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1 Heli x WATER DISTRICT CALENDAR YEAR 2017 WATER QUALITY REPORT PUBLISHED JUNE 2018 SETTING STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE IN PUBLIC SERVICE

2 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 About Us WE SERVE A POPULATION OF 274,526 Helix Water District provides a safe and reliable water supply for a nearly 50 square mile service area that includes the cities of La Mesa, Lemon Grove and El Cajon, the Spring Valley community and areas of Santee, Lakeside and unincorporated San Diego County. Helix is a special district - a not-for-profit, local government agency - and our history dates back to 1885 and the building of the flume that delivered water from Lake Cuyamaca to La Mesa. We are governed by a five-member board elected to four-year terms by the communities they serve. Public Participation Helix welcomes public participation and encourages customers to attend district board meetings. The board meets the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 6 p.m. and on the fourth Wednesday of each month at 3 p.m. Board meetings are held at our administration office located at 7811 University Avenue in La Mesa. Meeting dates, agendas, minutes and or by calling 619-667-6232. directions are available at hwd.com CONTACT US Water Quality hwd.com/water-quality-assistant/ 619-667-6248 [email protected] 2 ABOUT US Customer Service and Billing hwd.com WATER YOUR CAN TRUST 3 619-466-0585 [email protected] 4 WATER SUPPLY 7811 University Ave Emergencies 6 WATER TREATMENT Nights, weekends and holidays 619-466-3234 6 EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION Lake Jennings lakejennings.org 7 ABOUT LEAD 619-443-2510 - Lake 619-390-1623 - Campground HOW TO READ THE TABLES 8 9 WATER QUALITY DATA CONNECT WITH US hwd.com/news LEARN MORE 11 2

3 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 Water You Can Trust We are pleased to present your 2017 Water Quality Report, also known as the Consumer Confidence Report. Last year, as in years past, your tap water met all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and State of California drinking water health standards. Helix Water District vigilantly safeguards its water supplies and once again, we are proud to report that our system has never violated a primary maximum contaminant level. This brochure is a summary of last year’s water quality. Included are details about QUALITY where your water comes from, what it contains and how it compares to state and federal standards. RELIABILITY This report follows the State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking EFFICIENCY Water guidelines for CCRs dated January 2018. It is our intent to provide this report to all of our consumers. Additional copies may be obtained by calling 619-466-0585. If you have any questions or concerns regarding this water quality report, please contact Helix’s . [email protected] senior chemist, Cindy Ziernicki, at 619-667-6248 or In 2017, Helix Water District’s water met or surpassed every drinking water standard set by the State of California and U.S. EPA 3

4 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 Water Supply WHERE YOUR WATER COMES FROM Average Source Water Blend in 2017 Helix Water District is committed to providing you with safe and reliable water. Our water is a blend of imported raw (untreated) water purchased from the San Diego County Water Authority and local surface water. 48% State Water SDCWA’s imported water sources come from Northern California via the Project State Water Project and the Colorado River. Over the past 30 years, imported water has accounted for 86 percent of our water supply, on average, due to limited local precipitation. The remainder of our water supply comes from local water runoff collected in Lake Cuyamaca, El Capitan Reservoir, and Lake 34% Jennings. Colorado River Throughout the year, the ratio of water that we receive from each source changes depending on availability. What is in our water varies depending on the water source, and the geology and environment that it flows through on the way to our plant. Our state-certified employees test our source water continuously and adjust treatment accordingly to ensure high-quality water for our customers. All raw water, whether imported or local, is treated before entering our 18% distribution system. In 2017, over 99 percent of your water was treated Local- at Helix Water District’s R.M. Levy Water Treatment Plant in Lakeside; we El Capitan purchased less than one percent of treated imported water from the San Diego County Water Authority. POTENTIAL SOURCE WATER CONTAMINANTS The sources of drinking water, both tap water and bottled water, include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural Microbial contaminants, • livestock operations and wildlife. • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming. • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses. • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals that are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application and septic systems. which can be naturally occurring or the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. Radioactive contaminants, • In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State Water Resources Control Board prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations and California law also establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that provide the same protection for public health. 4

5 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 LAKE JENNINGS Photo: Pat Rendon HELP PROTECT WATERSHED SANITARY SURVEY UPDATE YOUR COMMUNITY’S WATER Protecting watersheds prevents contamination of water supplies. The Lake Jennings Limit use of fertilizers Watershed Sanitary Survey is regularly updated in accordance with state regulations. The most recent update was March 2016. The purpose of such surveys is to assess the watershed to determine the existence and potential hazards of contamination Dispose of chemicals sources that could reach the public water supply. properly Lake Jennings serves as a recreational area for the public, and activities that may affect water quality are closely monitored. The March 2016 Lake Jennings Watershed Sanitary Survey Update found the lake’s water quality to be vulnerable to wastewater, Pick up after your pet recreation, development, equestrian properties and pesticide/herbicide use. Through water quality monitoring and management of activities in and around the Properly maintain your lake, along with community involvement, Helix Water District is able to minimize the septic system risk of these potential sources of contamination. If you would like a summary of the assessment, please contact Helix’s senior chemist, Volunteer - Join a watershed . Cindy Ziernicki, at 619-667-6248 or [email protected] protection group or organize a storm drain stenciling project 5

6 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 Water Treatment OUR ADVANCED TREATMENT PROCESS Helix Water District customers receive water treated at the R. M. Levy Water Treatment Plant in Lakeside. Helix uses a proven, highly effective multi-step water treatment process to produce high-quality water for our customers. The multi-step water treatment AUTOMATED process includes the use of ozone as a highly effective disinfecting agent. Ozone is able WATER TESTING to inactivate and destroy a wide range of potentially harmful organisms and chemical MONITORED compounds in the raw source water. Ozone also reduces disinfection byproducts and 24/7 improves the taste and odor of the finished drinking water. OVER 200 WATER SAMPLES COLLECTED AND ANALYZED EAC H DAY CONTINUOUS WATER QUALITY TESTING STATE-CERTIFIED STAFF CONDUCT We continuously monitor and test the water during and after the treatment process. HANDS-ON TESTING Our state-certified operators and lab staff collect and analyze over 200 water samples IN THE FIELD AND each day. Hands-on testing is completed in the field and in our state-certified laboratory, IN OUR LAB which also uses the latest analytical instruments to perform automated testing which is continuously monitored. Helix’s treated water consistently meets all primary federal and state quality standards. Educational Information Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800-426- 4791. Additional information on bottled water is available on the California Department of Public Health website at https://www.cdph. ca.gov/Programs/CEH/DFDCS/Pages/FDBPrograms/FoodSafetyProgram/Water.aspx. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. U.S. EPA/Centers for Disease Control guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800- 426- 4791. 6

7 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 About Lead NO LEAD PIPE Helix Water District meets all standards for lead under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Lead and Copper Rule and does not have any lead pipes or service lines within its distribution system. Helix Water District is required to collect water samples from select homes and to test that water under the EPA’s Lead and Copper Rule. In 2015, 57 customers provided samples from their taps to Helix Water District for lead and copper analysis. The results are presented below. LEAD TESTING IN SCHOOLS Helix has no lead water mains or service lines in its distribution system and its water Assembly Bill 746, which was signed into law in October 2017, requires California water providers to conduct lead is non-corrosive to customer plumbing testing at public K-12 schools within their service area to determine if lead is present in the school’s private plumbing or water fixtures. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Helix Water District proactively contacted all schools Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components within its service area and offered testing in advance of the associated with service lines and home plumbing. Helix Water state’s 2019 deadline. All public schools, plus the majority District is responsible for providing high-quality drinking water, but of private schools, within Helix’s service area participated cannot control the variety of materials used in private plumbing in testing. All school samples met the lead standards components. established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Lead and Copper Rule. Please contact each school directly When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can to obtain individualized testing results. minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you do so, you may wish to collect the flushed water and reuse LEAD TESTING IN SCHOOLS it for another beneficial purpose, such as watering plants. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have NUMBER OF SCHOOLS REQUESTING TESTING SAMPLE DATE your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing 2017 79 methods and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available http://www.epa.gov/ from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at lead. LEAD AND COPPER TABLE SAMPLE 90TH CONTAMINANT RANGE AL VIOLATION PHG TYPICAL SOURCE (UNITS) PERCENTILE DAT E Internal corrosion of household water 57 sites sampled; 0.2 plumbing systems; discharges from industrial ND 2015 Lead (ppb) 15 No 0 sites over action level manufacturers; erosion of natural deposits Internal corrosion of household plumbing 57 sites sampled; 2015 ND No systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching 0.3 1.3 Copper (ppm) 0 sites over action level from wood preservatives 7

8 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 How to Read the Tables The tables on the following pages are a summary of the testing performed on your water from January 1 to December 31, 2017. The terms used in the tables are explained below. WHAT ARE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS? WHAT ARE WATER QUALITY GOALS? In addition to mandatory drinking water standards, the U.S. Drinking water standards are mandated by the U.S. EPA and state have set non-enforceable water quality goals Environmental Protection Agency and State of California. for some contaminants. Water quality goals are often set They set limits for substances that may affect consumer at such low levels that they are not achievable in practice health or aesthetic qualities of water. Water quality standards are enforceable and violations are reported. nor directly measurable. Nevertheless, these goals provide useful guideposts and direction for water management practices. A copy of Helix’s most recent Public Health Definitions - Water Quality Standards http://bit. Goals Report on Water Quality is available at • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level ly/2I2kK9n. of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. Definitions - Water Quality Goals Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs or • MCLGs as is economically and technologically The level • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): feasible. of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs are set Set to protect the odor, taste Secondary MCLs: • by the U.S. EPA. and appearance of drinking water. • The level of a contaminant Public Health Goal (PHG): MCLs and Primary Drinking Water Standard (PDWS): • in drinking water below which there is no known or MRDLs for contaminants that affect health along with expected risk to health. PHGs are set by the California their monitoring and reporting requirements, and Environmental Protection Agency. water treatment requirements. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): • • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs water. There is convincing evidence that addition of do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial control microbial contaminants. contaminants. Additional Definitions The Regulatory Action Level (AL): • ABBREVIATIONS concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other AL: Regulatory Action Level MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goal requirements that a water system must Colony CFU: -Forming Units mg/L: Milligrams per Liter follow. Grains per Gallon GPG: Maximum Residual MRDLG: MCL: Maximum Contaminant Level Disinfectant Level Goal • Treatment Technique (TT): A required N/A: Not Applicable Standard Unit SU: process intended to reduce the level of a Not Detected ND: TON: Threshold Odor Number contaminant in drinking water. No Standard NS: Micrograms per Liter μg/L: Nephelometric Turbidity Units NTU: DBPs are Disinfection Byproduct (DBP): • μs/cm: microSiemens per Centimeter pCi/L: picoCuries per Liter formed when disinfectants (chlorine, chloramines, ozone or others) react with organic and inorganic compounds naturally occurring in the water. 8

9 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 2017 Water Quality Data PRIMARY DRINKING WATER STANDARDS (a) TREATMENT PLANT EFFLUENT HELIX TREATMENT PLANT PHG/(MCLG)/ UNITS MAJOR SOURCES STATE MCL PARAMETER [MRDLG] AVG MIN MAX CLARITY (b) NTU N/A Soil runoff N/A 0.18 Highest Filter Effluent Turbidity N/A TT = 0.3 Highest % Percentage of Samples Meeting N/A 95% N/A 100% % Soil runoff Turbidity Limits < 0.3 NTU INORGANIC CHEMICALS Erosion of natural deposits; residue from 130 ug/L Aluminum (c) 1,000 600 74 97 some surface water treatment processes 1 0.6 Fluoride (d) 0.7 Water additive and natural deposits mg/L 2 0.8 Runoff and leaching from fertilizer use, ND 0.45 ND 10 septic tanks and sewage; erosion of natural Nitrate as Nitrogen mg/L 10 deposits ) e RADIONUCLIDES ( (0) Single Sample 6.96 Erosion of natural deposits pCi/L 15 Gross Alpha 0.43 Single Sample 4.7 Erosion of natural deposits pCi/L Uranium 20 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM PHG/(MCLG)/ MAX PARAMETER MIN UNITS AVG MAJOR SOURCES STATE MCL [MRDLG] MICROBIOLOGICAL Total Coliform Bacteria-State Total % 0% Naturally present in the environment 5.0% Coliform Rule (% positive samples/ (0%) month) (f) Fecal Coliform and E. coli-State Total (g) 0% Human and animal fecal waste % (0%) Coliform Rule Total Coliform Bacteria-Federal Revised Total Coliform Rule (% positive (0%) 0% TT = 5.0% % Naturally present in the environment samples/mo) (h) E. coli-Federal Revised Total Coliform % (g) (0%) 0% Human and animal fecal waste Rule DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS (DBPS), DISINFECTION RESIDUALS AND DBP PRECURSORS (FEDERAL) 80 N/A 26 44 36 Byproduct of drinking water chlorination Total Trihalomethanes ug/L 60 Haloacetic Acids 5 5.5 16 10.4 Byproduct of drinking water chlorination ug/L N/A Drinking water disinfectant added for mg/L [4.0] 0.3 3.5 2.2 2 [4.0] Chloramines as Cl treatment TT N/A 1.89 Total Organic Carbon 2.42 Natural and man-made sources mg/L 3.29 ug/L 10 0.1 ND ND ND Byproduct of drinking water ozonation Bromate 9

10 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 2017 Water Quality Data SECONDARY DRINKING WATER STANDARDS - AESTHETIC STANDARDS HELIX TREATMENT PLANT STATE MCL MAJOR SOURCES PHG PARAMETER UNITS AVG MAX MIN Erosion of natural deposits; residue from 130 97 Aluminum (c) ug/L N/A 74 200 some surface water treatment processes Runoff or leaching from natural deposits; N/A 88 73 Chloride 500 mg/L 66 seawater influence Naturally-occurring material and/or algae 2 3 ND Odor TON N/A 1 blooms N/A 1,600 810 663 Runoff or leaching from natural deposits uS/cm Specific Conductance 580 Runoff or leaching from natural deposits; 91 111 N/A 500 Sulfate mg/L 160 industrial waste N/A 310 500 393 Runoff or leaching from natural deposits Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) mg/L 1,000 ADDITIONAL PARAMETERS HELIX TREATMENT PLANT STATE MCL MAJOR SOURCES UNITS PARAMETER PHG MIN MAX AVG N/A N/A 74 99 89 Alkalinity as CaCO 3 mg/L N/A N/A 47 38 Calcium mg/L 32 Hardness is the sum of magnesium and N/A mg/L 170 200 185 calcium cations present in the water and is 3 Hardness as CaCO N/A naturally-occurring Hardness is the sum of magnesium and N/A 9.9 11.7 10.8 Hardness in grains per gallon calcium cations present in the water and is gpg N/A naturally-occurring mg/L 15 21 19 N/A Magnesium N/A N/A SU 8.2 pH 7.9 N/A 8.6 N/A 4.6 4.2 N/A mg/L Potassium 3.7 Sodium refers to the salt present in the water Sodium 78 65 mg/L N/A N/A 54 and is generally naturally-occurring i) UNREGULATED CHEMICALS REQUIRING MONITORING ( HELIX TREATMENT PLANT PARAMETER UNITS STATE MCL PHG MAJOR SOURCES AVG MIN MAX ug/L N/A ND 0.078 ND Fire extinguishing agent Bromochloromethane N/A N/A ND 26 ND Disinfection byproduct Chlorate N/A ug/L Industrial discharge; erosion of natural N/A 0.040 0.019 N/A Hexavalent Chromium ND ug/L deposits Potential disinfection byproduct; naturally- N/A N/A 4.3 3.9 ug/L Molybdenum 2.9 occurring ug/L Strontium N/A 560 1,100 873 Naturally-occurring N/A 10

11 Annual Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2017 Learn More About Your Water Quality Helix Water Talks Tour the R.M. Levy Water Treatment Plant Helix Water Talks is our new series of tours and discussions to give customers an inside look at how we provide reliable, high-quality water – from the science and engineering to the policies and operations. As part of the series, each year we offer a tour of our R.M. Levy Water Treatment Plant where you will see each step of the treatment process, from the control room to the chemistry lab to the ozonation facility. Future tour dates will be advertised in the bimonthly newsletter you receive with your bill, on our website and on our social media accounts. Subscribe to Helix Water News to be the first to know about upcoming events, rebates and more – simply provide your name and email address at the bottom of our homepage at hwd.com . Water Quality Assistant Have questions about a water quality issue? Explore our online Water Quality Assistant for answers to a variety of water quality questions at: hwd.com/water-quality-assistant/ FOOTNOTES (a) Over 100 parameters are monitored. Primary Drinking Water Standards monitored but not detected are not listed on the table. (b) Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our treatment process. The filter effluent turbidity max was 0.18 NTU and the average was 0.05 NTU. (c) Aluminum has both primary and secondary standards. (d) On January 7, 2017, Helix Water District’s R.M. Levy Water Treatment Plant’s fluoride system was shut down to perform repairs. The fluoride system was returned to service on February 16, 2017. Helix’s fluoridation system was in compliance with Sections 64433 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations in accordance with Water Supply Permit 05-14-15P- 001 issued by State Water Resources Control Board, Department of Drinking Water. Data from 2016. (e) Total coliform MCLs: No more than 5 percent of the monthly samples may be total coliform positive. The MCL was not (f) violated. (g) E. coli MCL: The occurrence of two consecutive total coliform-positive samples, one of which contains E. coli, constitutes an acute MCL violation. The MCL was not violated. Total coliform TT: No more than 5 percent of the monthly samples may be total coliform positive. The TT was not violated. (h) (i) Unregulated contaminant monitoring helps the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the SWRCB determine where certain contaminants occur and whether the contaminants need to be regulated. Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule 3 monitoring occurred in 2014. 11

12 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 906 San Diego, CA This booklet was printed on Endeavour Dull 30% recycled, FSC certified paper. CALENDAR YEAR 2017 Water Quality Report This report contains important information about your drinking water. Translate it, or speak with someone who understands it. Spanish Mandarin (Simplified) Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable. Si usted desea una traducción de este report en Español, por favor llame al (619) 466-0585. Arabic Tagalog Itong documento ay naglalaman nang mahalagang impormasyon tungkol sa tubig na maaring inumin. Maaring isalin sa taong na - kakaintidi. Farsi Vietnamese Korean

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