all of a kind family readers guide.pub

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2 The Companion All-of-a-Kind Family was produced by the Association of Jewish Libraries in celebration of the one hundredth birthday of author Sydney Taylor, born October 30, 1904. Edited by Heidi R. Estrin Contributors: Susan Berman Marci Lavine Bloch June Cummins Andrea Davidson Dr. Hasia Diner Anne Dublin Jonathan Estrin Etta Gold Rachel Kamin Linda Silver Phyllis Weeks Illustrations by Helen John reprinted by permission of GRM ASSOCIATES, INC., Agents for All-of-a-Kind Family by Sydney Taylor, Jo Taylor Marshall, from the book ©1951, Follett Publishing Co., copyright renewed 1979 by Ralph Taylor. © 2004, Association of Jewish Libraries All rights reserved. Contents of this guide may be photocopied for educational use only. Association of Jewish Libraries Room 1034 15 East 26th Street New York, NY 10010 www.jewishlibraries.org                       

3                                 All-of-a-Kind Family : What is the book about? 4 Why is All-of-a-Kind Family an important book? 5 The Setting: The Lower East Side 6-7 8 Who was Sydney Taylor? All-of-a-Kind Family 9 Discussion Questions on 10-11 All-of-a-Kind Family Extension Activities for 12 All-of-a-Kind Family All Grown Up Read-Alikes 13-14 The Sydney Taylor Book Award 15-16 The Sydney Taylor Manuscript Award 16 books Order form for the All-of-a-Kind Family 17 Order form for Sydney Taylor Book Award seals 18 19 Order form for Sydney Taylor Book Award poster                       

4                                                 !        "    # $ !        "    # $ !        "    # $ !        "    # $ Summary: Meet the All-of-a-Kind Family — Ella, Henny, Sarah, Charlotte, and Gertie — who live with their parents in New York City at the turn of the century. Together they share adventures that find them searching for hidden buttons while dusting Mama’s front parlor and visiting with the peddlers in Papa’s shop on rainy days. The girls enjoy doing everything together, especially when it involves holidays and All-of-a-Kind Family (1951) is the first book of a series. Other books in the series include surprises. More All-of-a-Kind Family (1954) , All-of-a-Kind Family Uptown (1957) , All-of-a-Kind Family Down- (1972) , and Ella of All-of-a-Kind Family (1978). town Amazon.com says: There’s something to be said for a book that makes you wish you’d been part of a poor immigrant family living in New York’s upper east side on the eve of World War I. Sydney Taylor's time-honored classic does just that. Life is rich for the five mischievous girls in the family. They find adventure in visiting the library, going to market with Mama, even dusting the front room. Young readers who have never shared a bedroom with four siblings, with no television in sight, will vicariously experience the simple, old-fashioned pleasures of talk, make-believe, and pilfered penny candy. The family's Jewish faith strengthens their ties to each other, while providing still more excitement and opportunity for mischief. Readers unfamiliar with Judaism will learn with the girls during each beautifully depicted holiday. This lively family, subject of four more “all-of-a- kind” books, is full of unique characters, all deftly illustrated by Helen John. Taylor based the stories on her own childhood family, and the true-life (Ages 9 to 12) quality of her writing gives this classic its page-turning appeal. “Memorable.” –The New York Times “Heartwarming bit of Americana. Delightful.” –Library Journal “A captivating picture of Jewish family life and religious observances...Entertaining and heartwarming...” –May Hill Arbuthnot, Children and Books –Chicago Sunday Tribune “Warmly related from the author’s own childhood memories...” books to be among the best...” —Linda Sue Park, author of the “I consider the All-of-a-Kind Family Newbery winning historical novel ‘A Single Shard’                       

5  !    !    !     !                                               " $         " $         " $         " $ By Heidi Estrin, Chair Sydney Taylor Book Award Committee Association of Jewish Libraries All-of-a-Kind Family The year 2004 marks the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Sydney Taylor, the author of the books. The year 2004 also marks the 350th anniversary of the settlement of Jews in America. As we look back over the years, we can see that All-of-a-Kind Family was a very important book in the history of American Jewish children’s publishing. It was the first book with Jewish characters to be read and loved by all kinds of children. It gave non-Jewish readers a glimpse of Jewish life. It helped Jews feel accepted in American culture. Professor June Cummins, Sydney Taylor’s biographer, says that All-of-a-Kind Family inaugurated the genre of Jewish children’s literature. Before All-of-a-Kind Family , Jewish children’s books tended to be written for Jewish audiences. Taylor’s books reach past those ethnic boundaries with a universal family story and characters everyone can care about. Today, all readers enjoy multicultural literature about Jews, African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Hispanics, and other peoples. Sydney Taylor helped break down barriers so that all ethnic groups could have a voice in children’s literature. books are also enjoyable literature. For over fifty years, readers have loved the adventures The All-of-a-Kind Family Lower East Side Memories: A Jewish Place in and the closeness of the family in the stories. Dr. Hasia Diner, in her book , says: America All-of-a-Kind Family was the first book I ever read with Jewish characters, Americans, with whom I could identify. The minute I pulled the book off the shelf and looked at the cover, I knew instinctively that the family in the book was Jewish and that its pages contained stories that would affect me deeply. I am not sure how I knew this, but I distinctly remember the pleasure of that moment of recognition and the hours of delight (since I read it over and over again) that it, and the other volumes in the series, brought. While it would be too much of a leap to say it changed my life, finding this book did give me a sense of validation and a rush of belonging that I never experienced again as a reader. In the first chapter of the book, the girls in the family, Jewish children in immigrant New York, go to the library – on Friday afternoon – on their weekly foray for books. Here I was reading a book that I found in the public library on a Friday afternoon in which the main characters, a family of little girls, did exactly what I did: get their library books on Friday afternoon, light Sabbath candles, eat kugel, celebrate Passover, speak English to their Yiddish-speaking parents, argue with each other, get in trouble, get out of trouble, and so on. Despite the fact that the book was set in a city I had never seen and that the actions took place a half century earlier than the years of my growing up, I felt an instantaneous bond with these girls and their neighborhood. I could not think of anyplace I wanted to visit more than New York, and I expected that the Lower East Side would look and sound just like it did when Henny, Ella, Gertie, Sarah, and Charlotte ran down the steps of the library, rushing home before the Sabbath began. Sydney Taylor’s work has been so important to American children’s literature that the Association of Jewish Libraries named both its children’s book award and its manuscript award for unpublished books in her memory. Since the awards were established, over fifty books have received medals for providing a positive and authentic picture of Jewish life, just as Sydney Taylor did in All-of-a-Kind Family . We hope that you will enjoy learning more about Sydney Taylor, and about the first book in series, published by Follett in 1951. the All-of-a-Kind Family          !             

6    %   &       ' %       %   &       ' %       %   &       ' %       %   &       ' %    By Dr. Hasia Diner, Professor of American Jewish History, New York University Sydney Taylor grew up on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York. This neighborhood played an important place in American history and in American Jewish history. In the decades before and after 1900 –when All-of-a-Kind-Family takes place, it was the largest Jewish neighborhood in America. In fact, it was the largest Jewish neighborhood in the world. Not only did hundreds of thousands of Jews live there, they created much of American Jewish culture there. On the Lower East Side, Jewish immigrants published Yiddish newspapers, books, and magazines. They staged Yiddish plays. They produced and performed Jewish music. They built Jewish schools and hospitals. They established labor unions to make sure that employers paid their workers a decent wage, and even created Socialist political groups that that said that great differences between the rich and the poor should not exist. Even Jews who lived in other parts of America read the newspapers and magazines that came from the Lower East Side. All of this made the Lower East Side a very exciting place, one where people took ideas very seriously. What and where was the Lower East Side? Why did it buzz with so much cultural creativity and political work? The Lower East Side lay in the southern part of New York City, on the island of Manhattan. It fell roughly below Houston Street on the north and Fulton and Franklin Streets to the south. The East River, served as its eastern boundary and on the west, Broadway and Pearl Streets. It had a history as a neighborhood long before Sydney Taylor lived there as a young girl and before the characters of All- of-a-Kind-of-Family had their adventures there. Even before the American Revolution, the neighborhood— which was not called the Lower East Side at the time— was a home for free black farmers and a number of wealthy white farmers. One of them, James de Lancey, who supported the British during the Revolution and had his land taken away, left his name—Delancey Street—as one of the most important streets of the neighborhood. After the Revolution many small merchants and shopkeepers lived in this area and in 1833 many Irish and German immigrants moved there. Of the German immigrants, a sizable number were Jewish. The first synagogues, kosher butcher shops, and other kinds of Jewish shops on the Lower East Side were built in the 1840’s. The immigrants of the Lower East Side lived in tenements, a very distinctive New York kind of building. The first one went up in 1833. Each tenement apartment building had four stories with four apartments on a floor. They did not have indoor running water or indoor plumbing. They were usually crowded, dark, and dirty. From the 1870’s to the 1920’s, huge numbers of immigrants came to America fleeing poverty, hunger, and oppression. Many came from eastern Europe, from Russia, Poland, Rumania, and Hungary. During that time, about three million Jews came to America. Most spoke Yiddish, although some of them came from Greece, Turkey and other parts of the Ottoman Empire. These Jews spoke Ladino.          "             

7 Of that huge wave of Jewish immigrants, a majority landed in New York and stayed there. In fact, until 1910 almost all Jewish immigrants made the Lower East Side their first American home. Why did they flock to New York in such great numbers? New York had emerged as the heart of America’s garment industry. Here, women’s clothing—dresses, blouses, shirt- waists, coats— were sewn to be sold all over the country and the world. Many Jews had been tailors or seamstresses before moving to America, and came with sewing skills and experience. So New York proved to be the perfect place to live and work. Also, garment making was an industry where it was easy to achieve some kind of success, to move from being a worker to owning a shop of one’s own. As these immigrants wrote back home to Europe about their jobs and their earnings, other European Jews came to America as well to join friends and relatives on the Lower East Side. They opened stores of all kinds and sizes to serve the Jewish population. Many stood on street corners and sold from pushcarts. Orchard and Grand Streets in particular saw dozens of pushcart vendors selling food and clothing. Others merchants put packs on their backs or sat behind a horse on a wagon and sold from the streets. As they went about they shouted out their wares. Yet others had actual stores. They sold food stuffs, clothing, paper, hardware, hats, books, basically anything that the growing immigrant Jewish population needed and wanted. Some of them collected discarded items—junk—and resold it to people who could not afford new items. Soon, the Lower East Side was a “city within a city.” It had its schools, libraries, playgrounds, theaters, work places, synagogues, and parks. It was a crowded neighborhood. People used every inch of space and could be found everywhere, on the streets, on the stoops of the tenements and in the hallways. In the hot weather they spent time on the roofs of their apartment buildings. Sometimes they slept out of doors on the fire escapes. Children played amidst the pushcarts and on the sidewalks. A reporter named Jacob Riis claimed that the Lower East Side was “the most densely populated district in all the world.” All of the activity on the streets brought people into close touch with each other. They knew each other’s business. They gossiped about each other and shared information of all sorts. Each person’s problems became everyone else’s as well. The crowding made for a great deal of excitement and tumult. Children always had others to play with. They never fretted over being lonely. The crowding had a down side as well. Certain diseases ran rampant, tuberculosis in particular. Because people lived so close together when someone got sick, everyone worried about the spread of germs and the outbreak of epidemics. People complained about the smell, the noise, and the lack of privacy. Many of the immigrant Jews saved their money and moved out to better and less crowded neighborhoods. Sydney Taylor and her sisters and brothers grew up on the Lower East Side. As an adult, Sydney remembered the crowding, the intensity, the different kinds of people, and the ways immigrant Jewish parents and their American-born children created a very distinctive culture that flourished for a few decades and then faded. But the bustle and excitement of the Lower East Side at the beginning of the twentieth century can be experienced again whenever a reader opens the pages of All-of-a-Kind Family.          #             

8 !     !      !      !     %     $ %     $ %     $ %     $ By June Cummins, Associate Professor, Department of English and Comparative Literature, San Diego State University The Family At the turn of the last century, the Brenner family emigrated to the United States, as so many Jewish families did. Four years after they arrived, their third daughter, Sarah Brenner, was born on October 30, 1904. Later, Sarah changed her name to Sydney, but her four sisters, Ella, Henrietta, Charlotte, and Gertrude, kept their first names, and Sydney immortalized these names by giving them to their character counterparts in her All-of- a-Kind Family books. Three brothers were subsequently born. As of 2004, only the youngest brother, Jerry survives. As a grown woman, Sydney remembered the early days of her family’s life on the Lower East Side. Although they were poor, like most Jewish immigrants, they had many happy times. Just like the girls in the books, Sydney and her sisters were “five little girls [who] shared one bedroom—and never minded bedtime. Snuggled in our beds we would talk and giggle and plan tomorrow’s fun and mischief.” (Something About The Author) The Story When Sydney had her own child, Jo, she told her stories of her childhood on the Lower East Side. Sydney felt Jo was lonely as an only child and wanted to share her past with her. “When Jo was little . . . I would sit beside her bed at night and try to make up for the lack of a big family by telling her about my own. Jo loved the stories about how papa and mama worked and how the five little girls helped out. She was delighted with the tales of our good times together and the enjoyment of simple pleasures. She loved the stories so much that I decided to write them all down especially for her. The manuscript went into a big (More Books by More People) box and stayed there.” The Book One summer when Sydney was away working as the drama counselor at Camp Cejwin, her husband Ralph decided to submit the manuscript to a contest sponsored by Follett. Sydney had no idea of his action until she received a letter in the mail. “No one was more surprised than I when I received a letter from Mrs. Meeks, the Children’s Book Editor of Wilcox & Follett, . I didn’t know what she was talking about. I told my husband and the telling me she wanted to publish All-of-a-Kind Family whole story came out. Then Mr. Follett telephoned me to say that All-of-a-Kind Family had won the Follett [Award].” (Something About The Author) The Series All-of-a-Kind Family After the success of the first book, Sydney went on to write four more for the series ( More All-of- a-Kind Family, All-of-a-Kind Family Uptown, All-of-a-Kind Family Downtown, and Ella of All-of-a-Kind Family) , as well as several other books for children. She toured schools and libraries all over the country, talking to children about her work. She also continued to work at Camp Cejwin and was there for over thirty years. The Legacy Sydney died of cancer on February 12, 1978. Although some of her books are over fifty years old, they are still beloved All-of-a-Kind Family books were re-released in paperback just a by many—both old and young (and in between)—today. The few years ago and continue to sell well. Linking up her past with her daughter’s present, Sydney made the Lower East Side at the turn of the last century come vividly alive for thousands of readers.          $             

9           ( #   ) #        ( #   ) #                       ( #   ) #       ( #   ) #           1. If you could be any character in , who would you most like to be? Why? Who would you least like to All-of-a-Kind Family be? Why? 2. Why was reading so important to the sisters? Do you feel the same way about reading? Why or why not? 3. Although the stories take place in the 1910’s, does anything happen to the girls in All-of-A-Kind-Family which is similar to something in your life today? Describe what that is. 4. How is the All of a Kind Family like your own family? How is the family different? 5. Think of a holiday mentioned in the story. How is it the same as or different from the way your family celebrates this holiday? 6. What is your favorite holiday as described in the book? Why? 7. The sisters in the book must help their mother with the housework. What chores do you do to help your family? How are your chores different from those in the story? 8. What is there in your own life that would be shocking or surprising or exciting to the children in this book? 9. What did children do for fun in this book? If you went back in time to visit the characters, what would you miss from your own time? 10. The Hebrew word “mitzvot” means commandments or good deeds. Can you find examples of characters performing “mitzvot” in this book? The Hebrew word “middot” refers to good character traits. What “middot” do you think the characters in the story possess?      %                 

10      ' *      +          ' *      +                    ' *      +           ' *      +             1. Hide-and-Seek Buttons In one of the chapters, Mama hides a dozen buttons around the room. If the girls dust well they will find all twelve buttons and Mama will know they have done a good job. Hide buttons around the room and let children find them, with or without dusting! 2. Fun & Games Have children research the games that children used to play at the turn of the twentieth century. Ask each child to choose a game and show the others in the group how to play it. 3. Succah Arts & Crafts , with fruits, paper chains, flowers, etc. All-of-a-Kind Family Decorate a succah like the one the family built and decorated in If you cannot decorate a real succah, make a miniature one from a shoebox, or draw a picture of the family’s succah as you imagine it from your reading. 4. Oral History All of a Kind Family is based on Sydney Taylor’s own memories of her childhood. Ask children what special memories they have of family times together. Have them ask an adult in their own family about special memories of family times together when he or she was young. 5. Costumes The family in the story cannot afford to buy costumes for Purim; so they create costumes out of their own clothing, or by borrowing other people’s clothes. Ask children to get creative and find a way to make costumes out of ordinary clothing or household objects. Wear the costumes for Purim, for a costume party, or just for a fun dress-up day. 6. Music Ask children to find a song that children or adults listened to in the early part of the twentieth century. Ask them to play the song on a musical instrument, or from a CD, and teach it to the other children.          &             

11 7. Immigration Show some pictures from a book about life in the “old country,” such as Suitcase of Dreams: Immigration Stories from the Skirball Cultural Center by Shelly Kale, or Golden Land: The Story of Jewish Migrations to America by Joseph Telushkin, or find pictures of shtetl life on the Internet, such as Shtetl at http://library.thinkquest.org/C004509/shtetl.htm. Look together at the pictures for clues about shtetl life. Then discuss questions such as: What would motivate people to leave their homes to travel to a new country? Can you think of any group of people today, including Jews, who have left their homes for a new country? What were their reasons for leaving? Where would we go if we had to leave our country? What are your reasons for the country you chose? Where would Jewish people go if there were no Israel? 8. Home Sweet Home Tenement: Immigrant Life on the Lower East Side by Raymond Show pictures of tenement homes from a source such as Bial, or the Tenement Museum web site at www.tenement.org, to give children an idea of what the homes were like on the Lower East Side where the sisters are growing up in the story. Ask the children to compare the rooms where the family lived with their own homes, with questions such as “Do you have your own bedroom, or do you share with a sister or brother? Describe a room in your home.” As a follow-up activity, readers could draw a floor plan with furniture on graph paper, create a diorama of a room, or make a plasticine model of a room from their own homes or from the home in the story. 9. Movie Time Show the video Dreams in the Golden Country , based on the Dear America book by Kathryn Lasky (the video is available for purchase through Scholastic at www.scholastic.com - click on The Scholastic Store). The story is about a Jewish immigrant family in New York in 1903, the challenges facing the family as they adjust to life in America, and the crisis they face when one of the daughters wants to marry an Irish boy. The movie provides the opportunity to discuss the challenges and compromises faced by immigrants during that time in history, many of which are still relevant today. Ask children to compare and contrast the characters’ experiences in All of a Kind Family to those in the movie. 10. Jewish Life Then & Now gives readers a sense of what Jewish life was like in the early twentieth century on the Lower East Side All-of-A-Kind Family in New York. What was Jewish life like at that time in the place where you live? Have children conduct research at a local synagogue library, academic library, or community archives to find out about local history, buildings, clothing, food, customs, etc. You can also contact your local Jewish Historical Society to find out about the history of the Jewish community in your area (Go to www.ajhs.org and click on “Academic Activities” and then “Other Historical Societies” to get contact information for the organization in your area). Many large cities offer local Jewish history tours that you can take. If you live close to New York, visit Ellis Island, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, the Eldridge Street Synagogue, or the Center for Jewish History. You can also arrange for a walking tour of the Jewish Lower East Side or of Immigrant New York through Big Onion Walking Tours (www.bigonion.com).                       

12                                          ,   -   ,   -   ,   -   ,   -  By June Cummins, Associate Professor, Department of English and Comparative Literature, San Diego State University All-of-a-Kind Family was based on Sydney Taylor’s real family. “Sarah” in the book was Sydney in real life. Here is The book what happened to the children of All-of-a-Kind Family when they grew up. '  '  '  '  Ella was born in 1900 in Germany, and came to America with her family as a baby. When she grew up, she married Joseph Kornweitz. She had two children, Leonard and June. After her first husband died, she remarried Albert Schoolman in the late 1980’s. Ella was involved with Camp Cejwin, a Jewish summer camp, for many years, writing music and creating costumes for plays put on by the campers. Just like in the books, Ella was very musical and always loved to sing. .   .   .   .   Henrietta (Henny) was born in 1902 in New York. She married Morris Fried (who changed his last name to Roberts) and had a daughter, Harriet, in 1925. She later married another man, Harry Davis. Henny ran the kitchen at Camp Cejwin, a Jewish summer camp. She was a voracious reader her whole life long. Her daughter says, “Henny was very pretty and attractive and loved to dance and was active and vivacious.” She always took care of other people, including Ralph Taylor after Sydney died. %   %   %   %   Sarah was born in 1904 in New York. When she was in high school, she changed her name to “Sydney.” She married Ralph Taylor in 1925, and had one daughter, Joanne, born in 1935. She was a dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company, and she worked at Camp Cejwin, a Jewish summer camp, writing, directing, and choreographing plays for the campers. In addition books, she wrote other children’s books such as Mr. Barney’s Beard, The Dog Who Came to Dinner, to the All-of-a-Kind Family and She died in 1978. Danny Loves a Holiday.                 Charlotte was born in 1907 in New York. She married Lou Himber and had one daughter, Susan, born in 1944. Charlotte became a writer and editor for the and the YMCA Circulator , as well as the author of a book called New York Times Magazine Famous In Their Twenties How to Survive . She lost much of her hearing, and at age 83 wrote a book for the deaf entitled Hearing Loss. She died in 1997. ,    ,    ,    ,    Gertrude (Gertie) was born in 1908 in New York. She married Murray Shiner and had one daughter, Judy, born in 1945. Gertie often wrote witty letters to companies to complain about their products, and would sometimes receive answers from the companies. She once wrote to Jergens to tell them that their oblong bottles of hand lotion always fell over. She told them “You should make their bottoms round like ours, so they can stay seated!” The company sent her a whole box of lotions, and Gertie thought it was quite funny that many of the bottles fell over and broke in the mail. Gertie died in 1993. /    0 /    0 /    0 /    0 Irving was born in 1912. In All-of-a-Kind Family he was called “Charlie.” He grew up to marry Ethel, and had two sons, Michael and Joel. He worked in the junk business (like his father). Irving was an expert Scrabble-player. He died in 1999.         Jerry was born in 1919. Readers learn of him in Ella of All-of-a-Kind Family when Mama tells Ella she’s pregnant. Jerry married Norma and had a daughter named Laurie, and a son named Charlie. Jerry was in the freight transportation business until he retired. Jerry is still living, and recently donated “The Brenner Collection” to the Library of Congress. This is a collection of 1,261 letters exchanged between Jerry and Norma while he served as a soldier in World War II. You can see part of The Brenner Collection online at www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/homefront-correspond.html.                       

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15    %     6   "       %     6   "       %     6   "       %     6   "    The Sydney Taylor Book Award was established in memory of Sydney by her husband Ralph. Each year, a committee of librarians from the Association of Jewish Libraries reads approximately one hundred new books, looking for the best Jewish children’s books of the year. They pick one winner for Younger Readers and one winner for Older Readers. Runners-up receive Honor medals. The authors and illustrators of the winning books are asked to come to the Association’s annual convention to give acceptance speeches and receive their awards. This list shows the winning titles for every year since the award was established through 2003. The first book listed under each year is the Younger Readers winner, and the second is the Older Readers winner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

16 %$    . :   / $ '     %         %         %         %        '  '  8  ' 7      %$ 7 #      7 #      7 #      7 #        )    + '8  @ '  ' &' 7     ' ) -' < '  2'  Since 1985, the Association of Jewish Libraries has given an  E)%$+  .  ,  /2F award each year to the best manuscript of an unpublished %$& Jewish children’s book. Sydney Taylor was unknown as an ' 2      .5,C  ' author when she won Follett’s manuscript competition with All- of-a-Kind Family , but she went on to become famous. The %#% librarians who judge the manuscripts each year hope that these  7 '.  '       ",   authors will someday be famous too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

17 8       8       8      8       %     6   "    %   %     6   "    %   %     6   "    %   %     6   "    %   SHIP TO: Name:_________________________________________________________________________ Organization:___________________________________________________________________ Address:_______________________________________________________________________ City:__________________________________________________________________________ State:____________________________________________________Zip:__________________ Phone: (______)__________________________Fax:(______)____________________________ E-mail address:__________________________________________________________________ SEALS PRICE QUANTITY AMOUNT Annual Awards Package: $ Gold and silver seals for current year’s $6.00 x winners, and Award info packet Sydney Taylor Book Award Seals $ $10.00 x Package of 20 (10 gold + 10 silver) $ $10.00 x Sydney Taylor Book Award Seals Package of 20 (all one color). Check one: ___ GOLD ___ SILVER Add Shipping: .50 cents per Package + GRAND TOTAL $ Please make out your check to and mail with this form to: AJL Debbie Stern AJL Vice-President for Publications Library, Reconstructionist Rabbinical College 1299 Church Road, Wyncote, PA 19095 Questions? Contact Debbie Stern at [email protected]          $             

18 8      8        8      8       %     6   "        %     6   "        %     6   "        %     6   "        SHIP TO: Name:_________________________________________________________________________ Organization:___________________________________________________________________ Address:_______________________________________________________________________ City:__________________________________________________________________________ State:____________________________________________________Zip:__________________ Phone: (______)__________________________Fax:(______)____________________________ E-mail address:__________________________________________________________________ POSTER PRICE QUANTITY AMOUNT $12.00 x $ Sydney Taylor Book Award Poster SUBTOTAL $ Add Shipping: $5.00 + GRAND TOTAL $ AJL and mail with this form to: Please make out your check to Lisa Silverman Sinai Temple Blumenthal Library 10400 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA, 90024 Questions? Contact Lisa Silverman at [email protected]          %             

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