time is the enemy

Transcript

1 is TIME the ENEMY The surprising truth about why today’s college students graduating ... and wha T needs To change aren’t n 1 Time Is the Enemy

2 September 2011 Governors Who Get It Some leaders run from challenges; others run toward them. When it comes to college completion, the numbers can be daunting. So tr oubling, in fact, that some leaders may be e bad news, especially in times tempted to keep the public in the dark. The last thing they want to do is deliver mor like these. That’s not the case for the leaders listed below. By participating in this groundbreaking report, they have courageously committed their states to confronting the college completion challenge head on. These governors understand the consequences of ignoring thousands of college dropouts: the shrinking family incomes, the weakened economic competitiveness, the squandered taxpayer investments, and the hollowing out of our civic engagement. But they know the upside, too. They share our optimism that better days and millions more college graduates are ahead because — under their leadership — states are on the move. New laws are hitting the books. New policies are taking hold. And students are already beginning to reap the rewards of a reinvented system of American higher education designed to meet modern needs. Improving college completion begins by ensuring that we count the success of every student. Thanks to the courageous leaders of these 33 states, we have now done so. Without them, this historic report would not have been possible. Complete College America, the citizens of their states, and all in our country who hope for a brighter future owe them our gratitude. When it comes to the vital importance of college completion, there’s no question: These governors “get it.” n Gov. Brian Sandoval (Nevada) n Gov. Jan Brewer (Arizona) n Gov. John Lynch (New Hampshire) Gov. Mike Beebe (Arkansas) n Gov. Susana Martinez (New Mexico) n Gov. Edmund Gerald Brown, Jr. (California) n n Gov. Bev Perdue (North Carolina) Gov. John Hickenlooper (Colorado) n Gov. John Kasich (Ohio) n n Gov. Rick Scott (Florida) n Gov. Mary Fallin (Oklahoma) Gov. Nathan Deal (Georgia) n Gov. John A. Kitzhaber, MD (Oregon) n Gov. Neil Abercrombie (Hawaii) n n Gov. Tom Corbett (Pennsylvania) Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter (Idaho) n n Gov. Dennis Daugaard (South Dakota) n Gov. Pat Quinn (Illinois) n Gov. Bill Haslam (Tennessee) Gov. Mitch Daniels (Indiana) n Gov. Rick Perry (Texas) n n Gov. Steven L. Beshear (Kentucky) Gov. Gary Richard Herbert (Utah) n Gov. Bobby Jindal (Louisiana) n n Gov. Robert McDonnell (Virginia) n Gov. Martin O’Malley (Maryland) n Gov. Chris Gregoire (Washington) Gov. Deval Patrick (Massachusetts) n Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin (West Virginia) n Gov. Mark Dayton (Minnesota) n n Gov. Matthew Mead (Wyoming) Gov. Haley Barbour (Mississippi) n n Gov. Jeremiah W. (Jay) Nixon (Missouri) Copyright © 2011 Complete College America. All rights reserved.

3 CoNTENTS 2 Time is the enemy Methodology 4 Part 1: the College Graduation Crisis Nontraditional students are the new majority 6 Part-time students rarely graduate 8 Graduation odds are especially low for students who are African American, Hispanic, older, or poor 10 Students are wasting time on excess credits ... 12 ... And taking too much time to earn a degree 12 Remediation: Too many students need it, and too few succeed when they get it 14 Time is running out: Five essential steps 16 Part 2: results from the States Total degrees and certificates 18 Graduation rates: Certificates 20 Graduation rates: Associate degrees 24 Graduation rates: Bachelor’s degrees 28 Average length of time and credits to degree 32 Enrollment in remedial education 34 Graduation from remedial courses 40 Transfers from two-year to four-year colleges 42 43 Part 3: State Profiles n 1 Time Is the Enemy

4 Time is the enemy thIs Is not an ordInary IntroductIon. there’s no tIme for that. Unless we move with urgency, today’s young people will be the first generation in American history to be less educated than their predecessors. Consider this a sobering wake-up call — and an urgent appeal for action now. Complete College America fundamentally Inside these pages you will get an unprecedented believes that for the United States to have look behind the ivy-covered walls of America’s any hope of leading the world again in the public colleges and universities and into how proportion of our citizens with a college well they are educating all — we repeat, all see every student. This education, we must first — of today’s college students. includes the part-timers and older students part is what’s new. The all who are struggling to balance jobs and school, Surprisingly, until this report, no one has bothered the millions who are trapped in the Bermuda to measure and report the success or failure of all Triangle of remediation, and the many first- U.S. college students. We’ve only been tracking generation freshmen who too often are left to students who are on campus for the first-time, fend for themselves when they arrive on campus. going full-time. That’s all the federal government We cannot tackle what’s holding them back from requires of colleges and universities, and until success if we do not understand their challenges now few exceeded this minimal standard. and the complicated natures of their lives. But 4 of every 10 public college students are Thanks to the courageous and enlightened able to attend only part-time. Which means leadership of governors and higher education leaders have been making policy decisions about institutions that shared their data, this historic higher education absent critical information report finally allows us to see what’s really about 40 percent of the students, as if their happening on campuses in 33 states. success or failure was less important than that of All students now count and are being counted. “traditional” full-time students. How can this be? We now have a much more complete picture of Worse, there’s more. Start full-time and then where we stand ... and what needs to be done transfer to a different institution? You haven’t so that all students have a fair shot at success. been counted. Receive some of the billions of Consider these findings: dollars in federal grants given out each year to n There is a new American majority on attend college? Few have followed up to check if campus. Seventy-five percent of today’s you dropped out or graduated. Older students, students are juggling some combination of students trapped in remediation, students families, jobs, and school while commuting pursuing valuable career certificates ... all have to class; according to the U.S. Department of been virtually invisible to policymakers, elected Education, only a quarter go full-time, attend officials, and taxpayers ... until now. n Complete College America 2

5 our country will simply not be economically residential colleges, and have most of their competitive if these students don’t succeed. bills paid by their parents. Students are taking too many credits and n Even Part-time students rarely graduate. n too much time to complete. Excessive when given twice as long to complete course-taking is slowing down progress to certificates and degrees, no more than a certificates and degrees. And students are quarter ever make it to graduation day. spending too much time in school. n Poor students and students of color struggle Remediation is broken, producing few n the most to graduate. Even though more of students who ultimately graduate. Sadly, these students than ever before are enrolling efforts intended to catch students up are in college, too few end up with certificates most often leaving them behind. or degrees. Given changing demographics, Time is the enemy of college completion. the BIG Idea: These historic data have revealed a common thread — and an animating principle to guide our work to boost college graduation: The longer it takes, the more life gets in the way of success. The result is a yawning skills gap caused by too few More students are working, and they are trained workers for more high-skill jobs than ever. working more hours than ever before. Many Incomes shrink. And America falls further behind. can afford to attend only part-time, extending the years until they graduate. More come to our But the path forward is clear. And thanks to the campuses underprepared for college — and leadership of the 33 states that provided the historic then get trapped in broken remedial approaches data in this report — and to the commitment of that don’t help, as time keeps slipping away. the 29 governors who have pledged their states More are overwhelmed by too many choices and to significant reform as members of the Complete too little structure, causing aimless wandering College America Alliance of States — there is great and wasted semesters and years. reason for optimism. All of this adds up to more and more time. We help more students graduate. We can can As the clock runs and the calendar turns, we create can provide a better deal for taxpayers. We all know what happens: Students’ lives fill up stronger economies in our communities, states, with jobs, relationships, marriages, children, and country. But we must redouble our efforts to and mortgages; the list goes on and on. Not do so ... now. surprisingly, college often gets left behind: a few There’s no time to waste. years of courses, no degree, and a lot of debt. n 3 Time Is the Enemy

6 METhodologY are captured in these findings — a clear majority The data presented in this report were provided of American students in public colleges and by the 33 participating states themselves, universities today. While we recognize that using the Complete College America/National there may be some variance in the data higher Governors Association Common Completion education institutions provided to their states, the Metrics. National findings in each category were significant number of students represented means based on the calculated medians of the state data. that the most alarming trends can be traced across More than 10 million students enroll in public all of the states represented in these findings. institutions annually in the states whose data About the Common Completion Metrics metrics at the core of NGA’s call to governors Common metrics — uniformly designed and to make college completion a priority. This applied — help us frame our data collection to significant action signaled a new national be most useful for driving change. Moreover, focus on the importance of consistent data adopting and reporting common metrics unifies to document the progress and success of us in a shared goal and communicates our postsecondary students across all states. commitment to doing the hard work necessary to bring about improvement. For more information on the Common Completion Metrics and the companion In July 2010, the National Governors Association Technical Guide, please visit (NGA) adopted the Complete College America www.completecollege.org . Common Completion Metrics in announcing its “Complete to Compete” initiative, placing the n Complete College America 4

7 PArT 1: The College graduation Crisis Time Is the Enemy n 5

8 What have we learned? 1 fIndInG Nontraditional students are the new majority. 25% 75% 75% of students are college commuters, 25% of students attend full- time at residential colleges. often juggling families, jobs, and school. And if they attend part-time, the federal government doesn’t even track their success ... as if they’re invisible. Graduation counted: 60% Full-time students Graduation not counted: 40% Part-time students 1 fIndInG actIon It’s time to start counting all students. n Complete College America 6

9 What do we do about it? responsibilities?” “Which remediation programs First things first. States need to understand who are successfully getting students back on track?” today’s students are and how they’re performing. “How many additional years and credits are Otherwise, states are flying blind. Governments students taking to earn a certificate or degree?” are good at counting “traditional” students: those who are first-time on campus, going full-time. But We urge all states to measure what matters most, they are only 25 percent of today’s public college disaggregating by race/ethnicity, age, gender, full- The federal Integrated Postsecondary students. time or part-time status, and income level: Education Data System (IPEDS) doesn’t count Outcome metrics n what happens to part-time students, who make Degrees awarded annually (number and up about 40 percent of all students, nor does change over time), graduation rates, and it count the success of transfer, low-income, or transfer rates. remedial students. n Progress metrics The 33 states that submitted data for this report Remediation (entry and success), success are closing this data gap, but many others still in first-year math and English, credit such as: “What can’t answer basic questions accumulation, retention rates, course percentage of our public college students are completion, and time and credits to degree. part-time, balancing work, classes, and/or family proGress: 33 states are now reporting the right data America/National Governors The following 33 states gave us data using the Complete College Association Common Completion Metrics. n 7 Time Is the Enemy

10 Too few students graduate. For part-timers, fIndInG 2 results are tragic — even when they have twice as much time. 1-year certificate full-time part-time within 2 years 12.2% 27.8% 2-year associate within 4 years 18.8% 7.8% 4-year bachelor’s within 8 years 24.3% 60.6% actIon It’s time to rethink scheduling and programs to help more students attend full-time. n Complete College America 8

11 What do we do about it? n Reduce the amount of time students must students need Today’s full-time and part-time be in class by using online technology and new, shorter, and faster pathways to degrees and allowing students to move on once they’ve of value. Colleges should: certificates demonstrated competency. Use block schedules, n with fixed and n Form peer support and learning networks predictable classroom meeting times, so that among students in the same program. part-time students who are juggling jobs, families, and school can know with certainty n into the regular college Embed remediation when they can go to work each day. curriculum so students don’t waste time before they start earning credits. proceed toward degrees Allow students to n with shorter or certificates at a faster pace, n Provide better information on every academic terms, less time off between terms, program’s tuition, graduation rates, and job and year-round scheduling. placement outcomes so that students can make more informed decisions at the front end. by enrolling Simplify the registration process n students once in a single, coherent program rather than making them sign up every term for individual, unconnected courses. pro Gress : some states are helping students balance priorities New York: The City University of New York offers Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) to help students complete associate degrees more quickly. By using block scheduling, student cohorts by major, and other supports, students can effectively balance jobs and school. The results speak for themselves: ASAP students have three times the graduation rate of their peers who do not participate in the program. Tennessee: Only Tennessee has a statewide approach to helping students balance work and school. The 27 Tennessee Tech Centers have average completion rates of 75 percent, with some centers regularly graduating all of their students. Unlike traditional approaches, students enroll in whole academic programs rather than individual courses, streamlining the path to completion by removing the burdens and confusion of individual course selection and availability. Programs are offered from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday, providing students with scheduling predictability so they can keep jobs while going to school. n 9 Time Is the Enemy

12 graduation odds are especially low fIndInG 3 for students who are African American, hispanic, older, or poor. full-time part-time 1-year 1-year 2-year 2-year 4-year 4-year certificate certificate associate associate bachelor’s in bachelor’s in in 1.5 years in 1.5 years in 3 years in 3 years 6 years 6 years african american 14.5% 39.9% 2.1% 15.0% 7.5% 7.8% hispanic 11.1% 18.5% 2.6% 9.1% 46.5% 16.7% older (25+ years at entry) 14.4% 30.2% 4.6% 11.3% 10.6% 27.0% ell grant) Low-income (p 10.9% 11.8% 23.1% 4.3% 17.3% 45.2% actIon It’s time for completion, not just enrollment, to become the goal. n Complete College America 10

13 What do we do about it? • of explicit, a handful with Start easy-to- must not just States get serious that graduation, understand such as gains in the measures is the goal . Showing up isn’t enough. enrollment, number of certificates and degrees awarded, the Colleges need incentives to ensure that their all percentage of students completing “on time” students also finish up, and they must be willing to and transferring from two-year to four-year share the results of their efforts. colleges successfully, and the number of courses States should set completion goals, statewide and by completed. campus. And they should tie at least part of colleges’ sustainability, • To ensure tie a modest funding to their success in meeting these goals. percentage of funding to performance and then steadily increase it over time. proGress: 29 states are leading reform efforts Members of the Complete College America Alliance of States have committed to: n Setting statewide and campus-specific degree and credential completion goals through 2020; n Collecting and reporting on common measures of progress and sharing those results publicly; and n Reinventing higher education to smooth paths to completion through aggressive state- and campus- level action plans. n 11 Time Is the Enemy

14 fIndInG 4 Students are wasting time on excess credits ... Bachelor’s certificate associate Should take 60 120 Should take credits Should take 30 credits credits Students take credits 79.0 Students take credits 136.5 63.5 credits Students take excess needed ... and taking too much time to earn a degree. associate certificate Bachelor’s Should take years Should take 2 Should take years 4 1 year 3.8 3.3 years 4.7 Full-time students take years years Full-time students take Full-time students take Part-time students take years 5.6 Part-time students take 5 years Part-time students take 4.4 years Staying in school longer doesn’t signficantly increase students’ chances of graduating. one extra year to earn an associate For instance, giving full-time community college students to earn a bachelor’s degree degree and giving full-time college students two extra years only for both groups. increases graduation rates by 4.9 percent — We must help them complete faster. actIon It’s time to give students more efficient pathways to success. n Complete College America 12

15 What do we do about it? Colleges should: Colleges need to recognize that time is the enemy. time more population, student today’s With Require formal, on-time completion plans n for add success. and more choices often up to less every student, updated annually. Being able to engage in an extended period of Enact caps of 120 credit hours for a bachelor’s n self-discovery or sample multiple courses out of degree and 60 credit hours for an associate catalogues the size of phone books might work degree. for students who have the luxury of unlimited n Create a common general education core time and money. But this approach doesn’t work program to ensure consistency. for the nearly 50 percent of students who work more than 20 hours a week or for the 25 percent of n of common core Require full transferability community college students who work more than courses. 35 hours a week. to help students n Adopt alternative pathways earn college credits, such as through Advanced Placement, online learning, and accelerated competency-based courses. proGress: some states are boosting productivity Full-time enrollment in Connecticut: community colleges increased dramatically when colleges began using full-time enrollment status as the default when processing student financial aid applications. The strategy shows students that attending college full-time is often more affordable than they expect. To reduce the likelihood Texas: The state is using Florida: that students will earn unnecessary comprehensive degree acceleration and excessive credits, colleges and strategies such as dual enrollment universities lose their state subsidy (allowing students to earn college for students who exceed a certain credit while in high school), early admission, credit-hour threshold. Additionally, students credit by examination, and Advanced are charged out-of-state tuition if they exceed Placement/International Baccalaureate credit. limits for repeating courses or if they take These strategies are made possible through a classes that have content essentially identical to common course-numbering system that allows ones they have already completed. credits from two-year colleges to be easily transferred to four-year institutions. n 13 Time Is the Enemy

16 remediation: Too many students need it, and 5 fIndInG too few succeed when they get it. Remedial classes have become the Bermuda Triangle of higher education. Most students are lost, and few will ever be seen on graduation day. of those seeking a bachelor’s of those seeking an associate 50.1% 20.7% degree require remediation degree require remediation remedial students are much less likely to graduate. 2-year associate in 3 years 1-year certificate in 1.5 years remedial All students All students remedial 13.9% 13.1% 22.6% 9.5% 4-year bachelor’s in 6 years All students remedial 55.7% 35.1% actIon It’s time to fix broken approaches to remediation. n Complete College America 14

17 What do we do about it? n to a career Provide alternative pathways The current remediation system is broken; too certificate or career-related credential for many students start in remedial courses and never students with major academic weaknesses. earn a credential of any kind. Colleges need to: Answer the fundamental question — is n n Divert students from traditional remedial what’s being taught in developmental — they aren’t working. programs education what students really need? It’s Mainstream as many students as possible n time to revisit both the structure and goals of into college-level courses. Provide co-requisite remedial math. Math should be a gateway, and embedded support for those needing extra not a gatekeeper, to successful college and help. everyday life. Reading and writing should be n Intensify instruction and minimize the time integrated. for entry into necessary to prepare students n Overhaul the current placement system. college-level courses. Current placement tests are not predictive. If where Eliminate the many exit points n placement tests are given, provide students students are lost by either not passing or not with pretest guidance, practice tests, and time enrolling in courses. to brush up. proGress: several states are reinventing remediation Few states have established statewide remediation policies, but many are moving in that direction. om Complete In fact, most of the states that have won Completion Innovation Challenge grants fr College America are using the funds to implement remediation reforms, including Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Texas, and West Virginia. n 15 Time Is the Enemy

18 tIme Is runnInG out Five essential steps that states should take right now count all students, set state- and campus-level 1. goals, and uniformly measure progress and By providing data for this report, 33 states have already success. proven that it’s possible to count the success of every student. And the 29 governors who have pledged to fulfill the commitments of membership in the Alliance of States are setting goals and reinventing higher education to create the conditions for higher achievement. More states should do the same. And the federal government should try to catch up by filling damaging gaps in the national database, raising the standard of measurement, and counting every student in our country. reduce the time it takes to earn a certificate or 2. The surest path to more college completions is the shortest one. degree. This does not mean “dumbing down” courses or undermining quality . Ensure that unnecessary credit requirements are not added to certificate and degree programs. Demand robust, comprehensive transfer agreements across campuses, systems, and states so students can easily take their hard-earned credits with them instead of losing valuable time when they must continually start over. transform remediation so that students earn — as 3. It’s quickly as possible — college credits that count. been proven: Current remediation approaches don’t make it more likely that students will graduate. Fixing remediation now may be the best thing we can do to boost college completion. And it’s clear what needs to be done: Start as many underprepared students as possible in first-year, full-credit classes. Do this by adding extra class time and tutoring support, but don’t make the students wait to earn cr edits that count toward their degrees. 4. restructure programs to fit busy lives. It’s time to face facts: College students today are going to have to work while trying to graduate. What else can they do when college is so expensive? Our response simply cannot be indifference. The best approaches “block” classes: Students attend full-time by learning from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., five days a week. Even better, create cohorts so similar students can support one another. Complicated lives are easier when people who understand can lean on one another. Governors from 29 states 5. Join complete college america. already have, and they’re benefitting from access to a hearty band of impatient reformers and experts in higher education policy and practice who understand the necessity of making changes now that can significantly boost college completion. There’s no question: A vital movement is building across America to boost college completion. Since time is the enemy, why wait to get on board? n Complete College America 16

19 PArT 2: results from the States Time Is the Enemy n 17

20 totaL deGrees and certIfIcates total degrees and certificates certificates 2007–08 2002–03 2007–08 Percent increase Percent increase 2002–03 37,020 5,779 7,138 23.5% 30,014 23.3% Arizona 17,848 Arkansas 2,046 3,178 55.3% 14,922 19.6% California 150,000 169,755 13.2% 14,485 13,534 -6.6% (CSU system only) Colorado 27,752 10.9% 1,832 1,755 -4.2% 25,031 95,697 27.3% 26,571 34,830 31.1% Florida 121,820 39,731 46,850 17.9% georgia 9,055 -10.5% 10,121 hawaii 5,564 5,799 4.2% 219 234 6.8% Idaho 7,301 7,588 3.9% 955 694 -27.3% Illinois 57,549 7.1% 4,843 5,469 12.9% 61,623 34,689 7.9% 2,721 2,929 7.6% Indiana 37,415 19,805 27,454 38.6% Kentucky 5,876 188.2% 2,039 louisiana 24,822 24,279 -2.2% 2,890 3,168 9.6% Maryland 25,681 30,107 17.2% 364 525 44.2% Massachusetts 25,020 9.3% 2,030 2,132 5.0% 22,883 Minnesota 25,427 28,197 10.9% 6,543 5,892 -9.9% Mississippi* NA NA NA 1,911 2,599 36.0% 10.4% Missouri 25,217 27,842 23.3% 1,121 1,382 Nevada 6,875 285 307 7.7% 9,145 33.0% 11,777 122 138 13.1% 11,518 2.2% New hampshire 13,411 25.7% 1,452 New Mexico 66.0% 10,672 2,411 35,273 39,029 10.6% 4,571 2,603 -43.1% North Carolina 52,605 59,979 14.0% 1,546 2,743 77.4% ohio 21,460 13.3% 572 346 -39.5% 24,309 oklahoma 18,874 20,678 9.6% 1,405 1,322 -5.9% oregon Pennsylvania 26,642 32,160 20.7% 1,787 2,532 41.7% (PASShE system only) South dakota 3,260 3,939 20.8% 16 17 6.3% Tennessee 22,109 11.2% 364 468 28.6% 24,596 107,577 17,216 19.8% Texas 16,025 -6.9% 128,928 Utah 21,167 4.4% 1,059 448 -57.7% 20,272 Virginia 37,397 42,943 14.8% 1,073 1,220 13.7% Washington 40,993 0.8% 5,144 4,231 -17.7% 40,646 West Virginia 9,498 11,193 17.8% 109 353 223.9% Wyoming 1,990 2,376 19.4% 326 346 6.1% Two-year data from Mississippi are from 2005–06, rather than 2002–03. We could not calculate total degree production for Mississippi * because two-year and four-year data are from different years. NA = Not applicable note: as part of our completion Innovation challenge, states were asked to submit the comprehensive data found in this report. seventeen states chose not to participate. four of these states — connecticut, maine, rhode Island, and vermont — already have committed to major improvements in their postsecondary programs by joining our alliance of states. n Complete College America 18

21 totaL deGrees associate and bachelor’s Bachelor’s degrees associate degrees 5-year percentage 5-year percentage 2002–03 2007–08 2002–03 2007–08 change change 7,732 16,503 18,675 Arizona 13.2% 44.9% 11,207 5,351 8,449 9,319 10.3% 4,427 Arkansas 20.9% California 83,089 73,803 61,712 73,132 18.5% 12.6% (CSU system only) 5,893 11.9% 17,933 20,104 12.1% Colorado 5,266 37,219 39,989 29,137 49,771 24.5% Florida 27.7% 7,665 33.3% 21,945 27,577 25.7% georgia 10,218 2,499 2,242 -10.3% 2,846 3,323 16.8% hawaii 1,774 Idaho 4,572 5,003 9.4% 1,891 6.6% 25,188 29,667 30,966 4.4% 23,039 9.3% Illinois 9,770 12.8% 23,303 Indiana 6.1% 8,665 24,716 5,454 6,749 23.7% 12,312 14,829 20.4% Kentucky 4,637 3,596 -22.4% 17,295 17,515 1.3% louisiana 7,788 29.9% 17,529 19,465 11.0% 10,117 Maryland 7,677 8,258 7.6% 13,176 14,630 11.0% Massachusetts 9,968 12,512 25.5% 8,916 9,793 9.8% Minnesota 9,536 6,680 8,736 30.8% 9,878 Mississippi 3.6% Missouri 7,497 16.6% 16,599 17,717 6.7% 8,743 2,031 2,903 4,559 5,935 30.2% Nevada 42.9% 3,179 8,460 8,107 3,289 4.4% New hampshire -3.3% 3,433 30.4% 5,787 6,525 12.8% New Mexico 4,475 5,925 6,964 17.5% 24,777 North Carolina 18.9% 29,462 ohio 19,172 16.9% 34,652 38,064 9.8% 16,407 7,773 13,115 6.0% oklahoma 15,726 19.9% 8,237 oregon 6,705 7.4% 11,225 12,651 12.7% 6,244 Pennsylvania 13.1% 9,540 12,313 29.1% 15,315 17,315 (PASShE system only) South dakota 374 55.8% 3,004 3,548 18.1% 240 6,357 15,388 9.6% Tennessee 17,160 11.5% 6,968 Texas 37,280 30.7% 61,828 75,623 22.3% 28,533 Utah 8,069 8,556 6.0% 11,144 12,163 9.1% Virginia 10,101 18.9% 26,223 29,714 13.3% 12,009 Washington 21,370 0.1% 14,155 15,392 8.7% 21,347 West Virginia 2,040 2,542 24.6% 7,349 8,298 12.9% Wyoming 1,664 2,030 22.0% NP NP NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. n 19 Time Is the Enemy

22 GraduatIon rates certificates part-time students full-time students Entry cohort, Entry cohort, In 1.5 In 1 started fall 2005 In 2 started fall 2005 In 2 In 1 In 1.5 year (headcount) years year years years (headcount) years NP NP NP NP NP Arizona NP NP NP 35.9% 1,166 4.7% 6.8% 12.5% 296 Arkansas 20.8% 18.7% California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 34.1% 36.5% 319 10.7% 12.5% 13.8% 337 Colorado 33.2% 17.5% 4.1% 2,904 12.1% 7.3% 9.4% Florida 1,655 21.0% 19.4% 27.3% 4,769 8.1% 13.1% 16.9% 6,788 georgia 25.0% dS dS hawaii 34 dS dS dS 36 dS 646 30.0% 33.4% 195 6.2% 12.3% 17.4% Idaho 25.1% 14.6% Illinois 3,010 6.2% 9.2% 10.8% 18.8% 2,288 22.4% 19.7% 9.0% 720 4.2% 15.2% 11.8% Indiana 395 21.5% 38.0% 42.0% 369 49.6% 51.5% 52.0% 100 Kentucky 42.0% 3.1% 21.0% 29.0% 500 louisiana 12.4% 19.6% 1,570 dS 185 16.8% 16.8% 282 dS dS dS Maryland 13.0% 27.8% dS 28.2% 55 241 dS dS Massachusetts 28.2% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP 1,304 36.0% 38.8% Mississippi 300 6.7% 8.0% 8.0% 37.8% Missouri 24.8% 28.1% 28.1% 241 dS dS dS 448 NP Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 1.8% 2.7% 6,524 0.8% NP 1.4% 10,992 New Mexico NP 41.9% 42.9% 43.1% 2,550 14.3% 15.4% 16.4% North Carolina 2,661 872 9.1% 15.1% 1,019 3.2% 5.2% 7.5% ohio 12.8% 10.8% 20.0% 12.7% 85 18.8% 102 20.0% oklahoma 12.7% 451 37.3% 42.4% 206 12.6% 23.8% 31.1% oregon 27.5% Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee NP 2.9% 2.0% 4.8% 50,714 54,622 2.8% 3.6% Texas 4.0% 88 dS dS 82 dS dS dS Utah dS 1,391 2.0% 4.0% 5.0% 1,793 Virginia dS dS dS Washington 16.5% 28.1% 1,410 4.1% 8.4% 12.6% 2,856 24.2% 94 11.7% 13.8% 16.0% 39 West Virginia dS dS dS Wyoming 33.7% 38.8% 52.0% 98 dS dS dS 43 NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n Complete College America 20

23 GraduatIon rates certificates (full-time) pell grant recipients transfer students Entry cohort, Entry cohort, In 2 started fall 2005 In 1 In 1.5 started fall 2005 In 1.5 year In 1 year years years (headcount) In 2 years (headcount) years NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Arizona dS dS dS NP NP Arkansas NP dS NP California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 34.3% 35.0% 35.7% 161 Colorado 35.4% 37.3% 440 34.2% 841 15.8% 22.8% 25.9% 471 11.5% 17.0% 20.8% Florida 2,841 21.0% 26.7% 30.0% 1,459 38.9% 46.6% 49.9% georgia 44 40.9% 43.2% 47.7% NP dS dS dS hawaii 100 35.0% 42.0% 223 17.5% 21.5% 27.8% Idaho 39.0% NP 13.4% NP 643 NP 17.4% 23.3% Illinois NP 43 48.8% 51.2% 177 13.6% 18.1% 19.8% Indiana 39.5% 81 42.0% 45.7% 45.7% Kentucky 28.6% 33.9% 33.9% 56 louisiana 14.7% 21.0% 25.2% NP NP NP NP 143 791 NP 20.2% 20.2% Maryland NP NP NP 16.4% Massachusetts 53.5% 57.3% 60.5% 64 25.0% 26.6% 26.6% 157 Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 225 49.3% 50.7% 51.1% 656 41.6% 42.5% 43.1% Missouri 227 30.0% 30.0% 62 43.6% 43.6% 43.6% 22.0% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP 3,455 NP 3.1% 4,326 1.9% NP 3.2% New Mexico 1.79% 700 41.0% 43.0% 43.6% North Carolina 25.0% 25.5% 25.5% 580 ohio 14.2% 18.3% 20.1% 455 8.6% 11.9% 13.9% 766 NP dS NP NP oklahoma dS dS dS NP oregon 33.8% 37.9% 42.0% 193 21.8% 29.0% 35.2% 219 Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) NP NP NP NP NP NP NP South dakota NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee dS 14.0% 28.0% NP Texas 29,918 3.7% 4.9% 5.7% 23,170 3.5% 4.7% 5.6% Utah 75 dS dS dS NP NP NP NP Virginia 1.0% 2.0% 3.0% 581 2.2% 4.1% 5.0% 1,224 Washington 2,623 21.0% 26.8% 29.5% 1,047 15.8% 24.7% 28.3% West Virginia NP NP NP NP dS dS dS dS dS dS dS dS dS Wyoming 27 dS dS NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n 21 Time Is the Enemy

24 GraduatIon rates , By race certificates (full-time) african american, White, other hispanic non-hispanic non-hispanic Entry Entry Entry Entry cohort, cohort, cohort, cohort, started started started started In 1.5 years fall 2005 fall 2005 In 1.5 years In 1.5 years fall 2005 fall 2005 In 1.5 years NP NP NP NP NP Arizona NP NP NP dS 919 21.3% 20 dS dS dS Arkansas 19 California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 32.2% dS 219 35.6% 20 dS 87 11 Colorado 346 7.2% 939 22.0% Florida 24.5% 268 12.3% 102 27.3% 2,752 20.4% 3,687 28.3% 206 25.2% 143 georgia NP NP NP NP NP 32 NP hawaii NP 55 NP NP 516 31.4% 72 30.6% Idaho NP 16.0% Illinois 1,647 19.6% 92 17.4% 349 200 17.5% 33 15 328 22.0% dS dS Indiana 19 dS dS dS 82 45.1% 13 dS dS Kentucky dS dS 687 15.9% 811 louisiana 55 25.5% 17 24.9% 14 63 dS 86 29.1% 22 dS Maryland NP dS 34.4% dS 154 28 32 dS Massachusetts 27 NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP dS dS 762 32.5% 498 47.0% 36 dS Mississippi Missouri dS 17 dS 387 30.0% 31 dS dS NP Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 2.5% 13.6% 4,465 NP 1,761 2.5% 4,418 New Mexico* 348 47.9% 750 45.7% 1,691 40.9% 126 49.2% North Carolina 94 30 dS 8.6% 664 13.4% 38 dS ohio 140 dS 21 dS 62 dS dS dS oklahoma 13 23 dS dS 367 37.6% 59 40.7% oregon dS Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP dS dS dS dS dS dS dS Tennessee dS 4.0% 4.3% 3.1% 26,330 18,241 3,390 2.4% Texas 6,661 dS dS dS 57 dS 24 dS Utah dS 45 dS 312 dS 985 Virginia 49 dS 5.0% Washington 13.0% 170 14.1% 1,944 25.6% 557 25.9% 185 dS 14.0% dS dS 86 West Virginia dS dS dS 39.4% dS dS dS 94 Wyoming dS dS dS * New Mexico data show graduation rates for two years, rather than 1.5 years. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n Complete College America 22

25 , By a Ge GraduatIon rates certificates (full-time) students students students age 20–24 age 17–19 age 25 and over Entry Entry Entry cohort, cohort, cohort, In 1 In 2 In 1.5 started In 1 In 2 started In 1.5 In 2 started In 1.5 In 1 years fall 2005 years year years fall 2005 year years fall 2005 years year years 4.3% 21.7% 17.0% 11.1% 14.4% 984 1,108 9.7% 13.3% 7.6% 6,820 Arizona 6.3% 17.7% 30.6% 217 17.6% 18.5% 34.7% 370 24.2% 27.4% 44.8% Arkansas 579 15.6% California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 39.6% 31.1% 31.9% 31.9% 37.7% 101 69 41.6% 43.6% 30.5% 32.3% Colorado 164 21.0% 26.1% 349 8.6% 11.5% 14.3% Florida 14.0% 15.9% 17.2% 827 12.5% 471 16.8% 25.6% 1,496 16.5% 21.5% 23.3% 22.8% 24.8% 30.2% 32.1% 2,983 georgia 2,309 hawaii dS dS dS dS dS dS 12 dS dS dS 20 dS 386 29.5% 33.9% 133 26.3% 30.1% 30.8% 127 26.0% 31.5% 34.6% Idaho 24.1% 7.7% Illinois 547 17.4% 20.3% 22.7% 535 27.5% 31.6% 36.6% 12.5% 1,205 15.9% 18.2% 147 72 dS dS dS 11.4% 22.4% 25.2% 27.2% Indiana 176 20.5% 34 30.2% 13 dS dS dS 32.1% 47.1% 55.9% 55.9% 53 Kentucky 32.1% dS 16.1% 25.8% 504 3.2% 17.9% louisiana 562 4.3% 28.3% 35.1% 504 25.6% 129 10.1% 10.1% 25 dS dS dS 31 35.5% 38.7% 38.7% Maryland dS 22.1% 39.3% 22.1% 28 39.3% 39.3% 181 32 50.0% 53.1% 53.1% Massachusetts 22.1% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP 37.0% Mississippi 40.1% 40.9% 438 33.3% 34.2% 35.4% 323 38.1% 38.7% 39.9% 543 Missouri 21.5% 24.2% 24.2% 92 28.3% 30.4% 30.4% 100 30.0% 30.0% 30.0% 256 NP Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 750 1.0% 1,000 4.7% NP 5.5% 1.9% 7.3% NP 9.5% 9,214 New Mexico NP 22.8% 23.1% 23.5% 539 42.5% 43.0% 43.2% 1,474 50.1% 51.5% 51.7% North Carolina 648 378 8.7% 16.1% 189 6.4% 7.9% 10.6% 305 11.2% 15.1% 16.7% ohio 13.5% dS 34 dS 24 dS dS dS 52 dS dS dS oklahoma dS 157 221 42.1% 73 31.5% 37.0% 42.5% 36.2% 33.1% 38.9% 42.7% oregon 22.2% Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee NP 6.3% 3.8% 6,762 4.4% 5.5% 4,876 9.1% 10.7% 11.7% 2.9% 42,984 Texas 1.9% dS 55 dS 19 dS dS dS 14 dS dS dS Utah dS 891 dS 2.0% 3.0% 192 dS 7.0% Virginia 305 dS 9.0% 10.0% 7.0% Washington 12.9% 23.7% 29.4% 531 17.5% 23.0% 26.6% 1,027 20.4% 25.6% 27.6% 1,259 38 dS dS dS 25 dS West Virginia dS 31 dS dS dS dS dS Wyoming 38.2% 52.7% 16 dS dS 38.2% 28 dS dS dS 55 NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n 23 Time Is the Enemy

26 GraduatIon rates associate degrees part-time students full-time students Entry cohort, Entry cohort, In 4 In 3 started fall 2004 In 4 In 3 In 2 started fall 2004 In 2 (headcount) years years years years years (headcount) years 8,926 15.4% 19.8% 8,252 1.1% 3.4% 6.2% Arizona 7.1% 5,682 5.0% 13.6% 17.6% 1,945 0.7% 3.0% 6.2% Arkansas California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) Colorado 13.7% 17.1% 6,318 1.4% 3.0% 5.6% 6,511 8.4% 36,269 5.2% 17.9% 25.6% 23,482 0.5% 4.2% 8.8% Florida 12,246 4.9% 13.5% 18.1% georgia 1.9% 6.0% 9.7% 3,868 hawaii 2,736 3.2% 12.2% 18.6% 1,859 0.8% 3.2% 6.1% Idaho 2,289 17.5% 21.4% 658 NP 5.5% 9.0% 8.7% 22,098 12,243 21.0% 26.0% Illinois 2.3% 6.4% 10.0% 9.5% Indiana 5.4% 13.8% 19.3% 12,971 0.5% 2.8% 6.1% 8,826 Kentucky 5,541 1.8% 8.5% 13.5% 1,703 dS 2.2% 5.5% louisiana 1.0% 4.2% 6.7% 2,306 0.6% 1.8% 3.7% 6,030 Maryland 12,110 4.5% 12.7% 18.3% 8,030 0.8% 2.8% 5.8% Massachusetts 11,074 4.4% 14.3% 19.3% 4,889 1.0% 4.3% 8.9% NP Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 18,570 7.4% 5.1% 10.2% 16.3% 18.8% 8,156 1.9% Missouri 11,607 22.2% 4,318 0.5% 2.6% 4.3% 9.8% 18.9% 3.9% 0.3% 16.6% 7,625 1,641 1.6% 3.0% Nevada 10.8% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP 11,073 3.3% 5.4% 7.1% 7,371 1.2% 2.4% 3.7% New Mexico 14,742 North Carolina 13.9% 17.5% 14,806 3.9% 6.8% 10.0% 8.8% 23,459 9,058 9.4% 16.5% ohio 1.2% 3.6% 7.8% 2.8% oklahoma 8.8% 17.9% 22.1% 4,821 3.5% 6.3% 9.2% 11,217 oregon 6,932 6.3% 15.0% 19.6% 3,841 1.4% 5.0% 8.0% Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota dS 5.5% 5.5% 24 dS dS dS 238 10,867 2,742 18.0% 22.3% Tennessee 0.9% 7.5% 10.9% 6.0% Texas 3.1% 7.8% 11.2% 52,283 0.6% 2.4% 4.7% 57,047 Utah 7,459 9.5% 16.5% 21.8% 4,249 0.9% 2.8% 5.5% Virginia 4.0% 16.0% 20.0% 6,651 1.0% 5.0% 9.0% 10,209 Washington 13,711 13.6% 26.3% 31.2% 4,947 4.4% 10.3% 15.3% West Virginia 3,411 5.2% 12.6% 16.7% 569 dS 4.7% 8.3% 7.7% 17.6% Wyoming 2,819 21.9% 32.3% 36.8% 778 12.7% NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n Complete College America 24

27 GraduatIon rates associate degrees (full-time) pell grant recipients transfer students Entry cohort, Entry cohort, In 4 In 3 In 3 In 4 started fall 2004 In 2 started fall 2004 In 2 (headcount) years years years years years (headcount) years NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Arizona NP 198 5.6% 15.2% 19.7% Arkansas NP NP NP NP California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 4,878 8.0% 11.3% 14.0% Colorado 7.4% 12.6% 16.1% 2,540 Florida 20,220 14.7% 23.5% 28.7% 14,055 3.5% 13.6% 20.6% georgia 7,048 11.6% 18.5% 22.1% 4,105 3.8% 11.2% 15.6% hawaii 2,193 15.5% 18.5% 681 3.1% 10.9% 15.0% 9.6% 713 23.8% 28.9% 1,005 3.5% 8.6% 11.8% Idaho 14.6% NP NP NP NP Illinois 7.2% 16.3% 20.6% 7,770 Indiana 810 7.0% 19.3% 27.7% 3,563 3.4% 9.2% 14.0% Kentucky 2,089 9.0% 15.9% 21.4% 4,807 1.9% 9.1% 14.7% louisiana 4.1% 8.8% 11.7% NP NP NP NP 3,296 Maryland 3,075 6.7% 16.1% 22.5% 3,385 2.6% 8.5% 13.2% Massachusetts 3,772 14.2% 22.8% 27.8% 3,237 3.1% 10.7% 15.3% NP Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 6,324 18.6% 21.0% 8,417 8.6% 14.8% 17.2% 13.3% 3,847 11.1% 19.9% 4,722 6.8% 14.2% 17.7% Missouri 17.3% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP 3,694 3.8% 5.8% 7.1% New Mexico 3.4% 6.1% 8.3% 4,281 North Carolina 15.0% 18.9% 23.3% 6,050 7.1% 11.8% 15.5% 5,384 10,842 9,962 17.8% 25.9% ohio 2.1% 7.7% 13.0% 8.5% oklahoma dS dS 23.8% 4,500 10.6% 19.9% 24.0% 42 oregon 1,991 12.7% 22.4% 28.8% 2,733 5.5% 13.7% 18.4% Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) 126 100 56.3% 58.7% South dakota dS dS dS 52.4% Tennessee 39.3% 50.5% 53.9% 6,586 4.6% 15.3% 19.7% 5,666 Texas 29,081 6.3% 10.3% 13.4% 25,321 2.6% 7.2% 10.8% Utah 5,074 23.6% 27.4% NP NP NP NP 17.0% Virginia 8.0% 16.0% 19.0% 3,258 3.0% 13.0% 17.0% 5,384 Washington 8,800 26.6% 30.8% 4,249 12.0% 23.7% 28.6% 18.6% 14.6% 1,321 15.4% 23.1% 26.7% 1,921 3.9% 10.6% West Virginia 31.5% 37.6% 33.7% 23.1% 167 Wyoming 950 21.2% 27.4% NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n 25 Time Is the Enemy

28 , By race GraduatIon rates associate degrees (full-time) african american, White, other hispanic non-hispanic non-hispanic Entry Entry Entry Entry cohort, cohort, cohort, cohort, started started started started In 3 years fall 2004 fall 2004 In 3 years In 3 years fall 2004 fall 2004 In 3 years 11.6% 4,596 17.9% 1,276 15.0% Arizona 2,521 11.9% 533 7.5% 4,358 15.1% 203 13.8% 989 10.6% Arkansas 132 California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 11.0% 7.8% 4,482 15.6% 641 8.6% 1,044 344 Colorado 6,305 10.0% 19,501 21.6% Florida 21.2% 8,209 14.1% 2,254 14.8% 3,127 7.5% 7,865 16.0% 895 11.6% 359 georgia dS 40 dS 299 11.7% 2,359 12.3% hawaii 38 152 17 dS 1,576 18.8% 544 15.8% Idaho 9.9% 12.9% Illinois 15,557 25.6% 1,069 15.6% 3,441 2,031 6.8% 972 309 7,328 15.1% 12.4% 9.4% Indiana 217 5.7% dS dS 4,349 9.8% 542 6.7% 74 Kentucky 576 dS 2,276 2.4% 3,102 louisiana 521 1.9% 131 5.9% 504 2,846 5.0% 7,375 16.1% 1,385 11.1% Maryland 9.1% 7.2% 16.2% 7.6% 7,850 1,037 1,154 13.5% Massachusetts 1,033 NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP 77 16.9% 8,285 14.4% 8,937 18.7% 1,271 11.6% Mississippi Missouri 12.1% 1,082 6.5% 9,581 20.8% 729 14.7% 215 244 Nevada dS 808 10.1% 490 14.1% 9.8% 99 NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 5.5% 6.0% 4,621 5.4% 789 5.2% 4,313 New Mexico 367 12.7% 2,714 7.7% 10,546 15.9% 1,001 10.4% North Carolina 481 457 5.5% 3.0% 19,019 10.4% 1,405 8.7% ohio 2,578 11.3% 2,175 7.3% 7,320 19.5% 471 20.1% oklahoma 1,251 431 137 dS 5,507 15.4% 857 15.9% oregon 10.9% Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota dS dS dS 184 6.0% 46 dS dS 134 11.9% 6.1% 8,370 20.8% 425 18.8% Tennessee 1,938 7.2% 8.5% 5.9% 27,727 19,026 3,549 9.0% Texas 6,745 347 83 dS 5,524 18.0% 1,505 13.4% Utah 8.4% 579 11.6% 1,976 9.0% 6,862 Virginia 792 20.1% 17.7% Washington 20.4% 590 14.9% 9,751 28.0% 2,328 24.7% 1,042 27 3,039 280 7.5% West Virginia 13.1% 65 dS dS Wyoming 26.0% 33 dS 2,545 33.2% 114 27.2% 127 NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n Complete College America 26

29 , By a Ge GraduatIon rates associate degrees (full-time) students students students age 20–24 age 17–19 age 25 and over Entry Entry Entry cohort, cohort, cohort, In 2 In 4 In 3 started In 2 In 4 started In 3 In 4 started In 3 In 2 years fall 2004 years years years fall 2004 years years fall 2004 years years years 4.3% 21.7% 17.0% 11.1% 14.4% 984 1,108 9.7% 13.3% 7.6% 6,820 Arizona 6.3% 14.8% 18.8% 693 1.6% 6.8% 8.9% 839 3.7% 13.6% 19.2% Arkansas 4,150 5.8% California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 7.6% 15.0% 5.6% 8.5% 11.4% 944 1,073 13.2% 16.6% 9.1% 18.4% Colorado 4,456 20.0% 28.4% 3,966 3.2% 9.8% 15.1% Florida 2.7% 8.4% 12.4% 29,048 5.8% 3,157 4.8% 18.8% 1,378 4.1% 9.8% 12.7% 13.9% 6.4% 15.0% 18.9% 9,905 georgia 963 hawaii 11.8% 18.7% 280 4.3% 12.1% 15.4% 206 9.2% 16.5% 21.4% 2,250 2.5% 1,557 18.8% 22.6% 390 5.9% 13.6% 18.2% 338 7.7% 15.4% 18.9% Idaho 9.6% 9.3% Illinois 5,830 10.3% 17.2% 20.9% 1,802 8.8% 16.3% 19.6% 23.1% 14,438 28.8% 14.8% 1,737 1,357 2.7% 8.0% 11.3% 5.8% 6.3% 14.8% 19.1% Indiana 5,732 21.2% 908 1.8% 735 dS 5.3% 9.4% 13.3% 2.8% 11.7% 17.8% 3,898 Kentucky 8.3% 0.6% 3.8% 6.5% 1,237 1.1% 4.0% louisiana 893 2.2% 5.9% 8.6% 3,900 5.9% 10,133 13.2% 19.1% 1,232 5.0% 9.7% 13.6% 742 5.0% 10.4% 15.1% Maryland 4.4% 4.1% 15.7% 20.1% 1,607 4.9% 11.8% 8,602 803 7.3% 14.9% 17.9% Massachusetts 14.7% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP 11.3% Mississippi 18.2% 20.9% 4,420 7.0% 10.7% 12.8% 2,975 11.0% 17.4% 19.7% 11,172 Missouri 11.0% 20.9% 24.4% 1,395 3.9% 9.0% 11.0% 863 5.8% 13.2% 16.7% 9,333 791 Nevada 16.3% 626 3.8% 9.9% 16.0% 222 5.9% 12.2% 19.4% 3.4% 11.3% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 763 2.8% 919 4.8% 7.7% 9.9% 6.2% 7.3% 11.1% 14.8% 9,358 New Mexico 4.7% 6.6% 12.2% 16.6% 2,775 9.9% 13.2% 15.2% 2,305 16.4% 21.6% 24.4% North Carolina 9,662 17,601 2.8% 17.7% 3,200 2.1% 6.6% 11.2% 2,658 3.7% 10.1% 15.1% ohio 9.8% 9.2% 1,836 23.4% 2,833 10.2% 16.3% 19.1% 7,601 12.3% 21.0% 25.3% oklahoma 18.9% 984 4,799 21.3% 1,149 6.3% 13.9% 18.0% 16.2% 4.9% 10.0% 13.3% oregon 6.5% Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota dS 6.4% 6.4% 30 dS dS dS dS dS dS dS 202 8,073 7.1% 25.4% 1,636 2.0% 8.2% 10.5% 1,158 4.2% 30.9% 17.4% Tennessee 20.4% 7.9% 11.8% 7,700 2.3% 5.3% 5,458 3.3% 8.3% 11.7% 8.2% 43,889 Texas 3.2% 13.2% 5,366 25.7% 1,650 4.7% 9.8% 19.5% 443 2.3% 5.0% 7.0% Utah 11.5% 7,976 4.0% 16.0% 21.0% 1,320 4.0% 13.0% Virginia 894 5.0% 15.0% 19.0% 17.0% Washington 14.0% 28.0% 33.0% 1,927 10.0% 20.0% 25.0% 1,407 14.0% 24.0% 27.0% 10,075 2,310 6.9% 13.7% 18.1% 579 2.6% West Virginia 9.7% 522 4.8% 14.2% 18.4% 6.0% 43.5% Wyoming 25.9% 30.9% 628 32.6% 40.3% 14.4% 346 42.2% 52.3% 56.1% 1,845 NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n 27 Time Is the Enemy

30 GraduatIon rates Bachelor’s degrees part-time students full-time students Entry cohort, Entry cohort, In 8 In 6 started fall 2002 In 8 In 6 In 4 started fall 2002 In 4 (headcount) years years years years years (headcount) years 14,329 57.7% 61.8% 787 14.1% 32.9% 38.8% Arizona 31.5% 9,929 16.8% 38.4% 42.5% 367 dS 8.2% 12.0% Arkansas California 14.8% 60.2% 2,155 6.1% 32.0% 41.6% 38,430 52.0% (CSU system only) Colorado 51.6% 54.5% 903 3.3% 11.1% 11.1% 18,186 28.8% 32,915 35.6% 64.7% 69.3% 1,605 11.7% 36.9% 43.4% Florida 22,830 24.3% 56.7% 62.3% georgia 3.5% 15.4% 21.8% 1,157 hawaii 2,238 14.9% 50.3% 57.1% 30 0.0% 20.0% 30.0% Idaho 4,218 44.3% 51.0% 1,230 4.5% 11.8% 16.7% 18.5% 23,445 181 61.3% 63.0% Illinois 10.5% 23.2% 24.3% 37.4% Indiana 26.2% 56.0% 60.6% 1,948 1.7% 9.3% 15.1% 26,908 Kentucky 14,772 20.0% 48.3% 52.9% 679 7.7% 21.7% 25.6% louisiana 15.8% 43.7% NP 1,106 1.4% 11.4% NP 23,175 Maryland 13,136 38.3% 63.7% 67.0% 614 8.3% 15.1% 18.2% Massachusetts 11,904 32.8% 57.8% 60.8% 272 6.3% 19.9% 24.3% NP Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 7,497 42.9% 38.9% 22.4% 53.4% 56.7% 303 11.9% Missouri 13,309 46.5% 659 12.6% 18.1% 19.1% 33.7% 45.8% 16.7% 4.4% 57.6% 1,483 2,396 31.8% 38.8% Nevada 51.5% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP 10,380 6.4% 23.9% 28.1% 6,261 1.1% 7.9% 10.1% New Mexico 26,328 North Carolina 63.5% 66.7% 216 5.6% 23.1% 26.9% 36.5% 34,420 1,267 59.7% 63.7% ohio 3.5% 10.0% 14.4% 29.5% oklahoma 19.0% 50.0% 55.4% 1,156 1.6% 9.9% 13.3% 13,766 oregon 9,562 31.6% 59.5% 64.0% 447 6.7% 22.4% 29.3% Pennsylvania 32.2% 15.9% 17,967 55.3% 56.9% 270 6.3% 13.3% (PASShE system only) South dakota 17.9% 51.3% 55.1% 469 dS 7.5% 10.2% 3,969 15,377 585 56.9% 61.7% Tennessee 6.3% 24.8% 32.7% 31.9% Texas 25.0% 56.1% 62.6% 2,804 8.4% 30.0% 38.7% 55,728 Utah 4,292 15.0% 38.2% 46.3% 713 3.4% 16.1% 22.6% Virginia 45.0% 72.0% 73.0% 273 7.0% 23.0% 29.0% 26,738 Washington 15,623 59.6% 63.2% 63.5% 1,443 31.7% 33.7% 34.0% West Virginia 9,142 22.2% 48.2% 51.9% 242 dS 10.3% 14.5% NP NP Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n Complete College America 28

31 GraduatIon rates Bachelor’s degrees (full-time) transfer students pell grant recipients Entry cohort, Entry cohort, In 6 In 8 started fall 2002 In 4 In 6 In 8 In 4 started fall 2002 years years years (headcount) years (headcount) years years 57.2% 64.4% 66.4% NP NP NP NP Arizona 8,942 354 31.4% 41.2% 44.6% NP NP NP NP Arkansas California 38,850 73.7% 12,840 9.7% 44.4% 54.0% 62.7% 71.2% (CSU system only) 13,675 51.2% 51.2% 3,094 20.2% 41.0% 44.7% Colorado 39.4% 22,773 61.6% 68.6% 70.9% NP NP NP NP Florida* 14,358 48.8% 60.4% NP 5,282 georgia 44.6% 50.9% 16.4% hawaii 2,205 50.0% 57.7% 59.7% dS dS dS dS Idaho 2,286 55.0% 59.0% 1,919 14.0% 34.1% 43.4% 44.7% 14,999 3,960 57.4% 58.1% Illinois 25.8% 45.8% 47.9% 54.2% Indiana 39.2% 70.5% 73.9% 5,624 14.6% 41.2% 46.7% 1,330 Kentucky 5,509 45.3% 55.1% 58.0% 13,314 21.2% 50.7% 55.3% louisiana 33.8% 44.2% NP NP NP NP NP 6,362 Maryland 8,591 59.8% 68.7% 71.7% NP NP NP NP Massachusetts 7,021 49.0% 57.4% 59.7% NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP NP 5,607 49.5% Mississippi 44.5% 40.7% 58.6% 60.1% 2,789 15.7% Missouri 7,688 48.7% 2,023 25.4% 38.6% 40.1% 45.1% 48.0% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Nevada NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP 2,774 6.9% 20.4% 23.1% 4,013 4.2% 17.4% 21.7% New Mexico 10,586 North Carolina 64.4% 66.5% 7,059 25.4% 51.8% 55.7% 57.2% 10,670 7,531 55.4% 58.2% ohio 16.5% 42.2% 47.1% 44.6% oklahoma 36.1% 52.8% 55.6% 3,791 12.1% 38.6% 44.4% 36 oregon 6,491 57.7% 65.2% 67.4% 2,481 24.6% 52.2% 57.5% Pennsylvania 60.9% 49.0% 5,420 55.1% 62.3% 5,142 24.4% 47.1% (PASShE system only) South dakota 35.8% 42.4% 45.2% 1,322 14.9% 46.8% 51.1% 1,969 8,974 5,530 58.3% 61.3% Tennessee 19.3% 46.7% 55.9% 48.5% Texas 50.4% 61.4% 64.9% 16,829 14.5% 42.0% 49.6% 42,456 Utah 5,728 47.2% 60.0% 63.5% NP NP NP NP Virginia 51.0% 61.0% 62.0% 4,779 27.0% 56.0% 58.0% 9,375 Washington 6,927 58.8% 60.1% 60.3% 3,251 53.2% 56.6% 57.1% West Virginia 2,985 43.6% 53.4% 55.5% 2,865 15.4% 38.7% 43.5% NP NP Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP * Florida did not report data from enough colleges to provide a reliable statistic for the Pell grant measure. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n 29 Time Is the Enemy

32 GraduatIon rates , By race Bachelor’s degrees (full-time) african american, White, other hispanic non-hispanic non-hispanic Entry Entry Entry Entry cohort, cohort, cohort, cohort, started started started started In 6 years fall 2002 In 6 years fall 2002 fall 2002 In 6 years In 6 years fall 2002 10,287 421 43.0% 1,677 59.8% 1,944 53.4% Arizona 53.7% 130 32.3% 2,073 23.9% 7,197 42.9% 529 36.1% Arkansas California 43.9% 2,492 35.7% 8,543 59.9% 12,764 51.6% 14,631 (CSU system only) 1,537 41.6% 453 38.0% 14,219 53.5% 1,977 48.2% Colorado 4,848 61.6% 5,304 53.5% 20,346 68.0% Florida 67.5% 2,417 georgia 469 56.5% 4,582 44.7% 15,811 59.8% 1,968 59.8% hawaii 41 16 dS 508 36.8% 1,673 54.9% 29.3% 237 3,539 36 33.3% Idaho 45.3% 406 41.9% 35.0% Illinois 50.7% 2,468 41.9% 16,673 65.0% 646 61.6% 1,459 Indiana 722 46.5% 1,324 35.2% 23,255 57.6% 1,607 55.7% Kentucky 37.8% 1,236 33.7% 12,910 50.1% 507 41.4% 119 louisiana 456 41.0% 6,534 28.8% 14,912 50.5% 1,273 40.7% Maryland 355 68.5% 3,962 42.7% 7,084 74.5% 1,735 66.6% 53.2% Massachusetts 371 40.7% 534 43.4% 9,489 59.9% 1,510 NP NP Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP NP Mississippi 61 2,891 39.9% 4,381 62.3% 164 51.8% 55.7% 208 980 27.4% 11,203 48.1% 918 38.3% Missouri 42.3% 194 47.4% 118 44.9% Nevada 52.0% 506 52.8% 1,578 New hampshire NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico 4,002 21.7% 317 17.7% 4,431 29.4% 1,630 15.8% North Carolina 60.3% 6,679 50.0% 17,777 68.5% 1,398 66.1% 474 ohio 657 49.9% 3,445 34.4% 28,024 63.2% 2,294 56.6% oklahoma 393 46.1% 844 38.6% 10,277 53.5% 2,252 39.0% 45.7% oregon 323 52.3% 162 59.6% 7,475 60.1% 1,602 Pennsylvania 42.5% 1,433 35.7% 15,517 57.8% 678 45.7% 339 (PASShE system only) 33 3,671 23 dS South dakota 52.6% 242 39.3% dS Tennessee 48.2% 3,155 44.6% 11,414 60.8% 586 51.0% 222 Texas 12,387 44.7% 7,186 35.6% 31,060 64.6% 5,095 61.2% Utah 158 27 22.2% 3,739 38.7% 368 36.1% 32.9% Virginia 69.1% 4,421 52.1% 18,686 76.1% 2,832 74.6% 799 Washington 561 56.1% 359 47.4% 10,567 64.5% 4,136 61.9% West Virginia 116 42.2% 480 34.6% 8,400 49.1% 146 45.2% NP NP Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n Complete College America 30

33 , By a Ge GraduatIon rates Bachelor’s degrees (full-time) students students students age 20–24 age 17–19 age 25 and over Entry Entry Entry cohort, cohort, cohort, In 4 In 8 In 6 started In 4 In 8 started In 6 In 8 started In 6 In 4 years fall 2002 years years years fall 2002 years years fall 2002 years years years 24.1% 62.8% 58.6% 33.0% 36.3% 87 421 31.0% 33.3% 31.9% 13,821 Arizona 19.5% 40.3% 44.4% 445 4.1% 12.4% 14.6% 255 5.5% 16.1% 22.4% Arkansas 9,229 17.8% California 74 590 10.5% 35.3% 40.9% 52.3% 18.9% 32.4% 37.8% 37,766 60.6% 14.8% (CSU system only) 21.6% 52.6% 12.7% 23.9% 27.2% 185 536 33.5% 34.6% 29.4% 55.6% Colorado 17,427 65.3% 69.9% 346 19.4% 35.8% 40.8% Florida dS 34.1% 38.6% 30,574 36.2% 44 24.9% 63.7% 603 13.3% 28.5% 33.2% 58.1% 6.1% 17.6% 20.7% 21,869 georgia 358 hawaii 50.4% 57.2% 27 dS 44.4% 51.9% dS dS dS dS 2,205 14.6% 3,199 44.6% 51.7% 759 27.7% 45.8% 52.0% 260 21.2% 36.2% 39.6% Idaho 16.1% 37.9% Illinois 639 25.2% 34.0% 42.1% 134 10.5% 17.9% 18.7% 62.1% 22,672 63.9% 57.7% 403 800 7.5% 19.9% 26.1% 27.1% 6.9% 19.4% 24.8% Indiana 25,705 62.3% 460 20.4% 566 7.1% 20.1% 24.0% 54.0% 25.4% 52.0% 54.4% 13,746 Kentucky 49.4% 16.6% 45.8% NP 1,168 3.5% 14.4% louisiana 424 5.7% 17.5% NP 21,583 NP 12,607 65.1% 68.4% 406 20.4% 31.3% 35.2% 120 14.2% 22.5% 25.0% Maryland 39.1% 33.2% 41.6% 61.4% 296 16.2% 37.8% 11,523 58 27.6% 43.1% 44.8% Massachusetts 58.4% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP 22.9% Mississippi 54.5% 57.9% 209 6.2% 18.7% 20.6% 34 dS dS dS 7,254 Missouri 34.8% 47.2% 47.9% 495 16.8% 22.6% 25.1% 185 6.0% 11.4% 13.0% 12,612 1,420 Nevada 57.3% 966 17.1% 51.2% 58.2% 10 dS dS dS 16.3% 51.6% NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 877 7.3% 859 2.1% 6.6% 7.9% 32.4% 1.6% 3.8% 5.5% 8,641 New Mexico 27.7% 37.0% 64.3% 67.4% 828 25.4% 45.0% 49.6% 141 18.4% 30.5% 36.2% North Carolina 25,359 33,064 30.5% 65.3% 992 6.7% 19.0% 24.2% 364 7.1% 17.0% 20.9% ohio 61.4% 20.1% 498 58.5% 1,664 16.6% 33.8% 38.7% 12,506 8.8% 18.1% 21.5% oklahoma 53.0% 125 9,074 64.8% 363 22.3% 45.5% 50.1% 60.3% 20.8% 40.0% 44.0% oregon 32.1% Pennsylvania 17,151 32.9% 56.4% 58.0% 659 16.4% 32.2% 33.7% 157 21.7% 33.1% 34.4% (PASShE system only) South dakota 18.5% 52.9% 56.7% 145 dS 21.4% 26.9% 65 dS 26.2% 29.2% 3,759 14,426 33.4% 63.6% 656 7.9% 23.2% 29.4% 295 12.9% 30.8% 38.0% Tennessee 59.0% 29.7% 63.6% 1,295 12.5% 24.6% 351 15.4% 29.3% 33.0% 57.0% 54,082 Texas 25.4% 37.3% 3,677 47.9% 563 13.0% 32.7% 39.2% 52 dS 25.0% 25.0% Utah 15.3% 26,217 46.0% 72.0% 74.0% 382 22.0% 43.0% Virginia 66 dS 27.0% 29.0% 45.0% Washington 62.0% 66.1% 66.5% 1,605 52.3% 54.1% 54.6% 1,247 44.1% 44.7% 44.7% 12,771 8,227 27.9% 50.5% 54.2% 742 10.8% West Virginia 32.2% 173 8.7% 23.1% 25.4% 23.6% NP Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n 31 Time Is the Enemy

34 averaGe LenGth of years) tIme to deGree (In for certificates and degrees awarded in 2007–08 associate-seeking certificate-seeking Bachelor’s-seeking (2 years needed) (4 years needed) (1 year needed) Part-time Part-time Full-time Part-time Full-time Full-time 4.6 years 5.2 years Arizona NP NP NP NP 5.2 6.9 7.0 years 5.4 years 5.7 years Arkansas 3.9 years California NP 5.2 NP NP NP 5.7 (CSU system only) 5.8 4.6 6.1 5.4 Colorado 3.9 4.5 5.2 4.6 3.3 4.3 Florida NP NP 4.9 4.9 6.1 georgia 2.7 3.5 3.9 7.8 5.8 8.7 5.6 7.2 5.0 hawaii 5.0 5.8 5.4 6.6 Idaho 3.3 4.9 3.0 4.0 5.5 3.0 Illinois 5.0 4.5 5.0 5.3 3.8 4.0 Indiana 3.4 4.7 5.8 5.5 6.6 Kentucky 3.8 4.4 4.9 7.3 5.5 7.1 6.4 6.4 5.8 louisiana 3.8 5.0 4.3 4.7 Maryland 3.1 4.6 3.1 Massachusetts 4.7 1.8 2.2 3.3 4.3 NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP 2.6 2.7 NA NA Mississippi: 2-year sector* 1.8 1.9 4.0 3.5 4.4 Mississippi: 4-year sector* 4.7 NA NA 3.7 1.4 4.2 4.6 2.6 Missouri 3.6 3.7 2.7 5.4 Nevada 4.7 4.0 5.0 NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP NP NP NP New Mexico NP NP NP 3.6 4.8 7.2 3.1 2.4 2.1 North Carolina ohio 4.9 4.4 5.4 3.6 3.9 3.8 1.8 2.8 5.0 5.7 oklahoma 1.5 2.8 3.4 NA NA 3.4 oregon: 2-year sector* 2.6 4.1 NA NA 4.4 5.4 NA oregon: 4-year sector* 4.6 Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) NP 5.4 4.7 6.9 South dakota NP 4.0 4.2 4.9 5.4 4.5 4.8 Tennessee 4.5 4.5 5.0 5.3 Texas 3.5 3.6 6.0 5.7 5.1 6.1 6.7 7.8 4.9 Utah 5.4 4.0 5.6 4.4 5.6 Virginia 3.5 4.1 Washington 4.1 4.4 2.2 3.1 4.7 5.1 6.2 5.3 7.0 4.4 West Virginia 5.0 6.9 3.6 6.7 NP NP Wyoming 2.0 * State reported average length of time and/or average number of credits accumulated to complete an associate degree separately for four-year and two-year colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. NA = Not applicable n Complete College America 32

35 avera Ge num Ber of deGree Lated to cred Its accumu for certificates and degrees awarded in 2007–08 certificate-seeking associate-seeking Bachelor’s-seeking (120 credits needed) (60 credits needed) (30 credits needed) Full-time Full-time Part-time Part-time Part-time Full-time 133 credits Arizona NP NP NP NP 136 credits NP 130 77 credits 86 credits 70 credits Arkansas 78 credits California 139 139 NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 92 140 Colorado 74 69 94 136 140 75 Florida 140 NP NP 75 133 134 georgia 99 96 92 97 139 136 75 76 69 hawaii 66 93 144 147 Idaho 58 62 102 68 70 58 60 Illinois 126 119 138 76 Indiana 139 79 68 90 142 143 Kentucky 69 64 92 99 NP NP NP NP NP louisiana NP 76 124 126 Maryland NP NP 75 79 Massachusetts 61 52 74 128 128 NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP 60 NA NA Mississippi: 2-year sector* 48 41 65 109 130 Mississippi: 4-year sector* 137 NA NA 106 69 65 123 47 72 Missouri 127 78 53 64 Nevada 134 78 133 NP NP New hampshire NP NP NP NP 148 142 New Mexico 63 47 99 87 127 120 71 78 30 North Carolina 32 ohio 137 132 69 52 86 80 74 140 136 oklahoma 32 39 79 72 NA 75 NA oregon: 2-year sector* 56 53 oregon: 4-year sector* 125 109 NA NA 87 NA Pennsylvania NP NP 130 133 NP NP (PASShE system only) NP 141 147 South dakota NP 86 101 80 134 79 135 Tennessee 61 50 92 149 149 Texas 70 58 98 87 147 146 89 89 92 Utah 79 81 128 130 Virginia 68 68 71 Washington NP 63 63 68 NP 99 144 146 75 77 West Virginia 90 83 82 NP NP Wyoming 56 55 * State reported average length of time and/or average number of credits accumulated to complete an associate degree separately for four-year and two-year colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. NA = Not applicable n 33 Time Is the Enemy

36 enroLLment In remedIaL educatIon total students in 2-year colleges students completing remedial courses and a college-level course total first-time in the same subject within two students completing entry students students enrolling in academic years of entry (fall 2006) remedial courses remedial courses 58.8% 1,258 26.8% 9,844 12.8% Arizona 16,744 2,640 NP NP NP NP NP NP Arkansas NP California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 5,934 35.3% 3,920 66.1% 3,876 65.3% Colorado 16,813 35,595 59.8% 21,297 65,513 7,955 22.3% Florida 54.3% 23,987 37.1% 5,085 57.1% 1,537 17.3% georgia 8,898 4,276 2,823 66.0% 1,174 41.6% 549 19.4% hawaii 2,282 Idaho 811 dS 307 23.5% 1,309 57.4% 19,987 13,224 66.2% 6,371 31.9% 41,054 48.7% Illinois 16,936 46.4% 10,788 63.7% Indiana NP 36,478 NP 15,976 5,434 34.0% 4,015 73.9% 3,385 62.3% Kentucky 6,454 4,073 63.1% 1,932 47.4% 563 13.8% louisiana 22,686 60.5% NP NP NP NP 13,719 Maryland 16,883 10,421 61.7% 5,534 53.1% 3,155 30.3% Massachusetts NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota 2,596 28,852 12,391 42.9% 8,080 65.2% 21.0% Mississippi Missouri 20,937 52.3% NP NP NP NP 10,952 10,271 4,272 2,942 68.9% 924 21.6% Nevada 41.6% NP NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP 12,237 57.0% 4,389 63.0% dS dS New Mexico 6,970 61,571 19,603 31.8% 9,876 North Carolina 2,364 12.1% 50.4% ohio 18,994 58.5% 9,141 48.1% 4,668 24.6% 32,467 11,393 71.3% 59.6% 4,841 oklahoma 1,628 24.0% 6,794 oregon 6,118 51.6% 4,876 79.7% 2,474 40.4% 11,851 Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota* NP NP NP NP NP NP NP 15,607 71.2% 5,162 46.5% 2,331 21.0% Tennessee 11,105 105,521 54,504 51.0% 7,791 Texas 7,694 14.3% 30.0% Utah 5,662 1,292 22.8% 972 75.2% 404 31.3% Virginia 33,984 14,476 43.0% 10,950 76.0% 3,225 22.3% Washington 16,178 45.9% 8,636 53.4% 1,533 9.5% 35,265 West Virginia 4,378 3,034 69.3% 1,932 63.7% 583 19.2% 46.1% Wyoming 1,459 49.3% 672 2,960 453 31.0% * South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n Complete College America 34

37 enroLLment In remedIaL educatIon directly from high school in 2-year colleges students completing remedial courses and a college-level course total first-time in the same subject within two students completing students enrolling in entry students academic years of entry remedial courses (fall 2006) remedial courses 1,942 15.2% 1,003 65.4% Arizona 10,097 6,608 29.4% NP NP NP NP NP NP Arkansas NP California NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) 43.1% 2,027 64.0% 1,976 62.4% 7,350 Colorado 3,165 54.6% 6,373 61.6% 25,901 24.6% Florida 47,840 15,962 5,126 2,953 57.6% 1,210 23.6% 12,816 georgia 40.0% 2,318 69.8% 958 41.3% 466 20.1% hawaii 3,320 882 1,613 61.9% 217 24.6% Idaho 54.7% 546 56.3% 67.4% 4,325 34.7% 12,472 8,412 Illinois 22,150 47.5% 4,030 61.4% NP Indiana 13,831 6,566 NP 3,120 49.1% 2,347 75.2% 1,958 62.8% 6,351 Kentucky 2,646 62.9% 1,211 45.8% 368 13.9% louisiana 4,209 10,843 NP NP NP NP 66.3% Maryland 16,353 7,528 66.9% 3,877 51.5% 2,357 31.3% Massachusetts 11,251 NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota 1,534 6,568 47.7% 4,594 69.9% 23.4% Mississippi 13,764 14,078 7,712 NP NP NP 0% Missouri 54.8% 2,052 Nevada 72.4% 512 25.0% 38.2% 5,377 1,485 NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 5,369 3,151 58.7% dS dS 7,207 New Mexico 74.5% 62 1.0% 21 33.9% North Carolina NP 6,525 NP 21,275 59.6% 6,203 48.9% 3,399 26.8% ohio 12,675 3,948 1,088 2,886 73.1% 6,505 27.6% oklahoma 60.7% 5,564 50.6% 2,240 79.6% 1,208 42.9% oregon 2,815 Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota* NP NP NP NP NP NP NP 7,206 3,463 48.1% 1,603 22.2% 10,889 66.2% Tennessee 38,863 51.7% 12,227 31.5% Texas 15.2% 75,208 5,900 3,326 716 21.5% 538 75.1% 230 32.1% Utah 18,255 9,650 53.0% 7,187 74.0% 2,140 22.2% Virginia 16,355 59.5% 4,995 51.4% 924 9.5% 9,727 Washington 2,576 1,753 68.1% 1,156 65.9% 372 21.2% West Virginia 362 2,294 47.5% 492 45.2% 1,089 33.2% Wyoming * South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n 35 Time Is the Enemy

38 enroLLment In remedIaL educatIon total students in 4-year colleges students completing remedial courses and a college-level course total first-time in the same subject within two students completing students enrolling in entry students academic years of entry remedial courses (fall 2006) remedial courses NP NP NP NP Arizona NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Arkansas NP California 59.6% 50,119 68.4% NP NP 29,871 20,442 (CSU system only) 9.3% 1,319 66.9% 451 22.9% 21,295 Colorado 1,971 NP NP NP NP NP Florida NP NP 6,595 3,413 51.8% 2,336 35.4% 36,457 georgia 18.1% dS dS dS dS dS dS hawaii 2,238 1,362 6,851 65.2% 575 42.2% Idaho 19.9% 888 15.8% 59.6% 1,692 40.7% 4,153 2,476 Illinois 26,182 12.4% 2,821 57.8% NP Indiana 39,217 4,882 NP 5,759 32.1% 4,607 80.0% 805 14.0% 17,945 Kentucky 4,305 20.0% 2,851 66.2% 1,453 33.8% louisiana 21,555 3,935 NP NP NP NP 24.9% Maryland 15,801 1,754 26.6% 1,396 79.6% 892 50.9% Massachusetts 6,604 NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota 943 1,801 21.4% 1,312 72.8% 52.4% Mississippi 8,397 Missouri 20,281 NP NP NP NP 2,867 14.1% 1,315 Nevada 77.3% 633 48.1% 29.1% 4,524 1,017 NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 822 613 74.6% dS dS 6,812 New Mexico 12.1% 1,643 5.3% 1,426 86.8% North Carolina 69.8% 30,868 1,147 37,934 25.0% 5,404 56.9% 3,644 38.4% ohio 9,491 4,992 1,406 3,308 66.3% 17,449 28.2% oklahoma 28.6% 10,119 11.5% 941 81.1% 714 61.5% oregon 1,161 Pennsylvania 19,518 5,422 27.8% 3,923 72.4% 1,748 32.2% (PASShE system only) South dakota 34.8% 1,154 70.5% 706 43.2% 4,703 1,636 NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee* 13,943 22.5% 6,853 49.2% Texas 32.1% 61,863 4,474 13,435 2,476 18.4% 2,022 81.7% 812 32.8% Utah 38,563 115 0.3% 92 80.0% 44 38.3% Virginia 24,191 4.7% NP NP NP NP 1,139 Washington 9,823 1,925 19.6% 1,346 69.9% 588 30.5% West Virginia NP NP NP NP NP NP NP Wyoming Tennessee does not offer remedial eduation at four-year colleges. * NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n Complete College America 36

39 enroLLment In remedIaL educatIon directly from high school in 4-year colleges students completing remedial courses and a college-level course total first-time in the same subject within two entry students students completing students enrolling in academic years of entry remedial courses remedial courses (fall 2006) NP NP NP NP NP Arizona NP NP NP Arkansas NP NP NP NP NP NP California 59.0% 20,178 69.0% NP NP 49,368 29,299 (CSU system only) 1,634 1,106 68.0% 428 50.1% Colorado 20,063 8.0% NP NP NP NP NP Florida NP NP 4,790 2,649 55.0% 1,850 39.0% 33,265 georgia 14.0% dS dS dS dS dS hawaii 2,174 dS 4,757 17.0% 556 68.0% 373 45.0% Idaho 820 3,844 Illinois 59.3% 1,560 40.6% 15.2% 25,255 2,282 11.0% 0.0% 60.0% NP 3,854 Indiana 34,312 2,298 4,966 3,992 80.4% 680 17.0% 15,697 Kentucky 31.6% 3,544 17.8% 2,442 68.9% louisiana 35.6% 19,888 1,261 14,026 25.0% NP NP NP 0.0% Maryland 3,537 1,698 80.0% 1,361 6,424 872 51.0% Massachusetts 26.0% NP NP NP NP NP NP Minnesota NP 8,082 1,703 21.0% 1,271 75.0% 54.0% Mississippi 918 Missouri 2,403 12.8% NP NP NP NP 18,832 3,885 Nevada 874 78.0% 539 48.0% 1,118 29.0% NP NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 714 532 75.0% dS dS 6,487 New Mexico 11.0% 1,533 5.0% 1,341 87.0% 1,100 72.0% North Carolina 29,796 36,123 8,523 4,976 58.0% 3,436 40.0% ohio 24.0% 3,429 1,095 2,430 71.0% 13,988 32.0% oklahoma 25.0% 9,624 11.0% 850 80.0% 653 62.0% oregon 1,058 Pennsylvania 18,523 4,980 27.0% 3,644 72.1% 1,635 32.8% (PASShE system only) South dakota 1,429 32.0% 1,029 72.0% 636 45.0% 4,423 NP NP NP NP NP NP Tennessee* NP 13,186 4,328 6,595 50.0% 60,051 32.8% Texas 22.0% 9,749 14.0% 1,049 78.0% 0 0.0% Utah 1,340 30,304 100 0.0% 79 79.0% Virginia 36.0% 36 Washington 1,001 6.0% NP NP NP 0.0% 15,443 9,069 72.0% 18.0% 1,171 West Virginia 520 32.0% 1,632 NP Wyoming NP NP NP NP NP NP * Tennessee does not offer remedial eduation at four-year colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. n 37 Time Is the Enemy

40 enroLLment In remedIaL educatIon pell grant recipients in 2-year colleges total first-time entry students students enrolling in remedial courses receiving p ell grants (fall 2006) (of total first-time entry students) NP Arizona NP NP Arkansas NP NP NP California NP NP NP (CSU system only) Colorado 48.2% 4,550 2,195 NP NP Florida NP georgia 8,333 3,758 45.1% 822 604 hawaii 73.5% Idaho 513 69.7% 736 8,974 5,307 Illinois 59.1% 3,046 52.0% 5,836 Indiana 6,983 3,783 54.2% Kentucky 2,548 1,852 louisiana 72.7% Maryland 4,193 73.8% 5,679 5,294 Massachusetts 68.3% 3,618 Minnesota NP NP NP Mississippi 11,450 6,123 53.5% Missouri 7,092 61.4% 4,357 NP NP Nevada NP NP NP NP New hampshire 3,477 2,756 79.3% New Mexico 12,508 7,725 North Carolina 61.8% ohio 8,940 68.6% 13,031 3,327 2,395 oklahoma 72.0% oregon 3,541 2,193 61.9% Pennsylvania NP NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota* NP NP NP 7,108 80.6% Tennessee 5,728 34,347 22,032 Texas 64.1% Utah NP NP NP Virginia 8,673 4,867 56.0% Washington 4,698 55.9% 8,398 West Virginia 2,078 1,646 79.2% Wyoming 724 477 65.9% * South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. n Complete College America 38

41 enroLLment In remedIaL educatIon pell grant recipients in 4-year colleges students enrolling in remedial courses total first-time entry students receiving p (of total first-time entry students) ell grants (fall 2006) NP NP NP Arizona NP NP Arkansas NP California 77.3% 11,959 15,466 (CSU system only) 19.3% Colorado 735 3,806 NP Florida NP NP 31.5% 3,082 9,786 georgia 443 dS dS hawaii 591 28.9% Idaho 2,048 1,789 5,050 Illinois 23.0% 20.0% Indiana 8,748 1,771 27.5% 15,350 Kentucky 4,215 31.1% 2,279 louisiana 7,335 1,655 45.9% Maryland 3,608 403 32.4% 1,245 Massachusetts Minnesota NP NP NP 1,137 35.7% Mississippi 3,188 Missouri 1,149 28.4% 4,043 NP Nevada NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP 22.5% New Mexico 442 1,962 North Carolina 866 10.6% 8,170 3,794 43.2% ohio 8,786 1,888 oklahoma 4,309 43.8% 318 14.4% 2,214 oregon Pennsylvania 5,294 2,139 40.4% (PASShE system only) 1,284 574 44.7% South dakota NP Tennessee* NP NP 6,864 19,358 35.5% Texas NP NP Utah NP 39 1.0% 6,539 Virginia 4,995 332 6.6% Washington 2,848 32.8% 934 West Virginia NP NP NP Wyoming Tennessee does not offer remedial eduation at four-year colleges. * NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n 39 Time Is the Enemy

42 GraduatIon rates of fuLL-tIme students enroLLInG In remedIaL educatIon associate degrees certificates Entry cohort, Entry cohort, started started fall 2005 fall 2004 In 3 years In 2 years NP NP NP NP Arizona NP NP 389 78 20.1% 4,219 396 9.4% Arkansas California NP NP NP NP NP NP (CSU system only) Colorado dS dS 3,061 281 9.2% dS NP NP NP NP NP NP Florida 2,065 330 16.0% 5,701 410 7.2% georgia hawaii 21 dS dS 1,852 191 10.3% Idaho 200 18.0% 635 81 12.8% 36 1,080 12,891 9.1% Illinois 1,806 14.0% 98 Indiana 52 21.4% 5,106 470 9.2% 243 Kentucky 57 19 33.3% 4,104 226 5.5% louisiana 72 11.8% 3,992 109 2.7% 612 Maryland NP NP NP 6,019 603 10.0% Massachusetts dS dS dS 6,756 693 10.3% NP Minnesota NP NP NP NP NP 8,953 1,188 Mississippi 121 42 34.7% 13.3% Missouri 153 dS 6,178 775 12.5% dS NP NP 825 80 9.7% Nevada NP NP NP NP New hampshire NP NP NP New Mexico* 4,645 8.3 1.8% 4,757 326 6.9% North Carolina 326 62 19.0% 7,822 762 9.7% ohio 67 11.7% 14,988 955 6.4% 573 oklahoma 39 dS 0.0% 6,385 587 9.2% oregon 61 21 34.4% 2,970 410 13.8% Pennsylvania NP NP NP NP NP NP (PASShE system only) NP NP 200 11 5.5% NP South dakota** NP NP NP 8,017 1,006 12.6% Tennessee 34,707 700 2.0% 35,974 2,080 5.8% Texas NP 20 NP 51.6% 2,525 1,304 Utah Virginia 16 2.0% 6,520 801 12.0% 718 Washington 1,146 229 20.0% 8,806 1,997 22.7% West Virginia dS dS dS 2,450 207 8.4% 21.7% Wyoming dS dS dS 1,560 339 * New Mexico data show graduation rates for two years, rather than 1.5 years. ** South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. DS = Fewer than 10 students, so data were suppressed. n Complete College America 40

43 GraduatIon rates of fuLL-tIme students enroLLInG In remedIaL educatIon Bachelor’s degrees Entry cohort, started In 6 years fall 2002 NP NP NP Arizona 955 22.1% Arkansas 4,316 California 23,080 10,620 46.0% (CSU system only) Colorado 377 21.7% 1,734 NP NP NP Florida 1,132 280 24.7% georgia hawaii 13 dS dS Idaho 938 20.9% 196 3,360 916 Illinois 27.3% Indiana 5,624 2,318 41.2% Kentucky 5,659 1,819 32.1% louisiana 1,223 22.3% 5,491 Maryland 2,010 980 48.8% Massachusetts 2,028 1,038 51.2% NP Minnesota NP NP Mississippi 1,888 36.3% 686 Missouri 968 21.2% 205 223 36.8% Nevada 82 NP NP New hampshire NP New Mexico 4,408 303 6.87% North Carolina 3,209 1,586 49.4% ohio 2,625 33.8% 7,760 oklahoma 2,675 819 30.6% oregon 1,257 635 50.5% Pennsylvania NP NP NP (PASShE system only) 1,298 37.7% South dakota 489 4,996 2,220 Tennessee 44.4% Texas 14,385 4,263 29.6% Utah 312 73 23.4% Virginia 292 40.0% 721 Washington NP NP NP West Virginia 2,700 859 31.8% NP NP Wyoming NP NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. n 41 Time Is the Enemy

44 percenta Ge of assocIate deGree-seeKInG students Who transfer out from 2-year to 4-year colleges only percentage of cohort identified in fall 2004 enrolling in a 4-year college (cohorts followed until august 31, 2008) Full-time Part-time 4.7% 16.6% Arizona 16.7% 6.1% Arkansas California NP NP (CSU system only) 23.3% 24.8% Colorado 5.7% 19.9% Florida 21.1% 10.6% georgia hawaii 13.8% 4.4% 15.9% Idaho 6.5% Illinois 18.6% 32.6% NP Indiana NP Kentucky 1.8% 8.8% louisiana 21.7% 10.9% Maryland 23.8% 9.0% 4.1% 12.8% Massachusetts Minnesota NP NP 11.2% Mississippi 19.2% 13.6% Missouri 25.4% 8.5% 19.9% Nevada NP New hampshire NP 21.1% New Mexico 15.3% 26.3% 20.2% North Carolina ohio 7.8% 17.1% 25.0% oklahoma 11.0% 11.5% 21.6% oregon Pennsylvania NP NP (PASShE system only) South dakota* NP NP 20.7% Tennessee 10.8% 22.0% 23.8% Texas 37.3% 21.7% Utah Virginia 9.0% 2.0% Washington 18.0% 9.7% 4.5% 16.3% West Virginia Wyoming 34.1% 14.8% * South Dakota reported data from Board of Regents only, which does not include any two-year-only colleges. NP = The state did not provide data for this metric. n Complete College America 42

45 PArT 3: State Profiles Time Is the Enemy n 43

46

47 MEMBER A ARIZON 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 64% entl y ha v e an associate degr ee ho iz or ona adults w higher cur r Ar 31% Skills gap 33% Methodolog Data: See the Sour ces . bsite y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. n e u t s f O o h w s t n e y d u p a n b i l l o r t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i l 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 28 44 2 26 Return as 34 1 20 13 sophomores Graduate on time 2 14 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 2 1 1 11 150% time 200% time 1 1 0 2 Total graduates 27 1 2 5 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 28 7 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 3 years 6 years 150% time 200% time 4 years 8 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents v ersities. lic pub om fr y onl es pr t epor r colleg and uni his T Note: data

48 ARIZON A 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 322,930 Total public college enrollment: t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g s e D Attending 218,072 171,603 151,327 P t-time ar Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 104,858 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Enrollment 18-24 e Ag Graduation White White White 55% 57% 52% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 20% 13% 35% Afr Afr ican ican ican Afr Amer ican Amer ican ican Amer 5% 4% 3% r Other aces aces Other r r aces Other 18% 29% 10% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 om submissions F state Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 3,462 18,675 16,503 2,997 11,207 7,732 7,138 5,779 354 832 136 425 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

49 ARIZON A 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Pell Grant Directly Age Certificate-Seeking African 25 and Age from HS Recipients Students Remedial (age 17–19) All Over Hispanic (at entry) American 20–24 White On-time (1 year) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 year NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 Within 1 years 2 / NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- African from HS 25 and Recipients Age Seeking Students Over American 20–24 (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White All (age 17–19) 4.3% NP* 7.6% 6.3% NP* 6.2% 5.5% 7.9% 7.1% On-time (2 years) 2004 NP* NP* 17% 11.1% 9.7% 11.6% 17.9% 15.4% 11.9% Within 3 years Full-Time 16.8% 19.8% 22.5% 21.70% 14.4% 13.3% 14.4% NP* NP* Within 4 years 1.0% NP* 1.3% 0.7% 0.6% 1.4% 1.1% 0.9% NP* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years 3.2% 3.7% NP* NP* 3.4% 4.2% 2.4% 2.0% 3.3% Part-Time NP* 7.6% 7.0% 4.7% 2.8% NP* 5.6% 5.8% 6.2% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 22.5% across the country — for Hispanic and African 16.8% American students, they’re tragic. 14.4% Age Pell Grant Directly Bachelor’s Degree- 25 and Recipients Age from HS African Seeking Students 20–24 Over American Hispanic (at entry) Remedial All White (age 17–19) On-time (4 years) 33.9% 17.1% 24.1% 19.5% 24.0% NP* NP* 31.5% 31.9% 2002 59.8% NP* 57.7% NP* 58.6% 33.0% 31.0% 43.0% 53.7% Within 6 years Full-Time 36.3% 33.3% 46.1% 59.3% 63.5% NP* NP* 61.8% 62.8% Within 8 years Within 4 years 14.5% 20.4% 14.1% 13.3% NP* 16.3% 13.4% NP* 17.6% 2002 27.9% NP* 34.0% 36.7% 38.9% 32.3% NP* 29.1% 32.9% Within 6 years Part-Time 29.4% 30.2% 40.9% NP* 40.0% 41.7% 38.8% 38.8% NP* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 31.0% 58.6% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 27.9% cohor icate tif Data: 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in ted star t cohor associate 2005–06, in ted star t Cer Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled all backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te ic. not pr o vide da ta for this metr did

50 A 2011 ARIZON Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 73.1% 51.9% return to campus 48.2% 36.6% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 76.9% 67.7% 64.0% 55.8% return to campus 45.0% 39.5% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 64.7% 34.1% 71.7% 38.3% credits in star t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, Associate ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 58.8% NP* of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 26.8% 12.8% NP* NP* NP* NP* Graduate Complete Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation within remediation remediation within remediation associated 6 years associated 3 years and and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years all F Data: 2005 Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta te NP* not pr o vide da ta did Complete College America n 4

51 A 2011 ARIZON Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time students take take students years 5.2 4.6 years Full-time Part-time students students take take Part-time Full-time NP* NP* students students take take ke Should ta 4 y ears for full-time students NP* NP* Should ta ke 2 y ears Should tak e 1 y ear for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Full-time Part-time students take take students credits 136 credits 133 Full-time Part-time students take take students NP* Full-time NP* Part-time 120 credits e Should tak take students take students NP* NP* 60 credits Should tak e 30 credits e Should tak Data: 2007–08 More students must graduate on time. ! 5 n Complete College America sta did not pr o vide da he te = NP* ta for this metr ic. T

52 2011 A ARIZON More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 19.8% Full-Time NP* 15.4% Full-Time 7.1% 6.2% 3.4% Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 3 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 61.8% 57.7% Full-Time 38.8% 31.5% 32.9% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years bachelor's in 2002–03 in ted star t cohor ted star 2004–05; Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n Complete College America 6 not ic. this for ta vide o pr metr did te sta he T = NP* da

53 MEMBER ARKANSAS 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 54% entl y ha v e an associate degr ee or cur kansas higher adults w ho r Ar 26% Skills gap 28% bsite Data: See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. o r n e t s f O u o h w s t n e y d u p b a n i l l l t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 35 51 2 12 Return as 36 0 18 4 sophomores Graduate on time 2 9 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 3 0 0 11 150% time 200% time 2 1 0 2 Total graduates 22 0 1 7 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 22 8 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 3 years 6 years 150% time 200% time 4 years 8 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents v ersities. lic pub om fr y onl es pr t epor r colleg and uni his T Note: data

54 ARKANSAS 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 135,191 Total public college enrollment: s e e r r g e e t D g n i a c i f i t P u s C & s u e r Attending 87,582 75,622 59,569 P ar t-time Full-time ear 2-y ear 4-y 47,609 colleg es es colleg Colleg otal State P opulation, Colleg e T e Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 78% 69% 70% Hispanic Hispanic 6% 3% Hispanic 2% Afr ican Afr Afr ican ican ican Amer Amer Amer ican ican 20% 19% 15% aces Other r aces Other r r aces Other 8% 5% 4% om Census CS PUMS 06-08; A degr ees fr data population IPEDS; om fr ollment b y r ace fr om enr 2009 all F Data: 2007-10 state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 1,755 9,319 8,449 1,542 5,351 4,427 3,178 330 291 179 246 2,046 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003 2008 Associate  Bachelor’s Certificate Certificate  Bachelor’s Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

55 ARKANSAS 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African Recipients Age from HS 25 and Students (age 17–19) All Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White 20–24 NP* 15.6% 24.2% 17.6% 6.7% 21.1% 21.3% 3.6% 18.7% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 17.7% 27.4% NP* 20.1% 18.5% 6.7% 21.3% 21.1% 20.8% Within 1 / 2 years Full-Time 35.9% 44.8% 31.9% NP* 30.6% 34.7% 18.8% 31.6% 39.8% Within 2 years 4.7% 6.1% DS* 2.4% NP* 11.8% 0.0% 2.6% 8.4% Within 1 year 2005 1 6.8% 4.8% DS* 8.2% 5.3% NP* 12.9% 10.1% 1.7% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time 11.7% DS* 12.5% 14.3% 14.3% NP* 18.8% 5.2% 11.8% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 35.9% ever graduate. 12.5% Pell Grant Directly Age Associate Degree- from HS Recipients Age 25 and African Seeking Students Over (at entry) Remedial White All 20–24 (age 17–19) American Hispanic 5.8% 3.8% 2.5% 2.7% NP* 5.5% 5.0% 3.7% 1.6% On-time (2 years) 2004 13.6% 6.8% 9.4% NP* 14.8% 13.6% 15.1% 10.6% 7.5% Within 3 years Full-Time 8.9% 19.2% 19.4% 15.2% 9.9% 17.6% 18.8% NP* 13.2% Within 4 years 0.8% 0.2% NP* 0.8% 0.8% 0.6% 0.3% 0.0% 0.7% Within 2 years 2004 3.8% 1.4% 0.7% 2.8% 2.8% 3.5% 3.0% NP* 3.1% Within 3 years Part-Time 6.2% 7.1% 3.7% 2.7% NP* 4.8% 5.5% 4.9% 8.7% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 19.4% across the country — for Hispanic and African 15.2% American students, they’re tragic. 9.9% Pell Grant Directly Age Bachelor’s Degree- from HS African Recipients 25 and Age Seeking Students American 20–24 Hispanic (at entry) All Over (age 17–19) Remedial White 4.1% 5.5% NP* 13.1% 19.9% 6.1% 5.3% 17.8% 16.8% On-time (4 years) 2002 12.4% 16.1% 23.9% 32.3% 22.1% 42.9% NP* 40.3% 38.4% Within 6 years Full-Time 14.6% 22.4% 39.2% 26.9% NP* 44.4% 42.5% 46.8% 28.7% Within 8 years 1.2% 1.0% 0.4% 2.8% NP* 1.9% 2.7% DS* 0.0% Within 4 years 2002 5.9% 4.7% 4.3% NP* 11.4% 8.2% 10.2% DS* 4.7% Within 6 years Part-Time 12.7% 7.0% NP* 12.0% 14.1% DS* 14.2% 7.5% 7.1% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 16.1% 40.3% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 5.9% star 2002–03 ted in cohor t Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. metr suppr essed. NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this e ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

56 2011 ARKANSAS Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 50.0% return to campus 34.6% 27.4% 23.2% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 68.6% 55.8% 49.0% 48.7% return to campus 34.9% 25.6% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 24.7% 53.4% 18.9% 30.2% credits star Associate in t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges NP* NP* of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 22.1% 9.4% NP* NP* NP* NP* Graduate Complete Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation within remediation remediation within remediation associated 6 years associated 3 years and and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years all F Data: 2006 Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta te NP* not pr o vide da ta did Complete College America n 4

57 2011 ARKANSAS Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Part-time students take students take Part-time years 7 years 6.9 Full-time Full-time take students take students students take years 5.7 years 5.4 Full-time 5.2 years take students years 3.9 ke Should ta 4 y ears for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta Should tak e 1 y ear for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time students take students take NP* credits 130.4 Full-time Part-time Part-time students take Full-time students take students take students take credits 85.5 78 credits credits 77.3 Should tak e 120 credits 69.7 credits 60 credits Should tak e 30 credits Should tak e 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! 5 n Complete College America = he sta te did not pr o T vide da ta for this metr ic. NP*

58 ARKANSAS 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 35.9% 17.6% Full-Time 20.8% 18.7% 13.6% Full-Time 12.5% 6.2% 5.0% 6.8% 3.0% Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 42.5% 38.4% Full-Time 16.8% 12.0% 8.2% Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

59 MEMBER C ALIFORNIA 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 67% degr or nia adults higher or ee an associate e v ha y entl r cur ho w Calif 36% Skills gap 31% e section See . w our on bsite y Methodolog and ces Sour the Data: Too few students make it through college. u p a f O n i l l o r n e o e h w s t n e d u t g e o r s l l o c c i l b y t i s r e v i n u 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 5 0 0 95 Return as 3 77 NP* NP* sophomores Graduate on time NP* 0 14 NP* (100% time) Additional graduates NP* 35 1 NP* 150% time 200% time NP* 1 8 NP* Total graduates 2 57 NP* NP* Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years NP* 59 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 150% time 3 years 200% time 4 years 8 years = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this metr ic. NP* f 2002 f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all all in ted star Data: 2-y ear cohor t For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America . es and uni v ersities. Data fr om CSU System onl y pub y onl data esents pr t epor r om lic fr his T Note: colleg

60 C ALIFORNIA 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 2,172,222 Total public college enrollment: e r u D P e e s & C e r t i f i c a t i u s n s g g e r Attending 1,631,299 1,207,960 964,262 t-time ar P Full-time ear 2-y ear 4-y es colleg es colleg 540,923 opulation, Colleg e P State e T Colleg otal e Ag Graduation Enrollment 18-24 White White White 40% 32% 37% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 28% 21% 41% Afr ican Afr ican Afr ican ican ican Amer ican Amer Amer 7% 7% 5% r aces r aces Other Other aces r Other 34% 33% 15% om submissions y b ees degr 06-08; PUMS CS A Census om 2007-10 fr om data population IPEDS; state fr enr 2009 all F Data: fr ace r ollment students. Now we must have more success from all ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Awarded Credentials Awarded 9,738 83,089 8,833 73,803 73,132 61,712 NP* NP* NP* NP* 13,534 14,485 2008 2008 2003 2003 2008 2003 2003 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 Associate Certificate  Associate Bachelor’s Bachelor’s  Certificate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! vide he = NP* sta te did not pr o T ta for this ic. metr da Complete College America n 2

61 C ALIFORNIA 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Pell Grant Directly Age Certificate-Seeking African 25 and Age from HS Recipients Students Remedial (age 17–19) All Over Hispanic (at entry) American 20–24 White On-time (1 year) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 year NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 Within 1 years 2 / NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- African from HS 25 and Recipients Age Seeking Students Over American 20–24 (at entry) White Remedial Hispanic All (age 17–19) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* On-time (2 years) 2004 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 3 years Full-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 4 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country — for Hispanic and African American students, they’re tragic. Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- 25 and from HS Age African Recipients Seeking Students (age 17–19) Over All White Hispanic Remedial American 20–24 (at entry) On-time (4 years) 20.3% 14.8% 10.2% 9.7% 14.8% 10.5% 18.9% 6.7% 9.8% 2002 43.9% 59.9% 46.0% 52.3% 35.3% 52.0% 35.7% 32.4% 44.4% Within 6 years Full-Time 43.9% 54.0% 55.2% 40.9% 60.2% 53.7% 37.8% 60.6% 66.2% Within 8 years Within 4 years 4.4% 6.2% 3.7% 3.0% 5.8% 9.3% 6.1% 6.9% 4.1% 2002 30.3% 32.0% 36.4% 32.7% 22.2% 13.8% 23.6% 32.6% 35.1% Within 6 years Part-Time 40.0% 27.2% 42.6% 47.9% 42.3% 41.6% 13.8% 35.8% 42.2% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 32.4% 52.3% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 13.8% cohor icate tif Data: 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in ted star t cohor associate 2005–06, in ted star t Cer Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te ic. not pr o vide da ta for this metr did

62 ALIFORNIA 2011 C Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus NP* NP* NP* NP* Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 80.8% 71.8% 68.3% 61.7% 51.9% return to campus 49.4% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year NP* NP* NP* NP* credits in star t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, Associate ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges NP* 59.6% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 68.4% 46.0% NP* NP* NP* NP* Graduate Complete Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation within remediation remediation within remediation associated 6 years associated 3 years and and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years all F Data: 2006 Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta te NP* not pr o vide da ta did Complete College America n 4

63 C ALIFORNIA 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time students take take students years 5.7 5.2 years Full-time Part-time students take students take Part-time Full-time NP* NP* students students take take Should ta ke 4 y ears for full-time students NP* NP* 2 y ears Should ta ke Should tak e 1 y ear for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time students take students take credits 139 credits 139 Full-time Part-time take students students take NP* Full-time NP* Part-time e 120 credits Should tak take students take students NP* NP* 60 credits Should tak e Should tak 30 credits e 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! 5 n Complete College America T sta te did not pr o = he vide da ta for this metr ic. NP*

64 C ALIFORNIA 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate Full-Time NP* NP* Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 60.2% 52.0% Full-Time 41.6% 32.0% Part-Time 14.8% In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years cohor star 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05; in t associate 2005–06; in Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted ted Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! Complete College America 6 n not ic. this for ta da vide pr metr did te sta he T = NP* o

65 MEMBER COLORADO 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 70% entl y ha v e an associate degr ee or cur ado higher adults w ho r Color 41% Skills gap 29% bsite Data: See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. o r n e t s f O u o h w s t n e y d u p b a n i l l l t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 21 56 3 20 Return as 41 1 10 6 sophomores Graduate on time 2 16 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 1 1 0 13 150% time 200% time 2 1 0 1 Total graduates 30 1 1 5 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 31 6 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 3 years 6 years 150% time 200% time 4 years 8 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents v ersities. lic pub om fr y onl es pr t epor r colleg and uni his T Note: data

66 COLORADO 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 229,430 Total public college enrollment: s e e r r g e e t D g n i a c i f i t P u s C & s u e r Attending 139,201 131,275 98,155 P ar t-time Full-time ear 2-y ear 4-y 90,229 colleg es es colleg Colleg otal State P opulation, Colleg e T e Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 76% 69% 68% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 10% 12% 22% ican ican Afr Afr ican Afr ican Amer Amer Amer ican ican 4% 4% 3% aces Other r aces Other r r aces Other 14% 11% 6% om Census CS PUMS 06-08; A degr ees fr data population IPEDS; om fr ollment b y r ace fr om enr 2009 all F Data: 2007-10 state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 4,481 20,104 17,933 3,829 5,893 271 81 200 113 5,266 1,755 1,832 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003 2008 Associate  Bachelor’s Certificate Certificate  Bachelor’s Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

67 2011 COLORADO Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Pell Grant Age Certificate-Seeking 25 and Age African Recipients from HS Students (age 17–19) White 20–24 (at entry) Remedial Over American Hispanic All 39.6% 31.9% 34.2% 18.2% 31.0% 34.7% 8.2% 30.5% 33.2% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 8.2% 41.6% 31.9% 31.1% 35.4% 18.2% 32.2% 35.6% 34.1% Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time 36.5% 37.3% 43.6% 37.7% 32.3% 10.2% 18.2% 36.8% 37.0% Within 2 years 13.8% 11.1% 10.7% 8.3% 13.2% 6.9% 11.4% 3.1% 7.1% Within 1 year 2005 1 8.3% 13.8% 12.5% 13.8% 6.9% 16.3% 7.1% 12.7% 3.1% Within 1 / years 2 Part-Time 8.3% 13.8% 14.7% 17.2% 4.6% 8.6% 13.9% 17.9% 7.1% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 36.5% ever graduate. 13.8% Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- Age African from HS Recipients 25 and Seeking Students (age 17–19) (at entry) Remedial 20–24 Hispanic Over White American All 5.4% 9.9% 4.4% 9.1% 8.4% 7.4% 3.7% 5.6% 7.6% On-time (2 years) 2004 13.2% 8.5% 15.6% 13.7% 12.6% 15.0% 7.8% 9.2% 11.0% Within 3 years Full-Time 16.6% 11.4% 19.1% 17.1% 13.5% 18.4% 16.1% 12.6% 10.8% Within 4 years 1.4% 1.8% 1.4% 1.1% 0.6% 1.0% 1.6% 0.4% 1.4% Within 2 years 2004 2.4% 3.3% 1.8% 2.4% 1.7% 3.0% 2.8% 3.1% 3.4% Within 3 years Part-Time 4.7% 3.9% 6.6% 4.3% 5.4% 6.3% 4.3% 5.6% 6.1% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 19.1% across the country — for Hispanic and African 13.5% American students, they’re tragic. 10.8% Pell Grant Directly Age Bachelor’s Degree- 25 and Recipients African from HS Age Seeking Students Remedial White Hispanic American Over 20–24 (age 17–19) (at entry) All 12.7% 21.6% 28.8% 7.3% 29.4% 20.5% 20.2% 30.7% 19.8% On-time (4 years) 2002 23.9% 33.5% 41.0% 38.0% 41.6% 53.5% 51.6% 52.6% 21.7% Within 6 years Full-Time 27.2% 34.6% 44.7% 55.6% 24.7% 41.7% 54.5% 56.3% 45.5% Within 8 years 2.6% 2.5% 3.3% 3.3% 2.1% 4.1% 3.8% 1.9% 2.5% Within 4 years 2002 5.8% 8.1% 5.0% 9.3% 13.6% 11.1% 12.2% 12.3% 14.3% Within 6 years Part-Time 5.8% 8.1% 5.0% 11.1% 12.2% 13.6% 14.3% 10.2% 12.3% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 33.5% 52.6% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 5.8% 2004–05, in ted ted star t cohor bachelor's 2002–03 star in Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and Americans to compete unless many more students from all ! walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America

68 COLORADO 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus 47.7% 30.8% 24.2% 18.4% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 73.3% 62.3% 57.6% return to campus 46.0% 32.4% 24.7% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 46.3% 70.7% 26.1% 32.2% credits Data: cohor bachelor's t 2004–05, in star t cohor Associate ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned star ear 2002–03; in ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 35.3% 9.3% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 66.1% 66.9% 65.3% 22.9% 21.7% 9.2% Complete Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation remediation within remediation remediation within and associated 6 years associated and 3 years college-level (projected) college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F Data: all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

69 2011 COLORADO Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Part-time students take Part-time take students take students years 6.1 Full-time Full-time years 5.8 years 5.4 take students Full-time take students take students years 4.6 4.5 years years 3.9 ke Should ta 4 y ears for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta e Should tak 1 y ear for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time students take students take 140 credits 136 credits Full-time Part-time take students students take Full-time Part-time credits 94 92 credits take students students take credits 74 Should tak 120 credits e 69 credits 60 credits e Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

70 COLORADO 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 36.5% Full-Time 34.1% 33.2% 17.1% 13.7% Full-Time 13.8% 12.5% 8.4% Part-Time 5.6% 3.0% Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 54.5% 51.6% Full-Time 28.8% 11.1% 11.1% Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

71 MEMBER 2011 A FLORID For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 63% y ha v e w ida adults ho higher or ee degr associate an cur r entl Flor 35% Skills gap 28% Methodolog the e Data: Sour ces bsite See y section on our . w and Too few students make it through college. t n e d u s s r v e t s y i n w t i f u r O h o e o e g e l l o c c i l b u p a n i l l o r n 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Enroll 38 2 27 33 Return as 29 1 24 12 sophomores Graduate on time 2 0 12 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 5 1 1 10 150% time 200% time 3 0 1 1 Total graduates 1 23 2 10 Graduate in 8 years Graduate in 4 years 12 24 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 150% time 6 years 3 years 200% time 8 years 4 years all cohor t star ted in f all 2004; Data: ear 2-y 2002 f in ted 4-y ear cohor t star For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data and uni v ersities. om fr y onl lic esents pr t epor pub colleg es r his T Note:

72 FLORID A 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 719,084 Total public college enrollment: t g s D P u e g r e e s & C e r t i f i c a e s r u i n Attending 515,236 383,090 335,994 t-time P ar Full-time ear 2-y ear 4-y 203,848 es colleg es colleg State P e Colleg T Colleg e otal opulation, Enrollment e 18-24 Graduation Ag White White White 60% 52% 52% Hispanic Hispanic 21% 23% Hispanic 18% ican ican ican Afr Afr Afr Amer ican ican Amer Amer ican 14% 17% 20% aces r Other Other r aces Other r aces 10% 8% 4% population submissions state 2007-10 om fr ace r y b ees degr 06-08; PUMS fr CS A Census om fr data Data: IPEDS; om ollment enr 2009 all F Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Awarded Credentials Awarded 8,660 49,771 39,989 37,219 34,830 29,137 26,571 3,395 3,108 NP* NP* NP* 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003  Associate Bachelor’s Certificate  Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! da he = NP* sta te did not pr o T ta for this ic. metr vide Complete College America n 2

73 2011 FLORID A Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking 25 and Age Recipients from HS African Students (age 17–19) White 20–24 Over (at entry) Remedial American All Hispanic 3.2% 8.6% 4.3% 5.2% 14.0% 12.5% 11.5% 16.4% 12.1% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 15.9% 11.5% 21.0% 17.0% 9.0% 7.2% 12.3% 17.5% 22.0% Within 1 years / 2 Full-Time 21.0% 14.7% 20.8% 17.2% 26.1% 14.3% 16.8% 25.7% 9.8% Within 2 years 4.1% 4.9% 3.6% 3.2% 5.0% 4.4% 3.4% 0.7% 7.9% Within 1 year 2005 1 8.8% 5.6% 5.3% 7.3% 9.6% 5.8% 4.3% 13.5% 7.2% Within 1 / 2 years Part-Time 6.9% 9.4% 11.0% 7.6% 12.4% 7.4% 15.8% 7.5% 9.2% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 21.0% ever graduate. 9.4% Age Pell Grant Directly Associate Degree- 25 and Age from HS Recipients African Seeking Students Remedial (at entry) Hispanic (age 17–19) White 20–24 All Over American 1.1% 5.8% 5.2% 3.8% 6.8% 3.5% 2.1% 2.7% 3.2% On-time (2 years) 2004 9.8% 8.4% 21.6% 14.1% 17.9% 20.0% 10.0% 9.4% 13.6% Within 3 years Full-Time 15.1% 12.4% 22.4% 29.5% 25.6% 20.6% 28.4% 16.0% 16.8% Within 4 years 0.6% 0.5% 0.3% 0.5% 0.6% 0.1% 0.5% 0.5% 0.4% Within 2 years 2004 3.6% 3.1% 4.2% 4.9% 4.9% 3.8% 2.6% 3.7% 2.7% Within 3 years Part-Time 9.7% 10.3% 6.3% 8.6% 8.8% 6.9% 8.5% 6.1% 7.7% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 29.5% across the country — for Hispanic and African 22.4% American students, they’re tragic. 16.0% Age Pell Grant Directly Bachelor’s Degree- African from HS 25 and Age Recipients Seeking Students Over White Hispanic American (at entry) Remedial (age 17–19) 20–24 All 22.7% 19.4% 31.5% 39.3% 35.6% 36.2% 21.1% 1.4% 24.9% On-time (4 years) 2002 34.1% 35.8% 50.1% 61.6% 53.5% 65.3% 68.0% 45.2% 64.7% Within 6 years Full-Time 40.8% 38.6% 71.8% 69.3% 47.9% 57.0% 69.9% 59.5% 67.6% Within 8 years 12.0% 17.9% 11.7% 11.9% NP* 10.5% 12.2% 8.1% 12.3% Within 4 years 2002 28.2% 29.3% 43.4% 38.7% 32.0% 37.1% 36.9% 38.5% NP* Within 6 years Part-Time 32.0% 30.8% 43.0% 42.2% 43.4% 45.4% NP* 43.3% 52.6% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 34.1% 65.3% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 28.2% in cohor 2002–03 star bachelor's ted Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. did metr ic. NP* = T he sta te this not pr o vide da ta for n 3 Complete College America

74 A 2011 FLORID Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 63.0% return to campus 45.2% 39.9% 30.8% Students in 4-year 100% 100% 86.2% colleges who 77.4% 68.7% 68.4% 57.6% 50.2% return to campus ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 75.3% 42.1% 70.2% 36.4% credits in star t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, Associate ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 54.3% NP* of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 59.8% 22.3% 9.4% NP* NP* NP* Graduate Complete Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation within remediation remediation within remediation associated 6 years associated 3 years and and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years all F Data: 2006 Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta te NP* not pr o vide da ta did Complete College America n 4

75 A 2011 FLORID Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Part-time take students Full-time take students 5.2 years take students Full-time 4.6 years years 4.3 take students Part-time Full-time years 3.3 students take students take Should ta ke 4 y ears for full-time students NP* NP* Should ta ke 2 y ears 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time take students take students credits 140 credits 140 Full-time Part-time students take students take Full-time credits 75 75 credits Part-time 120 credits e Should tak students take take students NP* NP* Should tak e 60 credits 30 credits Should tak e 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! 5 n Complete College America T sta te did not pr o = he vide da ta for this metr ic. NP*

76 FLORID A 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 25.6% 17.9% 21.0% Full-Time Full-Time 17.5% 12.1% 8.8% 9.4% 5.2% 7.3% 4.2% Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 69.3% 64.7% Full-Time 43.4% 35.6% 36.9% Part-Time In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

77 MEMBER 2011 GEORGIA For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 61% entl y ha v e an ho gia adults higher or ee degr associate w cur r Geor 34% Skills gap 27% Methodolog e Data: the Sour ces bsite See y section on our w . and Too few students make it through college. s f O s t n e d s r e w v i h u t y n u t i o e r o e g e l l o c c i l b u p a n i l l o r n 100 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 37 17 2 44 Return as 1 36 20 6 sophomores Graduate on time 4 11 1 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 3 0 1 14 150% time 200% time 2 0 3 0 Total graduates 0 28 2 9 Graduate in 8 years Graduate in 4 years 11 28 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 150% time 6 years 3 years 8 years 4 years 200% time 2004; cohor t star ted in f all Data: ear all 2-y 2002 f in ted 4-y ear cohor t star For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data uni v ersities. pub om fr y onl colleg esents pr t lic es and epor r his Note: T

78 GEORGIA 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 377,137 Total public college enrollment: s e e r r g e e t D g n i a c i f i t P u s C & s u e r Attending 251,296 212,732 Full-time P ar t-time ear 4-y ear 2-y 164,405 125,841 es colleg es colleg e Colleg State P opulation, Colleg e T otal Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White Hispanic Hispanic 65% 54% 53% 4% 8% Hispanic 3% ican Afr Afr ican Afr ican ican Amer Amer Amer ican ican 34% 32% 24% aces Other r aces Other r r aces Other 11% 8% 5% om Census CS PUMS 06-08; A degr ees fr data population IPEDS; om fr ollment b y r ace fr om enr 2009 all F Data: 2007-10 state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 5,064 27,577 4,464 21,945 10,218 10,121 9,055 1,456 7,665 1,269 811 419 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003 2008 Associate  Bachelor’s Certificate Certificate  Bachelor’s Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

79 GEORGIA 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African Recipients Age from HS 25 and Students (age 17–19) All Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White 20–24 38.9% 16.8% 24.8% 16.5% 15.6% 19.6% 22.4% 9.2% 19.4% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 22.8% 30.2% 46.6% 16.0% 21.5% 20.4% 28.3% 27.3% 25.0% Within 1 / 2 years Full-Time 27.3% 32.1% 18.5% 49.9% 25.6% 23.3% 22.6% 32.9% 30.6% Within 2 years 8.1% 8.9% DS* 7.4% 19.9% 7.5% 7.6% 8.6% 3.5% Within 1 year 2005 1 13.1% 11.5% 9.3% 14.7% 15.0% 29.6% 11.2% 7.6% 11.4% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time 18.2% 13.1% 16.9% 15.5% 12.8% 34.7% 14.3% 13.0% 20.1% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 27.3% ever graduate. 16.9% Pell Grant Directly Age Associate Degree- from HS Recipients Age 25 and African Seeking Students Over (at entry) Remedial White All 20–24 (age 17–19) American Hispanic 4.8% 5.0% 1.5% 2.2% 3.8% 5.9% 4.9% 6.4% 4.1% On-time (2 years) 2004 15.0% 9.8% 7.2% 11.2% 13.9% 13.5% 16.0% 14.8% 7.5% Within 3 years Full-Time 12.7% 18.9% 21.4% 20.1% 9.9% 18.1% 18.8% 15.6% 11.4% Within 4 years 3.3% 1.6% 1.6% 1.1% 2.4% DS* 1.3% DS* 1.9% Within 2 years 2004 7.6% 5.1% 4.0% 3.5% 8.8% 7.3% 6.0% 5.9% 5.4% Within 3 years Part-Time 9.7% 11.8% 13.8% 6.4% 10.0% 7.8% 6.6% 8.8% 12.4% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 21.4% across the country — for Hispanic and African 20.1% American students, they’re tragic. 9.9% Pell Grant Directly Age Bachelor’s Degree- from HS African Recipients 25 and Age Seeking Students American 20–24 Hispanic (at entry) All Over (age 17–19) Remedial White 13.3% 6.1% 16.4% 25.8% 26.3% 16.2% 6.1% 24.9% 24.3% On-time (4 years) 2002 28.5% 17.6% 44.7% 56.5% 24.7% 59.8% 44.6% 58.1% 56.7% Within 6 years Full-Time 33.2% 20.7% 61.8% 29.1% 50.9% 63.7% 62.3% 65.2% 50.8% Within 8 years DS* DS* DS* 5.6% 2.9% 3.5% 3.6% DS* DS* Within 4 years 2002 9.1% 10.4% 7.1% 10.7% 23.0% 15.4% 17.1% DS* 11.0% Within 6 years Part-Time 14.3% 17.0% 15.0% 21.8% 23.4% DS* NP* NP* 16.4% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 17.6% 58.1% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 9.1% star 2002–03 ted in cohor t Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. metr suppr essed. NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this e ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

80 GEORGIA 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 54.5% return to campus 38.5% 38.3% 26.3% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 82.2% 71.4% 65.4% 52.4% return to campus 37.0% 28.7% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 31.6% 43.0% 60.8% 40.1% credits Data: 2004–05, cohor in ted star t cohor Associate bachelor's 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear t 2002–03; in ted star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation . 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 37.1% 18.1% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 57.1% 51.8% 35.4% 24.7% 17.2% 7.2% Complete Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation within remediation within remediation remediation and associated 6 years associated and 3 years college-level (projected) (projected) college-level courses in courses in two years two years F Data: 2006 all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

81 GEORGIA 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time take students Full-time Part-time 6.2 years take students take students Full-time 4.9 years 4.9 years Part-time students take students take Full-time 3.9 years years 3.5 students take 2.7 years ke 4 y ears Should ta for full-time students 2 y ears Should ta ke Should tak 1 y ear e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time take students take students 134 credits 133 credits Full-time Part-time Part-time Full-time take students students take students take take students 99 credits 97 credits credits 96 92 credits 120 credits e Should tak e 60 credits Should tak e 30 credits Should tak Data: 2007–08 More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

82 GEORGIA 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 27.3% 25.0% 18.1% Full-Time 19.4% 13.5% 16.9% Full-Time 13.1% 9.7% Part-Time 6.0% 4.9% Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 62.3% 56.7% Full-Time 24.3% 21.8% 15.4% Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

83 MEMBER W HA AII 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 68% y ha v e an associate degr ee ho w or aii adults w higher cur r entl Ha 41% Skills gap 27% Methodolog Data: See the Sour ces . bsite y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. e u o t s f O h w s t n e y d u p a n i b l l o r n t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i l 100 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 40 27 32 0 Return as 26 0 27 13 sophomores Graduate on time 1 5 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 4 1 0 11 150% time 200% time 2 2 1 0 Total graduates 0 2 18 7 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 18 9 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 3 years 6 years 150% time 200% time 4 years 8 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents v ersities. lic pub om fr y onl es pr t epor r colleg and uni his T Note: data

84 HA W AII 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 50,932 Total public college enrollment: u g P s n & C e r t i f i c a t e r g e i u s r D s e e Attending 28,089 27,347 23,585 22,843 ar P t-time Full-time 2-y ear ear 4-y colleg es es colleg e T e State P opulation, Colleg Colleg otal 18-24 e Ag Graduation Enrollment White 26% White White 21% 22% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 3% 3% 11% Afr Afr Afr ican ican ican ican Amer Amer Amer ican ican 1% 1% 4% Other r aces r aces Other Other r aces 76% 74% 59% all 2009 enr ollment fr om IPEDS; population data fr om Census A CS PUMS 06-08 Data: F Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded Awarded 494 3,323 457 2,846 389 2,499 2,242 261 12 NP* 234 219 2003 2003 2008 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 Bachelor’s Certificate  Associate Bachelor’s  Certificate Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! vide he = ic. sta te did not pr o T da ta for metr this NP* Complete College America n 2

85 Hawaii 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, Native Hawaiian, Hispanic, or older. Pell Grant Directly Age Certificate-Seeking 25 and Native Recipients from HS Age Students White Hawaiian Hispanic (age 17–19) 20–24 All Over (at entry) Remedial On-time (1 year) DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 19.4% 2005 1 25.0% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time Within 2 years 27.8% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 1 year DS* 2.9% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 2005 1 Within 1 / years 2 DS* DS* 5.9% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Part-Time Within 2 years DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 11.8% DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates 27.8% ever graduate. 11.8% Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- Native Age 25 and from HS Recipients Seeking Students Hawaiian Hispanic White All 20–24 Over (age 17–19) (at entry) Remedial 3.1% 2.5% 4.3% 9.2% 3.0% DS* 1.7% 5.7% 3.2% On-time (2 years) 2004 10.9% 11.8% 12.1% 16.5% 10.3% DS* 11.7% 12.2% 8.8% Within 3 years Full-Time 16.7% 15.0% DS* 15.7% 18.6% 12.3% 18.7% 21.4% 15.4% Within 4 years DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 0.8% DS* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years 4.3% 2.4% DS* 5.5% DS* DS* 5.3% 2.1% 3.2% Part-Time 8.5% 5.1% 5.3% 7.5% 4.1% DS* 7.6% 6.1% 5.5% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 15.7% across the country — for Native Hawaiian students, they’re worse. 12.3% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- Native Age 25 and from HS Recipients Seeking Students All Hawaiian Hispanic White Over 20–24 (age 17–19) Remedial (at entry) On-time (4 years) 14.6% DS* 14.9% 16.5% 7.3% DS* DS* DS* DS* 2002 44.4% 36.8% 29.3% 43.2% DS* 50.3% 50.4% DS* DS* Within 6 years Full-Time 34.1% 40.4% 57.1% DS* DS* 57.2% 51.9% DS* 53.0% Within 8 years Within 4 years DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 2002 DS* DS* 20.0% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 6 years Part-Time DS* DS* 30.0% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America DS* = F e w er essed. 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr than

86 HA W AII 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 67.4% return to campus 47.9% 45.0% 29.5% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 80.4% 67.7% 60.4% 56.7% return to campus 46.7% 30.0% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Students who earn expected first-year 18.4% 74.6% 18.8% 61.4% credits t cohor Associate Data: in ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges DS* 66.0% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 41.6% 19.4% DS* DS* DS* 10.3% Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete Complete within within remediation remediation remediation remediation 3 years and associated associated 6 years and college-level college-level (projected) (projected) courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F all Data: Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! er e suppr essed. F = DS* w er than 10 students, so da ta w e Complete College America n 4

87 2011 HA W AII Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time students take Part-time years 8.7 Part-time students take take students years 7.8 7.2 years Full-time Full-time students take Full-time students take years 5.8 take students 5.6 years years 5 ke 4 y ears Should ta for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Full-time Part-time take students take students 139 credits 136 credits Full-time Part-time Part-time Full-time students take take students take students take students credits 76 credits 75 e 120 credits Should tak credits 69 credits 66 60 credits e Should tak e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

88 HA 2011 AII W More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Certificate Associate 27.8% 18.6% 25.0% Full-Time 19.4% 12.2% Full-Time 11.8% 6.1% 5.9% 3.2% 3.2% Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1.5 years In 1 year In 3 years In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 57.1% 50.3% Full-Time 30.0% 20.0% 14.9% Part-Time In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

89 MEMBER ID 2011 AHO For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 63% ha v e an associate degr ee or higher ho adults w cur r entl y Idaho 34% Skills gap 29% bsite Data: See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. h w s y l f O t n e d u t s t i s l o r i n e o n a p r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i l b u 100 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 32 46 9 13 Return as 5 30 15 3 sophomores Graduate on time 4 8 0 1 (100% time) Additional graduates 3 1 1 11 150% time 200% time 2 0 1 4 Total graduates 23 1 3 9 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 10 26 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years t cohor ear 2-y all Data: f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all 2002 f in ted star For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data uni v ersities. pub om fr y onl colleg esents pr epor r lic es and his T Note: t

90 ID AHO 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 56,172 Total public college enrollment: t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g s e D Attending 41,494 37,173 ar P t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 18,999 colleg es es colleg 14,678 State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Enrollment 18-24 e Ag Graduation White White White 84% 80% 83% Hispanic Hispanic 6% 12% Hispanic ican ican Afr Afr 5% Amer ican ican Amer 1% 1% Other r aces r aces Other r aces Other 12% 10% 5% all om 2007-10 state submissions Census CS PUMS A 06-08; degr ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 F om Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 1,034 4,941 990 4,574 1,891 1,774 318 226 67 33 694 955 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

91 ID 2011 AHO Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking Age 25 and Recipients African from HS Students White (age 17–19) 20–24 Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic All On-time (1 year) DS* 26.0% 25.1% 26.0% DS* 26.3% 14.0% 17.5% 24.1% 2005 1 DS* DS* 31.4% 30.0% 18.0% 21.5% 29.5% 30.1% 31.5% Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time Within 2 years 21.0% 33.9% 30.8% 34.6% 25.5% 34.7% 33.4% 27.8% DS* Within 1 year DS* DS* 6.2% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 2005 1 Within 1 years 2 / DS* 10.9% 12.3% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Part-Time Within 2 years 17.4% DS* DS* DS* 13.3% DS* 15.4% 16.9% 20.5% In most states, very few students seeking certificates 33.4% ever graduate. 17.4% Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- 25 and Age Recipients African from HS Seeking Students White Hispanic (age 17–19) All American (at entry) Over 20–24 Remedial 9.6% 8.7% 9.4% DS* DS* 7.7% 5.9% 3.5% 2.9% On-time (2 years) 2004 9.9% 18.8% 15.4% 13.6% 18.8% 8.6% 6.9% DS* 17.5% Within 3 years Full-Time 9.5% 23.0% 16.4% 21.4% 18.9% 18.2% 22.6% 11.8% DS* Within 4 years DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* NP* DS* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years DS* 4.7% DS* DS* 6.1% 5.5% DS* 6.3% 5.9% Part-Time DS* 9.8% DS* 9.2% 5.2% 8.4% 9.0% 10.0% DS* Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 23.0% across the country — for Hispanic and African 16.4% American students, they’re tragic. Pell Grant Directly Age Bachelor’s Degree- Recipients Age 25 and African from HS Seeking Students (age 17–19) Over 20–24 American All Hispanic White (at entry) Remedial On-time (4 years) 19.4% 27.7% DS* 18.5% 14.0% 4.7% 16.1% 6.3% 20.8% 2002 40.1% 34.1% 45.3% 33.1% 33.3% 34.6% 44.1% 44.3% 18.7% Within 6 years Full-Time 48.5% 52.0% 39.6% 36.1% 28.5% 52.1% 40.9% 51.0% 43.4% Within 8 years Within 4 years 4.7% DS* 4.5% 4.7% DS* DS* 4.8% 6.7% DS* 2002 6.8% 10.5% 12.9% 12.0% DS* 14.0% 12.4% 11.9% DS* Within 6 years Part-Time 19.8% 16.8% 16.8% DS* DS* 17.4% 16.7% 16.4% 11.9% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 33.1% 40.1% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 12.0% ted in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in Data: star t 2002–03 associate 2005–06, in ted star t cohor icate tif Cer cohor Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and ! walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this essed. ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr metr

92 ID AHO 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus 48.4% 31.0% 25.4% 20.6% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 64.8% 51.4% return to campus 44.2% 38.9% 28.5% 22.8% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Associate Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 31.0% 53.5% 41.9% 46.3% credits 2004–05, cohor in ted star t cohor Associate bachelor's 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; Data: in ted star t Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 19.9% 57.4% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 65.2% 62.0% 42.2% 23.5% 18.7% 6.9% Complete Graduate Complete Graduate Complete Complete within remediation within remediation remediation remediation and associated 3 years 6 years associated and college-level (projected) college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years F Data: 2006 all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

93 ID AHO 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time take students Part-time Full-time 6.6 years take students Full-time Part-time take students 5.8 years students take take students 5.4 years 5 years years 4.9 Full-time take students 3.3 years ke Should ta 4 y ears for full-time students 2 y ears Should ta ke 1 y ear e Should tak for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time students take take students credits 147 144 credits Full-time Part-time take students students take 102 credits credits 93 Part-time Full-time take students students take Should tak e 120 credits 62 credits credits 58 60 credits e Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

94 ID AHO 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 33.4% 30.0% 21.4% Full-Time 25.1% 17.5% Full-Time 17.4% 8.7% 12.3% 9.0% Part-Time 5.5% Part-Time In 4 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 51.0% 44.3% Full-Time 18.5% 16.7% 11.9% Part-Time In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

95 MEMBER 2011 ILLINOIS For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 67% y ha v e an associate degr ee or higher cur adults w ho r entl Illinois 43% Skills gap 24% bsite Data: See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. o h w s y f O l t n e d u t s t i s l i o r n e n a p r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i l b u 100 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 39 37 24 0 Return as 0 28 25 11 sophomores Graduate on time 4 15 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 4 1 0 9 150% time 200% time 2 1 0 1 Total graduates 25 2 0 10 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 12 25 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years t cohor ear 2-y all Data: f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all 2002 f in ted star For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data uni v ersities. pub om fr y onl colleg esents pr epor r lic es and his T Note: t

96 ILLINOIS 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 536,027 Total public college enrollment: s t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g e D Attending 383,960 283,311 252,716 t-time P ar Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear colleg es es colleg 152,067 State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 74% 60% 61% Hispanic 14% Hispanic Hispanic 7% 17% ican ican Afr Afr ican Afr ican Amer ican Amer Amer ican 15% 16% 10% Other aces aces r r Other aces r Other 11% 8% 6% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 state om F submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 6,776 33,125 6,713 31,612 25,188 23,039 1,352 986 451 335 5,469 4,843 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

97 ILLINOIS 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Pell Grant Directly Age Certificate-Seeking 25 and Age from HS Recipients African Students (at entry) White (age 17–19) Hispanic Over American 20–24 Remedial All On-time (1 year) 27.5% 4.7% 13.4% 7.7% 17.4% 14.6% 9.0% 15.3% 15.8% 2005 1 12.5% 17.4% 20.3% 31.6% 17.5% 16.0% 19.6% 18.8% 9.1% Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time Within 2 years 22.4% 13.3% 23.3% 23.2% 21.0% 19.8% 36.6% 22.7% 15.9% Within 1 year 7.8% 5.5% 6.2% 5.4% 9.6% 5.1% 1.7% 4.1% 5.2% 2005 1 Within 1 years / 2 7.3% 9.1% 9.4% 13.4% 8.4% 11.2% 9.9% 9.2% 4.5% Part-Time Within 2 years 9.1% 12.8% 10.0% 15.1% 10.8% 10.7% 6.4% 10.8% 12.2% In most states, very few students seeking certificates 22.4% ever graduate. 10.8% Directly Pell Grant Age Associate Degree- Recipients 25 and African from HS Age Seeking Students 20–24 White Hispanic American Over (age 17–19) (at entry) Remedial All 9.5% 7.2% 3.7% 9.3% 10.3% 8.8% 2.8% 3.8% 11.9% On-time (2 years) 2004 6.8% 21.0% 25.6% 12.9% 14.0% 16.3% 17.2% 23.1% 16.3% Within 3 years Full-Time 20.9% 31.0% 9.4% 18.3% 19.6% 26.0% 28.8% 20.6% 19.3% Within 4 years 2.3% 0.5% 0.9% 2.5% 3.5% 3.2% 1.3% 1.1% 0.4% Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years 6.6% 6.4% 4.0% 4.2% 8.3% 3.1% 2.2% 5.9% 6.6% Part-Time 11.7% 12.4% 5.9% 3.8% 8.5% 7.7% 9.3% 7.2% 10.0% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 31.0% across the country — for Hispanic and African 18.3% American students, they’re tragic. 9.4% Directly Age Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- African Recipients 25 and from HS Age Seeking Students American (at entry) (age 17–19) 20–24 Over Remedial Hispanic White All On-time (4 years) 9.0% 37.9% 25.2% 10.5% 17.4% 23.4% 41.1% 37.4% 25.8% 2002 43.8% 65.0% 50.7% 41.9% 17.9% 61.3% 62.1% 34.0% 45.8% Within 6 years Full-Time 66.3% 63.0% 53.8% 47.9% 46.9% 44.2% 18.7% 42.1% 63.9% Within 8 years Within 4 years 10.5% DS* DS* DS* 13.0% 8.1% 9.3% 6.7% 4.0% 2002 23.7% DS* DS* DS* 20.0% 28.1% 23.2% 40.0% 14.8% Within 6 years Part-Time 14.8% DS* 28.8% DS* 20.0% 25.8% 24.3% 40.0% DS* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 17.9% 62.1% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. associate 2002–03 ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in ted Data: t cohor in 2005–06, in ted star t cohor icate tif Cer star Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled all backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America DS* = F e w er essed. 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr than

98 ILLINOIS 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 65.7% return to campus 46.2% 41.8% 30.4% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 74.9% 64.4% 59.4% 51.2% return to campus 37.8% 32.3% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 49.4% 27.9% 80.6% 41.3% credits Data: cohor bachelor's t 2004–05, in star t cohor Associate ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned star ear 2002–03; in ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 48.7% 15.8% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 66.2% 59.6% 44.2% 40.7% 31.9% 14.0% Complete Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation remediation within remediation remediation within and associated 6 years associated and 3 years college-level (projected) college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F Data: all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

99 2011 ILLINOIS Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Part-time take students Full-time students take 5.5 years Part-time take students 5 years students take years 4.5 Full-time Full-time 4 years students take students take years 3 years 3 ke 4 y ears Should ta for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Full-time Part-time students take take students 126 credits 119 credits Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time students take take students students take take students Should tak 120 credits e 70 credits credits 68 60 credits credits 58 Should tak 60 credits e e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

100 ILLINOIS 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 26.0% 21.0% Full-Time 22.4% 18.8% Full-Time 14.6% 9.5% 10.0% 10.8% 6.4% 9.2% Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 63.0% 61.3% Full-Time 37.4% 24.3% 23.2% Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

101 MEMBER INDIAN 2011 A For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 58% ha v e an associate degr ee or higher cur adults w ho r entl y Indiana 36% Skills gap 22% bsite Data: See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. o r n e u t s f O o h w s t n e y d u p a b n i l l l i t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c 100 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 18 26 52 4 Return as 43 2 10 11 sophomores Graduate on time 1 14 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 1 1 1 16 150% time 200% time 1 2 1 0 Total graduates 1 2 32 3 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 33 5 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 3 years 6 years 150% time 200% time 4 years 8 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents v ersities. lic pub om fr y onl es pr t epor r colleg and uni his T Note: data

102 INDIAN A 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 287,065 Total public college enrollment: t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g s e D Attending 191,571 187,154 ar P t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 99,911 95,494 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Enrollment 18-24 e Ag Graduation White White White 85% 78% 81% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 3% 2% 6% Afr ican Afr Afr ican ican Amer Amer ican ican ican Amer 10% 9% 6% Other r aces Other r aces aces r Other 10% 6% 4% 2009 all Census om CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees b y r ace fr fr Data: F om 2007-10 state submissions data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 4,747 24,716 4,724 23,303 2,063 9,770 1,682 8,665 308 112 2,929 2,721 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

103 A INDIAN 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Pell Grant Directly Age Certificate-Seeking from HS Recipients Age 25 and African Students (age 17–19) American (at entry) Remedial Over Hispanic All 20–24 White 9.7% 3.0% 11.4% 10.5% 17.1% 13.6% 15.6% 22.4% 15.2% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 18.1% 18.2% 21.4% 12.5% 25.2% 21.1% 3.0% 19.7% 22.0% Within 1 2 years / Full-Time 21.5% 27.2% 12.5% 20.5% 19.8% 22.6% 23.8% 26.3% 3.0% Within 2 years 4.9% 4.2% 1.2% 4.5% 4.8% 5.5% 4.2% 3.1% 1.3% Within 1 year 2005 1 10.2% 9.0% 9.1% 3.7% 9.8% 11.3% 2.5% 10.2% 9.2% Within 1 2 / years Part-Time 11.8% 13.0% 9.1% 8.5% 13.1% 14.7% 5.0% 11.0% 14.8% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 21.5% ever graduate. 11.8% Pell Grant Age Directly Associate Degree- African Recipients from HS Age 25 and Seeking Students (age 17–19) All (at entry) 20–24 Remedial Over White Hispanic American 5.4% 2.3% 2.7% 2.3% 3.4% 5.8% 5.9% 6.3% 3.0% On-time (2 years) 2004 14.8% 8.8% 15.1% 13.8% 9.2% 14.8% 5.7% 9.2% 12.4% Within 3 years Full-Time 19.1% 13.2% 14.0% 7.8% 19.3% 14.0% 21.2% 21.2% 14.7% Within 4 years 0.7% 2.7% 0.5% 0.1% 80.0% 0.4% 0.1% 0.6% 0.1% Within 2 years 2004 2.7% 8.0% 2.3% 1.1% 2.4% 1.9% 3.1% 2.8% 1.7% Within 3 years Part-Time 11.3% 3.1% 4.6% 4.7% 5.7% 5.1% 6.6% 6.1% 5.5% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 21.2% across the country — for Hispanic and African 14.7% American students, they’re tragic. 7.8% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- Age African from HS 25 and Recipients Seeking Students All 20–24 Over American (at entry) Remedial (age 17–19) Hispanic White 6.9% 7.5% 9.3% 26.2% 27.3% 16.9% 14.6% 27.1% 6.9% On-time (4 years) 2002 19.9% 19.4% 52.7% 41.2% 56.0% 57.6% 46.5% 35.2% 27.3% Within 6 years Full-Time 26.1% 24.8% 52.4% 62.0% 32.8% 46.7% 62.3% 42.0% 60.6% Within 8 years 1.0% 0.8% 0.2% 1.7% 1.1% 1.4% 2.6% 0.6% 0.3% Within 4 years 2002 6.7% 4.9% 5.3% 5.9% 13.2% 9.3% 8.9% 4.2% 3.7% Within 6 years Part-Time 11.2% 11.2% 14.1% 15.1% 14.5% 10.8% 9.9% 12.8% 19.4% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 19.4% 52.7% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 6.7% in ted ted star t cohor bachelor's 2002–03 in star 2004–05, Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and Americans to compete unless many more students from all ! walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America

104 A 2011 INDIAN Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 55.7% return to campus 40.8% 33.0% 24.5% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 82.4% 70.3% 60.9% 60.6% return to campus 42.2% 32.0% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 4.3% 46.9% 10.8% 36.7% credits in star t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, Associate ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 46.4% 12.4% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 63.7% 57.8% 27.3% NP* 9.2% NP* Graduate Complete Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation within remediation remediation within remediation associated 6 years associated 3 years and and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years all F Data: 2008 Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta te NP* not pr o vide da ta did Complete College America n 4

105 2011 INDIAN A Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Part-time Part-time students take students take students take Full-time years 5.3 Full-time 5 years Full-time students take years 4.7 take students take students years 4 3.8 years years 3.4 4 y ears k e Should ta or full-time students f 2 y ears ke Should ta Should tak 1 y ear e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time students take students take 139 credits 138 credits Full-time Full-time take students Part-time Part-time students take take students credits 90 take students credits 79 76 credits e Should tak 120 credits 68 credits 60 credits e Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

106 INDIAN A 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 19.3% 21.5% 19.7% Full-Time 13.8% 15.2% Full-Time 11.8% 9.0% 5.4% 6.1% Part-Time 2.8% Part-Time In 4 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 60.6% 56.0% Full-Time 26.2% 15.1% 9.3% Part-Time In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

107 MEMBER KENTUCKY 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 57% r entl y ha v e an associate degr ee cur entuck or y adults higher w ho K 32% Skills gap 25% Methodolog Data: See the Sour ces . bsite y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. r n e t s f O u o h w s t n e y d u p b a n i l l o t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i l 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 27 61 3 9 Return as 63 1 5 1 sophomores Graduate on time 1 10 0 1 (100% time) Additional graduates 2 0 0 13 150% time 200% time 1 1 0 2 Total graduates 25 0 2 4 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 25 6 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 3 years 6 years 150% time 200% time 4 years 8 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents v ersities. lic pub om fr y onl es pr t epor r colleg and uni his T Note: data

108 KENTUCKY 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 197,793 Total public college enrollment: s t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g e D Attending 121,182 100,112 97,681 t-time ar P Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 76,611 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 86% 80% 85% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 3% 1% 3% Afr Afr ican ican ican Afr Amer ican Amer ican ican Amer 9% 10% 7% r Other aces aces Other r r aces Other 8% 6% 3% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 state om F submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 3,700 14,829 12,312 3,044 2,968 2,328 1,730 6,749 5,876 5,454 952 2,039 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

109 KENTUCKY 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African Recipients Age from HS 25 and Students (age 17–19) All Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White 20–24 30.2% 47.1% 46.2% 0.0% DS* 28.6% 29.8% 41.5% 38.0% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 46.2% 33.9% 33.3% 32.1% 55.9% 45.1% DS* 25.0% 42.0% Within 1 2 / years Full-Time 42.0% 32.1% 46.2% 33.3% 33.9% 55.9% DS* 45.1% 25.0% Within 2 years 49.6% 44.7% 33.3% 51.8% 54.6% 38.2% 39.7% 43.1% 43.8% Within 1 year 2005 1 51.5% 46.8% 33.3% 53.6% 55.8% 42.9% 44.8% 46.3% 41.8% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time 33.3% 54.3% 52.0% 46.8% 41.8% 44.4% 48.8% 44.8% 56.2% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 42.0% ever graduate. 52.0% Age Pell Grant Directly Associate Degree- Recipients 25 and Age from HS African Seeking Students American Over 20–24 Hispanic (age 17–19) (at entry) All White Remedial 2.7% 1.8% 1.8% 0.0% 1.9% 0.6% 2.2% 2.8% 1.1% On-time (2 years) 2004 11.7% 5.3% 0.5% 8.5% 8.1% 8.3% 9.8% 9.1% 5.5% Within 3 years Full-Time 17.8% 9.4% 14.7% 2.3% 12.2% 15.4% 13.5% 13.3% 10.0% Within 4 years 0.2% 0.6% 0.4% 0.4% 0.5% 0.5% DS* 0.6% 0.1% Within 2 years 2004 2.1% 2.6% 1.8% 2.0% 2.6% 2.2% 2.0% 2.3% 2.3% Within 3 years Part-Time 5.8% 4.3% 5.4% 5.5% 6.5% 5.4% 4.0% 7.3% 4.4% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 15.4% across the country — for Hispanic and African 12.2% American students, they’re tragic. 2.3% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- Age African Recipients 25 and from HS Seeking Students All Hispanic American Over 20–24 White (at entry) Remedial (age 17–19) 25.4% 7.1% 7.7% 12.8% 15.1% 21.2% 20.4% 20.0% 21.0% On-time (4 years) 2002 20.1% 52.0% 32.1% 50.7% 49.4% 33.7% 50.1% 37.8% 48.3% Within 6 years Full-Time 24.0% 54.4% 38.3% 42.0% 54.6% 52.9% 55.3% 54.0% 37.3% Within 8 years 3.9% 2.3% 4.3% 7.7% 7.4% DS* 10.4% 11.9% 2.5% Within 4 years 2002 8.6% 8.5% 17.3% 29.6% 13.9% 21.4% 21.7% 21.4% 12.5% Within 6 years Part-Time 12.4% 11.7% 25.0% 25.6% 25.4% 33.9% 23.8% 21.4% 18.7% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 52.0% 49.4% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 8.6% ted in cohor 2002–03 t star Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. than suppr essed. DS* = F e w er e 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

110 KENTUCKY 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 55.0% return to campus 35.2% 20.2% 13.5% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 72.0% 60.7% 55.4% return to campus 42.9% 33.7% 26.9% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 35.2% 63.3% 12.0% 27.2% credits bachelor's Data: 2004–05, star in ted t ted star t cohor Associate cohor 2006 all f om fr edits in cr ned ear 2002–03; Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 32.1% 34.0% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 80.0% 73.9% 62.2% 32.1% 5.5% 14.0% Complete Graduate Complete Graduate Complete Complete remediation within remediation remediation remediation within 3 years associated and 6 years and associated college-level (projected) college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years Data: all 2006 F Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

111 KENTUCKY 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time take students Part-time Full-time 6.6 years take students Full-time take students 5.8 years Part-time take students 5.5 years Full-time take students 4.9 years students take 4.4 years 3.8 years ke 4 y ears Should ta for full-time students 2 y ears Should ta ke Should tak 1 y ear e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time take students take students 143 credits 142 credits Part-time Full-time students take take students Full-time 99 credits Part-time 92 credits students take students take Should tak 120 credits e credits 69 64 credits 60 credits e Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

112 KENTUCKY 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 52.0% 51.5% Part-Time 42.0% 42.0% 38.0% Full-Time 13.5% 8.5% Full-Time 5.5% 2.2% 1.8% Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 52.9% 48.3% Full-Time 25.6% 20.0% 21.7% Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

113 MEMBER LOUISIAN A 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 53% ee adults w ho higher or an degr associate e v ha y entl r cur Louisiana 28% Skills gap 25% . bsite e w See on our section y Methodolog and ces Sour the Data: Too few students make it through college. c c i l b t s f O u p a n i l l o r n o e o h w s t r u n n e d u e g e l l o y t i s r e v i 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Enroll 22 67 3 8 Return as 53 2 8 2 sophomores Graduate on time 0 0 0 11 (100% time) Additional graduates 1 1 0 19 150% time 200% time 1 NP* 0 NP* Total graduates NP* NP* 1 2 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years NP* 3 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 4 years 8 years 200% time T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this metr ic. NP* = all 2002 in ted star t cohor ear 4-y all f f Data: 2-y ear cohor t star ted in 2004; For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents v ersities. pub om fr y onl data es pr t epor r colleg and uni his T Note: lic

114 LOUISIAN A 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 191,751 Total public college enrollment: e e r r g e e t D g n i a c i f i t P u s C & s u s e r Attending 130,826 120,601 P ar t-time Full-time 2-y ear ear 4-y 71,150 60,925 es colleg es colleg Colleg otal State P opulation, Colleg e T e Enrollment 18-24 e Ag Graduation White White White Hispanic 67% 58% 56% Hispanic 4% 3% Hispanic 2% Afr ican Afr Afr ican ican ican Amer Amer Amer ican ican 36% 31% 25% aces Other r aces Other r r aces Other 9% 6% 3% submissions Census CS PUMS 06-08; A degr ees fr data population IPEDS; om fr ollment b y r ace fr om enr 2009 all F Data: 2007-10 om state Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 3,165 17,515 3,161 17,295 522 281 752 250 3,596 4,637 3,168 2,890 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003 2008 Associate  Bachelor’s Certificate Certificate  Bachelor’s Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

115 2011 LOUISIAN A Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking 25 and Age Recipients from HS African Students (age 17–19) White 20–24 Over (at entry) Remedial American All Hispanic 1.6% 4.3% 3.2% 2.2% DS* 3.9% 1.5% NP* 3.1% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 17.9% 16.1% 28.3% 11.8% NP* 21.0% 29.4% 15.9% 24.9% Within 1 / 2 years Full-Time 29.0% 25.8% 17.8% NP* 25.6% 35.1% 24.3% 41.2% 32.6% Within 2 years DS* 1.0% 1.9% DS* 1.3% 2.2% DS* NP* 0.0% Within 1 year 2005 1 12.4% DS* 11.9% 12.3% 1.9% NP* 17.5% 10.7% 4.9% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time 20.2% 19.4% 19.6% 20.0% NP* 13.1% 16.1% 25.3% 8.3% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 29.0% ever graduate. 19.6% Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- 25 and from HS Age Recipients African Seeking Students All American Hispanic Over 20–24 White (age 17–19) (at entry) Remedial 0.6% 1.5% 0.4% 0.4% NP* 1.5% 1.0% 2.2% 1.1% On-time (2 years) 2004 4.0% 5.9% 2.7% 5.9% NP* 4.2% 2.4% 3.8% 3.8% Within 3 years Full-Time 5.9% 8.6% 6.7% 6.5% NP* 4.0% 4.8% 9.4% 6.1% Within 4 years 1.2% 0.3% NP* 0.1% 0.9% 0.1% 0.3% DS* 0.6% Within 2 years 2004 1.5% 2.6% 1.3% 1.4% NP* 2.6% 1.8% 0.0% 1.1% Within 3 years Part-Time NP* 3.7% 0.0% 2.9% 4.3% 4.7% 2.8% 3.7% 3.7% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 9.4% across the country — for Hispanic and African 6.1% American students, they’re tragic. 4.0% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- from HS African Recipients 25 and Age Seeking Students Over (age 17–19) 20–24 American (at entry) Hispanic White All Remedial 3.5% 5.7% NP* 15.8% 8.6% 3.9% 19.0% 16.6% 14.0% On-time (4 years) 2002 14.4% 17.5% 50.5% 22.3% NP* 45.8% 28.8% 41.0% 43.7% Within 6 years Full-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 8 years 1.0% 0.8% 1.4% 1.4% 0.4% 1.8% NP* 1.2% 2.6% Within 4 years 2002 5.2% 11.2% 7.0% NP* 11.4% 14.1% 13.2% 7.5% 14.9% Within 6 years Part-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 17.5% 45.8% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 11.2% Data: star ted in cohor 2002–03 bachelor's Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and ! walks of life graduate. metr suppr essed. NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this e ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

116 LOUISIAN A 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus 39.6% 38.7% 27.1% 24.9% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 79.7% 64.1% 62.7% 49.7% return to campus 31.9% 31.2% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Associate Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 35.5% 62.4% 30.5% 44.5% credits 2004–05, cohor in ted star t cohor Associate bachelor's 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; Data: in ted star t Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 20.0% 63.1% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 66.2% 47.4% 33.8% 22.3% 2.7% 13.8% Complete Graduate Complete Graduate Complete Complete within remediation within remediation remediation remediation and associated 3 years 6 years associated and college-level (projected) college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years F Data: 2006 all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

117 A LOUISIAN 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Part-time take students students take Full-time Part-time 7.3 years Full-time take students 7.1 years Full-time take students take students years 6.4 students take 6 years years 5.8 years 5.5 4 y ears ke Should ta for full-time students Should ta ke 2 y ears Should tak 1 y ear e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time take students take students NP* NP* Full-time Part-time students take students take NP* Full-time NP* Part-time e 120 credits Should tak students take students take NP* NP* Should tak e 60 credits 30 credits e Should tak Data: 2007–08 More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America = he sta te did not pr o T NP* da ta for this metr ic. vide

118 LOUISIAN A 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Certificate Associate 29.0% 21.0% 19.6% Full-Time 12.4% 6.7% Full-Time 4.2% 3.1% Part-Time 1.0% 3.7% 1.8% Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 3 years In 2 years In 1.5 years In 1 year On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 43.7% NP* Full-Time 15.8% NP* 11.4% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years t star 2002–03 in t cohor bachelor's Data: Cer tif icate cohor ted star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! 6 n Complete College America not ic. this ta da vide o pr metr did te sta he T = NP* for

119 MEMBER MAR YLAND 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 67% ee yland adults w higher or associate degr an e v ha y entl r cur ho Mar 45% Skills gap 22% . w our See section bsite e on y Methodolog and ces Sour the Data: Too few students make it through college. i l b u t s f O p a n i l l o r n e e o h w s t n e o r d u u g e l l o c c y t i s r e v i n 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 36 38 2 24 Return as 1 33 24 11 sophomores Graduate on time 2 15 0 NP* (100% time) Additional graduates 3 0 NP* 10 150% time 200% time 2 0 1 NP* Total graduates 0 26 NP* 7 Graduate in 8 years Graduate in 4 years 26 NP* Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 2 years 4 years 100% time 150% time 6 years 3 years 200% time 4 years 8 years T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this metr ic. NP* = all 2002 in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; f all Data: 2-y ear cohor t star ted in f For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents uni v ersities. om fr y onl data colleg pr t epor r lic es and his T Note: pub

120 MAR YLAND 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 258,695 Total public college enrollment: f e i c g a t C & s P n i u s u r r t i D s e e e r g e Attending 141,559 140,223 117,136 118,472 P ar t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear colleg es es colleg State otal T e Colleg e Colleg opulation, P Graduation Enrollment 18-24 Ag e White White White Hispanic Hispanic 57% 50% 54% 5% 7% Hispanic 4% Afr ican ican Afr Afr ican Amer ican Amer ican Amer ican 29% 22% 32% Other aces aces r Other r Other aces r 16% 17% 7% fr om Census A CS PUMS 06-08; IPEDS; degr ees b y r ace fr om 2007-10 state submissions ollment enr 2009 all om population F Data: data fr all Now we must have more success from students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded Awarded 3,996 19,465 3,753 17,529 10,117 7,788 612 722 NP* NP* 525 364 2003 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 2003 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008  Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Certificate  Certificate Associate Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! da he = NP* sta te did not pr o T ta for this ic. metr vide Complete College America n 2

121 MAR 2011 YLAND Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking Age African 25 and Recipients from HS Students (age 17–19) Over American Hispanic (at entry) Remedial All White 20–24 On-time (1 year) 35.5% 13.0% 24.4% DS* DS* DS* DS* NP* NP* 2005 1 NP* DS* 29.1% 16.8% 10.1% NP* 38.7% DS* DS* Within 1 2 / years Full-Time Within 2 years DS* 10.1% DS* 38.7% DS* 29.1% 16.8% NP* NP* Within 1 year DS* NP* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* NP* 2005 1 Within 1 years / 2 NP* DS* DS* NP* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Part-Time Within 2 years DS* DS* NP* NP* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates 16.8% ever graduate. Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- from HS 25 and Recipients Age African Seeking Students Hispanic White (age 17–19) American All Over (at entry) 20–24 Remedial 4.4% 4.5% 5.8% 2.2% 1.6% 5.0% 5.0% 2.6% 2.2% On-time (2 years) 2004 9.1% 16.1% 10.4% 9.7% 13.2% 8.5% 10.0% 5.0% 12.7% Within 3 years Full-Time 22.7% 15.9% 14.7% 18.3% 15.1% 13.6% 19.1% 13.2% 8.6% Within 4 years DS* 0.8% 1.0% DS* 0.6% 0.9% 1.3% 0.4% DS* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years 2.7% DS* 1.3% 2.7% 1.7% 2.9% 2.0% 2.8% 4.1% Part-Time 4.7% 3.3% 5.4% 4.5% 6.5% 5.8% 5.1% 7.6% DS* Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 22.7% across the country — for Hispanic and African 14.7% American students, they’re tragic. 8.6% Directly Age Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- Recipients 25 and Age African from HS Seeking Students All Remedial (at entry) Over Hispanic 20–24 American White (age 17–19) On-time (4 years) 19.5% 20.4% 39.1% NP* 18.6% 38.6% 48.8% 38.3% 14.2% 2002 74.5% 63.7% NP* 65.1% 48.8% 31.3% 22.5% 42.7% 68.5% Within 6 years Full-Time 71.5% 35.2% 25.0% 47.8% NP* 76.7% 67.0% 53.6% 68.4% Within 8 years Within 4 years NP* DS* 8.3% 11.3% DS* 6.2% 6.3% 10.7% 11.1% 2002 DS* 29.6% 16.6% 9.9% 13.4% NP* 16.3% 15.1% DS* Within 6 years Part-Time NP* 35.2% DS* 18.6% 18.2% 11.6% 20.7% 17.9% 45.2% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 22.5% 65.1% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 9.9% 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in ted star t Data: associate 2005–06, in ted star t cohor icate tif Cer cohor Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this essed. ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr metr

122 YLAND 2011 MAR Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 67.5% 50.5% return to campus 45.6% 33.3% Students in 4-year 100% 100% 87.5% colleges who 80.0% 76.0% return to campus 44.1% 34.2% 26.2% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 24.3% 69.6% 20.1% 19.4% credits in star t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, Associate ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 60.5% 24.9% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 48.8% NP* NP* NP* NP* 10.0% Graduate Complete Complete Graduate Complete Complete remediation within remediation within remediation remediation 6 years associated and 3 years associated and (projected) college-level college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years F 2006 Data: all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta NP* did not pr o vide da ta te Complete College America n 4

123 MAR 2011 YLAND Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Part-time Part-time students take Full-time take students students take Full-time students take years 5 4.7 years 4.6 years take students Full-time 4.3 years students take 3.8 years 3.1 years 4 y ears ke Should ta for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time take students take students credits 126 credits 124 Part-time Full-time students take students take Full-time 76 credits credits 75 Part-time 120 credits e Should tak students take take students NP* NP* Should tak e 60 credits 30 credits Should tak e 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! 5 n Complete College America T sta te did not pr o = he vide da ta for this metr ic. NP*

124 MAR 2011 YLAND More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Certificate Associate 18.3% 12.7% 16.8% 16.8% Full-Time 13.0% Full-Time 5.8% 4.5% 2.8% Part-Time DS* DS* Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1.5 years In 1 year In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 67.0% 63.7% Full-Time 38.3% 18.2% 15.1% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years t star 2002–03 in t cohor bachelor's Data: Cer tif icate cohor ted star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! 6 n Complete College America 10 essed. e w ta da so students, suppr than er w e F = DS* er

125 MEMBER MASSA 2011 CHUSETTS For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 70% ha v e an associate degr ee or higher ho adults w cur r entl y Massachusetts 53% Skills gap 17% bsite Data: See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. h w s y l f O t n e d u t s t i s l o r i n e o n a p r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i l b u 100 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 40 42 17 1 Return as 0 31 21 7 sophomores Graduate on time 2 14 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 4 1 0 11 150% time 200% time 2 1 0 1 Total graduates 26 2 0 8 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 10 26 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years t cohor ear 2-y all Data: f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all 2002 f in ted star For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data uni v ersities. pub om fr y onl colleg esents pr epor r lic es and his T Note: t

126 MASSA CHUSETTS 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 192,381 Total public college enrollment: t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g s e D Attending 118,218 102,321 90,060 t-time ar P Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 74,163 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Enrollment 18-24 e Ag Graduation White White White 77% 66% 74% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 9% 5% 11% Afr Afr ican ican ican Afr Amer ican Amer ican ican Amer 9% 7% 7% r Other aces aces Other r r aces Other 16% 11% 9% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 om submissions F state Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 2,259 14,630 2,177 13,176 8,258 7,677 1,127 850 250 236 2,132 2,030 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

127 2011 MASSA CHUSETTS Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking 25 and Age Recipients from HS African Students (age 17–19) White 20–24 Over (at entry) Remedial American All Hispanic 22.1% 50.0% 39.3% 25.9% 10.7% 34.4% DS* 25.0% 27.8% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 39.3% 22.1% 53.1% 1.1% 26.6% 28.2% 10.7% 25.9% 34.4% Within 1 / 2 years Full-Time 28.2% 22.1% 1.1% 26.6% 39.3% 53.1% 25.9% 10.7% 34.4% Within 2 years DS* 16.7% 15.6% DS* 0.0% 20.0% 5.3% DS* 6.3% Within 1 year 2005 1 DS* DS* 16.7% 25.0% 5.3% 6.7% 24.0% 15.4% 6.3% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time 16.7% 28.1% 18.2% DS* 6.7% 6.3% 23.1% 24.0% 5.3% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 28.2% ever graduate. 18.2% Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- 25 and from HS Age Recipients African Seeking Students All American Hispanic Over 20–24 White (age 17–19) (at entry) Remedial 4.1% 2.3% 1.8% 1.9% 3.1% 5.1% 4.4% 7.3% 4.9% On-time (2 years) 2004 11.8% 14.9% 10.3% 16.2% 10.7% 14.3% 7.6% 14.7% 7.2% Within 3 years Full-Time 15.7% 17.9% 19.3% 20.1% 15.3% 10.1% 15.4% 21.5% 11.7% Within 4 years 1.7% 0.9% 0.7% 0.2% 1.1% 0.2% 1.0% 0.3% 1.0% Within 2 years 2004 4.3% 5.2% 3.4% 2.8% 4.4% 4.8% 4.3% 1.3% 4.1% Within 3 years Part-Time 8.0% 8.9% 3.8% 7.8% 11.3% 10.1% 7.4% 6.1% 7.3% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 21.5% across the country — for Hispanic and African 11.7% American students, they’re tragic. 10.1% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- from HS African Recipients 25 and Age Seeking Students Over (age 17–19) 20–24 American (at entry) Hispanic White All Remedial 16.2% 27.6% NP* 32.8% 18.5% 22.3% 34.7% 33.2% 18.9% On-time (4 years) 2002 37.8% 43.1% 59.9% 51.2% NP* 58.4% 43.4% 40.7% 57.8% Within 6 years Full-Time 41.6% 44.8% 47.2% 61.4% NP* 53.8% 44.5% 60.8% 62.7% Within 8 years 6.7% 8.1% 6.0% 6.3% 5.7% 5.9% NP* 11.1% 13.0% Within 4 years 2002 13.3% 13.5% 24.5% NP* 19.9% 18.6% 21.7% 25.9% 22.9% Within 6 years Part-Time 18.9% 20.0% 29.6% 24.3% 24.0% 26.1% 26.4% 26.6% NP* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 43.1% 58.4% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 13.5% Data: star ted in cohor 2002–03 bachelor's Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and ! walks of life graduate. metr suppr essed. NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this e ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

128 MASSA CHUSETTS 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 53.0% return to campus 39.8% 27.7% 20.8% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 75.0% 61.1% 54.7% 50.9% return to campus 33.6% 29.1% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Associate Students who earn expected first-year 18.4% 69.4% 25.2% 51.2% credits Data: bachelor's t 2004–05, in star t cohor Associate ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear cohor 2002–03; in ted star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 26.6% 61.7% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 79.6% 53.1% 51.2% 50.8% 30.3% 10.3% Graduate Complete Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation within within remediation remediation remediation and associated 3 years 6 years associated and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F Data: all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

129 2011 CHUSETTS MASSA Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time students take students take 4.7 years Part-time Full-time years 4.3 students take take students Part-time years 3.3 Full-time years 3.1 take students ke 4 y ears Should ta take students for full-time students years 2.2 years 1.8 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear e Should tak for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time students take take students credits 128 128 credits Part-time Full-time students take Full-time take students Part-time 79 credits students take 74 credits Should tak 120 credits e students take credits 61 52 credits 60 credits e Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

130 2011 CHUSETTS MASSA More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate Full-Time 28.2% 27.8% 28.2% 19.3% 14.3% 18.2% DS* Part-Time Full-Time 8.9% 4.4% 4.3% Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 3 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 60.8% 57.8% Full-Time 32.8% 24.3% 19.9% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years t star 2002–03 in t cohor bachelor's Data: Cer tif icate cohor ted star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! 6 n Complete College America 10 essed. e w ta da so students, suppr than er w e F = DS* er

131 MEMBER MINNESO T A 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 70% or degr w ho higher adults ee associate an e v ha y entl r cur Minnesota 48% Skills gap 22% e on section See . w our bsite y Methodolog and ces Sour the Data: Too few students make it through college. b u p a n f O i l l o r n e o e h w s t n e d u g e o r u t n s l l o c c i l y t i s r e v i 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll NP* NP* NP* NP* Return as NP* NP* NP* NP* sophomores Graduate on time NP* NP* NP* NP* (100% time) Additional graduates NP* NP* NP* NP* 150% time 200% time NP* NP* NP* NP* Total graduates NP* NP* NP* NP* Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years NP* NP* Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 150% time 3 years 200% time 4 years 8 years ic. NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this metr f 2002 f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all all in ted star Data: 2-y ear cohor t For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America . es and uni v ersities. Data fr om MNSCU System onl y pub y onl data esents pr t epor r om lic fr his T Note: colleg

132 MINNESO T A 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 244,031 Total public college enrollment: s u P D e s & C e r t i f i c a t r g i u s r n g e e e Attending 151,226 134,458 109,573 P ar t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 92,805 es colleg es colleg Colleg e T Colleg e State P opulation, otal e Ag Graduation Enrollment 18-24 White White White 87% 78% 83% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 2% 1% 5% ican Afr ican ican Afr Afr Amer Amer ican ican ican Amer 5% 8% 4% r aces r aces Other Other aces r Other 8% 12% 7% om submissions y b ees degr 06-08; PUMS CS A Census om 2007-10 fr data population IPEDS; state fr ollment 2009 all F Data: om fr ace r enr students. Now we must have more success from all ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded Awarded 12,512 9,968 9,793 8,916 6,543 5,892 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 2003 2003   Associate Bachelor’s Certificate Certificate Associate Bachelor’s 2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! vide he = NP* sta te did not pr o T da for this ic. metr ta Complete College America n 2

133 MINNESO T A 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Pell Grant Directly Certificate-Seeking 25 and African Age from HS Recipients Students Remedial American Hispanic (at entry) Over 20–24 (age 17–19) All White On-time (1 year) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 year NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 Within 1 years 2 / NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- African from HS 25 and Recipients Age Seeking Students (age 17–19) White 20–24 American All (at entry) Remedial Over Hispanic NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* On-time (2 years) 2004 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 3 years Full-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 4 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country — for Hispanic and African American students, they’re tragic. Directly Age Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- African 25 and from HS Age Recipients Seeking Students Hispanic Remedial Over American (at entry) White All (age 17–19) 20–24 On-time (4 years) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2002 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 6 years Full-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 8 years Within 4 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2002 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 6 years Part-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 2004–05, icate tif Data: 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's cohor in ted star t cohor associate 2005–06, in ted star t Cer Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and ! walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te ic. not pr o vide da ta for this metr did

134 MINNESO A 2011 T Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 49.7% return to campus 36.6% 22.9% 21.0% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 72.8% 61.8% 54.6% 51.6% return to campus 42.6% 35.2% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Students who earn expected first-year NP* NP* NP* NP* credits cohor Associate Data: star 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, ted in t Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges NP* NP* of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Complete Graduate Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation within within remediation remediation remediation associated and associated 3 years and 6 years (projected) college-level college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years NP* Data: Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta te did NP* pr o vide da ta not Complete College America n 4

135 MINNESO T A 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time students take take students NP* NP* Full-time Part-time take students take students Part-time Full-time NP* NP* take students students take ke Should ta 4 y ears for full-time students NP* NP* 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear e Should tak for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time take students students take NP* NP* Full-time Part-time students take students take NP* Full-time NP* Part-time e 120 credits Should tak students take students take NP* NP* Should tak e 60 credits 30 credits e Should tak Data: 2007–08 More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America = he sta te did not pr o T NP* da ta for this metr ic. vide

136 A MINNESO 2011 T More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate Full-Time NP* NP* Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 1.5 years In 2 years In 2 years In 3 years In 1 year On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s Full-Time NP* Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years 2005–06; 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05; in ted star in cohor associate ted star t cohor Data: Cer tif icate t Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! Complete College America n 6 not ic. this for ta da vide o metr did te sta he T = NP* pr

137 MEMBER 2011 MISSISSIPPI For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 57% y ha v e an associate degr ee or higher cur adults w ho r entl Mississippi 32% Skills gap 25% bsite Data: See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. o r n e y t s f O p o h w s t n e t d u a u n i l l b l i i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 55 1 23 21 Return as 1 16 31 7 sophomores Graduate on time 7 5 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 3 6 1 0 150% time 200% time 1 0 1 1 Total graduates 12 0 2 11 Graduate in 8 years Graduate in 4 years 12 13 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 150% time 6 years 3 years 200% time 8 years 4 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data uni v ersities. pub om fr y onl colleg pr t epor r lic es and his T Note: esents

138 MISSISSIPPI 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 139,937 Total public college enrollment: s t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g e D Attending 81,798 111,175 28,762 P ar t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 58,139 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 61% 55% 52% 1% 1% 3% ican Afr Afr Afr ican ican ican Amer Amer Amer ican ican 43% 40% 34% r Other aces aces Other r r aces Other 4% 4% 3% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 state om F submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 1,790 9,878 1,742 9,536 8,736 6,680 723 502 27 15 2,599 1,911 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

139 MISSISSIPPI 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African Recipients Age from HS 25 and Students (age 17–19) All Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White 20–24 41.6% 37.0% 38.1% 33.3% 30.7% 33.3% 45.4% 32.2% 36.0% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 40.1% 38.7% 42.5% 34.7% 34.2% 32.5% 47.0% 33.3% 37.8% Within 1 / 2 years Full-Time 38.8% 39.9% 38.0% 43.1% 40.9% 35.4% 33.6% 50.0% 47.8% Within 2 years 6.7% 6.5% NP* 7.1% 10.9% 1.6% 6.0% 9.0% 0.0% Within 1 year 2005 1 8.0% 8.0% NP* 7.7% 9.0% 10.9% 6.6% 0.0% 7.2% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time 7.7% NP* 8.0% 8.0% 0.0% 10.9% 6.6% 7.2% 9.0% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 38.8% ever graduate. 8.0% Pell Grant Directly Age Associate Degree- from HS Recipients Age 25 and African Seeking Students Over (at entry) Remedial White All 20–24 (age 17–19) American Hispanic 11.3% 10.4% 7.2% 8.7% 8.6% 11.7% 10.2% 11.0% 7.0% On-time (2 years) 2004 17.4% 10.7% 13.3% 14.8% 18.2% 16.3% 18.7% 16.9% 14.4% Within 3 years Full-Time 12.8% 19.7% 21.7% 23.4% 16.5% 18.8% 20.9% 17.2% 16.0% Within 4 years 2.8% 1.3% 1.9% 1.1% 1.8% 2.6% 2.3% 3.8% 1.9% Within 2 years 2004 5.5% 3.4% 5.3% 6.4% 7.7% 5.4% 5.1% 4.8% 6.3% Within 3 years Part-Time 7.4% 8.1% 7.7% 6.7% 6.4% 4.9% 9.5% 9.7% 7.5% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 21.7% across the country — for Hispanic and African 23.4% American students, they’re tragic. 16.5% Pell Grant Directly Age Bachelor’s Degree- from HS African Recipients 25 and Age Seeking Students American 20–24 Hispanic (at entry) All Over (age 17–19) Remedial White 6.2% 11.8% 15.7% 27.9% 26.3% 16.2% 10.8% 22.9% 22.4% On-time (4 years) 2002 18.7% 20.6% 39.9% 55.7% 36.3% 62.3% 40.7% 54.5% 53.4% Within 6 years Full-Time 20.6% 26.5% 57.4% 40.7% 44.5% 57.9% 56.7% 65.4% 43.8% Within 8 years DS* DS* 6.7% 13.2% 5.8% 11.9% 15.4% DS* 6.8% Within 4 years 2002 DS* 22.2% 32.0% 33.0% 41.9% 38.9% 44.6% DS* 29.7% Within 6 years Part-Time DS* 22.2% 37.9% 42.9% 48.0% DS* 46.3% 36.0% 34.7% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 20.6% 54.5% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. DS* star 2002–03 ted in cohor t Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. metr suppr essed. NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this e ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

140 MISSISSIPPI 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 56.3% return to campus 31.9% 31.6% 22.5% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 78.9% 70.0% 65.3% 62.4% 53.8% 52.5% return to campus ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 30.9% 69.5% 13.6% 36.4% credits Data: 2004–05, cohor in ted star t cohor Associate bachelor's 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear t 2002–03; in ted star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation . 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 42.9% 21.4% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 72.8% 65.2% 52.3% 36.3% 21.0% 13.3% Complete Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation within remediation within remediation remediation and associated 6 years associated and 3 years college-level (projected) (projected) college-level courses in courses in two years two years F Data: 2006 all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

141 2011 MISSISSIPPI Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time students take students take 4.7 years years 4.4 Part-time Full-time take students students take Part-time Full-time years 2.7 take students Should ta 4 y ears ke 2.6 years students take for full-time students 1.9 years years 1.8 ke 2 y ears Should ta Should tak e 1 y ear for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time students take students take 137 credits 130 credits Full-time Part-time students take Full-time students take 120 credits e Should tak Part-time 65 credits take students credits 60 take students credits 48 41 credits 60 credits e Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

142 2011 MISSISSIPPI More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 38.8% Full-Time 37.8% 36.0% 18.8% 16.3% Full-Time 10.2% 7.4% 8.0% 8.0% 5.1% Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 3 years In 1.5 years In 1 year In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 56.7% 53.4% Full-Time 42.9% 38.9% Part-Time 22.4% In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

143 MEMBER 2011 MISSOURI For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 60% e v ha y entl r cur higher w i Missour adults or ee degr associate an ho 37% Skills gap 23% the See Data: . bsite e w our on section y Methodolog and ces Sour Too few students make it through college. n l o r n e o h w s t n d u t s f O i n a p u b l i c c o e l l e g e y t i s r e v i o u r l 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 2 39 15 44 Return as 1 35 23 8 sophomores Graduate on time 4 0 15 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 3 0 5 0 150% time 200% time 2 0 1 1 Total graduates 1 20 1 9 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 21 10 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years in ted star t cohor t 4-y 2004; all f in ted star ear 2-y Data: cohor 2002 all f ear For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data es and uni v ersities. fr y onl pub esents pr t r om lic colleg his T Note: epor

144 MISSOURI 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 219,440 Total public college enrollment: s t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g e D Attending 140,890 114,788 104,652 t-time ar P Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 78,550 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 83% 76% 80% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 2% 2% 4% Afr Afr ican ican ican Afr Amer ican Amer ican ican Amer 11% 13% 7% r Other aces aces Other r r aces Other 10% 8% 4% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 state om F submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 3,420 17,717 3,241 16,599 8,743 7,497 675 709 181 200 1,382 1,121 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

145 MISSOURI 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African Recipients Age from HS 25 and Students (age 17–19) All Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White 20–24 21.5% 30.0% 28.3% DS* DS* 43.6% DS* 26.6% 24.8% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 30.4% 43.6% DS* 24.2% 36.0% 30.0% DS* DS* 28.1% Within 1 2 / years Full-Time 28.1% 24.2% 30.4% DS* 43.6% 36.0% DS* 30.0% DS* Within 2 years DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 1 year 2005 1 DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 28.1% ever graduate. DS* Age Pell Grant Directly Associate Degree- Recipients 25 and Age from HS African Seeking Students American Over 20–24 Hispanic (age 17–19) (at entry) All White Remedial 6.1% 9.8% 11.0% 2.9% 6.8% 4.2% 11.0% 5.8% 3.9% On-time (2 years) 2004 13.2% 9.0% 6.5% 18.9% 12.1% 20.9% 20.8% 14.2% 12.5% Within 3 years Full-Time 16.7% 11.0% 17.7% 8.7% 17.2% 24.2% 22.2% 24.4% 15.9% Within 4 years DS* DS* DS* DS* 1.0% 0.5% DS* 0.7% DS* Within 2 years 2004 2.1% 1.4% DS* DS* 3.3% 2.6% 3.7% 2.0% 1.7% Within 3 years Part-Time 3.4% 5.7% 3.5% 4.3% 5.2% DS* DS* 3.1% 3.5% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 24.2% across the country — for Hispanic and African 17.2% American students, they’re tragic. 8.7% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- Age African Recipients 25 and from HS Seeking Students All Hispanic American Over 20–24 White (at entry) Remedial (age 17–19) 6.0% 16.8% 11.3% 17.4% 26.9% 25.4% 34.8% 33.7% 35.7% On-time (4 years) 2002 22.6% 11.4% 21.2% 38.6% 47.2% 27.4% 48.1% 42.3% 45.8% Within 6 years Full-Time 25.1% 13.0% 29.0% 42.8% 48.8% 46.5% 40.1% 47.9% 22.1% Within 8 years DS* DS* 7.9% 12.6% 15.5% DS* 18.3% DS* DS* Within 4 years 2002 DS* DS* 13.7% 24.8% DS* 22.1% 18.1% DS* DS* Within 6 years Part-Time DS* DS* DS* 19.1% 23.4% 25.5% DS* 14.4% DS* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 11.4% 47.2% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. DS* ted in cohor 2002–03 t star Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. than suppr essed. DS* = F e w er e 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

146 2011 MISSOURI Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 58.4% return to campus 43.6% 26.1% 26.7% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 80.4% 71.2% 66.1% 63.5% 53.1% return to campus 48.1% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Associate Students who earn expected first-year 87.3% 70.9% 93.6% 67.4% credits star Associate in t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 52.3% 14.1% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 21.2% 12.5% NP* NP* NP* NP* Graduate Complete Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation within remediation remediation within remediation associated 6 years associated 3 years and and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years all F Data: 2006 Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta te NP* not pr o vide da ta did Complete College America n 4

147 MISSOURI 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time take students Part-time Part-time students take years 4.6 students take students take 4.2 years Full-time years 3.7 years 3.6 take students Full-time ke Should ta 4 y ears 2.6 years for full-time students take students 2 y ears ke Should ta years 1.4 1 y ear e Should tak for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Full-time Part-time students take students take credits 127 123 credits Part-time Full-time Part-time take students students take take students Full-time 120 credits Should tak e 72 credits credits 69 credits 65 students take 47 credits Should tak 60 credits e e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

148 MISSOURI 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 22.2% 28.1% 28.1% Full-Time 18.9% 24.8% Full-Time 9.8% DS* DS* Part-Time 4.3% 2.6% Part-Time In 4 years In 1 year In 3 years In 2 years In 2 years In 1.5 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 46.5% 45.8% Full-Time 33.7% 19.1% 18.1% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years t star t 2002–03 in cohor bachelor's Data: Cer tif icate cohor ted star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! Complete College America 6 n 10 essed. e w ta da so students, suppr than er w e F = DS* er

149 MEMBER AD NEV 2011 A For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 58% ha y entl r cur ho higher adults v Ne ada or ee degr associate an e v w 28% Skills gap 30% . bsite e w our on section y Methodolog and ces Sour the See Data: Too few students make it through college. u l o r n e o h w s t n d u t s f O i n a p u b l i c c o e l l e g y t i s r e v i n e r o l 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Enroll 11 12 58 18 Return as 9 16 9 23 sophomores Graduate on time 1 0 3 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 1 3 7 1 150% time 200% time 1 1 1 1 Total graduates 11 4 2 3 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 15 5 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years in ted star t cohor t 4-y 2004; all f in ted star ear 2-y Data: cohor 2002 all f ear For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data es and uni v ersities. fr y onl pub esents pr t r om lic colleg his T Note: epor

150 NEV AD A 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 102,516 Total public college enrollment: r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i t g s e D Attending 57,851 89,574 44,665 t-time ar P Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 12,942 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg 18-24 e Ag Graduation Enrollment White White White 62% 54% 53% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 19% 10% 29% Afr ican Afr Afr ican ican Amer Amer ican ican ican Amer 9% 7% 5% Other r aces Other r aces aces r Other 20% 23% 10% 2009 all Census om CS PUMS 06-08; degr A fr ees b y r ace fr Data: F om 2007-10 state submissions data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Awarded Credentials Awarded 830 5,935 674 4,559 2,903 305 2,031 262 38 48 307 285 2003 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

151 NEV 2011 A AD Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Pell Grant Directly Certificate-Seeking Age African 25 and Recipients from HS Students Over American Hispanic (at entry) Remedial All White (age 17–19) 20–24 On-time (1 year) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* DS* 2005 1 DS* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 2 / years Full-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* DS* NP* NP* Within 1 year NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* DS* NP* 2005 1 Within 1 years / 2 NP* NP* NP* DS* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* DS* NP* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- African from HS 25 and Recipients Age Seeking Students 20–24 Hispanic (at entry) American Remedial All Over (age 17–19) White 5.9% NP* 3.4% 3.8% 2.4% 1.0% 2.0% 3.7% 3.9% On-time (2 years) 2004 9.7% NP* 11.3% 9.9% 12.2% 3.0% 10.1% 10.8% 9.8% Within 3 years Full-Time 16.8% 16.6% 15.6% 16.3% 4.0% 19.4% 16.0% 17.5% NP* Within 4 years 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.3% 0.3% 0.1% NP* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years 1.0% 2.5% NP* 2.3% 1.6% 1.6% 0.8% 0.9% 1.3% Part-Time NP* 3.2% 4.9% 2.2% 1.4% 5.0% 2.4% 2.1% 3.0% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 15.6% across the country — for Hispanic and African 16.8% American students, they’re tragic. 4.0% Age Pell Grant Directly Bachelor’s Degree- 25 and Recipients Age from HS African Seeking Students 20–24 Over American All Hispanic (at entry) Remedial White (age 17–19) On-time (4 years) 16.3% 16.9% 30.0% 17.1% 11.9% NP* 9.0% 16.7% 16.3% 2002 52.0% 36.8% 51.5% NP* 51.6% 51.2% 50.0% 44.9% 47.4% Within 6 years Full-Time 58.2% 50.0% 47.5% 55.2% 57.7% NP* 44.8% 57.6% 57.3% Within 8 years Within 4 years 1.6% 3.7% 3.5% 4.4% DS* 4.1% 4.7% NP* 4.5% 2002 DS* 31.8% 32.8% 27.8% 27.3% 31.8% NP* 31.2% 31.8% Within 6 years Part-Time 37.3% 40.6% NP* 33.8% 39.1% 38.9% 38.8% DS* 38.8% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 50.0% 51.6% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. DS* cohor icate tif Data: 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in ted star t cohor associate 2005–06, in ted star t Cer Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this essed. ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr metr

152 NEV A 2011 AD Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 73.0% 52.1% return to campus 40.3% 28.4% Students in 4-year 100% 100% 85.7% colleges who 77.8% 76.2% 73.2% 64.5% 58.9% return to campus ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Associate Students who earn expected first-year 9.9% 52.9% 27.2% 34.4% credits cohor in ted star t cohor Associate bachelor's 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; 2004–05, in ted star t Data: Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 29.1% 41.6% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 77.3% 68.9% 48.1% 36.8% 21.6% 9.7% Complete Graduate Complete Graduate Complete Complete within remediation within remediation remediation remediation and associated 3 years 6 years associated and college-level (projected) college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years F Data: 2006 all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

153 AD NEV A 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time students take Part-time students take take students years 5.4 Part-time Full-time years 5 take students years 4.7 take students Full-time years 4 3.7 years students take years 2.7 ke 4 y ears Should ta for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Full-time Part-time take students take students 134 credits 133 credits Full-time Part-time take students Full-time take students Part-time take students credits 78 78 credits 120 credits Should tak e take students credits 64 53 credits Should tak 60 credits e e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

154 A AD NEV 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate Full-Time NP* 16.6% 10.8% Full-Time 3.9% 3.0% Part-Time 1.6% Part-Time In 4 years In 1.5 years In 2 years In 1 year In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 57.6% 51.5% Full-Time 38.8% 31.8% Part-Time 16.7% In 6 years In 4 years In 8 years tif 2002–03 in ted star t cohor 2004–05; in ted star Data: Cer bachelor's icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America not ic. this for da vide o pr metr did te sta he T = NP* ta

155 MEMBER 2011 HAMPSHIRE NEW For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 67% v ha y entl r cur ho w higher e Hampshir w Ne adults or ee degr associate an e 46% Skills gap 21% y and Methodolog bsite w our on section . e Data: See the Sour ces Too few students make it through college. n l o r n e o h w s t n e d u t s f O i n a p u b l o l i c c g e o e y t i s r e v i l u r l 100 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Enroll NP* NP* NP* NP* Return as NP* NP* NP* NP* sophomores Graduate on time NP* NP* NP* NP* (100% time) Additional graduates NP* NP* NP* NP* 150% time 200% time NP* NP* NP* NP* Total graduates NP* NP* NP* NP* Graduate in 8 years Graduate in 4 years NP* NP* Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 2 years 4 years 100% time 150% time 3 years 6 years 8 years 200% time 4 years T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this metr ic. NP* = f 2002 f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all all in ted star Data: 2-y ear cohor t For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents es and uni v ersities. y onl data pub pr t epor r om lic colleg his T Note: fr

156 NEW HAMPSHIRE 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 38,413 Total public college enrollment: r u g P s n & C e r t i f i c a t e r g e i u s D s e e Attending 24,562 28,015 10,398 t-time ar P Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 13,851 colleg es colleg es Colleg T Colleg State P opulation, e e otal Enrollment 18-24 e Ag Graduation White White White 77% 79% 92% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 2% 2% 3% Afr ican ican Afr ican Afr ican ican Amer Amer Amer ican 1% 2% 2% Other aces aces r Other r Other aces r 19% 17% 3% all 2009 enr ollment fr om IPEDS; population data fr om Census A CS PUMS 06-08 Data: F Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded Awarded 8,460 8,107 3,289 3,179 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 138 122 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 Bachelor’s Certificate  Associate Bachelor’s  Certificate Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! vide he = ic. sta te did not pr o T da ta for metr this NP* Complete College America n 2

157 NEW HAMPSHIRE 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Pell Grant Directly Age Certificate-Seeking African 25 and Age from HS Recipients Students Remedial (age 17–19) All Over Hispanic (at entry) American 20–24 White On-time (1 year) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 year NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 Within 1 years 2 / NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- African from HS 25 and Recipients Age Seeking Students Over American 20–24 White (at entry) Remedial Hispanic All (age 17–19) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* On-time (2 years) 2004 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 3 years Full-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 4 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country — for Hispanic and African American students, they’re tragic. Directly Age Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- African 25 and from HS Age Recipients Seeking Students Hispanic Remedial Over American (at entry) White All (age 17–19) 20–24 On-time (4 years) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2002 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 6 years Full-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 8 years Within 4 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2002 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 6 years Part-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 2004–05, icate tif Data: 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's cohor in ted star t cohor associate 2005–06, in ted star t Cer Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te ic. not pr o vide da ta for this metr did

158 NEW 2011 HAMPSHIRE Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus NP* NP* NP* NP* Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Bachelor’s Associate Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year NP* NP* NP* NP* credits Associate cohor 2006 all f Data: fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in ted star t om Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges NP* NP* of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Complete Graduate Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation remediation within within remediation remediation associated associated 3 years 6 years and and college-level (projected) (projected) college-level courses in courses in two years two years NP* Data: Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta te did NP* pr o vide da ta not Complete College America n 4

159 NEW HAMPSHIRE 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time take students students take NP* NP* Full-time Part-time take students take students Full-time Part-time NP* NP* take students students take 4 y ears ke Should ta for full-time students NP* NP* Should ta ke 2 y ears e 1 y ear Should tak for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time take students students take NP* NP* Full-time Part-time students take students take NP* Full-time NP* Part-time e 120 credits Should tak students take students take NP* NP* Should tak e 60 credits 30 credits e Should tak Data: 2007–08 More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America = he sta te did not pr o T NP* da ta for this metr ic. vide

160 2011 NEW HAMPSHIRE More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate Full-Time NP* NP* Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1.5 years In 1 year In 3 years In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s Full-Time NP* Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years 2005–06; ted 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05; in ted star in cohor associate star t cohor Data: Cer tif icate t Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! 6 n Complete College America pr ic. this for ta da vide o metr did te sta he T = NP* not

161 MEMBER NEW MEXICO 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 61% degr w Mexico adults higher or ee an associate e v ha y entl r cur ho w Ne 29% Skills gap 32% e section See . w our on bsite y Methodolog and ces Sour the Data: Too few students make it through college. u p a f O n i l l o r n e o e h w s t n e d u t g e o r s l l o c c i l b y t i s r e v i n u 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 12 42 26 20 Return as 7 14 19 5 sophomores Graduate on time 1 0 1 0 (100% time) Additional graduates NP* 4 1 NP* 150% time 200% time 2 0 1 NP* Total graduates 1 6 NP* NP* Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years NP* 7 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 150% time 3 years 200% time 4 years 8 years = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this metr ic. NP* f 2002 f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all all in ted star Data: 2-y ear cohor t For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents es and uni v ersities. y onl data pub pr t epor r om lic colleg his T Note: fr

162 NEW MEXICO 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 129,971 Total public college enrollment: t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g s e D Attending 81,369 65,627 64,344 P ar t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 48,602 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Enrollment 18-24 e Ag Graduation White White 45% 37% White 34% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 41% 40% 50% ican Amer ican ican Amer Amer Indian Indian Indian 11% 3% 9% Other aces r r aces Other aces r Other 13% 11% 5% om state submissions Census CS PUMS 06-08; A degr ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om F 2007-10 Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 1,152 6,525 1,119 5,787 4,475 3,433 2,411 382 326 32 234 1,452 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

163 2011 New Mexico Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, American Indian, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking Age American 25 and from HS Recipients Students White Hispanic (age 17–19) Over Indian All (at entry) Remedial 20–24 On-time (1 year) 7.3% 2.1% 1.8% 1.3% 2.5% 4.7% 1.0% 1.9% 1.8% 2005 1 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time Within 2 years 2.7% 9.5% 3.3% 3.2% 1.9% 5.5% 13.6% NP* NP* Within 1 year 0.8% 0.9% 0.8% 0.8% 1.0% 0.9% 1.0% 0.6% 0.9% 2005 1 Within 1 2 / years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time Within 2 years 1.7% NP* 1.5% DS* NP* 1.5% 1.4% 1.9% 1.1% In most states, very few students seeking certificates 2.7% ever graduate. 1.4% Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- American Age 25 and from HS Recipients Seeking Students White Indian Hispanic All 20–24 Over (age 17–19) Remedial (at entry) 3.4% 2.8% 4.8% 7.3% 3.8% 2.9% 3.7% 3.3% 3.7% On-time (2 years) 2004 4.7% 7.7% 11.1% 6.0% 5.5% 5.4% 5.4% 6.9% 6.1% Within 3 years Full-Time 7.5% 9.9% 14.8% 8.2% 9.6% 6.9% 7.1% 6.2% 8.3% Within 4 years 1.1% 1.4% 1.3% 1.5% 1.0% 1.2% 0.9% 1.0% 1.4% Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years 2.1% 3.6% 2.4% 2.6% 2.4% 2.7% 2.2% 3.1% 2.4% Part-Time 4.6% 2.7% 3.4% 4.3% 4.0% 6.1% 3.7% 4.9% 3.0% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 6.9% across the country. 7.5% 8.2% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- African 25 and Age from HS Recipients Seeking Students American Hispanic White All Over 20–24 (age 17–19) (at entry) Remedial On-time (4 years) 8.6% 1.2% 6.4% 4.2% 7.3% 2.1% 1.6% 4.7% 5.1% 2002 21.7% 29.4% 6.9% 27.7% 6.6% 23.9% 17.7% 3.8% 17.4% Within 6 years Full-Time 33.3% 28.1% 7.9% 5.5% 21.5% 10.3% 21.7% 26.6% 32.4% Within 8 years Within 4 years 1.5% 1.7% 1.3% 2.4% 1.3% 1.1% 1.1% 0.3% 1.1% 2002 9.1% 7.7% 11.6% 3.1% 13.4% 1.1% 11.0% 16.4% 7.9% Within 6 years Part-Time 15.8% 1.6% 13.4% 11.9% 9.5% 10.1% 4.3% 20.5% 16.9% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 3.8% 27.7% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 1.1% t icate cohor Data: Cer 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in ted star t cohor associate 2005–06, in ted star tif Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this essed. ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr metr

164 MEXICO 2011 NEW Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus 44.9% 22.1% 19.6% 9.0% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 70.2% 55.4% 54.8% return to campus 47.1% 36.7% 28.5% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 97.9% 41.0% 88.3% 64.4% credits in star t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, Associate ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 57.0% 12.1% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 74.6% 63.0% 6.9% DS* DS* 6.9% Graduate Complete Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation within remediation remediation within remediation associated 6 years associated 3 years and and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years all F Data: 2006 Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! er e suppr essed. = F e w er DS* 10 students, so da ta w than Complete College America n 4

165 MEXICO NEW 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Full-time Part-time take students take students NP* NP* Full-time Part-time students students take take Full-time Part-time NP* NP* take students take students 4 y ears ke Should ta for full-time students NP* NP* 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Full-time Part-time take students students take 148 credits credits 142 Full-time Part-time students take take students credits 99 Full-time credits 87 students take Part-time Should tak e 120 credits credits 63 take students credits 47 e 60 credits Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! 5 n Complete College America sta did not pr o vide da he te = NP* ta for this metr ic. T

166 MEXICO NEW 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 7.1% 5.4% Full-Time 3.3% Full-Time NP* 2.7% 1.8% 3.7% 2.4% Part-Time 1.4% NP* Part-Time In 4 years In 3 years In 2 years In 1 year In 2 years In 1.5 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 28.1% 23.9% Full-Time 10.1% 6.4% 7.9% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years cohor star 2002–03 in t cohor bachelor's Data: Cer tif icate ted t star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! 6 n Complete College America not ic. this ta da vide o pr metr did te sta he T = NP* for

167 MEMBER A NOR 2011 TH OLIN C AR For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 63% r cur ho w adults higher Car Nor th or ee degr associate an e v ha y entl olina 36% Skills gap 27% our on section y Methodolog and ces Sour the See Data: . bsite e w Too few students make it through college. r l o r n e o h w s t n d u t s f O i n a p u b l i c c o e l l e y t i s r e v i n u g o e l 100 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 0 28 28 43 Return as 0 36 14 8 sophomores Graduate on time 4 0 16 1 (100% time) Additional graduates 1 12 0 1 150% time 200% time 5 1 0 1 Total graduates 0 29 3 10 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 29 13 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years in ted star t cohor t 4-y 2004; all f in ted star ear 2-y Data: cohor 2002 all f ear For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data es and uni v ersities. fr y onl pub esents pr t r om lic colleg his T Note: epor

168 A NOR TH C AR OLIN 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 424,191 Total public college enrollment: C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i t r g a e s e D Attending 248,058 255,430 168,761 176,133 P ar t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 69% 62% 82% Hispanic 4% Hispanic 2% Hispanic Afr Afr ican ican 10% Amer Amer ican ican 24% 22% aces Other r r Other aces aces Other r 9% 7% 7% IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: F om om state submissions Census data population 2007-10 all students. Now we must have more success from ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Awarded Credentials Awarded 5,793 29,462 5,368 24,777 229 330 40 179 6,964 2,603 5,925 4,571 2003 2008 2008 2008 2003 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

169 OLIN NOR 2011 A AR C TH Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking 25 and African from HS Age Recipients Students (age 17–19) Remedial (at entry) American Hispanic White All 20–24 Over 39.9% 46.8% 44.9% 42.5% 50.1% 22.8% 25.0% 17.5% 41.9% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 25.5% 51.5% 43.0% 23.1% 19.0% 45.7% 42.9% 47.9% 40.9% Within 1 / 2 years Full-Time 43.1% 43.2% 51.7% 23.5% 19.6% 25.5% 41.2% 47.9% 45.7% Within 2 years 14.3% 14.2% 14.3% 13.6% 11.6% 16.7% 6.1% 10.5% 10.8% Within 1 year 2005 1 15.4% 15.3% 15.6% 14.5% 11.6% 14.0% 17.3% 13.7% 6.4% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time 16.9% 16.4% 16.4% 15.2% 15.5% 7.6% 15.4% 18.3% 11.6% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 43.1% ever graduate. 16.4% Directly Age Pell Grant Associate Degree- from HS African 25 and Age Recipients Seeking Students American All Over White 20–24 (age 17–19) Hispanic Remedial (at entry) 4.5% 8.8% 7.1% 4.8% 10.1% 6.6% 7.1% 16.4% 9.9% On-time (2 years) 2004 13.2% 21.6% 9.7% 12.2% 13.9% 11.8% 12.7% 7.7% 15.9% Within 3 years Full-Time 24.4% 15.2% 17.5% 10.3% 19.8% 16.6% 13.9% 15.5% 16.4% Within 4 years 6.1% 4.3% 3.9% 4.6% 3.7% 2.2% 1.4% 3.0% 2.3% Within 2 years 2004 9.3% 5.6% 5.0% 3.9% 5.5% 3.8% 6.8% 8.0% 5.8% Within 3 years Part-Time 6.9% 9.3% 9.9% 10.0% 11.7% 8.8% 6.1% 12.2% 7.7% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 19.8% across the country — for Hispanic and African 16.4% American students, they’re tragic. 10.3% Pell Grant Directly Age Bachelor’s Degree- from HS African 25 and Age Recipients Seeking Students Hispanic All (age 17–19) American White Over Remedial (at entry) 20–24 18.4% 25.4% 24.1% 25.4% 37.0% 36.5% 41.1% 31.2% 20.8% On-time (4 years) 2002 30.5% 45.0% 64.3% 60.3% 68.5% 50.0% 63.5% 49.4% 51.8% Within 6 years Full-Time 36.2% 49.6% 66.7% 53.4% 67.4% 55.7% 63.5% 53.5% 71.5% Within 8 years DS* DS* 5.6% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 4 years 2002 14.3% DS* 25.0% 14.8% DS* 29.9% 23.1% 30.4% DS* Within 6 years Part-Time DS* 19.0% 33.6% DS* 26.9% 32.4% DS* 15.9% 30.0% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 30.5% 64.3% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 14.3% in 2002–03 star cohor bachelor's ted Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. than suppr essed. DS* = F e w er e 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

170 2011 NOR C AR TH OLIN A Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 49.3% return to campus 29.7% 25.0% 17.1% Students in 4-year 100% 100% 84.0% colleges who 76.2% 72.0% 49.5% return to campus 47.2% 40.3% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Associate Students who earn expected first-year 17.1% 76.5% 35.7% 27.2% credits t cohor Associate ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star 2004–05, t cohor in Data: bachelor's star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. PXVWEHIL[HG . Remediation 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 5.3% 31.8% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 86.8% 69.8% 50.4% 49.4% 12.1% 9.7% Complete Graduate Complete Complete Graduate Complete within remediation within remediation remediation remediation and 6 years associated and associated 3 years (projected) college-level college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years all 2006 Data: F Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! n Complete College America 4

171 AR A NOR 2011 OLIN C TH Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time students take 7.2 years Full-time students take Part-time years 4.8 Full-time take students students take Part-time years 3.6 Full-time take students years 3.1 take students ke Should ta 4 y ears years 2.4 for full-time students 2.1 years Should ta 2 y ears ke 1 y ear e Should tak for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Full-time Part-time take students take students 127 credits credits 120 Full-time Part-time take students take students credits 78 120 credits e Should tak credits 71 Full-time Part-time take students students take 60 credits Should tak e credits 32 credits 30 e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

172 2011 NOR TH C AR A OLIN More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate Full-Time 43.1% 42.9% 41.9% 17.5% 13.9% 16.4% Full-Time 15.4% 10.0% 8.8% Part-Time 6.8% Part-Time In 4 years In 1.5 years In 1 year In 3 years In 2 years In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 66.7% 63.5% Full-Time 36.5% 26.9% 23.1% Part-Time In 6 years In 8 years In 4 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

173 MEMBER 2011 OHIO For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 59% cur v ha y entl r higher ho adults Ohio w or ee degr associate an e 36% Skills gap 23% Sour the See Data: . bsite e w our on section y Methodolog and ces Too few students make it through college. i l o r n e o h w s t n d u t s f O i n a p u b l i c c o e l l e g e o y t i s r e v r n u l 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 2 35 14 49 Return as 1 42 21 6 sophomores Graduate on time 1 0 15 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 2 0 15 0 150% time 200% time 4 0 2 1 Total graduates 32 0 1 7 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 32 8 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years in ted star t cohor t 4-y 2004; all f in ted star ear 2-y Data: cohor 2002 all f ear For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data es and uni v ersities. fr y onl pub esents pr t r om lic colleg his T Note: epor

174 OHIO 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 464,815 Total public college enrollment: s t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g e D Attending 307,251 265,750 199,065 ar P t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 157,564 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 83% 76% 80% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 2% 2% 3% Afr Afr ican ican ican Afr Amer ican Amer ican ican Amer 13% 13% 8% r Other aces aces Other r r aces Other 9% 8% 4% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 state om F submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 6,325 38,064 6,294 34,652 19,172 3,168 2,916 16,407 477 257 2,743 1,546 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

175 OHIO 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African Recipients Age from HS 25 and Students (age 17–19) All Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White 20–24 8.7% 11.2% 6.4% 2.9% 6.7% 8.6% 7.9% 9.8% 9.1% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 7.9% 11.9% 11.7% 13.5% 15.1% 13.4% 10.0% 8.6% 12.8% Within 1 2 / years Full-Time 15.1% 16.1% 10.6% 13.8% 13.9% 16.7% 13.3% 15.8% 9.3% Within 2 years 3.2% 1.3% 4.6% 3.7% 3.6% 2.7% 2.8% 3.2% 1.8% Within 1 year 2005 1 5.2% 1.9% 9.1% 5.8% 6.5% 3.3% 4.8% 4.5% 3.2% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time 9.1% 8.6% 7.5% 2.5% 7.3% 7.8% 7.7% 7.6% 7.4% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 15.1% ever graduate. 7.5% Age Pell Grant Directly Associate Degree- Recipients 25 and Age from HS African Seeking Students American Over 20–24 Hispanic (age 17–19) (at entry) All White Remedial 1.3% 2.8% 2.8% 1.0% 2.1% 1.3% 3.1% 3.7% 2.1% On-time (2 years) 2004 10.1% 6.6% 3.0% 9.4% 5.5% 9.8% 10.4% 7.7% 6.4% Within 3 years Full-Time 15.1% 11.2% 13.0% 5.3% 10.7% 18.2% 16.5% 17.7% 12.0% Within 4 years 1.5% 1.4% 0.5% 1.0% 0.8% 1.2% DS* 1.4% 0.3% Within 2 years 2004 3.6% 3.8% 2.5% 1.1% 4.0% 3.6% 3.4% 3.2% 2.2% Within 3 years Part-Time 6.0% 8.2% 6.9% 7.8% 8.9% 3.9% 2.8% 8.4% 6.4% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 18.2% across the country — for Hispanic and African 10.7% American students, they’re tragic. 5.3% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- Age African Recipients 25 and from HS Seeking Students All Hispanic American Over 20–24 White (at entry) Remedial (age 17–19) 7.1% 6.7% 7.9% 12.0% 22.7% 16.5% 30.5% 29.5% 32.0% On-time (4 years) 2002 19.0% 17.0% 33.8% 42.2% 61.4% 34.4% 63.2% 49.9% 59.7% Within 6 years Full-Time 24.2% 20.9% 38.9% 55.1% 67.2% 63.7% 47.1% 65.3% 39.5% Within 8 years 1.9% 1.9% 2.3% 3.5% 4.1% 2.9% 5.6% 1.2% 0.6% Within 4 years 2002 4.9% 6.1% 6.8% 16.4% 5.3% 11.8% 10.0% 3.5% 5.9% Within 6 years Part-Time 10.7% 6.8% 5.9% 14.4% 17.4% 23.0% 6.2% 9.5% 9.5% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 17.0% 61.4% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 4.9% ted in cohor 2002–03 t star Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. than suppr essed. DS* = F e w er e 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

176 OHIO 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 60.9% return to campus 45.1% 44.4% 32.2% Students in 4-year 100% 100% 85.6% colleges who 78.3% 72.1% 51.2% return to campus 43.2% 34.0% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 26.3% 67.2% 25.9% 44.0% credits Data: 2004–05, cohor in ted star t cohor Associate bachelor's 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear t 2002–03; in ted star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation . 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 58.5% 25.0% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 56.9% 48.1% 38.4% 33.8% 24.6% 6.4% Complete Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation within remediation within remediation remediation and associated 6 years associated and 3 years college-level (projected) (projected) college-level courses in courses in two years two years F Data: 2006 all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

177 2011 OHIO Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Part-time take students Full-time students take 5.4 years Part-time Full-time take students Full-time 4.9 years students take students take years 4.4 take students 3.9 years 3.8 years years 3.6 ke 4 y ears Should ta for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Full-time Part-time students take take students 137 credits 132 credits Full-time Part-time take students Full-time take students credits 86 take students Part-time 80 credits 120 credits Should tak e credits 69 take students 52 credits Should tak 60 credits e e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

178 OHIO 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 16.5% 15.1% Full-Time 9.4% 12.8% Full-Time 9.1% 2.8% 7.8% 7.5% Part-Time Part-Time 5.2% 3.6% In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 63.7% 59.7% Full-Time 29.5% 14.4% 10.0% Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

179 MEMBER 2011 OKLAHOMA For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 59% y ha v e an associate degr ee or higher cur adults w ho r entl Oklahoma 30% Skills gap 29% bsite Data: See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. o h w s y f O l t n e d u t s t i s l i o r n e n a p r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i l b u 100 2-Year Public College 4-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 36 44 16 4 Return as 1 36 21 7 sophomores Graduate on time 3 8 1 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 3 0 1 14 150% time 200% time 2 1 0 2 Total graduates 24 2 1 8 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 10 25 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years t cohor ear 2-y all Data: f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all 2002 f in ted star For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data uni v ersities. pub om fr y onl colleg esents pr epor r lic es and his T Note: t

180 OKLAHOMA 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 179,622 Total public college enrollment: s t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g e D Attending 108,900 101,150 78,472 t-time ar P Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 70,722 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 74% 67% 66% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 5% 3% 9% Afr Afr ican ican ican Afr Amer ican Amer ican ican Amer 9% 8% 6% r Other aces aces Other r r aces Other 19% 16% 17% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 state om F submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 2,886 15,726 13,115 2,285 8,237 7,773 923 857 33 23 346 572 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

181 OKLAHOMA 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African Recipients Age from HS 25 and Students (age 17–19) All Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White 20–24 5.8% 14.7% 16.7% DS* DS* DS* DS* 11.3% 10.8% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 16.7% DS* DS* 7.7% 17.6% 14.5% DS* DS* 12.7% Within 1 2 / years Full-Time 12.7% 7.7% 16.7% DS* DS* 17.6% DS* 14.5% DS* Within 2 years 18.8% 20.0% DS* 22.0% 24.1% 14.3% 4.8% DS* 0.0% Within 1 year 2005 1 20.0% 20.0% DS* 23.7% 24.1% 9.5% DS* 0.0% 19.0% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time DS* 23.7% 20.0% 20.0% 19.0% 9.5% 0.0% DS* 24.1% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 12.7% ever graduate. 20.0% Age Pell Grant Directly Associate Degree- Recipients 25 and Age from HS African Seeking Students American Over 20–24 Hispanic (age 17–19) (at entry) All White Remedial 3.4% 8.8% 9.2% 4.3% 10.6% 2.5% 9.4% 12.3% 10.2% On-time (2 years) 2004 21.0% 16.3% 7.3% 17.9% 11.3% 18.9% 19.5% 19.9% 9.2% Within 3 years Full-Time 25.3% 19.1% 24.0% 9.4% 15.9% 24.0% 22.1% 23.4% 13.1% Within 4 years 2.9% 6.0% 1.3% 6.9% 2.2% 3.5% 1.0% 3.7% 0.4% Within 2 years 2004 4.8% 9.1% 1.0% 2.5% 6.6% 6.3% 5.4% 11.2% 2.1% Within 3 years Part-Time 4.6% 8.3% 14.4% 9.2% 9.7% 3.6% 3.9% 12.8% 6.9% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 24.0% across the country — for Hispanic and African 15.9% American students, they’re tragic. 9.4% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- Age African Recipients 25 and from HS Seeking Students All Hispanic American Over 20–24 White (at entry) Remedial (age 17–19) 8.8% 16.6% 6.2% 13.4% 15.3% 12.1% 20.1% 19.0% 20.5% On-time (4 years) 2002 33.8% 18.1% 30.6% 38.6% 53.0% 38.6% 53.5% 46.1% 50.0% Within 6 years Full-Time 38.7% 21.5% 45.7% 53.9% 58.7% 55.4% 44.4% 58.5% 36.7% Within 8 years 1.2% 1.7% 1.6% 1.6% 1.9% DS* 2.2% 0.8% 1.5% Within 4 years 2002 4.6% 7.6% 15.3% 16.1% 12.9% 10.2% 9.9% 9.2% 5.9% Within 6 years Part-Time 10.5% 5.8% 11.8% 13.3% 14.0% 21.5% 11.7% 20.0% 17.3% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 18.1% 53.0% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 4.6% ted in cohor 2002–03 t star Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. than suppr essed. DS* = F e w er e 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

182 OKLAHOMA 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 58.0% return to campus 42.0% 42.0% 30.0% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 81.0% 73.0% 67.0% return to campus 40.0% 31.0% 24.0% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 31.5% 26.2% 56.5% 26.1% credits Data: cohor bachelor's t 2004–05, in star t cohor Associate ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned star ear 2002–03; in ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 59.6% 28.6% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 71.3% 66.3% 30.6% 28.2% 24.0% 9.2% Complete Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation remediation within remediation remediation within and associated 6 years associated and 3 years college-level (projected) college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F Data: all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

183 2011 OKLAHOMA Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time students take Full-time take students 5.7 years years 5 Full-time Part-time take students take students Part-time Full-time years 2.8 years 2.8 ke 4 y ears Should ta take students students take for full-time students 1.8 years 2 y ears Should ta ke years 1.5 Should tak e 1 y ear for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Full-time Part-time take students students take 140 credits 136 credits Part-time Full-time take students students take 79 credits credits 74 Should tak e 120 credits Part-time Full-time students take take students Should tak 60 credits e credits 39 credits 32 e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

184 OKLAHOMA 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 22.1% 17.9% Full-Time Part-Time 20.0% 20.0% 8.8% 12.7% 9.2% 12.7% 10.8% 6.3% Part-Time Full-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 55.4% 50.0% Full-Time 19.0% 13.3% 9.9% Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

185 MEMBER OREGON 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 67% r entl y ha v e an associate degr ee cur eg or on adults higher w ho Or 36% Skills gap 31% Methodolog Data: See the Sour ces . bsite y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. r n e t s f O u o h w s t n e y d u p b a n i l l o t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i l 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 34 45 2 19 Return as 34 1 19 8 sophomores Graduate on time 3 14 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 3 0 1 13 150% time 200% time 1 1 0 2 Total graduates 29 0 2 7 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 29 9 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 3 years 6 years 150% time 200% time 4 years 8 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents v ersities. lic pub om fr y onl es pr t epor r colleg and uni his T Note: data

186 OREGON 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 183,332 Total public college enrollment: s t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g e D Attending 106,512 107,241 76,820 76,091 P t-time ar Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 75% 69% 76% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 6% 4% 13% Afr ican Afr Afr ican ican Amer Amer ican ican ican Amer 2% 2% 2% Other r aces Other r aces aces r Other 22% 19% 9% 2009 all Census CS om PUMS 06-08; degr A ees b y r ace fr fr Data: F om 2007-10 state submissions data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Awarded Credentials Awarded 2,432 12,651 2,328 11,225 6,705 6,244 295 82 408 40 1,322 1,405 2008 2003 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

187 OREGON 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African Recipients Age from HS 25 and Students (age 17–19) All Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White 20–24 22.2% 33.1% 31.5% 0.0% 17.4% 21.8% 16.4% 27.5% 27.5% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 37.0% 29.0% 34.4% 36.2% 38.9% 37.6% 21.7% 50.0% 37.3% Within 1 2 / years Full-Time 42.4% 42.1% 42.5% 44.3% 35.2% 42.7% 30.4% 42.2% 50.0% Within 2 years 12.6% DS* 20.8% 10.9% 10.5% 11.6% 14.2% 13.6% 13.2% Within 1 year 2005 1 23.8% DS* 29.2% 23.0% 17.5% 24.5% 24.7% 15.8% 30.2% Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time 37.5% 29.7% 31.1% 100.0% 30.2% 34.0% 23.7% 29.6% 26.3% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 42.4% ever graduate. 31.1% Age Pell Grant Directly Associate Degree- Recipients 25 and Age from HS African Seeking Students American Over 20–24 Hispanic (age 17–19) (at entry) All White Remedial 3.9% 6.3% 6.5% 2.9% 5.5% 3.4% 6.5% 4.9% 6.3% On-time (2 years) 2004 10.0% 13.9% 5.8% 15.0% 10.9% 16.2% 15.4% 13.7% 13.8% Within 3 years Full-Time 13.3% 18.0% 18.4% 8.8% 15.8% 20.1% 19.6% 21.3% 21.3% Within 4 years 2.1% 2.2% 0.0% 0.9% 0.9% 1.4% 0.8% 1.5% 0.6% Within 2 years 2004 4.9% 4.4% 2.9% 1.8% 5.3% 5.0% 5.2% 4.3% 3.8% Within 3 years Part-Time 7.7% 8.6% 7.5% 8.0% 8.4% 5.7% 1.8% 6.6% 8.0% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 20.1% across the country — for Hispanic and African 15.8% American students, they’re tragic. 8.8% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- Age African Recipients 25 and from HS Seeking Students All Hispanic American Over 20–24 White (at entry) Remedial (age 17–19) 20.8% 22.3% 22.0% 20.4% 22.3% 24.6% 32.1% 31.6% 32.9% On-time (4 years) 2002 45.5% 40.0% 50.5% 52.2% 60.3% 45.7% 60.1% 52.3% 59.5% Within 6 years Full-Time 50.1% 44.0% 53.1% 57.6% 64.5% 64.0% 57.5% 64.8% 54.9% Within 8 years 5.9% 5.1% 7.1% 6.7% 6.9% 4.2% 7.3% 0.0% 2.1% Within 4 years 2002 17.6% 13.9% 17.9% 25.2% 12.8% 22.7% 22.4% 10.0% 16.7% Within 6 years Part-Time 20.3% 25.5% 20.8% 29.3% 29.3% 32.2% 10.0% 23.2% 17.0% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 40.0% 60.3% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 17.6% ted in cohor 2002–03 t star Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. than suppr essed. DS* = F e w er e 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

188 OREGON 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 56.6% return to campus 41.7% 33.3% 28.0% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 77.0% 65.5% 60.4% return to campus 42.7% 33.1% 29.3% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 48.3% 41.7% 74.1% 40.2% credits Data: 2004–05, cohor in ted star t cohor Associate bachelor's 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear t 2002–03; in ted star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation . 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 51.6% 11.5% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 81.1% 79.7% 61.5% 50.5% 40.4% 13.8% Complete Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation within remediation within remediation remediation and associated 6 years associated and 3 years college-level (projected) (projected) college-level courses in courses in two years two years F Data: 2006 all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

189 OREGON 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time students take Full-time Part-time years 5.4 students take students take Part-time Full-time years 4.4 students students take take 4.1 years Full-time 3.4 years years 3.4 take students Should ta ke 4 y ears years 2.6 for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta e 1 y ear Should tak for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Full-time students take Part-time take students 125 credits 109 credits Full-time Part-time take students take students Part-time Full-time credits 75 120 credits e Should tak credits 72 students take students take 56 credits credits 53 Should tak 60 credits e e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

190 OREGON 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 42.4% 37.3% Full-Time 31.1% 27.5% 19.6% 23.8% 15.0% Part-Time Full-Time 8.0% 6.3% 5.0% Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 64.0% 59.5% Full-Time 31.6% 29.3% 22.4% Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

191 MEMBER PENNSYL V ANIA 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 60% ee associate ania adults higher or ennsylv degr an e v ha y entl r cur ho w P 43% Skills gap 17% section See . w our on e bsite y Methodolog and ces Sour the Data: Too few students make it through college. p a n f O i l l o r n e o e h w s t n e d u t s g e o r l l o c c i l b u y t i s r e v i n u 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 1 NP* NP* 99 Return as NP* NP* NP* NP* sophomores Graduate on time NP* 0 32 NP* (100% time) Additional graduates NP* 23 0 NP* 150% time 200% time NP* 0 1 NP* Total graduates 0 56 NP* NP* Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years NP* 56 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 150% time 3 years 200% time 4 years 8 years = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this metr ic. NP* f 2002 f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all all in ted star Data: 2-y ear cohor t For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America y es and uni v ersities. Data fr om P ASSHE System onl pub . y onl data esents pr t epor r om lic fr his T Note: colleg

192 PENNSYL V ANIA 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 378,724 Total public college enrollment: u g P s n & C e r t i f i c a t e r g e i u s r D s e e Attending 275,248 230,848 t-time P ar Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 147,876 colleg es colleg es 103,476 e e T otal State P opulation, Colleg Colleg 18-24 e Ag Graduation Enrollment White White White 75% 74% 78% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 3% 3% 6% Afr Afr Afr ican ican ican ican Amer Amer Amer ican ican 10% 11% 12% Other r aces r aces Other Other r aces 13% 12% 5% all 2009 enr ollment fr om IPEDS; population data fr om Census A CS PUMS 06-08 Data: F Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded Awarded 1,928 17,315 1,781 15,315 12,313 9,540 NP* NP* NP* NP* 2,532 1,787 2003 2003 2008 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 Bachelor’s Certificate  Associate Bachelor’s  Certificate Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! vide he = ic. sta te did not pr o T da ta for metr this NP* Complete College America n 2

193 PENNSYL 2011 ANIA V Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Pell Grant Directly Certificate-Seeking Age African 25 and Recipients from HS Students Over American Hispanic (at entry) Remedial All White (age 17–19) 20–24 On-time (1 year) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 2 / years Full-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 year NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 Within 1 years / 2 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- African from HS 25 and Recipients Age Seeking Students 20–24 Hispanic Remedial American (at entry) All Over (age 17–19) White NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* On-time (2 years) 2004 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 3 years Full-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 4 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country — for Hispanic and African American students, they’re tragic. Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- 25 and from HS Age African Recipients Seeking Students (age 17–19) Over All White Hispanic Remedial American 20–24 (at entry) On-time (4 years) 34.4% 32.2% NP* 24.4% 32.9% 16.4% 21.7% 14.8% 20.4% 2002 42.5% 57.8% NP* 56.4% 32.2% 55.3% 35.7% 33.1% 47.1% Within 6 years Full-Time 49.0% 44.5% NP* 33.7% 34.4% 59.3% 56.9% 58.0% 38.2% Within 8 years Within 4 years 7.6% 6.4% 3.4% DS* NP* 7.2% 6.3% 7.8% DS* 2002 DS* 13.3% 19.0% NP* 10.2% 17.6% DS* 11.0% 14.8% Within 6 years Part-Time 10.2% 14.7% 22.8% 17.7% 15.9% 20.6% DS* DS* NP* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 33.1% 56.4% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 17.6% cohor icate tif Data: 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in ted star t cohor associate 2005–06, in ted star t Cer Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled all backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this essed. ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr metr

194 PENNSYL V ANIA 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus NP* NP* NP* NP* Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Associate Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year NP* 76.2% NP* 54.3% credits t cohor Associate Data: in ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 27.8% NP* of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 32.2% 20.1% NP* NP* NP* NP* Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete Complete within within remediation remediation remediation remediation 3 years and associated associated 6 years and college-level college-level (projected) (projected) courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F all Data: Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. T = NP* sta te did not pr o vide da ta he Complete College America n 4

195 PENNSYL V ANIA 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Full-time Part-time take students take students NP* NP* Part-time Full-time students students take take Part-time Full-time NP* NP* take students take students 4 y ears ke Should ta for full-time students NP* NP* 2 y ears ke Should ta Should tak e 1 y ear for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time students take take students 133 credits credits 130 Full-time Part-time take students students take NP* Full-time NP* Part-time e 120 credits Should tak take students take students NP* NP* 60 credits Should tak e Should tak 30 credits e 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! 5 n Complete College America T sta te did not pr o = he vide da ta for this metr ic. NP*

196 V PENNSYL ANIA 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate Full-Time NP* NP* Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 3 years In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 56.9% 55.3% Full-Time 32.2% 15.9% 13.3% Part-Time In 6 years In 4 years In 8 years star 2002–03 in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05; in t cohor associate 2005–06; in Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted ted Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! 6 Complete College America n not ic. this for ta da o pr metr did te sta he T = NP* vide

197 MEMBER AK SOUTH D 2011 O T A For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 63% or Dak ota adults higher degr ee associate an e v ha y entl r cur ho w South 44% Skills gap 19% w our on section See e . bsite y Methodolog and ces Sour the Data: Too few students make it through college. i l l f O o r n e o e h w s t n e d u t s l l o g e c o r c i l b u p a n y t i s r e v i n u 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 10 5 84 1 Return as 4 64 NP* NP* sophomores Graduate on time NP* NP* 15 0 (100% time) Additional graduates NP* 28 NP* 0 150% time 200% time 0 0 4 0 Total graduates NP* 47 0 NP* Graduate in 8 years Graduate in 4 years NP* NP* Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 3 years 6 years 150% time 8 years 200% time 4 years = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this metr ic. NP* f 2002 f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2004; all all in ted star Data: 2-y ear cohor t For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents es and uni v ersities. y onl data pub pr t epor r om lic colleg his T Note: fr

198 A SOUTH D AK O T 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 36,365 Total public college enrollment: C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i t r g a e s e D Attending 25,831 30,192 ar P t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 6,173 10,534 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 92% 82% 83% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 1% 1% 3% Afr Afr ican ican ican Afr Amer ican Amer ican ican Amer 1% 1% 1% r Other aces aces Other r r aces Other 16% 7% 13% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 state submissions F om Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 1,056 3,548 906 3,004 21 7 3 4 374 240 17 16 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

199 SOUTH 2011 A T O AK D Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking Recipients African Age 25 and from HS Students (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White (age 17–19) All American 20–24 Over On-time (1 year) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 2 years / Full-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 1 year NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2005 1 Within 1 years / 2 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Part-Time Within 2 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Pell Grant Age Directly Associate Degree- African Recipients Age 25 and from HS Seeking Students All Remedial Over American Hispanic (age 17–19) White (at entry) 20–24 DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* On-time (2 years) 2004 6.4% DS* 5.5% DS* 6.0% DS* DS* DS* 5.5% Within 3 years Full-Time 6.4% 5.5% 6.0% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 5.5% Within 4 years DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Part-Time DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal across the country — for Hispanic and African American students, they’re tragic. Directly Age Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- from HS Age 25 and Recipients African Seeking Students 20–24 (at entry) American (age 17–19) Remedial Over Hispanic White All On-time (4 years) DS* 14.9% 18.5% DS* 7.9% 18.6% 0.0% DS* 17.9% 2002 26.2% DS* DS* 52.6% 51.3% 46.8% 52.9% 37.7% 21.4% Within 6 years Full-Time 41.7% 26.9% 55.1% 56.4% DS* DS* 29.2% 56.7% 51.1% Within 8 years Within 4 years DS* DS* DS* DS* 0.0% DS* 0.0% DS* DS* 2002 DS* 5.8% 8.1% DS* DS* 7.5% DS* 10.1% DS* Within 6 years Part-Time DS* 11.1% 10.2% DS* 7.7% DS* DS* 13.6% 9.0% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 26.2% 52.9% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, 2002–03 cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's cohor in t star ted associate Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this essed. ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr metr

200

201 D SOUTH 2011 AK O T A Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time take students years 6.9 Part-time take students Full-time take students 5.4 years Full-time take students 4.7 years 4 years Full-time Part-time take students students take Should ta ke 4 y ears for full-time students NP* NP* 2 y ears Should ta ke 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time take students take students credits 147 credits 141 Part-time students take Full-time take students 101 credits 86 credits Full-time Part-time Should tak 120 credits e students take students take NP* NP* e 60 credits Should tak e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! 5 n Complete College America T sta te did not pr o = he vide da ta for this metr ic. NP*

202 D T O A AK 2011 SOUTH More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Certificate Associate Full-Time NP* Full-Time 5.5% DS* 5.5% Part-Time DS* DS* Part-Time In 4 years In 3 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 55.1% 51.3% Full-Time 17.9% 10.2% 7.5% Part-Time In 4 years In 6 years In 8 years ted star t cohor Data: 2004–05; in ted star t cohor associate 2005–06; in ted star t cohor icate tif Cer 2002–03 in bachelor's Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! Complete College America n 6 metr essed. e er w ta da so students, 10 than w e F = DS* ic. suppr this for ta da vide o pr not did te sta he T = NP* er

203 MEMBER TENNESSEE 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 56% entl y ha v e an associate degr ee or cur ennessee higher adults w ho r T 31% Skills gap 25% bsite Data: See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. o r n e t s f O u o h w s t n e y d u p b a n i l l l t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Enroll 37 52 2 9 Return as 42 1 20 4 sophomores Graduate on time 2 17 0 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 4 1 1 13 150% time 200% time 2 0 0 2 Total graduates 32 1 1 8 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 33 9 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 4 years 2 years 100% time 3 years 6 years 150% time 200% time 4 years 8 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents v ersities. lic pub om fr y onl es pr t epor r colleg and uni his T Note: data

204 TENNESSEE 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 218,859 Total public college enrollment: a n g r D P s e g r e e s & C e r t i f i c t e s u u i Attending 151,948 113,576 105,283 t-time P ar Full-time ear 2-y ear 4-y 66,911 es colleg es colleg State P e Colleg T otal e Colleg opulation, Enrollment e 18-24 Graduation Ag White White White 74% 73% 72% Hispanic Hispanic 4% Hispanic 2% 2% ican Afr Afr ican Afr ican Amer ican ican Amer Amer ican 18% 19% 21% aces r Other Other r aces Other r aces 6% 6% 3% population state 2007-10 om fr ace r y b ees degr 06-08; PUMS fr Data: CS A Census om fr data submissions IPEDS; om ollment enr 2009 all F Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Awarded Credentials Awarded 2,714 17,160 2,599 15,388 6,968 6,357 416 372 26 DS* 468 364 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003 2008 2008   Associate Bachelor’s Certificate Certificate Associate Bachelor’s 2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! ta e = DS* w er than 10 students, so F w er e essed. suppr da Complete College America n 2

205 TENNESSEE 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking Recipients 25 and African from HS Age Students All (age 17–19) Over American Hispanic (at entry) Remedial White 20–24 On-time (1 year) DS* NP* NP* NP* DS* DS* DS* DS* NP* 2005 1 NP* DS* DS* 35.0% NP* DS* 14.0% NP* NP* Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time Within 2 years 28.0% NP* NP* NP* DS* DS* 61.0% NP* DS* Within 1 year NP* DS* NP* DS* NP* NP* DS* DS* DS* 2005 1 Within 1 years / 2 DS* DS* NP* DS* DS* NP* NP* NP* DS* Part-Time Within 2 years NP* DS* DS* DS* NP* NP* NP* DS* DS* In most states, very few students seeking certificates ever graduate. Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- Age Recipients from HS African 25 and Seeking Students 20–24 Over American Hispanic Remedial (age 17–19) (at entry) White All DS* 1.0% 4.2% 2.0% 4.6% 3.1% 7.1% 6.0% 7.2% On-time (2 years) 2004 6.1% 12.6% 18.0% 14.7% 11.9% 8.2% 20.4% 15.3% 20.8% Within 3 years Full-Time 25.4% 25.4% 10.5% 17.4% 8.9% 16.4% 15.9% 22.3% 19.7% Within 4 years 1.3% DS* DS* DS* DS* 1.1% 0.6% 0.9% 0.6% Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years 8.7% 10.2% 4.6% 7.5% 7.3% 6.8% 7.2% DS* 4.3% Part-Time 6.1% 15.2% 7.1% 10.0% 9.9% 11.1% 10.9% 12.5% DS* Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 25.4% across the country — for Hispanic and African 16.4% American students, they’re tragic. 8.9% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- African 25 and Age from HS Recipients Seeking Students American (age 17–19) (at entry) White Remedial Hispanic 20–24 Over All On-time (4 years) 19.3% 33.4% 7.9% 12.9% 17.3% 30.2% 31.9% 35.0% 21.8% 2002 48.2% 60.8% 56.9% 59.0% 46.7% 23.2% 30.9% 44.4% 44.6% Within 6 years Full-Time 51.2% 29.4% 38.0% 49.8% 55.9% 65.3% 61.7% 51.4% 63.6% Within 8 years Within 4 years 5.1% DS* 10.2% 4.9% DS* 6.7% 6.3% DS* DS* 2002 12.1% 31.4% 28.0% 24.8% 13.6% 42.6% 27.7% 19.1% DS* Within 6 years Part-Time DS* 38.1% 38.1% 45.1% 32.7% 51.9% 20.2% 19.2% 22.8% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 30.9% 59.0% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 13.6% t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star cohor in 2004–05, bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate ted Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled all backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this essed. ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr metr

206 2011 TENNESSEE Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 54.0% return to campus 42.2% 32.1% 27.9% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 80.2% 71.7% 65.8% return to campus 39.8% 34.4% 27.4% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 58.7% 56.9% 92.1% 71.1% credits star Associate in t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 71.2% NP* of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 46.5% 44.4% 21.0% NP* NP* 12.6% Graduate Complete Complete Graduate Complete Complete remediation within remediation within remediation remediation 6 years associated and 3 years associated and (projected) college-level college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years F 2006 Data: all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta NP* did not pr o vide da ta te Complete College America n 4

207 TENNESSEE 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time Part-time students take Full-time Part-time students take Full-time take students 5.4 years take take students students take students 4.9 years years 4.8 4.5 years years 4.5 4.2 years ke 4 y ears Should ta for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Full-time Part-time students take take students 135 credits 134 credits Part-time Full-time take students students take Full-time credits 80 credits 79 Part-time students take Should tak e 120 credits take students 61 credits 50 credits Should tak 60 credits e e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

208 TENNESSEE 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 22.3% Full-Time 18.0% NP* Full-Time 10.9% 7.5% 6.0% Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 3 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 61.7% 56.9% Full-Time 31.9% 32.7% 24.8% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years 2004–05; in ted 2002–03 in ted star t cohor star bachelor's Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! 6 n Complete College America not ic. this for ta vide o pr metr did te sta he T = NP* da

209 MEMBER 2011 TEXAS For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 60% e v ha y entl r cur higher w exas T adults or ee degr associate an ho 31% Skills gap 29% the See Data: . bsite e w our on section y Methodolog and ces Sour Too few students make it through college. n l o r n e o h w s t n d u t s f O i n a p u b l i c c o e l l e g e y t i s r e v i o u r l 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 1 41 38 20 Return as 1 18 26 20 sophomores Graduate on time 2 0 5 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 1 0 7 1 150% time 200% time 2 1 0 1 Total graduates 0 13 2 5 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 13 7 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years in ted star t cohor t 4-y 2004; all f in ted star ear 2-y Data: cohor 2002 all f ear For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data es and uni v ersities. fr y onl pub esents pr t r om lic colleg his T Note: epor

210 TEXAS 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 1,131,425 Total public college enrollment: s e e r r g e e t D g n i a c i f i t P u s C & s u e r Attending 662,634 549,089 582,336 P ar t-time Full-time ear 2-y ear 4-y 468,791 colleg es es colleg Colleg otal State P opulation, Colleg e T e Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 54% 46% 43% Hispanic Hispanic 32% Hispanic 39% 26% ican Afr Afr ican Afr ican ican Amer Amer Amer ican ican 13% 13% 10% aces Other r aces Other r r aces Other 10% 9% 5% om Census CS PUMS 06-08; A degr ees fr data population IPEDS; om fr ollment b y r ace fr om enr 2009 all F Data: 2007-10 state submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 15,151 75,623 13,319 61,828 37,280 28,533 4,277 3,648 2,176 2,903 16,025 17,216 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003 2008 Associate  Bachelor’s Certificate Certificate  Bachelor’s Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

211 2011 TEXAS Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Pell Grant Age Certificate-Seeking 25 and Age African Recipients from HS Students (age 17–19) White 20–24 (at entry) Remedial Over American Hispanic All 9.1% 4.4% 3.5% 2.2% 3.0% 3.1% 1.1% 1.9% 2.9% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 2.0% 10.7% 5.5% 2.9% 4.7% 3.1% 4.0% 4.3% 4.0% Within 1 years 2 / Full-Time 4.8% 5.6% 11.7% 6.3% 3.8% 2.9% 3.8% 4.9% 5.2% Within 2 years 2.1% 1.8% 2.0% 2.4% 5.0% 2.2% 3.1% 1.0% 1.0% Within 1 year 2005 1 3.1% 2.7% 2.8% 3.0% 3.0% 6.6% 1.7% 4.3% 1.9% Within 1 / years 2 Part-Time 3.8% 3.6% 3.5% 3.9% 2.8% 3.8% 5.3% 7.5% 2.4% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 4.8% ever graduate. 3.6% Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- Age African from HS Recipients 25 and Seeking Students (age 17–19) (at entry) Remedial 20–24 Hispanic Over White American All 2.4% 3.6% 2.4% 3.2% 3.1% 2.6% 1.6% 2.3% 3.3% On-time (2 years) 2004 8.3% 5.3% 8.5% 7.8% 7.2% 8.2% 5.9% 5.8% 7.2% Within 3 years Full-Time 11.7% 7.9% 11.7% 11.2% 11.3% 11.8% 10.8% 9.2% 8.1% Within 4 years 0.7% 1.0% 0.6% 0.7% 0.7% 0.4% 0.6% 0.2% 0.5% Within 2 years 2004 2.2% 3.0% 1.8% 2.1% 1.6% 2.4% 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% Within 3 years Part-Time 4.5% 3.7% 5.4% 3.9% 4.7% 4.9% 3.8% 4.7% 5.0% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 11.7% across the country — for Hispanic and African 11.3% American students, they’re tragic. 8.1% Pell Grant Directly Age Bachelor’s Degree- 25 and Recipients African from HS Age Seeking Students Remedial White Hispanic American Over 20–24 (age 17–19) (at entry) All 12.5% 15.4% 25.0% 6.5% 25.4% 11.7% 14.5% 31.3% 15.0% On-time (4 years) 2002 24.6% 29.3% 42.0% 35.6% 44.7% 64.6% 56.1% 57.0% 29.6% Within 6 years Full-Time 29.7% 33.0% 49.6% 63.6% 37.8% 42.8% 62.6% 70.0% 52.9% Within 8 years 6.5% 4.3% 8.4% 10.7% 4.9% 4.6% 9.1% 5.5% 3.3% Within 4 years 2002 13.0% 13.4% 17.7% 18.6% 34.1% 30.0% 36.5% 21.8% 21.3% Within 6 years Part-Time 18.3% 19.5% 26.4% 38.7% 46.1% 43.6% 27.3% 25.7% 28.3% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 29.3% 57.0% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 13.0% 2004–05, in ted ted star t cohor bachelor's 2002–03 star in Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and Americans to compete unless many more students from all ! walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America

212 TEXAS 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 63.8% 54.2% return to campus 48.2% 43.6% Students in 4-year 100% 100% 87.5% colleges who 80.4% 73.4% 72.5% 64.2% 57.8% return to campus ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Students who earn expected first-year 64.1% 34.0% 71.6% 28.3% credits ted 2004–05, in bachelor's star t cohor Associate Data: 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; cohor in ted star t Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! . Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 22.5% 51.0% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 49.2% 32.1% 30.0% 29.6% 14.3% 5.8% Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete Complete remediation within within remediation remediation remediation 6 years associated and and associated 3 years (projected) college-level college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years all 2006 Data: F Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! n Complete College America 4

213 2011 TEXAS Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time students take Full-time Part-time students take 6 years Full-time students take 5.3 years take students 5 years Part-time Full-time 4.5 years take students take students 3.6 years 3.5 years 4 y ears ke Should ta for full-time students Should ta ke 2 y ears 1 y ear e Should tak for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time Full-time take students take students 149 credits 149 credits Full-time Part-time take students students take Full-time credits 98 92 credits Part-time take students students take Should tak 120 credits e credits 70 58 credits 60 credits e Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

214 TEXAS 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 11.2% 7.8% Full-Time Full-Time 4.8% 3.1% 4.0% 2.9% 4.7% Part-Time Part-Time 3.6% 2.4% 2.8% In 4 years In 2 years In 3 years In 1.5 years In 1 year In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 62.6% 56.1% Full-Time 38.7% 30.0% 25.0% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

215 MEMBER 2011 AH UT For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 68% ha v e w adults ho cur r higher or ee degr associate an entl y Utah 38% Skills gap 30% Methodolog the Sour e Data: ces bsite See y section on our w . and Too few students make it through college. O t n e d u s s r v e t s y i n w t i f u r h o e n o e g e l l o c c i l b u p a n i l l o r 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Full-Time Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Enroll 45 4 26 25 Return as 15 2 24 11 sophomores Graduate on time 4 0 4 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 3 1 0 6 150% time 200% time 3 0 2 1 Total graduates 1 12 1 10 Graduate in 8 years Graduate in 4 years 11 13 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 150% time 6 years 3 years 200% time 8 years 4 years all cohor t star ted in f all 2004; Data: ear 2-y 2002 f in ted 4-y ear cohor t star For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data and uni v ersities. om fr y onl lic esents pr t epor pub colleg es r his T Note:

216 UT AH 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 162,650 Total public college enrollment: t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g s e D Attending 111,405 80,139 82,511 P t-time ar Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 51,245 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Enrollment 18-24 e Ag Graduation White White White 81% 76% 83% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 6% 3% 10% Afr ican Afr Afr ican ican Amer Amer ican ican ican Amer 1% 1% 1% Other r aces Other r aces aces r Other 16% 15% 6% 2009 all Census om CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees b y r ace fr fr Data: F om 2007-10 state submissions data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Awarded Credentials Awarded 1,983 12,163 1,924 11,144 8,556 8,069 761 490 47 57 448 1,059 2008 2003 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

217 2011 UT AH Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking 25 and Age Recipients from HS African Students (age 17–19) White 20–24 Over (at entry) Remedial American All Hispanic 1.8% DS* DS* DS* 0.0% 1.8% DS* NP* DS* On-time (1 year) 2005 1 DS* 1.8% DS* DS* NP* DS* 0.0% DS* 1.8% Within 1 / 2 years Full-Time DS* 3.6% DS* NP* DS* DS* DS* DS* 3.5% Within 2 years DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* NP* DS* Within 1 year 2005 1 DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* NP* DS* DS* DS* Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time DS* DS* DS* DS* NP* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates DS* ever graduate. DS* Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- 25 and from HS Age Recipients African Seeking Students All American Hispanic Over 20–24 White (age 17–19) (at entry) Remedial 11.5% 2.6% 1.8% 2.4% NP* 10.8% 9.5% 2.3% 4.7% On-time (2 years) 2004 9.8% 5.0% 51.6% 18.0% NP* 16.5% 8.0% 19.5% 8.4% Within 3 years Full-Time 13.2% 7.0% 21.8% 25.7% NP* 10.0% 11.7% 23.8% 11.5% Within 4 years 0.7% 0.8% NP* 1.1% 0.9% 0.2% DS* DS* 0.9% Within 2 years 2004 2.8% 2.1% 3.0% 1.2% NP* 2.9% 2.8% 1.2% DS* Within 3 years Part-Time NP* 5.5% 3.6% 5.3% 4.5% 5.8% DS* 3.7% 6.2% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 23.8% across the country — for Hispanic and African 11.5% American students, they’re tragic. 10.0% Age Directly Pell Grant Bachelor’s Degree- from HS African Recipients 25 and Age Seeking Students Over (age 17–19) 20–24 American (at entry) Hispanic White All Remedial 13.0% 13.5% NP* 15.0% 11.1% 5.4% 15.4% 15.3% 8.9% On-time (4 years) 2002 32.7% 25.0% 38.7% 23.4% NP* 39.2% 22.2% 32.9% 38.2% Within 6 years Full-Time 37.3% 25.0% 22.2% 47.9% NP* 28.8% 34.8% 46.3% 47.2% Within 8 years 5.0% 0.0% 3.7% 3.4% 0.0% 3.1% NP* DS* DS* Within 4 years 2002 14.9% 10.6% 6.7% NP* 16.1% 17.1% 9.4% DS* 17.5% Within 6 years Part-Time 16.7% 18.4% DS* 22.6% 23.7% 15.6% 14.7% 25.3% NP* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 25.0% 39.2% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 10.6% Data: star ted in cohor 2002–03 bachelor's Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and ! walks of life graduate. metr suppr essed. NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this e ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

218 UT AH 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 53.8% return to campus 41.6% 32.2% 29.5% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 58.2% return to campus 45.0% 41.5% 41.7% 31.9% 27.7% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Associate Students who earn expected first-year 28.3% 59.8% 52.3% 40.5% credits Data: bachelor's t 2004–05, in star t cohor Associate ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear cohor 2002–03; in ted star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 18.4% 22.8% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 81.7% 75.2% 51.6% 32.8% 31.3% 23.4% Graduate Complete Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation within within remediation remediation remediation and associated 3 years 6 years associated and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F Data: all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

219 UT AH 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time take students Full-time years 7.8 Part-time students take Part-time students take 6.7 years Full-time students take Full-time years 6.1 take students 5.7 years students take 5.1 years years 4.9 ke 4 y ears Should ta for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Full-time Part-time take students take students 147 credits credits 146 Full-time Full-time Part-time Part-time students take students take students take take students 92 credits credits 89 89 credits 87 credits Should tak e 120 credits e Should tak 60 credits e 30 credits Should tak 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

220 2011 AH UT More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 21.8% Full-Time DS* 16.5% Full-Time 9.5% 5.5% 2.8% Part-Time Part-Time In 4 years In 3 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 46.3% 38.2% Full-Time 22.6% 15.0% 16.1% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years bachelor's in 2002–03 in ted star t cohor ted star 2004–05; Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n Complete College America 6 10 essed. e er w da so students, suppr than er w e F = DS* ta

221 MEMBER 2011 VIRGINIA For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 66% e v ha y entl r cur higher w ginia Vir adults or ee degr associate an ho 42% Skills gap 24% the See Data: . bsite e w our on section y Methodolog and ces Sour Too few students make it through college. n l o r n e o h w s t n d u t s f O i n a p u b l i c c o e l l e g e y t i s r e v i o u r l 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 1 25 18 57 Return as 0 48 14 7 sophomores Graduate on time 1 0 26 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 2 0 15 1 150% time 200% time 2 1 0 1 Total graduates 0 42 2 5 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 42 7 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years in ted star t cohor t 4-y 2004; all f in ted star ear 2-y Data: cohor 2002 all f ear For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data es and uni v ersities. fr y onl pub esents pr t r om lic colleg his T Note: epor

222 VIRGINIA 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 349,425 Total public college enrollment: s t r a e C c & t s e e r P u r s u i n g e i f i g e D Attending 190,854 208,155 158,571 P ar t-time Full-time ear 2-y 4-y ear 141,270 colleg es es colleg State P opulation, e e Colleg T otal Colleg Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e Ag White White White 69% 62% 63% Hispanic Hispanic 7% 5% Hispanic 4% ican ican Afr ican Afr Afr Amer ican ican Amer ican Amer 19% 23% 14% r Other aces aces Other r r aces Other 15% 13% 7% Census CS PUMS 06-08; degr A ees fr b y r ace fr Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment enr 2009 all om 2007-10 state om F submissions Now we must have more success from all students. ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Credentials Awarded Awarded 6,009 29,714 5,310 26,223 12,009 10,101 1,026 1,192 245 65 1,220 1,073 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Associate Certificate  Certificate  2007–08 Data: And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

223 VIRGINIA 2011 Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African Recipients Age from HS 25 and Students (age 17–19) All Over American (at entry) Remedial Hispanic White 20–24 2.2% DS* DS* DS* DS* 0.0% 1.9% DS* 2.0% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 2.0% 9.0% 4.1% 2.0% 7.0% DS* 5.0% 0.0% 4.0% Within 1 / 2 years Full-Time 5.0% 10.0% 3.0% 5.0% 3.0% 7.0% 3.2% DS* 6.1% Within 2 years NP* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 0.0% Within 1 year 2005 1 1.0% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 1 years 2 / Part-Time DS* DS* 1.0% DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 5.0% ever graduate. 1.0% Pell Grant Directly Age Associate Degree- from HS Recipients Age 25 and African Seeking Students Over (at entry) Remedial White All 20–24 (age 17–19) American Hispanic 4.0% 2.2% 2.0% 1.0% 3.0% 5.3% 4.0% 5.0% 4.0% On-time (2 years) 2004 15.0% 13.0% 12.0% 13.0% 16.0% 16.0% 17.7% 11.6% 9.0% Within 3 years Full-Time 17.0% 19.0% 22.2% 16.2% 12.0% 20.0% 21.0% 17.0% 17.0% Within 4 years 1.0% 1.0% DS* 0.3% 1.0% 0.0% DS* DS* 1.0% Within 2 years 2004 6.0% 4.0% 3.0% 4.0% 4.0% 6.0% 5.0% 7.0% 6.0% Within 3 years Part-Time 9.0% 10.0% 7.0% 5.0% 10.0% 7.0% 7.0% 9.0% 9.0% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 22.2% across the country — for Hispanic and African 16.2% American students, they’re tragic. 12.0% Pell Grant Directly Age Bachelor’s Degree- from HS African Recipients 25 and Age Seeking Students American 20–24 Hispanic (at entry) All Over (age 17–19) Remedial White 22.0% 15.0% 27.0% 39.8% 50.4% 24.7% 12.0% 46.0% 45.0% On-time (4 years) 2002 43.0% 27.0% 52.1% 69.1% 40.0% 76.1% 56.0% 72.0% 72.0% Within 6 years Full-Time 45.0% 29.0% 70.8% 44.0% 58.0% 74.0% 73.0% 77.6% 54.3% Within 8 years DS* 0.0% DS* 8.0% DS* 7.0% 11.0% DS* DS* Within 4 years 2002 0.0% DS* DS* 17.0% 27.0% 23.0% 26.0% DS* 15.0% Within 6 years Part-Time DS* DS* 22.0% 29.0% 30.0% DS* 33.0% DS* 21.0% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 27.0% 72.0% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 0.0% star 2002–03 ted in cohor t Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. metr suppr essed. NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this e ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

224 VIRGINIA 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 57.0% return to campus 38.0% 34.0% 26.0% Students in 4-year 100% 100% 84.0% colleges who 75.0% 71.0% return to campus 47.0% 35.0% 34.0% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Associate Bachelor’s Students who earn expected first-year 71.0% 31.5% 88.0% 37.1% credits Data: cohor bachelor's t 2004–05, in star t cohor Associate ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned star ear 2002–03; in ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 2-Year Colleges 4-Year Colleges 43.0% 0.3% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 80.0% 76.0% 40.0% 38.3% 22.3% 12.0% Complete Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation remediation within remediation remediation within and associated 6 years associated and 3 years college-level (projected) college-level (projected) courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F Data: all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

225 2011 VIRGINIA Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Part-time Part-time take take students students take students Full-time 5.6 years 5.6 years years 5.4 Full-time students take Full-time students take years 4.4 take students 4 years years 3.5 ke Should ta 4 y ears for full-time students 2 y ears ke Should ta e Should tak 1 y ear for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time students take students take 130 credits 128 credits Part-time Full-time Full-time Part-time students take take students students take students take 81 credits 79 credits Should tak 120 credits e credits 68 68 credits 60 credits e Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

226 VIRGINIA 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 20.0% 16.0% Full-Time 9.0% 4.0% 5.0% 5.0% Full-Time 4.0% Part-Time 2.0% 1.0% Part-Time 1.0% In 4 years In 2 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 73.0% 72.0% Full-Time 45.0% 29.0% 23.0% Part-Time In 8 years In 4 years In 6 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

227 MEMBER ASHINGT W ON 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 70% ha v e an associate degr ee or cur ashington higher adults w ho r entl y W 39% Skills gap 31% Data: bsite See the Sour ces . Methodolog y section on our w e and Too few students make it through college. r n e o t s f O h w s t n e b d u u p a l n i l l o y t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c i 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Full-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll 41 16 4 39 Return as 32 1 24 6 sophomores Graduate on time 6 23 1 1 (100% time) Additional graduates 5 1 0 2 150% time 200% time 2 0 0 0 Total graduates 2 25 1 13 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 26 15 Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 150% time 3 years 6 years 8 years 200% time 4 years f in ted star t cohor all 2-y Data: ear f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y 2002 2004; all For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America esents ersities. colleg lic pub om fr y data and pr t epor r es uni v his T Note: onl

228 W ASHINGT ON 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 306,239 Total public college enrollment: e u D P e e s & C e r t i f i c a t i u s n r s g g e r Attending 188,827 157,447 148,792 ar t-time P Full-time 2-y ear 4-y ear 117,412 es colleg es colleg opulation, Colleg e T e otal State P Colleg Ag Graduation Enrollment 18-24 e White White White 68% 62% 71% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 7% 6% 12% Afr ican Afr ican Afr ican ican ican Amer ican Amer Amer 4% 4% 4% r aces Other aces r Other aces r Other 22% 27% 13% om submissions y b ees degr 06-08; PUMS CS A Census 2007-10 om om fr data population IPEDS; state fr ollment 2009 all F Data: fr ace r enr students. Now we must have more success from all ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Awarded Credentials Awarded 2,463 21,370 21,347 15,392 1,701 14,155 1,050 NP* NP* 653 4,231 5,144 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003   Associate Bachelor’s Certificate Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! vide he = NP* sta te did not pr o T ta for this ic. metr da Complete College America n 2

229 2011 W ON ASHINGT Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking African 25 and Recipients Age from HS Students 20–24 American (at entry) Remedial Over White Hispanic All (age 17–19) 17.5% 10.6% 6.5% 20.4% 12.9% 15.8% 9.8% 17.3% 16.5% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 25.6% 23.0% 23.7% 24.7% 20.0% 14.1% 13.0% 24.2% 25.6% Within 1 years / 2 Full-Time 28.1% 26.2% 28.3% 27.6% 29.4% 26.6% 17.3% 29.6% 15.3% Within 2 years 4.1% 3.6% 2.3% 7.8% 3.3% 3.3% 3.9% 6.1% 8.6% Within 1 year 2005 1 8.4% 7.9% 5.7% 7.8% 7.5% 7.8% 15.7% 9.8% 9.0% Within 1 / 2 years Part-Time 12.6% 12.8% 8.0% 13.7% 14.2% 25.4% 13.5% 11.4% 13.8% Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 28.1% ever graduate. 12.6% Directly Pell Grant Age Associate Degree- Recipients African from HS Age 25 and Seeking Students All White Hispanic Remedial (at entry) (age 17–19) American 20–24 Over 12.0% 13.6% 15.0% 9.1% 8.4% 14.0% 8.0% 13.9% 10.5% On-time (2 years) 2004 23.8% 20.3% 28.0% 22.7% 14.9% 26.3% 20.4% 27.6% 23.7% Within 3 years Full-Time 27.0% 24.5% 24.6% 33.0% 31.2% 28.6% 33.0% 18.5% 28.5% Within 4 years 18.7% 4.6% 4.8% 2.3% 2.1% 3.9% 7.0% 4.4% 4.5% Within 2 years 2004 10.0% 26.2% 4.8% 10.3% 11.2% 12.1% 10.5% 10.2% 8.8% Within 3 years Part-Time 16.1% 16.0% 14.4% 29.7% 15.7% 18.4% 14.9% 9.3% 15.3% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 33.0% across the country — for Hispanic and African 24.6% American students, they’re tragic. 18.5% Pell Grant Age Directly Bachelor’s Degree- from HS Recipients 25 and Age African Seeking Students Remedial Over 20–24 (age 17–19) American (at entry) Hispanic White All 44.1% 52.3% 43.5% 59.6% 60.6% 51.3% 62.0% 53.2% NP* On-time (4 years) 2002 44.7% 54.1% 63.2% 66.1% 64.5% 56.1% 47.4% NP* 56.6% Within 6 years Full-Time 54.6% 44.7% 66.5% 48.5% 63.5% 64.9% 56.5% 57.1% NP* Within 8 years 47.6% 27.5% 33.9% 31.7% 29.7% NP* 27.3% 33.8% 48.5% Within 4 years 2002 49.3% 29.0% 50.9% 38.4% NP* 33.7% 36.4% 29.7% 27.3% Within 6 years Part-Time 29.3% 49.3% 29.7% 34.0% 36.7% 51.5% 27.3% 38.8% NP* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 44.7% 66.1% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 29.0% star ted 2002–03 in cohor t Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, bachelor's Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all backgrounds and walks of life graduate. did metr ic. NP* = T he sta te this not pr o vide da ta for n 3 Complete College America

230 W ASHINGT ON 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 57.2% return to campus 40.7% 29.3% 26.6% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 81.9% 69.4% 62.8% return to campus 22.5% 15.1% 9.8% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Students who earn expected first-year 38.6% NP* 49.6% NP* credits t cohor Associate Data: in ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 4.7% 45.9% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 53.4% 22.7% NP* 9.5% NP* NP* Graduate Graduate Complete Complete Complete Complete within within remediation remediation remediation remediation 3 years and associated associated 6 years and college-level college-level (projected) (projected) courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F all Data: Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. T = NP* sta te did not pr o vide da ta he Complete College America n 4

231 W ON ASHINGT 2011 Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Part-time Full-time Part-time take students take students students take take students 4.7 years Full-time 4.4 years years 4.1 years 4.1 students take Full-time 3.1 years take students ke Should ta 4 y ears for full-time students years 2.2 Should ta ke 2 y ears Should tak e 1 y ear for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time take students students take NP* NP* Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time take students take students students take take students Should tak e 120 credits credits 71 68 credits 63 credits 63 credits 60 credits e Should tak e 30 credits Should tak Data: 2007–08 More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America = he sta te did not pr o T NP* da ta for this metr ic. vide

232 W ASHINGT ON 2011 More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 31.2% 26.3% Full-Time 28.1% 24.2% Full-Time 15.3% 13.6% 16.5% 10.3% 12.6% Part-Time 8.4% Part-Time In 4 years In 2 years In 3 years In 1.5 years In 1 year In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 63.5% 63.2% Full-Time 59.6% 34.0% 33.7% Part-Time In 6 years In 8 years In 4 years ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; bachelor's cohor t star ted in 2002–03 Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n 6 Complete College America

233 MEMBER VIRGINIA WEST 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 53% v ha y entl r cur ho higher adults Vir est W ginia or ee degr associate an e w 28% Skills gap 25% . bsite e w our on section y Methodolog and ces Sour the See Data: Too few students make it through college. r l o r n e o h w s t n d u t s f O i n a p u b l i c c o e l l e y t i s r e v i n u g o e l 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Full-Time Enroll 2 26 5 68 Return as 1 53 16 2 sophomores Graduate on time 1 0 15 0 (100% time) Additional graduates 2 18 0 0 150% time 200% time 3 2 0 0 Total graduates 0 35 0 6 Graduate in 4 years Graduate in 8 years 35 6 Key to measuring time Bachelor’s Associate 2 years 4 years 100% time 6 years 3 years 150% time 200% time 8 years 4 years in ted star t cohor t 4-y 2004; all f in ted star ear 2-y Data: cohor 2002 all f ear For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data es and uni v ersities. fr y onl pub esents pr t r om lic colleg his T Note: epor

234 WEST VIRGINIA 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 82,518 Total public college enrollment: e e r r g e e t D g n i a c i f i t P u s C & s u s e r Attending 59,950 60,777 21,741 P ar t-time Full-time 2-y ear ear 4-y colleg es es colleg 22,568 Colleg otal State P opulation, Colleg e T e Enrollment 18-24 e Ag Graduation White White White 87% 86% 90% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 2% 2% 2% ican ican Afr Afr ican Afr Amer Amer ican ican Amer ican 6% 5% 5% r aces aces Other Other r r aces Other 7% 6% 3% A 2009 all F Data: data population IPEDS; om fr ollment CS PUMS 06-08 om Census fr enr students. Now we must have more success from all ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Overall Credentials Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Credentials Awarded Awarded 1,458 8,298 7,349 1,245 2,542 327 51 324 29 353 2,040 109 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003 2008 Associate  Bachelor’s Certificate Certificate  Bachelor’s Associate Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! Complete College America n 2

235 2011 WEST VIRGINIA Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Age Directly Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking 25 and Age Recipients from HS African Students (age 17–19) White 20–24 Over (at entry) Remedial American All Hispanic 11.3% 0.0% DS* DS* 22.6% 10.5% DS* 11.6% 11.7% On-time (1 year) 2005 1 22.6% 4.0% 13.2% DS* 14.5% DS* DS* 13.8% 14.0% Within 1 years / 2 Full-Time 16.0% 17.7% DS* 22.6% 15.8% 8.0% DS* 16.3% DS* Within 2 years DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* Within 1 year 2005 1 DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 5.3% 9.1% DS* DS* Within 1 / 2 years Part-Time DS* DS* DS* DS* DS* 9.1% DS* 5.3% DS* Within 2 years In most states, very few students seeking certificates 16.0% ever graduate. DS* Age Pell Grant Directly Associate Degree- 25 and Age from HS Recipients African Seeking Students Remedial (at entry) Hispanic (age 17–19) White 20–24 All Over American 1.8% 6.0% 5.2% 7.4% 5.6% 3.9% 0.7% 4.8% 2.6% On-time (2 years) 2004 6.9% 14.2% 13.1% 11.1% 12.6% 13.7% 7.5% 8.4% 10.6% Within 3 years Full-Time 9.7% 18.4% 11.1% 17.4% 16.7% 14.6% 18.1% 9.6% 12.5% Within 4 years 0.9% DS* DS* 0.5% 0.6% 0.3% DS* DS* DS* Within 2 years 2004 6.1% 2.6% 4.7% 3.2% 5.1% DS* DS* 2.5% 3.4% Within 3 years Part-Time 8.8% 5.6% 6.1% 6.4% 8.3% 7.7% 10.0% DS* 10.0% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 17.4% across the country — for Hispanic and African 11.1% American students, they’re tragic. 9.6% Age Pell Grant Directly Bachelor’s Degree- African from HS 25 and Age Recipients Seeking Students Over White Hispanic American (at entry) Remedial (age 17–19) 20–24 All 8.7% 10.8% 16.4% 23.0% 22.2% 23.6% 15.4% 8.2% 10.6% On-time (4 years) 2002 23.1% 27.9% 38.7% 42.2% 34.6% 50.5% 49.1% 31.8% 48.2% Within 6 years Full-Time 32.2% 25.4% 52.9% 51.9% 36.7% 43.5% 54.2% 36.9% 43.1% Within 8 years 2.2% 1.9% 1.2% DS* 0.0% DS* DS* DS* 1.3% Within 4 years 2002 8.4% 13.0% 6.0% 10.0% DS* 9.8% 10.3% 11.2% 8.8% Within 6 years Part-Time 15.2% 14.0% 14.2% DS* 14.5% 14.6% 12.0% 10.0% 9.6% Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 23.1% 50.5% graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. 8.4% in cohor 2002–03 star bachelor's ted Data: Cer tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06, associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05, t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from all walks of life graduate. than suppr essed. DS* = F e w er e 10 students, so da ta w er n 3 Complete College America

236 WEST VIRGINIA 2011 Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 60.1% return to campus 41.4% 41.9% 29.8% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who 77.9% 67.7% 63.2% 49.2% return to campus 37.9% 32.4% ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Associate Students who earn expected first-year 32.9% 65.4% 32.9% 35.9% credits Data: bachelor's t 2004–05, in star t cohor Associate ted 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear cohor 2002–03; in ted star Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often ! balance jobs and school. Remediation PXVWEHIL[HG . 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 19.6% 69.3% of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 69.9% 63.7% 31.8% 30.5% 19.2% 8.4% Graduate Complete Graduate Complete Complete Complete remediation within within remediation remediation remediation and associated 3 years 6 years associated and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years 2006 F Data: all Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! 4 n Complete College America

237 2011 WEST VIRGINIA Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Bachelor’s Associate Part-time take students Part-time years 7 students take Full-time Part-time Full-time 6.2 years take students students take Full-time students take years 5.3 take students 5.1 years years 5 4.4 years ke Should ta 4 y ears for full-time students Should ta 2 y ears ke 1 y ear e Should tak for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time students take students take credits 146 144 credits Full-time Part-time take students Full-time students take Part-time credits 99 students take students take 90 credits 77 credits credits 75 120 credits e Should tak 60 credits e Should tak Should tak e 30 credits 2007–08 Data: More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America

238 WEST 2011 VIRGINIA More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 16.7% 12.6% 16.0% Full-Time Full-Time 13.8% 11.7% 8.3% 5.2% 4.7% Part-Time DS* Part-Time DS* In 4 years In 2 years In 2 years In 1.5 years In 1 year In 3 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s 51.9% 48.2% Full-Time 22.2% 14.5% 10.3% Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years t star 2002–03 in t cohor bachelor's Data: Cer tif icate cohor ted star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t star ted in 2004–05; Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! 6 n Complete College America 10 essed. e w ta da so students, suppr than er w e F = DS* er

239 MEMBER OMING WY 2011 For a strong economy, the skills gap must be closed. By 2020, jobs requiring a career certificate or college degree 65% v ha y entl r cur ho higher adults oming W y or ee degr associate an e w 34% Skills gap 31% e Data: See w our Sour on section y Methodolog and ces the . bsite Too few students make it through college. i s t n e d u t s f O w h o e n r o l l i n a p y t i s r e v i n u r o e g e l l o c c u l b 100 4-Year Public College 2-Year Public College Full-Time Part-Time Part-Time Full-Time Enroll NP* NP* 22 78 Return as NP* NP* 47 9 sophomores Graduate on time 17 NP* NP* 2 (100% time) Additional graduates 8 NP* 1 NP* 150% time 200% time 4 1 NP* NP* Total graduates 4 NP* NP* 29 Graduate in 8 years Graduate in 4 years 33 NP* Key to measuring time Associate Bachelor’s 4 years 2 years 100% time 150% time 3 years 6 years 8 years 200% time 4 years he T = this metr NP* ic. for ta da vide o pr not did te sta 2004; in ted star t cohor 2-y Data: 2002 all f in ted star t cohor ear 4-y ear all f For too many students, the path through college ends with no degree — and often lots of debt. ! 1 n Complete College America data es colleg lic pub om fr y onl ersities. esents pr t epor v uni and his T Note: r

240 WY OMING 2011 We’re making great progress in providing access to more students. 33,003 Total public college enrollment: e r u D P e e s & C e r t i f i c a t i u s n s g g e r Attending 23,255 17,929 15,074 P ar t-time Full-time 2-y ear ear 4-y colleg es es colleg 9,748 opulation, Colleg e Colleg T e State P otal e Ag Graduation Enrollment 18-24 White White White 90% 84% 86% Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic 5% 5% 8% Afr ican Afr ican Afr ican ican ican Amer ican Amer Amer 1% 1% 1% r aces r aces Other Other aces r Other 5% 10% 5% om submissions y b ees degr 06-08; PUMS CS A Census om 2007-10 om fr data population IPEDS; state fr enr 2009 all F Data: fr ace r ollment students. Now we must have more success from all ! For states to compete, their students must earn more degrees and certificates. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Overall Credentials Awarded Credentials Awarded 652 2,030 543 1,664 181 NP* NP* 165 NP* NP* 346 326 2003 2008 2003 2008 2003 2008 2008 2003 2008 2003 2003 2008  Associate Certificate Bachelor’s  Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Data: 2007–08 And all credentials should provide clear pathways to success. ! vide he = NP* sta te did not pr o T ta for this ic. metr da Complete College America n 2

241 WY 2011 OMING Graduation rates are very low, especially if you’re poor, part time, African American, Hispanic, or older. Directly Age Pell Grant Certificate-Seeking Age African 25 and Recipients from HS Students (age 17–19) Over American Hispanic (at entry) Remedial All White 20–24 On-time (1 year) 37.5% 33.7% 34.0% 50.0% DS* 21.4% 38.2% DS* 12.9% 2005 1 19.4% 50.0% 39.4% 38.8% 38.2% DS* 39.3% 37.5% DS* Within 1 2 / years Full-Time Within 2 years 53.6% 52.7% 43.8% DS* 50.0% 52.1% 52.0% 35.5% DS* Within 1 year 4.7% DS* 5.4% DS* DS* 8.0% DS* DS* DS* 2005 1 Within 1 years / 2 DS* 10.8% 9.3% 16.7% DS* DS* DS* 16.0% DS* Part-Time Within 2 years DS* 16.7% DS* DS* 24.0% DS* 11.1% 14.0% 16.2% In most states, very few students seeking certificates 52.0% ever graduate. 14.0% Age Directly Pell Grant Associate Degree- 25 and Age Recipients African from HS Seeking Students Over 20–24 (age 17–19) American Hispanic White All (at entry) Remedial 23.1% 9.7% 14.4% 32.6% 42.2% 21.9% 18.9% 22.5% 9.1% On-time (2 years) 2004 21.7% 33.7% 33.2% 32.3% 9.1% 52.3% 40.3% 25.9% 26.0% Within 3 years Full-Time 36.8% 37.7% 32.3% 9.1% 56.1% 43.5% 30.9% 37.6% 27.5% Within 4 years 3.1% 10.8% 0.4% 11.9% 10.7% 12.5% 7.7% 7.8% 8.3% Within 2 years 2004 Within 3 years 12.5% 12.6% 16.9% 12.7% 19.4% 18.3% 14.3% 4.4% 5.6% Part-Time 17.6% 12.5% 17.5% 25.0% 21.7% 23.7% 19.5% 8.4% 10.3% Within 4 years Associate degree graduation rates are abysmal 37.7% across the country — for Hispanic and African 32.3% American students, they’re tragic. 9.1% Pell Grant Directly Age Bachelor’s Degree- Age 25 and from HS African Recipients Seeking Students American Hispanic Over White 20–24 (at entry) Remedial All (age 17–19) On-time (4 years) NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2002 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 6 years Full-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 8 years Within 4 years NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* 2002 NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 6 years Part-Time NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* Within 8 years Almost no one over the age of 25 graduates; students fresh out of high school are most likely to succeed. associate 2002–03 ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, in ted star Data: cohor in 2005–06, in ted star t cohor icate tif Cer t Given changing demographics, our country will not have enough skilled all backgrounds and ! Americans to compete unless many more students from walks of life graduate. 3 n Complete College America NP* = T he sta te did not pr o vide da ta for this essed. ic. DS* = F e w er than 10 students, so da ta w er e suppr metr

242 OMING 2011 WY Retention rates drop from year to year. Many get discouraged and drop out ... Full-Time Part-Time Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Start Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Students in 2-year 100% 100% colleges who 60.4% return to campus 43.1% 31.4% 30.8% Students in 4-year 100% 100% colleges who return to campus NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* NP* ... after falling off track early. Full-Time (24 credits) Part-Time (12 credits) Associate Bachelor’s Bachelor’s Associate Students who earn expected first-year NP* 45.1% NP* 53.9% credits in star t Data: cohor 2006 all f om fr edits cr ned ear 2002–03; in ted star t cohor bachelor's 2004–05, Associate ted Staying enrolled is particularly tough for part-time students, who must often balance jobs and school. ! . PXVWEHIL[HG Remediation 4-Year Colleges 2-Year Colleges 49.3% NP* of freshmen require remediation of freshmen require remediation of those ... of those ... 46.1% 31.0% 21.7% NP* NP* NP* Graduate Complete Complete Complete Graduate Complete remediation within remediation remediation within remediation associated 6 years associated 3 years and and (projected) (projected) college-level college-level courses in courses in two years two years all F Data: 2006 Current approaches almost always guarantee failure. ! for this metr ic. = T he sta te NP* not pr o vide da ta did Complete College America n 4

243 2011 OMING WY Precious time and money are lost when students don’t graduate on schedule. Students are taking too much time ... Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Part-time students take take students years 6.9 years 6.7 Full-time Part-time students take students take NP* NP* Full-time students take years 3.6 Full-time take students 4 y ears ke Should ta for full-time students years 2 ke Should ta 2 y ears 1 y ear Should tak e for full-time students for full-time students ... and too many credits. Certificate Associate Bachelor’s Part-time Full-time take students students take NP* NP* Full-time Part-time students take take students Full-time Part-time 83 credits credits 82 Should tak e 120 credits take students students take credits 56 55 credits 60 credits e Should tak e 30 credits Should tak Data: 2007–08 More students must graduate on time. ! n 5 Complete College America = he sta te did not pr o T NP* da ta for this metr ic. vide

244 WY 2011 OMING More time isn’t giving us enough success. For certificate and associate degree students, graduation rates are very low ... even when students take more time. Associate Certificate 52.0% 36.8% 32.3% Full-Time 38.8% Full-Time 33.7% 21.9% 17.6% 12.7% Part-Time 14.0% 9.3% Part-Time In 4 years In 1 year In 1.5 years In 2 years In 3 years In 2 years On-time graduation rates for bachelor’s degree students are shockingly low. And adding time beyond six years produces little additional success. Bachelor’s Full-Time NP* Part-Time In 8 years In 6 years In 4 years Cer 2004–05; 2002–03 in ted star t cohor in ted star Data: bachelor's tif icate cohor t star ted in 2005–06; associate cohor t Even modest progress provides little comfort when overall graduation rates are so low. ! n Complete College America 6 not ic. this for ta vide o pr metr did te sta he T = NP* da

245 ac Kno WL ed Gments This is an unprecedented report, which would not have been possible without the support and hands-on expertise and assistance of many people and institutions. the 33 states: their governors, higher education leaders, and higher education institutions. They showed real courage in providing these data, the good and the bad. our phILanthropIc partners: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Ford Foundation, Lumina Foundation for Education, and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Stan Jones (President), Cheryl Orr Dixon (Senior Vice our staff: President), Tom Sugar (Senior Vice President and Project Lead), Mike Baumgartner (Vice President, Finance and Special Projects), Dominique Raymond (Director, Alliance State Relations), Wes Moore (Research Analyst), Renee Davidson (Executive Assistant), and Jeff Stanley (Associate Vice President, State Higher Education Executive Officers). and our productIon partners: KSA-Plus Communications, which provided editorial assistance and graphic design.

246 aBout compLete coLLeGe amerIca It’s really about the states ... we’re just here to help. Established in 2009, Complete College America is a national nonprofit with a single mission: to work with states to significantly increase the number of Americans with quality career certificates or college degrees and to close attainment gaps for traditionally underrepresented populations. The need for this work is compelling. Between 1970 and 2009, undergraduate enrollment in the United States more than doubled, while the completion rate has been virtually unchanged. We’ve made progress in giving students from all backgrounds access to college — but we haven’t finished the all-important job of helping them achieve a degree. Counting the success of all students is an essential first step. And then we must move with urgency to reinvent American higher education to meet the needs of the new majority of students on our campuses, delicately balancing the jobs they need with the education they desire. Complete College America believes there is great reason for optimism ... and a clear path forward. With a little more support — and a lot of common sense — we can ensure that many more young people get the high-quality college education that will help them live productive and fulfilling lives. All Americans will share in the benefits of their success. 1250 H Street, NW, Suite 850 Washington, DC 20005 completecollege.org

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