies, Theatre, of Drama include: such as Makeup Artist, Makeup Assistant, Theatre Theatre and Performance Studies, Theatre Arts, Visual Designer, Stylist, Body Art Technician, Wig Maker, and Performing Arts. and Production Crew. Course Requirements for Transfer Students Courses: Units Students who plan to transfer to a four year college 3 DRAM 124 Makeup for the Stage or university and earn a bachelor’s degree in this Introduction to Theatrical Glamour: DRAM 145A discipline should consult with a counselor or visit the Promotional Events 3 Transfer/Career Center to determine the appropriate DRAM 146C Introduction to Theatrical Glamour major preparation courses for their specific transfer 3 Practicum: Promotional Events institution and major. Transfer students may also Total Units = 9 earn an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences with an emphasis. This degree may • 2018–2019 306 S an D iego C ity C ollege

307 general education and graduation requirements for be individually tailored to each student’s specific transfer requirements in order to provide the most The the associate degree are listed in the catalog. associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. efficient path to transfer. More information on transfer programs and procedures is available in the Transfer Programs section of the catalog. Associate of Arts Degree: Visual and Performing Arts Theatre Musical Theatre Musical Theatre Program Emphasis This program provides some of the preparation This program provides fundamental skills and for transfer to programs in dance, voice, acting, theory in musical comedy, theatre and music both movement and provides basic training in musical for transfer students and for persons interested theatre and theatre. in participating in theatre and musical theatre productions. Career Options Some career options listed require a baccalaureate Units Courses Required for the Major: degree. A partial list of possible career options Tap I DANC 115A 1 – 1.5 follows: musical theatre stage performer, actor/ Beginning Acting DRAM 132 3 performer, choreographer, dancer, stage movement DANC 135A Jazz Dance I 1 – 1.5 instructor, cruise ship performer, high school and Choose two courses from the following: elementary movement and dance instructor. 4 DRAM 240A Musical Theater Repertoire Program Learning Outcomes DRAM 240B Musical Theatre Repertoire II 4 Musical Theatre is the most diversified area of the DRAM 240C 4 Musical Theatre Repertoire III dramatic arts. Our focus in training students is DRAM 240D Musical Theatre Repertoire IV 4 to integrate three art forms: acting, singing and Choose two courses from the following: dancing into a single mode of expression. Our Musical Theatre Dance I DRAM 241A 2 students explore the unique relationship that exists 2 DRAM 241B Musical Theatre Dance II among these three disciplines, in order to compete 2 Musical Theatre Dance III DRAM 241C as performers in a challenging job market. DRAM 241D Musical Theatre Dance IV 2 Students who complete the program will be able to: Choose one course from the following: • Effectively practice Musical Theatre arts through Technical Theatre Practicum - Costume DRAM 243A involvement in the creation and presentation of 2 and Makeup public performances in Musical Theatre. Technical Theatre Practicum - Lighting DRAM 243B and Sound 2 Explain and practice basic production processes • DRAM 243C 2 Technical Theatre Practicum - Scenic such as acting, scenic, costume, make-up design, DRAM 243D Technical Theatre Practicum - Stage and technical operations related to production. Management 2 Identify/describe the historical and cultural • Total Units 19–20 dimensions of Musical Theatre, including the Recommended Electives: D a n c e 110 A . works of leading musical theatre playwrights and composers. Associate in Arts in Theatre Arts for Acquire the discipline, cooperation, • Transfer Degree: accountability, and perseverance necessary for positive self-identification an success in life. Description Faculty Telephone Office The Associate in Arts in Theatre Arts for Transfer Degree is intended for students who plan to Duane Gardella 619-388-3594 C-106A complete a bachelor’s degree in Theatre or a C-106B 619-388-3088 Katherine Rodda related major in the California State University (CSU) system. It is accepted by some but not all Academic Programs CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree The associate degree in Musical Theatre requires and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be completion of the courses listed below. Additional C an D iego S ity C • 2018–2019 ollege 307

308 out of state universities. It is not accepted by the required to complete no more than 60 units after UC system. transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be appropriate preparation for students transferring Theatre It is strongly recommended that students consult to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. with a counselor to determine which general Students who plan to complete this degree should education option is most appropriate for their consult a counselor for additional information about individual educational goals. participating CSU campuses as well as university admission, degree and transfer requirements. Electives as needed to meet maximum of 60 CSU-transferable units required for the degree. It is strongly recommended that students consult with a counselor to determine which general The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T education option is most appropriate for their degrees: individual educational goals. Completion of 60 CSU-transferable semester units. No more than 60 units are required. Note: Students intending to transfer into this major at a CSU should consult with a counselor and visit Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in www.assist.org for guidance on appropriate transfer all CSU-transferable coursework. While a minimum coursework. of 2.0 is required for admission, some CSU campuses Program Learning Outcomes: and majors may require a higher GPA. Please see a counselor for more information. Upon completion of the program, the student will be Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an able to: “AA-T” or “AS-T” major (see list below). All courses in • Effectively practice the theatre arts through the major must be completed with a grade of C or involvement in the creation and presentation of bet ter. public performances in theatre. Certified completion of the California State Develop a structural approach to interpretation • University General Education-Breadth pattern of language in dramatic text. (CSU GE; (see page 126 ) for more information); OR • the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Explain and practice basic production processes such as acting, scenic, costume, and makeup Curriculum pattern (IGETC; see page 118 for more design, and technical operation related to information). production. Program Goals The purpose of the Associate in Arts in Theatre • Identify the historical and cultural dimension Arts for Transfer degree is to offer an organized of theatre, including the works of leading playwrights, actors, directors, and designers. course of study that will prepare students intending to major in Theatre Arts at the California State Acquire inter-cultural and multi-cultural • University (CSU). It is accepted by some but not all understanding, as well as perception of the CSU campuses. Students who complete this degree universal and timeless human conflicts presented and transfer to a participating CSU campus will be in dramatic works. required to complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. It may not be Augment the discipline, cooperation, • appropriate preparation for students transferring accountability, and perseverance necessary for to a CSU campus that does not accept the degree. positive self-identification and success in life. Students who plan to complete this degree should In addition to the courses listed General Education: consult a counselor for additional information about above, students must complete one of the following participating CSU campuses as well as university general education options: admission, degree and transfer requirements. The IGETC pattern (page 118 • ) is accepted by Program Emphasis all CSU campuses and most UC campuses and Careers related to this field typically require majors. It is also accepted by some private/ education beyond the associate degree level and independent or out of state universities. some may require a graduate degree. The CSU GE pattern (page 126 • ) is accepted by all CSU campuses and some private/independent or C iego D an S ity C • 2018–2019 308 ollege

309 on-the-job training and related technical instruction Career Options to achieve the position of journeyperson in one Careers related to this field typically require education beyond the associate degree level and of the state-approved programs. The length of the program depends on the trade selected and some may require a graduate degree. can range from two to five years. The program Courses Required for the Major: Units encourages the transfer of skills and knowledge DRAM 105 Introduction to Dramatic Arts or from master journeymen and journeywomen to History of Canonized Theatre – DRAM 136 apprentices to further employment potential in their Ancient Greece to the Restoration * 3 trade. The California state system was established DRAM 132 Beginning Acting 3 in 1939 with the passage of the Shelley-Maloney Apprenticeship Rehearsal and Performance I 3 DRAM 242A Apprenticeship Labor Standards Act. This act established the California Apprenticeship Council Select three courses from the following (nine as the policy-making body; named the State (It is recommended that students select units): Director of Industrial Relations as the administrator courses that meet lower division major preparation of apprenticeship; authorized the Division of requirements for their transfer university). Apprenticeship Standards (DAS) to approve 3 Beginning Stagecraft DRAM 123 training standards and provide assistance in the Makeup for the Stage DRAM 124 3 development of apprenticeship programs; and 3 Intermediate Acting DRAM 133 assigned responsibility for related and supplemental 3 DRAM 143 Beginning Costuming training to state and local boards responsible for Total Units = 18 vocational education. Affirmative Action Statement Apprenticeship The Apprenticeship Committees for whom the District provides related and supplemental Award Type Units instruction have indicated they do not and will not discriminate against any employee or against any Associate of Science Degree/Certificate of applicant for employment because of age, race, Achievement: color, religion, handicap, ancestry, sex or national ABC Construction Electronic Systems origin. Technician 18* 24* ABC Electrical Admission To The Program 24* ABC Heating, Ventilation, & Air Conditioning 21* ABC Pipefitting Indenture in a state-approved apprenticeship 24* ABC Plumbing program is a required prerequisite to enroll in the ABC Sheet Metal 21* apprenticeship related and supplemental classes. 18* Honeywell Tool & Die Applicants for apprenticeship should contact the 35* Operating and Maintenance Engineers employer, program coordinator or labor union 34.5* Communications Technician listed before each program in the apprenticeship San Diego Gas and Electric Company 30* course description section of the catalog. Each of San Diego Transit Electronic Technician 32* the individual programs listed in the apprenticeship San Diego Trolley: course description section of this catalog is Light Rail Vehicle Lineman 34* administered by an apprenticeship committee made Revenue Maintainer 23.5* up of member representatives from the respective 30* Wayside Assistant Lineman trades or industries. This committee serves as the Solar Turbines 29* approval body for all apprenticeship matters relating to the particular trade. See our Website for more * and courses to meet graduation requirements, information: http://sdcity.edu/Apprenticeship . general education and electives as needed to meet the minimum of 60 units required for the degree. Completion Requirements In addition to the academic requirements listed Description below, each apprentice must complete the The apprenticeship training program provides prescribed number of hours of training during the an opportunity for a balanced approach of an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019 309 S ollege

310 Poway, CA 92064; (858) 513-4700. Only students period of the apprenticeship program as approved accepted as apprentices under Associated Builders by the apprenticeship committee to receive the and Contractors are eligible for enrollment in certificate of achievement or two-year degree. Apprenticeship the following Construction Electronic Systems Technician (CEST), Electrical (ELEC), Heating Certificate of Achievement Ventilation & Air Conditioning (HVAC), Pipefitting Requirements: (PLPF), Plumbing (PLBG), and Sheet Metal (SHEE) Courses Required for the Major Units courses. COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS: In addition to the academic requirements listed below, Completion of the related and supplemental each apprentice must complete the prescribed instruction during the period of the program as number of hours of training during the period of approved by the Apprenticeship Committee the apprenticeship program as approved by the Total Units = 25–48 apprenticeship committee to receive the certificate of achievement or two-year degree. Associate of Science Degree Requirements: Career Options The Construction Electronic Systems Technician The Associate of Science Degree is conferred upon programs will prepare students for employment successful completion of the required apprenticeship as a Low-voltage Electrician (Sound and Signal programs of Associated Builders and Contractors Technician). (A.B.C.), Honeywell Tool and Die, Jet Products Corporation, Operating and Maintenance Engineers ABC Electrical Apprenticeship Program Learning HVAC, San Diego City Civil Service Communications Outcomes: Technician, San Diego Gas and Electric Company, San • Demonstrate preparedness for successful Diego Trolley, San Diego Transit, or Solar Turbines, transition to the Journeyman level designation Incorporated. and professional certification by the California Units Courses Required for the Major Division of Apprenticeship Standards in Construction Electronic Systems as a Technician. Completion of the related and supplemental instruction during the period of the program as Illustrate procedures utilized for ABC • approved by the Apprenticeship Committee Construction Electronic Systems Technician Total Units = 25–48 specific practices in use of tools, techniques and hands-on skills and competencies for Additional general education and graduation Journeyman-level practices in ABC Construction requirements for the associate degree are listed in Electronic Systems Technician Apprenticeship. the Academic Requirements section of catalog. The associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. • Identify and utilize equipment and related components of ABC Electronic Systems English 101. Recommended electives: Technician profession to meet target standards for measurement, calibration, and Construction Associated Builders and Electronic Systems Technician practices at Contractors Journeyman levels. Construction Electronic Systems • Read, comprehend and apply ABC Construction Electronic Systems Technician instructions and Technician Apprenticeship design standards for construction or production Program Description outcomes as required by ABC trade practices and The following are a three-year electrical industry standards. apprenticeship program in the low-voltage electrical trade, and four-year apprenticeship programs in electrical trades (inside wireman); heating, ventilation & air conditioning (HVAC), pipefitting; plumbing; and sheet metal. Applications for these programs should be directed to Associated Builders and Contractors, 13825 Kirkham Way, • 2018–2019 310 C ity C iego D an S ollege

311 Program Learning Outcomes: Certificate of Achievement: Construction Electronic Systems Demonstrate preparedness for successful • transition to the journeyman level designation Technician Apprenticeship and professional certification by the CA Division Courses Required for the Major: Units of Apprenticeship standards for ABC Electrical CEST 301A Introduction to Construction Apprenticeship. 3 Electronic Systems Technician I • Illustrate procedures used in ABC Electrical CEST 301B Introduction to Construction practices in the use of tools, techniques 3 Electronic Systems Technician II and hands-on skills and competencies for Apprenticeship CEST 302A Intermediate Construction Electronic Journeyman-level work in Electrical. Systems Technician I 3 CEST 302B Intermediate Construction Electronic • Identify and utilize equipment and related 3 Systems Technician II electrical components to meet ABC standards for CEST 303A Advanced Construction Electronic measurement, calibration and Electrical practices 3 Systems Technician I at Journeyman levels. Advanced Construction Electronic CEST 303B • Read, comprehend and apply ABC Electrical Systems Technician II 3 constructions and design standards for Total Units = 18 construction on production outcomes as required by ABC Electrical practices and industry Associate of Science Degree: standards. Construction Electronic Systems Technician Apprenticeship Certificate of Achievement: Electrical Apprenticeship Units Courses Required for the Major: CEST 301A Introduction to Construction Units Courses Required for the Major 3 Electronic Systems Technician I Introduction to Electrical ELEC 301A Introduction to Construction CEST 301B 3 Apprenticeship I Electronic Systems Technician II 3 ELEC 301B Introduction to Electrical Intermediate Construction Electronic CEST 302A 3 Apprenticeship II Systems Technician I 3 Intermediate Electrical ELEC 302A Intermediate Construction Electronic CEST 302B 3 Apprenticeship I Systems Technician II 3 Intermediate Electrical ELEC 302B CEST 303A Advanced Construction Electronic Apprenticeship II 3 Systems Technician I 3 3 ELEC 303A Advanced Electrical Apprenticeship I Advanced Construction Electronic CEST 303B Advanced Electrical Apprenticeship II ELEC 303B 3 3 Systems Technician II Electrical Apprenticeship Specialties I 3 ELEC 304A Total Units = 18 Electrical Apprenticeship Specialties II 3 ELEC 304B Total Units = 24 Recommended electives: English 101. Associate of Science Degree: Associated Builders and Electrical Apprenticeship Contractors Associate of Science Degree Requirements: The Electrical Apprenticeship Associate of Science Degree is conferred upon This is a four-year electrical apprenticeship program successful completion of the required apprenticeship in the electrical trades (inside wireman). Applications program of Associated Builders and Contractors. for this program should be directed to Associated Courses Required for the Major Units Builders and Contractors, 13825 Kirkham Way, ELEC 301A Introduction to Electrical Poway CA 92064; 858-513-4700. Only students 3 Apprenticeship I accepted as apprentices under Associated Builders ELEC 301B Introduction to Electrical and Contractors are eligible for enrollment in the Apprenticeship II 3 following electrical courses. an D C ity C ollege • 2018–2019 311 S iego

312 Intermediate Electrical ELEC 302A Certificate of Achievement: 3 Apprenticeship I Heating, Ventilation & Air Intermediate Electrical ELEC 302B Apprenticeship Conditioning Apprenticeship II 3 ELEC 303A Advanced Electrical Apprenticeship I 3 Units Courses Required for the Major Advanced Electrical Apprenticeship II 3 ELEC 303B HVAC 301 Introduction to HVAC I 3 ELEC 304A Electrical Apprenticeship Specialties I 3 HVAC 302 3 Introduction to HVAC II 3 Electrical Apprenticeship Specialties II ELEC 304B HVAC 303 3 Intermediate HVAC I Total Units = 24 HVAC 304 Intermediate HVAC II 3 3 HVAC 305 Advanced HVAC I Additional general education and graduation 3 HVAC 306 Advanced HVAC II requirements for the associate degree are listed in HVAC Specialties I 3 HVAC 307 the Academic Requirements section of catalog. The HVAC Specialties II HVAC 308 3 associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Total Units = 24 English 101. Recommended electives: Associate of Science Degree: Associated Builders and Heating, Ventilation & Air Contractors Conditioning Heating, Ventilation & Air Associate of Science Degree Requirements: The Associate of Science degree is conferred upon Conditioning Apprenticeship successful completion of the required apprenticeship A four-year Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning program of Associated Builders and Contractors. (HVAC) apprenticeship program. Applications should Units Courses Required for the Major be directed to Associated Builders and Contractors, 3 HVAC 301 Introduction to HVAC I 13825 Kirkham Way, Poway CA 92064; 858-513-4700. Introduction to HVAC II HVAC 302 3 Only students accepted as apprentices under HVAC 303 Intermediate HVAC I 3 Associated Builders and Contractors are eligible for 3 Intermediate HVAC II HVAC 304 enrollment in the following HVAC courses. 3 Advanced HVAC I HVAC 305 Program Learning Outcomes: HVAC 306 3 Advanced HVAC II 3 HVAC 307 HVAC Specialties I Demonstrate preparedness for successful • HVAC 308 HVAC Specialties II 3 transition to the Journeyman level designation and professional certification by the California Total Units = 24 Division of Apprenticeship Standards for ABC Additional general education and graduation HVAC . requirements for the associate degree are listed in Illustrate procedures utilized for ABC HVAC • The the Academic Requirements section of catalog. practices in use of tools techniques and associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. hands-on skills and competencies for English 101. Recommended electives: Journeyman-level practices in the HVAC field. • Identify and utilize equipment and related Associated Builders and components of HVAC to meet ABC standards for Contractors measurement, calibration and HVAC practices at Journeyman levels. Pipefitting Apprenticeship • Read, comprehend and apply HVAC instructions A four-year apprenticeship program. Applications and design standards for construction or should be directed to Associated Builders and production outcomes as required by ABCA HVAC Contractors, 13825 Kirkham Way, Poway CA 92064; practices and industry standards in HVAC. 858-513-4700. Only students accepted as apprentices under Associated Builders and Contractors are eligible for enrollment in the following pipefitting courses ollege 312 S an D iego C ity C • 2018–2019

313 PLPF 330 Prerequisite: Pipefitting apprentices must complete Pipefitting III 3 Plumbing (PLBG) 305, 310, 315 and 320 with a grade PLPF 335 3 Pipefitting IV of “C” or better or equivalent prior to enrolling in the Total Units = 21 Apprenticeship Pipefitting program. Note: Proficiency in oxy-fuel cutting of straight, Proficiency in oxy-fuel cutting of straight, curved curved and bevel cuts, and shielded metal arc and bevel cuts, and shielded metal arc welding of welding of mild steel plate is required for completion mild steel plate is required for completion of the of the Pipefitting Apprenticeship program. Welding apprenticeship program. Welding proficiency can proficiency can be achieved through non-credit be achieved through non-credit courses offered courses offered through the San Diego Community Apprenticeship through the San Diego Community College District College District Continuing Education division. Continuing Education division. Associate of Science Degree: Pipefitter Program Learning Outcomes: Pipefitting (Construction Trades) • Demonstrate preparedness for successful Apprenticeship transition to the Journeyman level designation and professional certification by the California Associate of Science Degree Requirements: The Division of Apprenticeship Standards in Associate of Science Degree is conferred upon Pipefitting. successful completion of the required apprenticeship program of Associated Builders and Contractors. • Illustrate procedures utilized for Pipefitting Proficiency in oxy-fuel cutting of straight, curved practices in use of tools techniques and and bevel cuts, and shielded metal arch welding hands-on skills and competencies for of mild steel plate is required for completion of Journeyman-level practices in Pipefitting. the Pipefitting Apprenticeship program. Welding Identify and utilize equipment and related • proficiency can be achieved through non-credit components of Pipefitting to meet Plumbing courses offered through the San Diego Community standards for measurement, calibration and College District Continuing Education division. Pipefitting practices at Journeyman levels. For fourth year, second semester, Apprentices may choose between Advanced Pipefitting 335 or Read, comprehend and apply Pipefitting • increasing their proficiency with oxy-fuel equipment instructions and design standards for Pipefitting to scarf metal and cut bevels; and shielded metal arc production outcomes as required by Plumbing welding of mild steel plates, tee, lab and square butt practices and industry standards. joints and fillet welds. Prerequisite – Pipefitting apprentices must Certificate of Achievement: complete the following courses with a grade of “C” Pipefitting (Construction Trades) or better, or equivalent, prior to enrolling in the Apprenticeship Apprenticeship Pipefitting program: Units Prerequisite – Pipefitting apprentices must PLBG 305 Introduction to Plumbing I 3 complete the following courses with a grade of “C” and or better, or equivalent, prior to enrolling in the 3 Introduction to Plumbing II PLBG 310 Apprenticeship Pipefitting program: Units and PLBG 305 3 Introduction to Plumbing I PLBG 320 Intermediate Plumbing II 3 and Units Courses Required for the Major: PLBG 310 Introduction to Plumbing II 3 PLBG 305 3 Introduction to Plumbing I and 3 PLBG 310 Introduction to Plumbing II PLBG 320 Intermediate Plumbing II 3 PLBG 315 3 Intermediate Plumbing I Courses Required for the Major: Units PLBG 320 3 Intermediate Plumbing II PLBG 305 Introduction to Plumbing I 3 PLPF 325 Pipefitting I 3 Introduction to Plumbing II PLBG 310 3 3 Pipefitting III PLPF 330 PLBG 315 Intermediate Plumbing I 3 PLPF 335 Pipefitting IV 3 3 Intermediate Plumbing II PLBG 320 Total Units = 21 3 PLPF 325 Pipefitting I 313 • 2018–2019 ollege S ity C iego D an C

314 PLBG 335 Plumbing Construction Specialties 3 Additional general education and graduation PLBG 340 Plumbing Code 3 requirements for the associate degree are listed in The the Academic Requirements section of catalog. Apprenticeship Total Units = 24 associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. Associate of Science Degree: English 101. Recommended electives: Plumbing (Construction Trades) Apprenticeship Associated Builders and Associate of Science Degree Requirements: Contractors The Associate of Science Degree is conferred upon Plumbing Apprenticeship successful completion of the required apprenticeship A four-year apprenticeship program. Applications program of Associated Builders and Contractors. should be directed to Associated Builders and Proficiency in oxy-fuel cutting of straight, curved Contractors, 13825 Kirkham Way, Poway CA 92064; and bevel cuts, and shielded metal arc welding 858-513-4700. Only students accepted as apprentices of mild steel plate is required for completion of under Associated Builders and Contractors are the Plumbing Apprenticeship program. Welding eligible for enrollment in the following plumbing proficiency can be achieved through non-credit courses. courses offered through the San Diego Community College District Continuing Education division. Program Learning Outcomes: Courses Required for the Major: Units ABC Plumbing Apprenticeship students will: PLBG 305 Introduction to Plumbing I 3 • Demonstrate preparedness for successful 3 PLBG 310 Introduction to Plumbing II transition to the Journeyman level designation PLBG 315 Intermediate Plumbing I 3 and professional certification by the California Intermediate Plumbing II PLBG 320 3 Division of Apprenticeship Standards for PLBG 325 3 Advanced Plumbing I Plumbing. Advanced Plumbing II PLBG 330 3 Plumbing Construction Specialties 3 PLBG 335 • Illustrate procedures utilized for ABC Plumbing PLBG 340 3 Plumbing Code Apprenticeship in use of tools techniques Total Units = 24 and hands-on skills and competencies for Journeyman-level practices in ABC Plumbing Additional general education and graduation Apprenticeship. requirements for the associate degree are listed in The the Academic Requirements section of catalog. • Identify and utilize equipment and related associate degree requires a minimum of 60 units. components of plumbing to meet ABC Plumbing standards for measurement, calibration and ABC English 101. Recommended electives: Plumbing practices at Journeyman levels. • Read, comprehend and apply plumbing Associated Builders and instructions and design standards for Contractors construction or production outcomes as required Sheet Metal Apprenticeship by plumbing practices and industry standards. A four-year sheet metal apprenticeship program. Certificate of Achievement: Applications should be directed to Associated Plumbing (Construction Trades) Builders and Contractors, 13825 Kirkham Way, Poway CA 92064; 858-513-4700. Only students Apprenticeship accepted as apprentices under Associated Builders Courses Required for the Major: Units and Contractors are eligible for enrol