RSS Curriculum Links

Transcript

1 ResourceSmart Schools Curriculum Links Linking sustainability into the Victorian Curriculum

2 © Sustainability Victoria ENG063 April 2016 Authorised and published by Sustainability Victoria, Level 28, Urban Workshop 50 Lonsdale Street Melbourne Victoria 3000 Australia Accessibility This document is available in PDF and Word format on the internet at www.resourcesmartschools.vic.gov.au While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that the contents of this publication are factually correct, Sustainability Victoria gives no warranty regarding its accuracy, completeness, currency or suitability for any particular purpose and to the extent permitted by law, does not accept any liability for loss or damages incurred as a result of reliance placed upon the content of this publication. This publication is provided on the basis that all persons accessing it undertake responsibility for assessing the relevance and accuracy of its content. ResourceSmart Schools Curriculum Links should be attributed to Sustainability Victoria. ResourceSmart Schools Curriculum Links (excluding all trade marks and logos) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Australia licence. In essence, you are free to copy, distribute and adapt the work, as long as you attribute the work and abide by the other licence terms. Go to http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ to view a copy of this licence. ii

3 Contents 2 How to use this guide Foundation 3 One and Two 17 Three and Four 29 Five & Six 43 Suggested Resources 57 ResourceSmart Schools online www.resourcesmartschools.vic.gov.au 1

4 How to use this guide ResourceSmart Schools For ResourceSmart Schools, each action includes module icons Curriculum Links to show which resource module they fit with best. The icons that are used are: ResourceSmart Schools encourages schools to build sustainability into everything they do. ResourceSmart Schools Curriculum Links Waste module Biodiversity module has been developed as a tool that will assist teachers to build sustainability into their teaching. Energy module Water module ResourceSmart Schools Curriculum Links provides suggested learning activities that link sustainability into all areas of the If your school is working on one of these resource modules, search Victorian Curriculum from Foundation through to Year 6. through the document for activities that include the relevant icon. It is anticipated that through the links made between the Victorian For more information about ResourceSmart Schools Curriculum and ResourceSmart Schools, schools will be able and the resource modules, visit the Resources page to deliver a more comprehensive and integrated approach to of www.resourcesmartschools.vic.gov.au education for sustainability. This will assist schools to: › Meet the cross curriculum priority of sustainability in the Victorian Curriculum F-10 and the Australian Curriculum; and › Meet the requirements of ResourceSmart Schools by including teaching about the resource areas of water, biodiversity, waste and energy. For each year level, the activities have been developed to address a Big Question / Inquiry that will be explored: What is a living world and how do we care for Foundation: 1 ourselves and one another? How do we use natural resources in a sustainable 2 Years 1 and 2: manner to help us in our daily lives? 3 Years 3 and 4: What can we learn about the use of natural resources from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people’s perspective to help us live in a sustainable manner? 4 Years 5 and 6: Why is it important that we live on our planet in a way that is environmentally sustainable, and what can we do as young custodians to safeguard our planet? The Resource section provides a list of resources for use by teachers and students. 2

5 Foundation t LEVEL: Foundation UNIT: Life — “Our precious living world” BIG QUESTION/INQUIRY: What is a living world and how do we care for ourselves and one another? RATIONALE: Being part of a community of living things, we must respect ourselves, one another and show concern for all living things by sharing and being fair. MAJOR ASSESSMENT TASK: In a class gathering, where parents are invited to attend, students present an assessment task of their choice demonstrating their response to the question, What is a living world and how do we care for ourselves and one another? 3

6 Domain: The Arts Strands: Dance/Drama/Media Arts/Music/Visual Arts Visual Arts Practices Explore and Express Ideas › › Use fundamental locomotor and non-locomotor movements, Experiment with different materials and techniques to make body parts, bases and zones to explore safe movement artworks possibilities and dance ideas Present and Perform › Explore sound and silence and ways of using their voices, movement and instruments to express ideas (music) › Rehears and perform songs and short instrumental pieces that they have learnt and composed (music) Drama Practices Respond and Interpret › Use voice, facial expression, movement and space to imagine and improvise characters and situations (drama) › Respond to media artworks by describing ideas, characters, setting and stories Learning Experiences may include: › › › Perform dances representing aspects Create a dance mimicking the Create a collage using natural, found movements of their favourite mini of the natural world (wind, water, litter, materials. plants and animals) beast. Read story of “The Ant and the Grasshopper” (Aesop) to assist. Walk like ants in a line; hop like grasshoppers; fly › Learn the song ‘Alexander Beetle’, and and buzz like bees; move like a ladybird › create percussive accompaniment to View a video clip about the natural etc. enhance the song. world and needs of a living thing, such as ‘A Bugs Life’, ‘The Lorax’, ‘Happy Feet’ ‘Deadly 60’ etc. (animated/real world). List the main characters; identify the OR › Learn a song about the natural world setting and retell the story. This may be (biodiversity, water, waste, energy). done through drama, visual art, dance, › Create a dance using the movements of computer graphics etc. NOTE: do not fruit/vegetable picking: watch the complete film, but sections i.e. bend to pick strawberries or carrots; which apply to chosen topic. stretch to pick apples or oranges; carry › Role-play aspects of the natural world laden baskets of fruit; shake soil off (wind, water, litter, plants and animals). potatoes; react to pricking fingers on blackberry bush. Put these movements together in a set sequence (own choice of order) and repeat to chosen music. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › In this area teacher observations of child’s participation in and completion of activities according to set criteria/rubric 4

7 Foundation Domain: Critical and Creative Thinking Meta Cognition Questions and Possibilities › › Investigate ways to problem-solve, using egocentric and Consider personal reactions to situations or problems and how these reactions may influence thinking experiential language Reasoning › Consider how reasons and examples are used to support a point of view and illustrate meaning Learning Experiences may include: › › Students explore and discuss the Students sort food, such as fruits from Like vs Do not like vegetables or sometimes foods from findings of our favourite food survey. › Consider other consumers, such as often foods. This activity could be small animals; for example spiders, ants, › Students use their findings for growing completed using graphics/picture cards. snails and slaters. Share our perception their favourite seasonal foods. of these through class discussion, poster making and labelling, dramatisation etc. › Students explore, through their 5 senses, See Learning Experiences in Personal and a range of common and uncommon Social Capability › Students list and graph the class’s foods, listing reasons why they like/ favourite foods. do not like something they have experienced. Use a graphic organiser to record results. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Accurate completion and interpretation of graph (M/SP) › Accurate completion of graphic organiser and participation in discussion › Teacher observation of students’ use of accurate language to give reasons for their choices 5

8 Domain: English Speaking and Listening Reading and Viewing Speaking and Listening refers to the various formal and informal Reading and Viewing involves students understanding, interpreting, ways oral language is used to convey and receive meaning. critically analysing, reflecting upon, and enjoying written and visual, It involves the development and demonstration of knowledge print and non-print texts. It encompasses reading and viewing a about the appropriate oral language for particular audiences and wide range of texts and media, including literary texts. Reading occasions, including body language and voice. It also involves the involves active engagement with texts and the development of development of active-listening strategies and an understanding of knowledge about the relationship between them and the contexts the conventions of different spoken texts. in which they are created. It also involves the development of knowledge about a range of strategies for reading. Writing Writing involves students in the active process of conceiving, planning, composing, editing and publishing a range of texts. Writing involves using appropriate language for particular purposes or occasions, both formal and informal, to express and represent ideas and experiences, and to reflect on these aspects. It involves the development of knowledge about strategies for writing and the conventions of Standard Australian English. Learning Experiences may include: Speaking and Listening Writing Reading › › › Students are encouraged to present both Students are encouraged to write Teachers and students are encouraged formal and informal presentations on appropriate texts in the area of to read appropriate texts in the area of sustainability. sustainability. These can include both sustainability. These can include both fiction and non-fiction texts in a variety fiction and non-fiction texts in a variety › Students are encouraged to listen to of genres. of genres. See the Resource List at the and respond to a variety of formal and end of this document for examples and informal presentations on sustainability. › Students use their school grounds as ideas. inspiration to create a list of words and › images about the natural environment. Students create a library of their favourite texts. Using the following genres and processes may assist students in this unit: › Procedural Text › Narrative Text › Explanatory Text Group Reading › Scientific language Oral language: › Debate › Oral presentation to audience › Vocabulary › Questions › Clarifying › Open ended › Wondering › Giving Reasons... › Explanations These Language Modes are immersed throughout all Learning Experiences listed in varying degrees. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: 6 6

9 Foundation Domain: Ethical Capability Decision Making and Actions Understanding Concepts › › Explore the meaning of right and wrong, good and bad, as Explore the effects that personal feelings can have on how people behave in situations where ethical issues are involved concepts concerned with the outcomes of acts. Learning Experiences may include: › Like vs Do not like Students will develop a sense of Relates to Learning Experiences in Mathematics in regard to litter mapping... belonging to and engagement with civic › Consider other consumers such as small life as an active and informed citizen animals and insects, for example mice, through caring for the classroom, spiders, ants, snails and slaters, and placing litter in appropriate bins, turning share our perception of these through off lights when not needed and turning class discussion, poster making and off taps. labelling, dramatisation... › Students develop a sense of belonging › After having viewed a story/video clip to the school community and learn about about the natural world and needs of respect and concern for others and the a living thing, such as ‘The Ant Bully’; environment as the students assist with identify the characters perceptions of the care of school gardens, grounds one another and how these altered (including picking up litter, correct during the story. This could be recycling, having wrapper free lunches) completed through a brainstorm, small and caring for school animals. group discussion, completion of graphic organiser. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › In this area teacher observations of child’s participation in and completion of activities according to set criteria/rubric 7 7

10 Domain: Health and Physical Education Personal, Social, Community Health Strands: Contributing to healthy and active communities › Identify actions that promote health, safety and wellbeing Learning Experiences may include: › See Learning Experiences in Critical and Food and nutrition Students develop knowledge, Creative Thinking and Ethical Capability in understanding and skills to make › Students investigate the role of food healthy, informed food choices and regard to healthy v’s non healthy foods. and nutrition in enhancing health to explore the contextual factors that and wellbeing. This may involve influence eating habits and food choices guest speakers, for example the – this will include the students learning school canteen person or gardener, a about where food originates through chef, a sports personality, a doctor, a their active involvement in a school/ nutritionist, the Life Ed Van. community garden. Students plan/ create a healthy food menu Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › In this area teacher observations of child’s participation in and completion of activities according to set criteria/rubric. › Accurate completion of menu and participation in discussion 8

11 Foundation Domain: The Humanities Strands: Geography GEOGRAPHICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILLS GEOGRAPHICAL KNOWLEDGE Place, space and interconnection Places and our connection to them › › Definition of places as parts of the Earth’s surface that have Describe and explain where places and activities are located been given meaning by people and how places can be defined Data and information at a variety of scales › Represent data and the location of places and their features by › Weather and seasons constructing tables, plans and labelled maps › Natural, managed and constructed features of places, their location and how they change Learning Experiences may include: › › › Identify changes in natural, managed Make a map of the school (birds-eye Describe the hierarchy of places: from and constructed features in their place, view) and identify and label the places the personal size of their garden, the such as the change that occurs in size of the school grounds, the size of you know (front gate, classroom, deciduous trees throughout the seasons. a local park/recreation area. Create a playground, quiet area) and activities which occur in each area (assembly, Students create a scientific poster to class chart showing Small, Medium and es. play, gardening). Large Spaces. record noted chang › › Describe the daily and seasonal weather Mark on the school map where litter is of their place by its rainfall, temperature, most commonly found. Describe how it sunshine and wind and how this affects gets there. their gardens. › Make a map of a school garden bed › where edible plants are going to be Use observations and or photographs planted (birds-eye view). Use colour and to identify and describe natural features line to represent the plants within this (for example hills, rivers, trees). garden bed. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Completion of map and correct use of labels (M/MG) › In this area teacher observations of child’s participation in and completion of activities and use of informal language describing size › Recording of daily and seasonal weather › Completion of scientific poster according to criteria/rubric (S/SIS) 9

12 Strands: History HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE Personal histories › Differences and similarities between students’ daily lives perspectives of life during their parents’ and grandparents childhoods including family traditions, leisure time and communications Learning Experiences may include: › Invite grandparents and parents in to Choose one of the ideas below share their memories and stories of how › Invite in grandparents and parents to they used energy when they were young. share their memories and stories of Students draw a labelled picture depicting where food came from when they were a message they heard about the use of young. Did food come from local places energy in the past. or from far away? Students draw a picture depicting a message they heard about food in the past. › Students head out on an excursion to an historical park to see first-hand the use of energy, water, biodiversity and waste › Invite in grandparents and parents to share in early Australia their memories and stories of how waste Students complete worksheets as a result was managed when they were young. of the excursion. Did they recycle through reusing things? Students draw a labelled picture depicting a message they heard about waste in the past. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of food picture › Satisfactory completion of waste picture and accurate use of labels › Satisfactory completion of energy picture and accurate use of labels › Satisfactory completion of post excursion worksheets Domain: Intercultural Capability Strands: Cultural Diversity Cultural Practices › › Identify what is familiar and what is different in ways culturally Identify and discuss cultural diversity in the school and/or community diverse individuals and families live Learning Experiences may include: › › Explore various edible plants found Students explore cultural diversity in food experiences. This may include within the garden or local nursery and Languages class meal, a simple identify where they have come from. discussion about students’ past Link to cultural naming of food of food experiences or a multicultural day. and globalisation (for example, Lebanese cucumber and locating Lebanon on the This learning experience links to globe/large world map or Dutch Carrots Critical and Creative Thinking & Health and identifying the Netherlands). and Physical Education This learning experience links to Geographical Knowledge Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Teacher observation of students’ participation in the discussion and use of map (H/G/GK) (M/MG)

13 Domain: Mathematics Measurement and Geometry Strands: NUMBER AND ALGEBRA STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY › Patterns and algebra Data representation › Interpret simple data displays about yes/no questions › Sort and classify familiar objects and explain the basis for these classifications, and copy, continue and create patterns with objects and drawings MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY Using units of measurement › Use direct and indirect comparison to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language › Connect days of the week to familiar events and actions Location and transformation › Describe position and movement Learning Experiences may include: › › This learning experience links to Students observe, discuss and copy the Compare the size of chickens to the size The Humanities – Geography natural patterns in the world around of the egg they lay them, particularly those found in the garden and nature, such as looking at the patterns of seeds inside an apple, › › Make paper pots in which to grow Students mark on a class timetable the the rows of trees in a plantation, the days they are responsible for the garden, seedlings, making the pots according to circles in a slice of wood, the patterns on the size of the plant which they are going or taking their bins to the compost / the back of a leaf or ladybird, the stripes worm farm and the recycle bins to grow. Measure out soil/potting mix as on a zebra required. › Use everyday language of location and › Compare the height and width of plants in direction when planting or harvesting in Choose one of the following two learning the garden/school grounds as they grow. the garden, for example, between, near, experiences: next to, behind... › Compare the size of produce from the garden. Are all capsicums the same size › Count litter in different areas of the when they grow? school ground. Compare areas to show Data representation – see learning which has highest litter count experience in Creative and Critical Thinking Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory recording of a chosen pattern found in the natural world (A/VA) › Satisfactory collection and recording of plant growth/size over time › Satisfactory collection, recording and interpretation of where litter is found in the school grounds › Satisfactory knowledge and completion of timetable/days of week › Teacher observation of students’ use of appropriate language of location when working in the garden/school grounds (H/G/GK)

14 Personal and Social Capability Domain: SOCIAL AWARENESS AND MANAGEMENT SELF-AWARENESS AND MANAGEMENT Recognition and expression of emotions Relationships and diversity › › Develop a vocabulary and practise the expression of emotions to Practise the skills required to include others and make friends describe how they feel in different familiar situations with peers, teachers and other adults Development of resilience Collaboration › › Identify their likes and dislikes, needs and wants, abilities and Name and practise basic skills required to work collaboratively strengths with peers › Recognise that problems or challenges are a normal part of life and that there are actions that can be taken to manage problems Learning Experiences may include: › Throughout their time working in the garden/farm/school grounds, students identify and express a range of emotions in their interactions with others. They begin to identify and practise basic skills for including and working with others in the group. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Teacher observation of students’ use of appropriate language/skills when working with others in the garden/school grounds

15 Foundation Domain: Science SCIENCE INQUIRY SKILLS SCIENCE UNDERSTANDING Science as human endeavour Questioning and predicting › › Respond to and pose questions, and make predictions about People use science in their daily lives familiar objects and events Biological sciences Planning and conducting › Living things have a variety of external features and live in › different places where their basic needs, including food, water Participate in guided investigations, including making and shelter, are met observations using the senses, to explore and answer questions › Living things grow, change and have offspring similar Recording and processing to themselves › Use a range of methods, including drawings and provided tables, Chemical science to sort information › Analysing and evaluating Objects are made of materials that have observable properties › Everyday materials can be physically changed or combined with › Compare observations and predictions with those of others other materials in a variety of ways for particular purposes Communication Earth and space sciences › Represent and communicate observations and ideas about › Observable changes occur in the sky and landscape; daily and changes in objects and events in a variety of ways seasonal changed affect everyday life › Earth’s resources are used in a variety of ways Learning Experiences may include: › › › Through a range of resources, such Students will observe over time Students are given opportunities to look as hands on, observations, texts and particular living things and take notes at the garden for evidence of energy on their growth and development. multimedia, students explore and (sun), and suggest ideas as to why some This may be observing germination of a identify the basic needs of all living flowers follow the sun or open and close seed, eggs hatching, seedlings growing, at night. things (air, water, food, sun &/ shelter) or implemented through the use of › Students use a Venn diagram to multimedia or hardcopy resources demonstrate their understanding of the if living things are unavailable. links between basic needs. They are to › Students plant and care for seeds in a Students will record the life cycle of a explore three different living things, for variety of conditions/places and observe chosen living thing. This may be achieved example a human, a pumpkin and a frog. what occurs. As a result of this care, through the use of multimedia or story This may be a whole class, small group they can list the needs of plants for (for example The Very Hungry Caterpillar or individual activity. quality growth. Eric Carle). › Students will observe one area of the These learning experience links to school grounds to detect the range of Mathematics, The Humanities and Critical Why is it so? living things that coexist in this space, and Creative Thinking Choose one of the following learning recording what they see in the form of experiences: a diagram. › Students are given opportunities to Some students may further investigate look at the garden for evidence of the how the basic needs of the living things concepts of force (wind), and suggest found in this particular space are met. ideas as to why some plants grow on an angle. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › › Satisfactory completion of the Venn diagram Satisfactory completion of life cycle chart/diagram › › Satisfactory completion of living things chart/diagram Teacher observations of students’ reasoning of Why is it so?

16 Domain: Technologies DESIGN TECHNOLOGIES DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES Data and information Food and fibre production › Explore how plants and animals are grown for food, clothing and › Collect, explore and sort data and use digital systems to present shelter data creatively › ... share information with known people in safe online Food specialisations environments Explore how food is selected and prepared for healthy eating › Materials and technologies specialisation › Explore the characteristics and properties of materials and components that are used to create designed solutions Learning Experiences may include: › › › Students choose one animal from the Using a fruit or vegetable, students As a class and using the Alphabet Key, class list to investigate and record their explore: students list as many farm animals as findings using digital technology – this they can. 1. Where and how it grows? may be as simple as choosing images 2. When is it ready to harvest? to create an informative picture of the animal and their needs in their found 3. How is it harvested? environment. For example a cow in 4. How is it transported to the shop/to a fenced paddock, with a barn, hay, a your table? water trough and a farmer... 5. How is it prepared /cooked? Students save the above information/ creation and email to a known person or 6. How is it eaten? upload to a 1 shared site (google docs...) 7. Prepare a report on findings This may be digital, a series of photographs, illustrations, labelled diagrams, graphic organiser, written song lyrics, a poem, written or oral report...). These learning experience links to multiple Domains Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory use of digital technology to create an informative picture › Satisfactory emailing/uploading of document informative picture › Satisfactory completion of prepared report on findings of fruit/vegetable investigation 14

17 Biodiversity Energy Waste & Recycling Water Domains: Strands/Sub Strands: D The Arts A Dance Dr Drama MA Media Arts M Music VA Visual Arts Questions and Possibilities QP CCT Critical and Creative Thinking R Reasoning M Metacognition Reading and Viewing English E Understanding Concepts UC EC Ethical Capability DMA Decision Making and Actions HPE Health and Physical Education H The Humanities CC Civics and Citizenship EBL Economics and Business Levels G Geography GCS Geographical Concepts and Skills GK Geographical Knowledge H History HCS Historical Concepts and Skills HK Historical Knowledge Cultural Practices CP Intercultural Capability IC CD Cultural Diversity NA Mathematics M Number and Algebra MG Measurement and Geometry Statistics and Probability SP PSC Self-Awareness and Management Personal and Social Capability SAM Social Awareness and Management SoAM Science SU S Science Understanding Bs Biological sciences Cs Chemical sciences ESs Earth and Space sciences Ps Physical sciences SIS Science Inquiry Skills T Technologies DT Design Technologies Ts Technologies and society Tc Technologies context Cds Creating designed solutions DiT Digital Technologies Ds Digital systems Di Data and information Cds Creating digital solutions 15

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19 One and Two t LEVEL: One and Two UNIT: Life — “Our irreplaceable common home” BIG QUESTION/INQUIRY: How do we use natural resources in a sustainable manner to help us in our daily lives? RATIONALE: As we interact in a community of living things, we are challenged to contribute with awareness, care, persistence and respect for ourselves and one another so that we achieve a sustainable lifestyle. MAJOR ASSESSMENT TASK: At a ‘Going Green Science Fair’, students demonstrate... How do we use natural resources in a sustainable manner to help us in our daily lives? ... through presentations for improving an everyday item/action using natural resources in a more sustainable manner. 17 17

20 Domain: The Arts Strands: Dance/Drama/Media Arts/Music/Visual Arts Explore and Express ideas: Present and Perform: › › Use simple technical and expressive skills when presenting Use imagination and experimentation to explore musical ideas using voice, movement, instruments and body percussion. dance that communicates ideas about themselves and their world to an audience Visual Arts Practices: Drama Practices: › Experiment different materials, techniques and processes › to make artworks in a range of art forms. Use voice, facial expression, movement and space to imagine and establish role and situation. Present and Perform: › Create and present media artworks that communicate ideas and stories to an audience. Learning Experiences may include: Common Products Tasks Daily Practices Tasks Common Products Tasks › › › In a group – Create and then present Use articles from the natural world In pairs – Create a story about someone a dance demonstrating the natural to create a sculpture. dropping some rubbish and then being resources and energy used to make a ‘encouraged’ to pick it up by a litter chair (or piece of paper). Begin at the monitor and place it in a bin. Students tree growing with energy from the sun, to use voice, face, and body posture to nutrients from the soil, and the goodness show the role they may be playing. of water. The tree is chopped down, transported to a factory and shaped with tools and our hands to make a › On an iPad/tablet – film another group’s chair (or paper). The chair or paper dance or drama presentation so that can then be recycled after use. it can be shown to another class/ › Many forms of energy have gone into parent group. making this chair or piece of paper. › Explore using musical instruments, including the voice and body percussion, to create a soundscape for the drama piece. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › In this area teacher observations of child’s participation in and completion of activities according to set criteria/rubric 18

21 One and Two Domain: Critical and Creative Thinking Meta Cognition Questions and Possibilities › › Consider personal reactions to situations or problems Investigate ways to problem-solve, using egocentric and how these reaction may influence thinking and experiential language › Make simple modifications to known ideas and routine solutions to generate some different ideas and possibilities Reasoning › Consider how reasons and examples are used to support a point of view and illustrate meaning Learning Experiences may include: › See Learning Experiences in Mathematics Question a current class/school/home Daily Practices Tasks practice, collect data to support thinking › Thinking Keys – The Ridiculous Key – and create an action plan for a more Common Products Tasks Try to justify this statement: By law, sustainable response. For example: every household must recycle every › Thinking Key – The Commonality Recycling – investigate school recycling possible part of rubbish. – Find common points between: bins and discuss ways to Refuse and A flyswatter and a car tyre. › Discuss the 5R’s (Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, Reduce packaging through Nude Food In small groups, students use a range Recycle, Recover) lunches, Reuse materials and packaging of experiential language to problem in school projects, and then discuss › Hold a class discussion or debate solve the commonality of everyday what’s left to Recycle. How is it recycled › Discuss or debate class/school common products. and can some of it be Recovered instead commitment to one of these issues of going to landfill? – Efficient use of Water › Students create a poster depicting an – Efficient use of Energy action plan to help improve a class – Management of Waste sustainable practice. – Management of Biodiversity Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Teacher observes students ability to make possible suggestions during discussion or debate on the Thinking Key › Teacher observes students participation and suggestions during discussion or debate on the class/school’s commitment to the use of resources › Satisfactory completion of a poster depicting an action plan to help improve a class sustainable practice › Teacher observes students’ satisfactory use of experiential language to problem solve the commonality of everyday common products 19

22 Domain: English Speaking and Listening Reading and Viewing Speaking and Listening refers to the various formal and informal Reading and Viewing involves students understanding, interpreting, ways oral language is used to convey and receive meaning. critically analysing, reflecting upon, and enjoying written and visual, It involves the development and demonstration of knowledge print and non-print texts. It encompasses reading and viewing a about the appropriate oral language for particular audiences and wide range of texts and media, including literary texts. Reading occasions, including body language and voice. It also involves the involves active engagement with texts and the development of development of active-listening strategies and an understanding knowledge about the relationship between them and the contexts of the conventions of different spoken texts. in which they are created. It also involves the development of knowledge about a range of strategies for reading. Writing Writing involves students in the active process of conceiving, planning, composing, editing and publishing a range of texts. Writing involves using appropriate language for particular purposes or occasions, both formal and informal, to express and present ideas and experiences, and to reflect on these aspects. It involves the development of knowledge about strategies for writing and the conventions of Standard Australian English. Learning Experiences may include: Oral language: Speaking and Listening Reading › Debate › › Teachers and students are encouraged Students are encouraged to make both › formal and informal presentations on to read appropriate texts in the area of Oral presentation to audience sustainability. sustainability. These can include both › Vocabulary fiction and non-fiction texts in a variety › Students are encouraged to listen to › Questions of genres. See the Resources section and respond to a variety of formal and › Clarifying of this document for examples. informal presentations on sustainability. › Open Ended › Students participate in regular readings › Students create a class library list › Wondering and discussion of favourite texts on of favourite texts about the natural sustainability. › Giving Reasons... environment. › Explanations These Language Modes are immersed Using the following genres and processes Writing throughout all Learning Experiences listed may assist students in this unit: in varying degrees. . › Students are encouraged to write › Procedural Text appropriate texts in the area of › Narrative Text sustainability. These can include both fiction and non-fiction texts › Explanatory Text in a variety of genres. Group Reading › Students use their school grounds › Scientific language as inspiration to create illustrated storybooks about the natural environment. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of a poster depicting an action plan to help improve a class sustainable practice › Teacher observes students’ satisfactory use of experiential language to problem solve the commonality of everyday common products 20

23 One and Two Domain: Ethical Capability Decision Making and Actions Understanding Concepts › › Explore the meaning of right and wrong, good and bad, as Explore the type of acts often considered right and those often considered wrong, and the reasons why they are considered so concepts concerned with the outcomes of acts. Learning Experiences may include: Daily Practices Tasks See Learning Experiences in Critical and Creative Thinking. › Students explore the question “What happens when I throw litter on the ground?” – list students’ responses and discuss further. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: Domain: Health and Physical Education Personal, Social, Community Health Strands: Contributing to healthy and active communities Communicating and interacting for health and wellbeing › › Explore actions that help make the classroom a healthy, Examine health messages and how they relate to health safe and active place decisions and behaviours › Identify and explore natural and built environments in the community where physical activity can take place Learning Experiences may include: › Daily Practices Tasks Students create a poster about safe use Common Products Tasks of Garden Tools for their kitchen garden › › Students investigate a space for a Students answer the question, (create a class rubric of what the poster “What messages have you heard about kitchen garden to show healthy food should include). healthy food?” – list students’ responses growing at school. Explore how a garden › For example, the kitchen garden area is requires people to help and work and discuss further. free of sharp garden stakes, the running together. For example – “What are all of track is kept clear of litter, the swimming the jobs it takes to create and look after pool is kept clear of leaves, classroom a kitchen garden?” kept clear of food scraps etc. › Students explain the need for clean, tidy and safe common areas where physical activity takes place. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Teacher observes students’ responses to the key question about healthy food › Satisfactory completion of Safe Use of Garden Tools poster – according to class rubric 21

24 Domain: The Humanities Strands: Geography GEOGRAPHICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILLS GEOGRAPHICAL KNOWLEDGE Place, space and interconnection Places and our connection to them › › Reasons why some places are special and some places are Identify how people are connected to different places important to people and how they can be looked after. Data and information › Represent data and the location of places and their features by constructing tables, plans and labelled maps Learning Experiences may include: › Students present the information gained Daily Practices Tasks in the form of a graph/chart/table. › Locate, count/measure and map where the following resources may be/are found within the school: See Learning Experiences in Design › Use of Water Technology & Mathematics › Use of Energy › Management of Waste/Litter › Management of Biodiversity For example - make a map of the school (birds-eye view) and identify and label the places you know where these resources are found (drinking taps, classroom lights, recycling bins, butterfly garden). Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of a map and placement of labels including a title (M/MG) › Satisfactory completion of graph/chart/table identifying location of water/waste/litter/ › energy/biodiversity found within the school (M/MG) Strands: History HISTORICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILLS KNOWLEDGE Historical significance › Identify the significance of a person and/or place in the local community. Learning Experiences may include: › Daily Practices Tasks Students present their findings as a poster. › Research the significant contributions made to our local community by one of the following people: Gardeners, Parks Officers and Rangers, Waste Management Services, Energy Management Services, Water Management Services. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of poster demonstrating significant contributions made by a specific person within our local community 22 22

25 One and Two Domain: Intercultural Capability Cultural Diversity Cultural Practices › › Identify what is familiar and what is different in ways culturally Imagine and explain what their response might be if they were placed in a different cultural situation or setting diverse individuals and families live. Learning Experiences may include: › Compare and contrast daily practices Daily Practices Tasks regarding our use of natural resources. › Discuss daily practises within our own › Students create graphs/tables showing families regarding our use of natural comparisons of resource use across the resources, Water, Energy, Waste and school (i.e. length of showers, recycling Biodiversity and how can we help our etc.) and explain plausible reasons why families to make simple modifications the results may be different amongst to change their routines? different groups of people. › For example – having shorter showers, turning off lights, switching TV off when not in the room, correct use of Recycle Bin, caring for living things... May connect to Learning Experiences in Critical and Creative Thinking Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Teacher observes students’ responses to the discussion and suggestions for making healthier changes to our daily practises (EC/UC) › Satisfactory completion of graph/table to demonstrate the contrast between our use of natural resources and observe students’ plausible reasons why the results may be different amongst different groups of people (CCT/QP & R) 23 23

26 Domain: Mathematics MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY Using units of measurement Chance › › Measure and compare the lengths, masses and capacities of pairs Identify outcomes of familiar events involving chance and describe them using everyday language such as “will happen”, of objects using uninform informal units L1 “won’t happen”, or “might happen” L1 › Describe duration using months, weeks, days and hours L1 › Identify practical activities and everyday events that involve › Compare masses of objects using balance scales L2 chance. Describe outcomes as ‘likely’ or ‘unlikely’ and identify › Name and order months and seasons L2 some events as ‘certain’ or ‘impossible’ L2 › Use a calendar to identify the date and determine the number Data representation and interpretation of days in each month L2 › Represent data with objects and drawings where one object or Location and transformation drawing represents one data value. Describe the displays L1 › Give and follow directions to familiar locations L1 › Collect, check and classify data L2 › Interpret simple maps of familiar locations and identify the › Create displays of data using lists, table and picture graphs relative of positions of key features L2 and interpret them L2 Learning Experiences may include: › Students present the information gained Daily Practices Tasks See Learning Experiences in Design Technology & The Humanities - Geography in the form of a graph/chart/table. › Locate, count/measure and map where The information can be used to identify the following resources may be/are changes that may be needed to improve found within the school: resource use within the school. For › Use of Water example – “How many recycling bins are needed to supply each classroom › Use of Energy and staffroom?” “How many “switch off” › Management of Waste/Litter energy signs do we need to make for › Management of Biodiversity around our school?” Suggestions for Formative Assessment: 24 24

27 One and Two Domain: Personal and Social Capability SELF-AWARENESS AND MANAGEMENT SOCIAL AWARENESS AND MANAGEMENT Recognition and expression of emotions Relationships and diversity › › Listen to other’s ideas, and recognise that others may see Extend their vocabulary through which to recognise and describe emotions and when, how and with whom it is things differently appropriate to share emotions Collaboration Development of resilience › Recognise that conflict occurs and distinguish between › appropriate and inappropriate ways to deal with conflict Explain how being prepared to try new things can help identify strategies when faced with unfamiliar or challenging situations Learning Experiences may include: Daily Practices Tasks See Learning Experiences in Design Technology & The Humanities - Geography Suggestions for Formative Assessment: 25 25

28 Domain: Science SCIENCE UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE INQUIRY SKILLS – Science as human endeavour Questioning and predicting › › Respond to and pose questions, and make predictions about People use science in their daily lives familiar object and events Biological sciences › Living things have a variety of external features and live in Planning and conducting different places where their basic needs, including food, water › Participate in guided investigations, including making and shelter, are met observations, using the senses, to explore and answer questions › Living things grow, change and have offspring similar to Recording and processing themselves › Use informal measurements in the collection and recording of Chemical science observations › Objects are made of materials that have observable properties › Use a range of methods, including drawings and provided tables, › Everyday materials can be physically changed or combined with to sort information other materials in a variety of ways for particular purposes Analysing and evaluating Earth and space sciences › Compare observations and predictions with those of others › Observable changes occur in the sky and landscape; daily Communication and seasonal changes affect everyday life › Represent and communicate observations and ideas about › Earth’s resources are used in a variety of ways changes in objects and events in a variety of ways Learning Experiences may include: Understanding Living Things Understanding Living Things Common Products Tasks › › Students collect and analyse data Management of Biodiversity – caring regarding rainfall and weather patterns to for our school chickens/livestock and tending to their basic needs. understand how they affect plant growth See Learning Experiences in Design and animal behaviour. This understanding Technologies and Health and Physical Students demonstrate ability to correctly can then be communicated to the class Education where students explored trees care for plants and animals found within through posters, tables and graphs, role as useful resources for the community our classroom/school grounds by tending play, song... to their daily needs through individual and Understanding Living Things group projects/rosters. › Students investigate, design and create Understanding Living Things Daily Practices Tasks a Butterfly Garden/Mini-Beast Mansion within the school grounds using a › Explore the needs of living things, and variety of native species to encourage list what it is that they need to survive. biodiversity. › Explore the diet of a variety of living As per first Learning Experiences in Critical › Students explore the question, things, classifying them as consumers, and Creative Thinking ‘Why do we need a butterfly garden producers and decomposers. in our school?’ (See the following website for The Science Inquiry Skills are applicable and information on Consumers, Producers practised across all Learning Experiences and Decomposers, as well as food chains www.sheppardsoftware.com). › Explore food chains with students, using the food chain games on the website above. › Students design a scientific poster that presents a known food chain that includes producers, consumers and decomposers. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Teacher observes students’ ability to follow the class roster and demonstrate correct care for plants and animals found within our classroom/school grounds › Satisfactory completion of scientific food chain poster › Satisfactory communication of the link between weather patterns and plant growth or animal behaviour through a poster, table and graph, role play or song. › Satisfactory completion of the garden using appropriate native species to encourage biodiversity › Satisfactory and safe use of gardening tools (HPE) and planting procedures 26

29 One and Two Domain: Technologies Strands: Design Technologies TECHNOLOGIES CONTEXTS DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES Food and fibre production Data and information › › Explore how plants and animals are grown for food, clothing and Collect, explore and sort data, and use digital systems to present the data creatively shelter › Share information with known people in safe online Food specialisations environments › Explore how food is selected and prepared for healthy eating Materials and technologies specialisation › Explore the characteristics and properties of materials and components that are used to create designed solutions Strands: Digital Technologies › Data and information Share information with known people in safe online environments › Collect, explore and sort data, and use digital systems to present the data creatively Learning Experiences may include: › Daily Practices Tasks Students focus on the value of a tree in Common Products Tasks – relation to the way a tree provides for › › Read the picture story book by Students create a digital presentation our needs and brainstorm the uses of Shel Silverstein (1964) The Giving Tree demonstrating simple ways to be a tree. Students then sort and classify environmentally sustainable in their Harper & Row, to engage the children these uses. in thinking about our interaction with daily lives (Nude Food to school, Students create a scientific poster to trees/living things. reusable drink bottle, composting demonstrate their understanding of the As a class, discuss the students’ thoughts food scraps, switching off lights etc.). many uses of trees in our society. on our interactions with living things. › Students share digital presentation with class/family/school etc. › Students will investigate a household › Students will explore and explain object, for example a wooden chair, and how plants are grown for a variety decide why this particular material was See Learning Experiences in Critical and of purposes, including food, clothing, used to create this product and where Creative Thinking household items, warmth, shelter etc. this material originates Through the use of a graphics organiser, In small groups, students create a short students will explain the purpose of iMovie/digital presentation explaining growing particular plants. For example their understanding of the origin of the cotton for clothing and trees for house material and thoughts and reasoning for building. how this material can be looked after and sustained for years to come. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Teacher observes students’ participation in class discussion about our interactions with living things › Satisfactory completion of graphic organiser depicting the purpose of growing particular plants › Satisfactory completion of scientific poster depicting the many uses of trees in our society › atisfactory completion of small group iMovie/digital presentation, identifying a common products, why it works and its origins (T/DT Di) › Satisfactory completion of small group iMovie/digital presentation, identifying a common products, why it works and its origins (CCT/QP & MC) › Satisfactory emailing/uploading of document informative picture 27

30 Biodiversity Energy Water Waste & Recycling Strands/Sub Strands: Domains: D A The Arts Dance Dr Drama MA Media Arts M Music VA Visual Arts QP CCT Critical and Creative Thinking Questions and Possibilities Reasoning R Metacognition M E English Reading and Viewing Ethical Capability UC EC Understanding Concepts DMA Decision Making and Actions Health and Physical Education HPE The Humanities CC H Civics and Citizenship EBL Economics and Business Levels G Geography GCS Geographical Concepts and Skills DI Data and Information GK Geographical Knowledge H History HCS Historical Concepts and Skills HK Historical Knowledge IC Intercultural Capability Cultural Practices CP CD Cultural Diversity M Mathematics Number and Algebra NA MG Measurement and Geometry Statistics and Probability SP Personal and Social Capability Self-Awareness and Management SAM PSC SoAM Social Awareness and Management Science SU S Science Understanding Bs Biological sciences Cs Chemical sciences ESs Earth and Space sciences Ps Physical sciences SIS Science Inquiry Skills Technologies DT T Design Technologies Ts Technologies and society Tc Technologies context Cds Creating designed solutions DiT Digital Technologies Ds Digital systems Di Data and information Cds Creating digital solutions 28

31 Three and Four t LEVEL: Three and Four UNIT: The Natural World BIG QUESTION/INQUIRY: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people have a wonderful understanding of the environment and interacted with it accordingly. What can we learn about the use of natural resources from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people’s perspective to help us live in a sustainable manner? RATIONALE: As we interact in a community of living things, with a rich diversity of perspectives, we are challenged to learn from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and recognise and identify skills which demonstrate a positive relationship with the earth. MAJOR ASSESSMENT TASK: Utilising the four key resources, Biodiversity, Energy, Waste and Water, from the ResourceSmart Schools program, students give an example of the belief of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people that the landscape provides nourishment for survival, to enable all life to share and celebrate the gifts that are provided by nature for each resource. 29 29

32 Domain: The Arts Strands: Dance/Drama/Media Arts/Music/Visual Arts Explore and Express ideas: Explore and Express ideas (Music): › › Improvise and structure movement ideas for dance sequences Use imagination and creativity to explore pitch, rhythm/time using safe dance practice, the elements of dance and and form, dynamics and tempo using voice, movement and choreographic devices instruments Explore and Express ideas: Present and Perform (Visual Art): › › Explore different ways of displaying artworks to enhance Explore ideas and narrative structures through roles and situations and use empathy in their own improvisations their meaning for an audience. and devised drama. Present and Perform: › Plan, create and present media artworks for specific purposes with awareness of responsible media practice Learning Experiences may include: › › › Students explore local Aboriginal and Students will make a photographic/video Explore the idea that The Arts are forms of communication and spiritual Torres Strait Islander art techniques journal of the production of an artefact expression about connection to the and symbols used in representing as part of their Adaptation – tools environment in Aboriginal and Torres totems. In Aboriginal spirituality a totem and technology learning experience. is a natural object, plant or animal that is Consider the types of natural resource Strait Islander people’s cultures. the spiritual emblem for a person, family materials used in making artefacts and or group. whether these materials would have been sourced locally. › Students choose a totem that represents › Students explore Aboriginal and Torres See Learning Experience in The the natural world and use art techniques Strait Islanders’ representation of the Technologies: Digital Technologies in their production of The Totem Poster. environment (animal movement, water in billabongs, rivers and sea) in their dance through the use of media. See Learning Experience in The Humanities: › Students explore traditional musical Civics and Citizenship instruments of the Aboriginal people. Use › Students explore a Dreamtime story and these instruments to explore the sounds in retell the story to the class through role the Australian landscape. Can you create play. (Explore more than The Rainbow the sound of a kangaroo hopping, snake Serpent, being aware that each language slithering, wind and water whooshing? area has its own Dreaming stories). Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Engagement in all of The Arts learning experiences utilising the specific skills learnt for each strand (T-DT) (H-CC) 30 30

33 Three and Four Domain: Critical and Creative Thinking Meta Cognition Questions and Possibilities › › Explore reactions to a given situation or problem and consider Consider concrete and pictorial models to facilitate thinking, including a range of visualisation strategies the effect of pre-established preferences Reasoning › Investigate why and when the consequences of a point of view should be considered › Identify and use ‘if then...’ and ‘what if...” reasoning Learning Experiences may include: › › › As a class, combine the responses to the In small groups, students discuss the Teacher reads the picture story book of The Story of Rosy Dock (Jeannie Baker) to above statements in the form of a class following statements: T Chart. the class, followed by the discussion on: › If early settlers had not introduced › rabbits, then... If early settlers had not introduced rosy dock, then... › If early settlers had not introduced camels, then... › If early settlers had not introduced foxes, then... › If early settlers had enjoyed eating kangaroo meat, then... › If early settlers had followed Aboriginal practises, then... › If early settlers had not dammed rivers, then... Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory participation in small group and whole class discussions 31 31

34 Domain: English Speaking and Listening Reading and Viewing Speaking and Listening refers to the various formal and informal Reading and Viewing involves students understanding, interpreting, ways oral language is used to convey and receive meaning. critically analysing, reflecting upon, and enjoying written and visual, It involves the development and demonstration of knowledge print and non-print texts. It encompasses reading and viewing a about the appropriate oral language for particular audiences and wide range of texts and media, including literary texts. Reading occasions, including body language and voice. It also involves the involves active engagement with texts and the development of development of active-listening strategies and an understanding knowledge about the relationship between them and the contexts of the conventions of different spoken texts. in which they are created. It also involves the development of knowledge about a range of strategies for reading. Writing Writing involves students in the active process of conceiving, planning, composing, editing and publishing a range of texts. Writing involves using appropriate language for particular purposes or occasions, both formal and informal, to express and represent ideas and experiences, and to reflect on these aspects. It involves the development of knowledge about strategies for writing and the conventions of Standard Australian English. Learning Experiences may include: Reading Speaking and Listening Oral language: › Debate › › Teachers and students are encouraged Students are encouraged to present both › to read appropriate texts in the area of formal and informal presentations on Oral presentation to audience sustainability. sustainability. These can include both › Vocabulary fiction and non-fiction texts in a variety › Students are encouraged to listen to › Questions of genres. and respond to a variety of formal and › Clarifying › informal presentations on sustainability. Explore a range of Indigenous Australian › Complex children’s books (e.g Dingo’s Tree by › Students explore the oral tradition in Gladys & Jill Milroy, Why I Love Australia › Wondering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander by Bronwyn Bancroft, Splosh for the culture and find examples of spoken › Giving Reasons... Billabong by Ros Moriarty). stories to listen to and, where possible, › Explanations observe body language. Students can For more suggestions of books, see the use this tradition to tell a story about Resource section at the end of this document. These Language Modes are immersed their favourite place in nature – it could throughout all Learning Experiences listed be their garden or a place in the bush. in varying degrees. Writing › Students are encouraged to write Using the following genres and processes appropriate texts in the area of may assist students in this unit: sustainability. These can include › Procedural Text both fiction and non-fiction texts › in a variety of genres. Narrative Text › › Explanatory Text Students explore ways to write about the Australian landscape incorporating the art Group Reading elements (pattern, colour, shape, texture, › Scientific language contrast) or create a text that describes how students imagine the Australian landscape looked before early settlers. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: 32

35 Three and Four Domain: Ethical Capability Decision Making and Actions Understanding Concepts › › Discuss the role of personal values and dispositions in ethical Discuss the ways to identify ethical considerations in a range of problems decision-making and actions Learning Experiences may include: See Learning Experience in Personal and Social Capability Suggestions for Formative Assessment: Health and Physical Education Domain: Personal, Social, Community Health Strands: Contributing to healthy and active communities Being healthy, safe and active › › Identify and practise strategies to promote health, safety Describe strategies to make the classroom and playground and wellbeing healthy, safe and active places › Communicating and interacting for health and wellbeing Participate in outdoor games and activities to examine how participation promotes a connection between the community, › Discuss and interpret health information and messages natural and built environments, and health and wellbeing in the media Learning Experiences may include: › › As a class, produce a persuasive The Growing, Preparation and Cooking Ensuring all safety measures are utilised, text to the school community outlining of Traditional Food students experiment with cooking using the ingredients from the Indigenous the positive aspects of an Indigenous › Students explore traditional cooking and food garden for wellbeing and food garden and the skills, methods and food preparation methods of Aboriginal recipes obtained through their research. food production. and Torres Strait Islander people. (If produce from own Indigenous Invite a guest speaker, or make use of food garden is not harvestable, seek media resources to obtain appropriate ingredients from another local source.) › information, such as: As a class, devise a plan for an Indigenous food garden within your school. Use your TV series: Wild Kitchen with Clayton local Indigenous nursery or Council for Donovan: ABC TV series, information to research which plants are Traditional Remedies TV series: Tasty bush tucker by ABC suited to growing in your area. The plan › Gardening Australia http://splash. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait will include a pictorial map identifying abc.net.au/home#!/media/30798/ Islander people knew of the medicinal where particular plants will be planted understanding-bush-foods qualities of plants. Investigate this and a breakdown of resources and costs statement and the current use Article: About Native Australian food required to create the garden. of natural plants, being used for SBS http://www.sbs.com.au/food/ medical reasons today. article/2008/07/01/about-native- › australian-food Explore how often natural medicines › As a class, create your Indigenous food are advertised in the media. Make a garden within your school, using your digital recording/graph of your findings. pictorial map to assist with the design Using a graphic organiser, students and planting. present their findings. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of graphics organiser demonstrating students’ knowledge of › using natural medicines vs contemporary medicines › our societies dependence on these medicines to live a healthy life 33

36 Domain: The Humanities Strands: Civics and Citizenship Laws and Citizens Government and Democracy › › Explain the roles of local government and some familiar services Distinguish between rules and laws and discuss why rules and laws are important provided at the local level Learning Experiences may include: › Aboriginal belief systems and culture are Using Tony Ryan’s THINKERS KEYS think about habitat, Teacher Note: introduced species, transport, informed by the responsibility of caring for The What If... Students respond to the infrastructure... question, What If your totem was the the land. An example is the totem system employed by many language groups. black cockatoo... Depending on the place and time of birth, › Students find 5 or more points › Students research the Aboriginal totems a totem of an animal or plant is assigned of difference between: of the local area and create a poster to a child. It is their responsibility to be a based on one of these totems, or choose › Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander protector or steward for this animal for their own totem from an indigenous peoples use of the land the rest of their life. (Thelma Parker, 2015) animal or plant local to their area. › European settlers use of the land. For this learning experience divide the students into two groups, one to set their timeframe for 400+ years ago, the other in today’s time. What different knowledge and responsibility for the care of the land will each group have? This may lead to some interesting discussions at the end of their poster presentations. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of their Totem poster, which will include: › a title (name of totem) › a collage, illustration or painting of a totem inspired by Aboriginal people’s connection to their local area › a list of their responsibilities › examples of how they will care for their totem. 34

37 Three and Four Domain: The Humanities Strands: Geography GEOGRAPHICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILLS GEOGRAPHICAL KNOWLEDGE Place, space and interconnection Places and our connection to them › › The many countries/Places of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Identify and explain the interconnections within places and between places Islander peoples throughout Australia, and the custodial responsibility they have for Country/Place, and how this Data and information influences views about sustainability. › Interpret maps and other geographical data and information › Types of natural vegetation and the significance of vegetation to develop identifications, descriptions, explanations and to the environment, the importance to animals and people conclusions, using geographical terminology including simple and different views on how they can be protected; the use and grid references, compass direction and distance management of natural resources and waste and different views on how to do this sustainably Learning Experiences may include: › › A Place To Call Home Using Tony Ryan’s THINKERS KEYS The Students consider how Aboriginal and Interpretations Key... Give 3 possible Torres Strait Islander people disposed › Students receive a copy of two maps explanations for: of waste, 400 years ago, without of Victoria; one, a map of Victorian harming the environment compared For thousands of years, the original Aborigines language territories and a with how we dispose of our waste in inhabitants of Australia, Aboriginal and map of Victoria highlighting regions and today’s society. These findings could be Torres Strait Islander peoples occupied major towns. In pairs/small groups, the added to the Country and Place poster the lands with very different boundaries students lay the maps beside each other in the History strand. than today, centred on intimate to attain a perspective of where Victorian relationship with land and sea. Aboriginal language territories are situated. Students share their findings “It’s my father’s land, my grandfather’s with the class. See Learning Experience in The Humanities: land, my grandmother’s land. And I’m History related to it, which also gives me my – Father Dave Passi, Plaintiff identity.” in Mabo Case. › Students will identify the Victorian Aboriginal language territory of their area. http://aiatsis.gov.au/explore/articles/ aboriginal-australia-map Suggestions for Formative Assessment: See Assessment Task in The Humanities: History 35

38 Domain: The Humanities Strands: History HISTORICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILLS HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE Chronology/Cause and Effect Community, Remembrance and Celebrations › › The significance of Country and Place to Aboriginal and Torres Identify the significance of a person and/or place in the local Strait Islander people who belong to a local area community. › The diversity and longevity of Australia’s first peoples and the significant ways Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are connected to Country and Place (land, sea, waterways and skies) and the effects on their daily lives Learning Experiences may include: › “We cultivated our land, but in a way different Students will research and identify the Country and Place from the white man. We endeavoured to indigenous plants and animals found in Land is fundamental to the wellbeing of live with the land; they seemed to live off it. their local Aboriginal language territory. Aboriginal people. The land is not just soil or I was taught to preserve, never to destroy.” During the exploration the concept of rocks or minerals, but a whole environment Aborigine Tom Dystra ecosystems could be explored to discuss that sustains and is sustained by people what plants and animals need in a place and culture. For Indigenous Australians, the to survive: space, light, water, food, http://www.australia.gov.au/about- land is the core of all spirituality and this shelter and a place to breed. australia/australian-story/austn- relationship and the spirit of 'country' is indigenous-cultural-heritage central to the issues that are important to Indigenous people today. › Students consider the statement above, › Students investigate, record and discussing their feelings about this All of Australia's Aboriginals were compare plants and animals found in statement. semi-nomadic hunters and gatherers, bordering Aboriginal language territories with each clan having its own territory to identify trade. from which they 'made their living'. These territories or 'traditional lands' › Students research and identify the were defined by geographic boundaries geographical boundaries between Based on their My Country research task, such as rivers, lakes and mountains. Victorian Aboriginal language territories students begin to identify what they can They understood and cared for their and label their findings on a poster learn about the use of natural resources different environments, and adapted titled ‘My Country’, which will include from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander to them. a detailed map of Victorian Aboriginal people’s perspective to help us live in a more language territories. sustainable manner. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of ‘Country and Place’ poster, according to class designed rubrics, including: › map of Victorian Aboriginal language territories › comparison of indigenous vegetation and fauna found in bordering Aboriginal language territories › identification of main trade › identification of waste disposal 400 years ago › comparison of waste disposal from 400+ years ago to today 36

39 Three and Four Domain: Intercultural Capability Cultural Diversity Cultural Practices › › Explain the role of cultural traditions in the development Compare their own and others cultural practices, showing how these may influence the ways people relate to each other of personal, group and national identities Learning Experiences may include: See Learning Experience in Personal See Learning Experience throughout all and Social Capability areas within The Humanities and Personal and Social Capability Suggestions for Formative Assessment: The Languages Domain: Learning languages broadens students’ horizons about the Students acquire communication skills in a second language. They personal, social, cultural and employment opportunities that are develop understanding about the role of language and culture in available in an increasingly interconnected and interdependent communication. Their reflections on language use and language world. The interdependence of countries and communities requires learning are applied in other learning contexts. people to negotiate experiences and meanings across languages and cultures. Learning Experiences may include: › › › Teachers and students are encouraged This may include naming of It may also include comparison with the country of the language in research to communicate about sustainability in environmental management systems the language they are learning. activities being implemented throughout in the language being learned. For the unit. For example: comparing the example: Waste Bins also labelled in the second language, garden Extreme Weather and Geographical Changes that occur in the country of areas/implements named in second second language to Australia. language, language teacher using part of sustainability theme in teaching vocabulary, and an indigenous food/ medicinal garden labelled in the local Aboriginal languages. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: 37

40 Domain: Mathematics MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY Using units of measurement Chance › › Measure, order and compare objects using familiar metric units Conduct chance experiments, identify and describe possible of length, area, mass and capacity L3 outcomes and recognise variation in results L3 › › Use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, Identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens L4 masses, capacities and temperatures L4 Data representation and interpretation Location and transformation › › Create simple grid maps to show position and pathways L3 Collect data, organise into categories and create displays using lists, tables, picture graphs and simple column graphs, › Identify symmetry in the environment L3 with and without the use of digital technologies L3 › Use simple scales, legends ad directions to interpret information › Interpret and compare data displays L3 contained in basic maps L4 › Select and trial methods for data collection including survey › Create symmetrical patterns, pictures and shapes with questions and recording sheets L4 and without digital technology L4 Learning Experiences may include: › › See Indigenous Food Garden learning Research the seeds collected, Mapping experience in Health and Physical Education discovering more about the plant’s size See Learning Experience in The and the needs for growth, including Humanities: Geography and History, Health whether drying is required before and Physical Education, The Arts: Visual Art propagating. and Critical and Creative Thinking › Students identify and describe possible growth outcomes and recognise Seed Propagation Challenge variation in results. › In small groups, students collect › Students plan for propagation of the a range of local indigenous seeds. seeds, planting them and caring for These could be sourced from a local them as required. Indigenous nursery, collecting seeds › Student groups compare their success from existing plants at the school or in seed propagation. contributions from members of the school community. Consider food and medicinal plants for use in the school’s Indigenous food garden. Students make a note of the plant name(s), the size of the plant from which the seed came and the conditions in which it was growing. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of Seed Propagation Challenge including: › seed collection › data collection › identify and describe possible outcomes › analysis of results 38

41 Three and Four Personal and Social Capability Domain: SELF-AWARENESS AND MANAGEMENT SOCIAL AWARENESS AND MANAGEMENT Relationships and diversity Recognition and expression of emotions › › Identify and explore the expression of emotions in social Describe the ways in which similarities and differences can situations and the impact on self and others effect relationships Development of resilience Collaboration › › Identify how persistence and adaptability can be used when Demonstrate skills for effective participation in group tasks and use criteria provided to reflect on the effectiveness of the teams faced with challenging situations and change in which thy participate Learning Experiences may include: › › › Throughout this unit students have Consider how Aboriginal and Torres Students research how Aboriginal been asked to work frequently in pairs and Torres Strait Islander families Strait Islander peoples managed and and small groups. Their capacity to do shared the use of natural resources. had different roles in fulfilling everyday needs and caring for the land before the so, understanding the needs of others, will assist in their understanding how arrival of the early settlers. For example Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander investigate the roles and activities in communities have traditionally worked finding food, water and shelter, burning in groups to find food and water, and off the vegetation, or making tools care for the land. and implements. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory participation in class discussions 39

42 Domain: Science SCIENCE UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE INQUIRY SKILLS Science as human endeavour Questioning and predicting › › Science knowledge helps people to understand the effects With guidance, identify questions in familiar contexts that can be investigated scientifically and predict what might happen based of their actions on prior knowledge Biological sciences Planning and conducting › Different living things have different life cycles and depend › on each other and the environment to survive. Safely use appropriate materials, tools, equipment and technologies Chemical sciences Recording and processing › Natural and processed materials have a range of physical › Use a range of methods including tables and column graphs to properties; these properties can influence their use represent data and to identify patterns and trends Earth and space sciences Analysing and evaluating › Earth’s surface changes over time as a result of natural › Compare results with predictions, suggesting possible reasons processes and human activity for findings Communication › Represent and communicate ideas and findings to show patterns and relationships using formal and informal scientific language. Learning Experiences may include: › - Finding water Students discuss examples of how The term soakage refers to water that Aboriginal and Torres Strait people seeps into the sand, and is stored below, sometimes as part of an ephemeral demonstrated stewardship of the land. A lot of Australia is covered by desert or river or creek. Soakages were important semi-arid land. Indigenous Australians › It has been said that many Aboriginal sources of water for Aboriginal people in survived in this dry continent for thousands and Torres Strait people moved camp the desert. They would scoop out the sand of years. They survived by finding water regularly, dependant on food and or mud using a coolamon or woomera, using different methods. water supply. often to a depth of several metres, until Sometimes there is a lot of water Students discuss this statement in clean water gathered in the hole. Knowing underground. Some groups of Indigenous small groups and further investigate to the precise location of each soakage was Australians dug wells and tunnels to find this determine the accuracy of this statement. extremely valuable knowledge. water. If a group was moving away from a (Reading, appropriate video clips, guest water supply, animal skins were made into speaker) › Students explore the function of a bags that could carry water. coolamon or woomera in retrieving water Aboriginal people looked at where birds and and create a scientific poster, including: animals found water. They followed dingos See Learning Experience in The Humanities: › a diagram of a coolamon or woomera to rock pools or watched where ants went History & Geography, The Technologies and containing labelled parts underground. They also knew that where Health and Physical Education › there were lots of trees there must be water a short procedural text for retrieving underground. water › It has been said that Aboriginal people in › http://www.skwirk.com/p-c_s-1_u- examples of use remote areas may be able to find water 287_t-705_c-2638/how-aboriginal- in seemingly dry ground. and-torres-strait-islander-people- Students discuss this statement in met-their-basic-needs/nsw/hsie/ small groups and further investigate to places:-then,-now-and-tomorrow/ determine the accuracy of this statement. australia-before-1788 (Reading, appropriate video clips, guest speaker) - Water Witcher by Jan Ormerod - picture story book introduces water witching/dowsing Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory participation in class discussions › Satisfactory completion of woomera / coolamon scientific poster, including: › labelled diagram › procedural text for use › examples of use 40

43 Domain: Technologies Design and Technologies Strands: Technologies and Society CREATING DESIGNED SOLUTIONS › Recognise the role of people in design and technologies Investigating occupations and explore factors, including sustainability, that › Critique needs or opportunities for designing and explore and test impact on the design of solutions to meet community needs a variety of materials, components, tools and equipment and the techniques needed to create designed solutions TECHNOLOGIES CONTEXTS Producing Food and fibre production › Select and use materials, components, tools and equipment › Investigate food and fibre production used in modern using safe work practices to produce designed solutions or traditional societies Evaluating Food specialisations › Evaluate design ideas, processes and solutions based on criteria › Investigate food preparation techniques used in modern for success developed with guidance and including care for the or traditional societies environment and communities Planning and Managing Materials and technologies specialisation › Plan a sequence of production steps when making designed solutions › Investigate the suitability of materials, systems, components, tools and equipment for a range of purposes DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES Digital Systems › Explore a range of digital systems with peripheral devices for different purposes, and transmit different types of data Data and information › Collect, access and present different types of data using simple software to create information and solve problems › Individually and with others, plan, create and communicate ideas and information safely, applying agreed ethical and social protocols Learning Experiences may include: › › Adaptation – tools and technology Using Tony Ryan’s THINKERS KEYS Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait The Different Uses Key... Find 4 different Islander people utilised vegetation to Tools and implements reflect the uses that Aboriginal and Torres Strait create baskets of a variety of sizes and geographical location of different groups. use. Investigate which indigenous and/or people found for a rock. For example, coastal tribes used fishbone native vegetation would be most suitable It is suggested that students make a to tip their weapons, whereas desert to create these baskets in your local area photographic/video journal of this experience tribes used stone tips. While tools varied and endeavour to make one for a selected › by group and location, Aboriginal people Students identify the tools and implements purpose. Students may work in small all had knives, scrapers, axe-heads, of the local Aboriginal people, and explain groups with a combined purpose in mind. spears, various vessels for eating the way these tools met the community’s It is suggested that students make a and drinking, and digging sticks. needs. Compare the tools and implements photographic/video journal of this experience Aboriginal people used to find food and Aboriginal people achieved two world water with the tools and implements we firsts with stone technology. They were the use today (for example a rock used to first to introduce ground edges on cutting dig for edible roots compared to a shovel › Students will collect their data and tools and to grind seed. They used stone digging for garlic, or a coolamon and findings throughout the Adaptation – tools tools for many things including: to make animal skin pouch for collecting water and technology learning experiences. other tools, to get and prepare food, to compared to a tap and bucket). These can be recorded digitally to become chop wood, and to prepare animal skins. their presentation assessment task. Students consider the energy needs in After European discovery and English using traditional and contemporary tools colonisation, Aboriginal people quickly and implements. If appropriate, student realised the advantages of incorporating could attempt to recreate one of these tools. These learning experiences in The metal, glass and ceramics. They were It is suggested that students make a Technologies will combine in the completion easier to work with, gave a very sharp photographic/video journal of this experience of a presentation from students to the class. edge, and needed less re-sharpening. The Humanities learning experiences http://www.australia.gov.au/about- may add to their knowledge and help australia/australian-story/austn- with investigations. indigenous-cultural-heritage Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of ‘Adaption – tools and technologies’ digital/ presentation, according to class designed rubrics, including: › identification of the tools and implements of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people › detailed explanation of the way this tool met the community’s needs › comparison to tools and implements used today › adequate research to direct the completion of a functional article (SU-Cs) (DiT- Di) 41

44 Biodiversity Energy Waste & Recycling Water Domains: Strands/Sub Strands: D The Arts A Dance Dr Drama MA Media Arts M Music VA Visual Arts Critical and Creative Thinking QP Questions and Possibilities CCT Reasoning R M Metacognition E English Reading and Viewing Understanding Concepts Ethical Capability EC UC Decision Making and Actions DMA Health and Physical Education HPE CC H The Humanities Civics and Citizenship EBL Economics and Business Levels G Geography GCS Geographical Concepts and Skills GK Geographical Knowledge H History HCS Historical Concepts and Skills HK Historical Knowledge CP Cultural Practices Intercultural Capability IC Cultural Diversity CD NA Mathematics M Number and Algebra MG Measurement and Geometry Statistics and Probability SP Self-Awareness and Management SAM Personal and Social Capability PSC Social Awareness and Management SoAM Science S SU Science Understanding Bs Biological sciences Cs Chemical sciences ESs Earth and Space sciences Ps Physical sciences SIS Science Inquiry Skills Technologies DT T Design Technologies Ts Technologies and society Tc Technologies context Cds Creating designed solutions DiT Digital Technologies Ds Digital systems Di Data and information Cds Creating digital solutions 42 42

45 Five and Six t LEVEL: Five & Six UNIT: Our Sustainable Planet — “A Recipe for Change” BIG QUESTION/INQUIRY: Why is it important that we live on our planet in a way that is environmentally sustainable, and what can we do as young custodians to safeguard our planet? RATIONALE: As global citizens, we are challenged to identify the unique aspects of this sometimes vulnerable planet. Major issues we are facing, including pollution, global warming, the lack of fresh water and loss of biodiversity, encourage us to use our influence to develop respectful relationships with animals, their habitats, plants, the land, the seas, the rivers, in this one community of life on earth. MAJOR ASSESSMENT TASK: Students independently create a presentation for a Parents and Friends Showcase that outlines their ‘Recipe for Change’... Students will be assessed on their use of digital technologies for: internet research, creation of charts/graphs for the purpose of data recording, labelled diagrams, photography. Their presentation may include two or more of the following: posters, a PowerPoint presentation, photographs, videos, an IMovie, a three dimensional model, visual and performance artworks. 43 43

46 Domain: The Arts Strands: Dance/Drama/Media Arts/Music/Visual Arts Respond and Interpret: Present and Perform: › › Perform devised and scripted drama that develops narrative and Explain how aspects of the elements of music are combined to uses performance styles and design to engage an audience communicate ideas, concepts and feelings by comparing music from different cultures, times and locations Present and Perform: Explore and Express ideas: › Plan, produce and present media artworks for specific purposes › using responsible media practices Explore visual arts practices as inspiration to create artworks that express different ideas and beliefs Learning Experiences may include: › › › Using techniques from a chosen visual art Listen to and compare various Rehearse and perform a play compositions about the seasons, weather, about environment/pollution. field to express their feelings as a result rain, water, wind. Teachers, do not give of listening to the music, students create Some suggestions: Night of the Wild an individual artwork. e.g. Sculpture; titles of composition. After listening ask: Geese (Judith Crabtree), The Ant’s Picnic painting; collage; textile art. “What nature scenes was the composer (S Taylor & K Densley). depicting in this music?” “What aspects of the music suggested this?” Some examples: › Students “step into the shoes of another” - Vivaldi. Four Seasons and experience life from another (1988) for Orchestra. Kakadu perspective. E.g. a young person living Peter Sculthorpe - in a community where they have to earn money to support their family by https://www.youtube.com/ scavenging at local tip. (Role Play). watch?v=N2qqj1_ILyA Mangrove (1979) / Peter Sculthorpe (Australia) https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=ucgYOMS7Kro › After conducting individual research on a chosen sustainability topic, students - Music by Josh Wynter Antarctica present their findings through: https://www.youtube.com/ › Creating a video clip on chosen topic watch?v=zn0vQFR6SCs to inform audience about issues. Vangelis - Theme from Antarctica E.g. littering in school grounds affects https://www.youtube.com/ waterways or damming rivers/ watch?v=GOwuniIgYXM irrigation leads to salinity; OR › Creating a video advocating the use of wind turbines/solar panels. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Student particpation in planning, rehearsing and presenting the play utilising skills gained during drama sessions. › Students able to maintain character throughout role play. › Video clip contians appropriate and accurate information. It has been created utilising the skills learned during meda arts lessons. › Rubric could be created based on learned skills/research content. › Particpation in class responses to questions regarding music – completion of the follow up Visual Arts activity. › Appropriate use of techniques and materials in Art piece, as learned during Visual Art lessons. 44

47 Five and Six Domain: Critical and Creative Thinking Meta Cognition Questions and Possibilities › › Identify and form links and patterns from multiple information Investigate thinking processes using visual models and language sources to generate non-routine ideas and possibilities Reasoning › Investigate common reasoning errors including contradiction and inconsistency, and the influence of context › Consider the importance of giving reasons and evidence and how the strength of these can be evaluated Learning Experiences may include: 2) What reasons and evidence 3) Use a ‘think, pair, share’ process to GLOBAL perspective are given that: respond to and give information about an 1) Explore the principles for sustainability issue such as: › creating dams is good/bad for as presented by the Earth Charter › the natural world pollution: oil spills (www.earthcharter.org). Choose one of the › › pollution: ocean gyre garbage patches installing solar power is too expensive 16 points and create a poster/brochure/ › › use of coal for electricity, water tanks are the best way to video clip/PowerPoint to advertise › conserve water cutting down forest to grow other trees. this important aspect of sustainability. › (Large group work). purchasing green power is too Remember to use graphics and text to expensive explain your point of view. (Individual work). › Present the evidence in the form of a See Learning Experiences in Ethical Capability graphic organiser e.g. concept map/ Venn diagram. (Pair/small group work). Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Completed advertisement using criteria and class determined rubric. › Accurate completion of graphic organiser – utilising a class prepared rubric to ensure both sides of issue are presented. › Final presentation from group including thinking of all members of the group. Did group work well together? Did they achieve the objective of exploring and presenting accurate information? 45

48 Domain: English Speaking and Listening Reading and Viewing Speaking and Listening refers to the various formal and Reading and Viewing involves students understanding, interpreting, informal ways oral language is used to convey and receive critically analysing, reflecting upon, and enjoying written and visual, meaning. It involves the development and demonstration of print and non-print texts. It encompasses reading and viewing a knowledge about the appropriate oral language for particular wide range of texts and media, including literary texts. Reading audiences and occasions, including body language and voice. involves active engagement with texts and the development of It also involves the development of active-listening strategies knowledge about the relationship between them and the contexts and an understanding of the conventions of different spoken texts. in which they are created. It also involves the development of knowledge about a range of strategies for reading. Writing Writing involves students in the active process of conceiving, planning, composing, editing and publishing a range of texts. Writing involves using appropriate language for particular purposes or occasions, both formal and informal, to express and represent ideas and experiences, and to reflect on these aspects. It involves the development of knowledge about strategies for writing and the conventions of Standard Australian English. Learning Experiences may include: Oral language: Reading Speaking and Listening › Debate › › Students are encouraged to present both Teachers and students are encouraged › formal and informal presentations on to read appropriate texts in the area of Oral presentation to audience sustainability. These can include both sustainability. › Vocabulary fiction and non-fiction texts in a variety › Students are encouraged to listen to › Questions of genres. For example, A Forest by Marc and respond to a variety of formal and › Clarifying Martin. informal presentations on sustainability. › Complex Students could present their ideas about › Wondering sustainability projects at their school in a forum where the audience (class) has the › Giving Reasons... Writing opportunity to ask questions and receive › Explanations › Students are encouraged to write responses. appropriate texts in the area of These Language Modes are immersed sustainability. These can include both throughout all Learning Experiences listed fiction and non-fiction texts in a variety in varying degrees. Using the following genres and processes of genres. may assist students in this unit: › Students write a text describing how › Procedural Text a sustainability project could benefit › their school. For example, solar or wind Narrative Text generation, water tanks for flushing › Explanatory Text toilets, or collection of rain water to a Group Reading frog bog or wetland. › Scientific language Suggestions for Formative Assessment: 46

49 Five and Six Domain: Ethical Capability Decision Making and Actions Understanding Concepts › › Explore the significance of ‘means versus ends’ by considering Discuss how ethical principles can be used as the basis for two ways to act when presented with a problem: one that action, considering the influence of cultural norms, religion, world views and philosophical thought on these principles privileges means and one ends › Discuss the role and significance of conscience and reasoning in ethical decision-making Learning Experiences may include: › Students explore Earth Charter Principle See Learning Experiences in Health and GLOBAL perspective number nine, “Eradicate poverty as Physical Education, Humanities – Economics › Students explore the following: an ethical, social and environmental “We depend on our environment and the imperative” through investigating a story See Learning Experiences in Humanities – way we live impacts upon it. As custodians of a child/family living in poverty in a History we are called to be resourceful and third world country. innovative to make our environment (Useful resources can be found at sustainable.” World Vision, Caritas, Save the Children, Oxfam ...) – What do you think this statement means? › As a result, students devise a means – How can you/we make sure that this of supporting these families. Consider happens? how what we think of as waste could be of use to others. For example, how – Is it really our responsibility – your school can reuse furniture and or someone else’s? Why? other materials at the school for local communities, and/or raise funds for a local charity or a community group See Learning Experiences in Critical and around the world. Creative Thinking Suggestions for Formative Assessment: Students devise a creative way of fundraising to support a family living in poverty according to class created rubric 47

50 Domain: Health and Physical Education Strands: Personal, Social, Community Health Contributing to healthy and active communities Being healthy, safe and active › › Explore how participation in outdoor activities supports personal Plan and practise strategies to promote health, safety and community health and wellbeing creates connections to the and wellbeing natural and built environment Communicating and interacting for health and wellbeing › Recognise how media and important people in the community influence personal attitudes, beliefs, decisions and behaviours Learning Experiences may include: › › › Using Tony Ryan’s THINKERS KEYS Explore differences in food preparation Examine health issues affecting people and presentation e.g. in a restaurant, in different places e.g. diseases spread What if ... answer the question: fast-food outlet, café. For example, by mosquitoes, and how these may “What if the world’s population be changing as a result of a changing what materials go into food packaging immediately doubled?” climate. and what waste is produced after the food is consumed, or when food is transported OR from different countries – how many food › Explore the health and physical miles does it take to create a hamburger? wellbeing of people in other countries, including the impact of unequal access to resources – food and clean water. Create a power point presentation to share their findings with their peers. See Learning Experiences in Ethical Capability, The Humanities – Economics Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Completed power point presentation assessed according to content and digital technology skills (DiT Di) › Active participation in class discussion and the satisfactory completion of Venn diagram 48

51 Five and Six Domain: The Humanities CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS Citizenship, Diversity and Identity Resource Allocation and Making Choices › › Investigate how people with shared beliefs and values work Identify types of resources (natural, human, capital) and explore the ways societies use them in order to satisfy the needs and together to achieve their goals and plan for action wants of recent and future generations Consumer and Financial Literacy › Consider the effect that consumer and financial decisions of individuals may have on themselves, their family, the broader community and the natural, economic and business environment › Economic and Business Reasoning and Interpretation › Make decisions, identify appropriate actions by considering the advantages and disadvantages, and form conclusions concerning an economics or business issue or event Learning Experiences may include: › › How Nude Food can reduce Waste Research, devise and present an in- Students discuss the environmental footprint of these products and devise depth study of influential people in the › Provide students with examples of world of environmental sustainability. a school-based action plan to help common lunch box items that come in promote environmentally sustainable How did they work with others to both wrapped packaging and in other shopping choices. achieve their goals and plan for action? forms (for example packaged yoghurt vs Present as a written report. Include › Students create a class action plan yoghurt portioned into small containers graphics/photos where possible. for a day or more each week to have or fresh fruit portions vs individually Nude Food lunches with the school packaged fruit bars). community. › Students research the cost of each › Students write a letter to a local See Human Impact on the Natural World portion and compare the quantity supermarket/manufacturers about learning experience in the Humanities: vs value for money, recording their concerns with the issue of Geography and comparing the results using packaging creating waste. numerical and column graphs. › Using Tony Ryan’s THINKERS KEYS › Based on their How Nude Food can The Ridiculous Key: Try to justify the › Students examine the wrapped reduce Waste research task, students statement: packaging of items and sort these begin to identify and create a recipe for according to the recyclable and non- ”By law, every household must recycle change at their school. recyclable packaging. Which of these EVERY possible piece of rubbish” items could be brought to school as Nude Food? Suggestions for Formative Assessment: Satisfactory completion of: › › appropriate action plan, data collection, › › data analysis, advertisement and/letter (MG & SP) 49

52 Domain: The Humanities Strands: Geography GEOGRAPHICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILLS GEOGRAPHICAL KNOWLEDGE Place, space and interconnection Factors that shape places and influence interconnections › › Location of the major countries of the Asian region in relation Describe and explain interconnections within places and between places, and the effects of these interconnections to Australia and the geographical diversity within the region › Data and information Impacts of bushfires or floods on environments and communities and how people can respond › Interpret maps and other geographical data and information using digital and spatial technologies as appropriate, to develop › Environments and human influences on the location ad identifications, descriptions, explanations and conclusions that characteristics of places and the management of spaces within them use geographical terminology › Factors that influence people’s awareness and opinion of places Learning Experiences may include: › As a group, create a list of plausible 5. On a blank map of the world, students Food Miles – How Far has your Dinner alternatives to the products selected. Travelled? label the equator, the Northern and For example home grown or locally grown Southern Hemispheres, continents, › Working in small groups, provide tomatoes could replace canned Italian oceans, the tropical, temperate and polar students with examples of a meal (in a tomatoes to help reduce food miles. zones. (The following website may be shopping bag place all of the ingredients Students create a pictorial representation 6. useful for explaining the different zones) needed to make the meal, and a recipe of their alternate shopping bag. www.webquest.hawaii.edu/kahihi/ card) to determine how far each item 7. As a class discuss the effects sciencedictionary/C/climatezone.php has travelled: of importing food. › There are nine designated biomes in the Students unpack their shopping bag and 1. world: tropical forests, savanna, desert, read the recipe card to see what they are polar and high-mountain ice, chaparral, cooking. temperate grass land, temperate Based on their Food Miles research task, 2. Students read the package to determine deciduous forest, coniferous forest, tundra students begin to identify and create a where the product was produced. (arctic and alpine). Using the internet, recipe for change. (Product of . . .) and locate these places students search for an image and on a world map. definition of each biome, to be recorded Using the Food Miles Calculator 3. Biomes – Biomes, what are they? as a digital poster or presentation. (www.foodmiles.com) determine the › The world is made up of many different Students may wish to include a map distance travelled by each ingredient biomes. Biomes are large regions of the of the world showing the location of and record their findings. world with similar plants, animals, and the different biomes. Calculate the total miles for their meal, 4. other living organisms that are adapted to recording their findings. the climate and other conditions. A biome is made of many similar ecosystems. Based on their biomes research task, students begin to identify and create www.geographypods.com/24-rainforests-- a recipe for change. deserts.html Suggestions for Formative Assessment: Satisfactory completion of map, including; Satisfactory completion of: - equator, - data collection, - the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, - data calculations, - continents, - pictorial representation of their alternate shopping bag - oceans, - participation in class discussion (MG & SP) - the tropical, temperate and polar zones Completed digital presentation demonstrating knowledge of biomes (DTDI) 50

53 Five and Six Domain: The Humanities Strands: History HISTORICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILLS HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE Historical Sources as evidence Historical Knowledge: The Australian colonies – › › The nature of convict or colonial presence, including the Describe perspectives and identify ideas, beliefs and values of factors that influence changing patterns of development, how people and groups in the past the environment changed, and aspects of the daily life of the inhabitants, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Australia as a nation › Significant contributions of individuals and groups, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and migrants, to changing Australia society Learning Experiences may include: Suggested Topics Based on their Human Impact on the Human Impact on the Natural World Natural World research task, students › Students choose one of the following Whaling (within Australian coastal waters) begin to explore and identify barriers to topics to explore the impact on the natural › Fishing Industry and means of reaching understandings environment. Their exploration must with and between culturally diverse groups › Deforestation caused by include identifying ideas, beliefs and in an effort to create a recipe for change. - Mining values of people and groups, both past and present. This could include the influence - Wood chipping of significant people, both convict, colonial, - Agriculture/Horticulture migrant or Aboriginal and Torres Strait › Great Barrier Reef Islander peoples. - Mining Students will present their findings utilising - Tourism a concept map, which demonstrates the › Extinction of animal species due to event/issue and the effects this has had human demand on both people and environment over time. A timeline may be useful to include - Palm Oil if appropriate. - Cosmetics Industry - Medicinal - Development - Mining › Altering Water courses - building of dams - salinity The impact of Colonisation and the Gold Rush could also be part of this exploration. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of concept map which demonstrates the event/issue and the effects this has had on both people and environment over time. (EC) 51

54 Domain: Intercultural Capability Cultural Diversity Cultural Practices › › Identify barriers to and means of reaching understandings with Explain how intercultural experiences can influence beliefs and behaviours, including developing a critical perspective on and and between culturally diverse groups respect for their own and others cultures Learning Experiences may include: See Learning Experiences in The Humanities: Based on their research tasks, students Geography and The Humanities: History begin to explore and identify barriers to and means of reaching understandings with and between culturally diverse groups in an effort to create a recipe for change. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: Domain: The Languages Learning languages broadens students’ horizons about the personal, Students acquire communication skills in a second language. social, cultural and employment opportunities that are available They develop understanding about the role of language and culture in an increasingly interconnected and interdependent world. The in communication. Their reflections on language use and language interdependence of countries and communities requires people to learning are applied in other learning contexts. negotiate experiences and meanings across languages and cultures. Learning Experiences may include: › › › This may include naming of It should also involve the culture and Teachers and students are encouraged to use the language they are learning, environmental management systems country of the language, in research activities being implemented throughout in the language being learned. For to communicate in the area of the unit. For example: comparing the environmental sustainability. example: Waste Bins also labelled in the second language, garden areas/ Extreme Weather and Geographical implements named in second language, Changes that occur in the country of language teacher using sustainability second language to Australia. theme in vocabulary learning and teaching, and an Indigenous Food Garden labelled with the local Aboriginal language/s. Suggestions for Formative Assessment: 52

55 Five and Six Domain: Mathematics MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY Using units of measurement Chance › › List outcomes of chance experiments involving equally likely Choose appropriate units of measurement for length, area, outcomes and represent probabilities of those outcomes using volume, capacity and mass L5 fractions L5 › Calculate the perimeter and area of rectangles and the volume › and capacity of prisms using familiar metric units L5 Conduct chance experiments with both small and large numbers of trials using appropriate digital technologies L6 › Convert between common metric units of length, mass and capacity L6 Data representation and interpretation › Solve problems involving the comparison of lengths and areas › Pose questions and collect categorical or numerical data by using appropriate units L6 observation or survey L5 Location and transformation › Construct, interpret and compare a range of data displays, including side-by-side column graphs for two › Use a grid reference system to describe locations. Describe routes using landmarks and directional language L5 Learning Experiences may include: The following Learning Experiences See Learning Experiences in all of the other include a wide range of Mathematical domains, particularly mapping and timeline knowledge and skills: Learning Experiences in The Humanities. 1. How Nude Food can reduce Waste 2. Food Miles 3. Biomes 4. Human Impact on the Natural World Suggestions for Formative Assessment: See Assessment Tasks in linked Learning Experiences Domain: Personal and Social Capability SELF-AWARENESS AND MANAGEMENT SOCIAL AWARENESS AND MANAGEMENT Relationships and diversity Recognition and expression of emotions › › Define and recognise examples of stereotypes, discrimination Explore the links between their emotions and their behaviour and prejudice and discuss how they impact on the individual Development of resilience Collaboration › Identify the skills for working independently and describe their › performance when undertaking independent tasks Identify the characteristics of an effective team and develop descriptions for particular roles including leadership, and describe both their own and their team’s performance when undertaking various roles Learning Experiences may include: See Learning Experiences in Health and See Learning Experiences where students are working in small groups Physical Education Suggestions for Formative Assessment: 53

56 Domain: Science SCIENCE UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE INQUIRY SKILLS Science as human endeavour Questioning and predicting › › Scientific understandings, discoveries and inventions are used to With guidance, pose questions to clarify practical problems or inform personal and community decisions and to solve problems inform a scientific investigation, and predict what the findings that directly affect people’s lives of an investigation might be based on previous experiences or general rules Biological sciences Planning and conducting › The growth and survival of living things are affected by the › physical conditions of their environment With guidance, plan appropriate investigation types to answer questions or solve problems and use equipment, technologies Earth and space sciences and materials safely, identifying potential risks › Sudden geological changes or extreme weather conditions can Recording and processing affect Earth’s surface › Construct and use a range of representations, including tables Physical sciences and graphs, to record, represent an describe observations, › Energy from a variety of sources can be used to generate patterns or relationships in data electricity, electric circuits enable this energy to be transferred Analysing and evaluating to another place and then to be transformed into another form › Compare data with predictions and use as evidence in of energy developing explanations Communicating › Communicate , ideas and processes using evidence to develop explanations of events and phenomena and to identify simple cause-and-effect relationships Learning Experiences may include: › Suggested Topics – Extreme Weather and Geographical Using Tony Ryan’s THINKERS KEYS Changes What if Thinker’s Key › Bushfires What if we could utilise these forces of › Students choose one of the following › Cyclones/Typhoons nature to provide energy, water or waste topics to explore the impact on the › Tsunami/Tidal Waves management resources, rather than disturb natural environment using digital the natural world as we currently do? › Floods technologies. Students will present their findings through a three dimensional › Drought For example: model of their topic plus a scientific › Earthquake – tapping into the energy provided by sun poster explaining their research. The rather than mining for and burning coal › Volcanic Eruptions location of where these events have to provide electricity for our homes. › Sink Holes occurred over the past ten years could be marked on a world map, if › Tornadoes › Using Tony Ryan’s THINKERS KEYS appropriate. A timeline may be also The Inventors Key useful to include. Design a means of transporting flood water to places of drought Suggestions for Formative Assessment: Satisfactory completion of three dimensional model and scientific poster to be assessed according to class created rubric. 54

57 Five and Six Domain: Technologies Design and Technologies Strands: Technologies and Society DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES › Investigate how people in design and technologies occupations Data and information address competing considerations, including sustainability, in › Acquire, store and validate different types of data and use a range the design of solutions for current and future use of software to interpret and visualise data to create information › Plan, create and communicate ideas, information and online TECHNOLOGIES CONTEXTS collaborative projects, applying agreed ethical social and Food and fibre production technical protocols › Investigate how and why food and fibre are produced in managed environments Food specialisations › Investigate the role of food preparation in maintaining good health and the importance of food safety and hygiene Learning Experiences may include: The following Learning Experiences See Learning Experience in Science – include a wide range of Digital The Inventors Key Technologies understanding, knowledge › Using Tony Ryan’s THINKERS KEYS and skills: The Prediction Key How Nude Food can reduce Waste 1. Cotton is a fibre that requires high levels Food Miles 2. of water – is this a sustainable source of 3. Biomes fibre for a sustainable world? Will we use 4. Human Impact on the Natural World it in the future? 5. Extreme Weather and Geographical Changes › Based on the above research tasks, › Highlight the positives of having packaged students begin to identify and create food compared to the negative aspects. a recipe for change. Use a T Chart to present your findings. See Learning Experiences in Health and Physical Education Suggestions for Formative Assessment: › Satisfactory completion of T Chart › Use of digital technologies for: › internet for research › creation of charts/graphs for the purpose of data recording › labelled diagrams › graphics organisers › posters › Power Point Presentation › Photography › Videos › Creating an IMovie 55

58 Biodiversity Energy Waste & Recycling Water Domains: Strands/Sub Strands: D The Arts A Dance Dr Drama MA Media Arts M Music VA Visual Arts Critical and Creative Thinking QP Questions and Possibilities CCT Reasoning R M Metacognition E English Reading and Viewing Understanding Concepts Ethical Capability EC UC Decision Making and Actions DMA Health and Physical Education HPE CC H The Humanities Civics and Citizenship EBL Economics and Business Levels G Geography GCS Geographical Concepts and Skills GK Geographical Knowledge H History HCS Historical Concepts and Skills HK Historical Knowledge CP Cultural Practices Intercultural Capability IC Cultural Diversity CD NA Mathematics M Number and Algebra MG Measurement and Geometry Statistics and Probability SP Self-Awareness and Management SAM Personal and Social Capability PSC Social Awareness and Management SoAM Science S SU Science Understanding Bs Biological sciences Cs Chemical sciences ESs Earth and Space sciences Ps Physical sciences SIS Science Inquiry Skills Technologies DT T Design Technologies Ts Technologies and society Tc Technologies context Cds Creating designed solutions DiT Digital Technologies Ds Digital systems Di Data and information Cds Creating digital solutions 56 56

59 Suggested Resources t Suggested Resources These are only a few of many resources which could be used in Education for a Sustainable future learning experiences. 57 57

60 TEACHER SUPPORT MATERIALS Title Year Publisher Synopsis Author Through the ResourceSmart Schools Current Australian N/A ResourceSmart Schools program, schools can take action to minimise Sustainable Schools www.sustainability.vic.gov.au/ waste, save energy and water, promote Initiative services-and-advice/schools biodiversity and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. ResourceSmart Schools also Sustainability helps Victorian school students and teachers Victoria show leadership in climate change through practical and achievable actions. The Victorian Curriculum Foundation to Victorian Curriculum N/A 2016 Victorian Curriculum 10 (F-10) establishes what every student and Assessment http://victoriancurriculum.vic. should be learning from Foundation Authority (VCAA) edu.au/ to Year Ten. The curriculum has been established as a step towards lifelong learning, social development and active and informed citizenship and is the common set of knowledge and skills essential for all students. This resource is written for teachers to Josephine Lang 2007 Curriculum Education How to succeed with Corporation help them develop skills and knowledge for Sustainability within themselves, their students and the Little Books of Big Ideas school community in an endeavour to create an environmentally sustainable school community. It links social justice, cultural diversity and good governance to education for sustainability. Education for sustainability is a concept Tony Cook 2005 The Australian Education for a which should be implemented throughout Government Sustainable Future: all schools. This resource offers some Department of A National Environmental ideas to assist teachers, schools and The Environment Education Statement for school communities in this task. and Heritage Australian Schools Education for sustainability should be The Australian 2010 Sustainability Curriculum implemented from Foundation to Year Government Framework: 10. This resource offers information Department of A Guide for Curriculum and guidance to school communities The Environment, Developers and Policy Makers and teachers on how to structure a Heritage and developmental program for students. the Arts Wendy Sarkissian 2009 Earth Scan This book looks at education for sustainability Kitchen Table Sustainably through the lens of community engagement. Publication: London The heart of the book approaches sustainability from the ‘bottom up’, with the community engaging through components of Education, Action, Trust, Inclusion, Nourishment and Governance – EATING. 58

61 Suggested Resources TEACHER SUPPORT MATERIALS Publisher Synopsis Author Title Year Lan Wang Editor 2002 Curriculum Global Perspectives: a Statement on Global Global Perspectives Corporation Education for Australian Schools offers a A statement for global education concise, practical and philosophical guide for Australian schools to the aims and themes of global education as it has developed in Australia. Approaching Indigenous and Torres Strait Drama Australia 2007 Drama Australia : Aboriginal Drama Australia: Islander understandings and issues can and Torres Strait Islander often be a challenging and difficult task Guidelines for Drama/Theatre for teachers. This resource offers a variety Education of ways of approaching texts created by www.dramaaustralia.org.au/ Indigenous Australians. assets/filesATSIg 59

62 PICTURE STORY BOOKS Title Year Publisher Synopsis Author Eric Carle 1969 The story tells us of a baby caterpillar who, The Very Hungry Caterpillar Penguin Putnam after hatching from the egg finds that he is so hungry that for five days all he does is eat. After a while he has eaten so much that he feels unwell and so spins himself a cocoon, where he remains for some time, before emerging as a brightly coloured butterfly 1990 Walker Books When visiting a tropical rainforest, a young Where the Forest meets the Sea Jeannie Baker boy imagines that he is living in a time of extinct and unique animals. He pretends that aboriginal children are playing there and wonders how much longer the rainforest might survive? The Giving Tree - Harper & Row This book describes the friendship between Shel Silverstein a boy and a tree. It tells us of the boy’s growth and development from childhood to old age and how the tree supports him through all the major events in the boy’s life. The Water Hole Graeme Base 2003 Penguin Books A story in rhyme and number, of the animals gathering at a water hole through the different weather and the different seasons The Tiny Seed Eric Carle 1991 Ashton Scholastic This book tells the story of a small seed that is carried by the autumn wind to places new. We hear of other seeds that are dropped into the sea, burned by the sun or eaten by birds. Many seeds are stepped upon or picked, but this seed survives and grows into a beautiful flower that in turn creates new seeds which are carried off by the wind. Jeannie Baker 1995 The Story of Rosy Dock The author of this story wants readers to Greenwillow become aware of what can happen when introduced plants are allowed to grow and spread throughout the land and endanger the native plants and animals of the country Lester and Clyde James H Reece 1991 Ashton Scholastic This rhyming story tells the story of young Lester the frog who has been sent away by his older friend Clyde to find a new home. However, his travels take him to places that are full of garbage, and ponds that are gooey, slimy and sticky. He decides to return home to their peaceful pond surrounded by fresh air and treat his older friend with more respect. The colorful vocabulary gives young readers an interesting lesson of conservation. Lester and Clyde Running Scared James H Reece 1995 Ashton Scholastic This second story in the Lester and Clyde series tells us of their beautiful pond being destroyed by machines and the journey which follows as they search for a new home. 60

63 Suggested Resources PICTURE STORY BOOKS Year Publisher Author Title Synopsis Greenwillow 1991 Window This book has no words, yet explores the Jeannie Baker concept of change through the eyes of Sam and the changing view as seen through a window. The original outlook of sky and wilderness changes to one of a growing city and finally to a scene showing a sign advertising housing blocks for sale. 2009 JoJo Publishing: This story tells us of plants that are The Faraway Seed Anna Boucatt introduced into an environment where they Melbourne Australia are not native. It can also be interpreted as a story about people who come from another country and bring with them much to share with those already living in this land. At some time we were all “seeds from a faraway place”. 2004 Walker Books Belonging is a wordless picture book Belonging Jeannie Baker and companion to Window. This book explores the rescuing of a city street as seen through Tracy’s window. It not only explores the re-greening of a city, but the role of the community as it is empowered to take on the responsibility of changing the environment. Dr Seuss 1971 The Lorax Random House Dr Seuss has captured the imaginations of both young and young at heart with this exceptional tale of the negative impact Harper Collins 2012 economic growth, consumerism and greed can have on the environment. With the help of the Lorax, the guardian of the trees, we are able to see the impact of deforestation and how the beliefs of one little boy can have a huge impact on the natural world. Walker Books 2012 Isabella’s Garden Glenda Millard & This story explores growth, seasonal change and the beginning and ending of the life Australia Rebecca Cool of a seed – how they blossom, grow and eventually lead to new life. Lara Bergen 2009 This book explores all the wonderful things Don’t Throw That Away you can do with “rubbish”. Reuse it in all kinds of creative ways. Frank Asch 1994 This story rejoices in the friendship that The Earth and I one child has with the Earth. They listen to each other, play together and care for each other. However, when the Earth becomes sad the child tries to find a way to make it happy again. The Thirsty Flowers This book investigates the necessities of plant life and the relationship between plants and humans. 61

64 PICTURE STORY BOOKS Author Synopsis Title Year Publisher IDW Publishing 2008 Ellie Bethel Michael Recycle This story is about a young superhero who is able to teach people about recycling. Michael Recycle shows a community how to clean up the town and is declared the “Green Caped Crusader”. 2008 IDW Publishing Michael Recycle helps Doug to change his Litterbug Dough Ellie Bethel wasteful, messy, lazy and littering ways. Ellie Bethel 2012 IDW Publishing When on vacation in the Great Redwood Michael Recycle and Forest, Michael Recycle and the tree-top cops The Treetop Cops save the day when the forest is under threat. Lola asks her classmates to assist her in a Lauren Child and Dial Books for 2009 Charlie and Lola: Bridgit Hurst competition to recycle her old toys. She has Young Readers We are Extremely discovered the competition when her friend Very Good Recyclers Charlie convinces her not to throw the toys away. The prize for the winner is a real live tree for her to plant. SCRIPTED PLAYS Author Year Publisher Synopsis Title Judith Crabtree 1995 Hodder Children’s An ecological theme is at the centre of this Night of the Wild Geese story of enchantment and magic. By the end Books Australia (in Imagine This... A reader’s of this haunting tale we the audience believe theatre resource book. that the Geese are indeed our brothers. M.Robertson & B. Poston- Anderson This play is about just one day in the life of Steve Taylor & 1997 Radical Wombat The Ant’s Picnic Kevin Densley the Ant family ... Mum and Dad, Suffishy Ant, Collective (in 10 in one: A collection of plays. Conveny Ant and Brilly Ant VIDEO CLIPS/FILMS Music Year Length Synopsis Title NB At no time should these following videos be used in full – as most require parent permission. It is important for teachers to use only ‘snippets’ of the film to demonstrate an aspect of learning. Often you can find appropriate segments of the film as You Tube clips. Happy Feet John Powell 2006 1 hr 48 mins In Antarctica, the young emperor penguin Mumble needs to be able to sing if he (Warner Bros) wishes to attract a mate. However, Mumble expresses himself through tap-dancing, as he has such a dreadful voice, and charms the female penguins through his dance. Happy Feet 2 Mumble is now known as the Master of Tap, John Powell 2011 1 hr 58 mins but his son Erik is averse to dancing. He (Warner Bros) runs away from home meeting a penguin that can fly – the Mighty Sven. It is not until their world is disturbed by powerful forces, that Mumble is able to compete with Erik’s new role model. 62

65 Suggested Resources VIDEO CLIPS/FILMS Year Length Synopsis Title Music 1998 1hr 35 mins Wanting to save his ant colony from Randy Newman It’s a Bugs Life destruction by grasshoppers, an ant enlists (Pixar Animation Studios what he thinks are warrior bugs, but in fact Walt Disney Pictures) are members of a circus troupe John Powell 2012 1hr 35 mins In his endeavour to win the heart of Audrey, The Lorax by Dr Seuss twelve year old Ted must investigate (Universal Studios) the story of the Lorax. Living in a town – Thneedville – which is lacking in trees and flowers, it will be difficult to find what Audrey most desires – a Truffula tree. This lack of nature has been caused by the greed of the Onceler, who no longer cares about nature or the environment. Thomas Newman 2003 1hr 40 mins Marlin is exceedingly vigilant with his son Finding Nemo Nemo – both clown fishes living in the sea. (Pixar, Walt Disney Pictures & Nemo wants to prove to his father that he is Disney Enterprise) able to care for himself and swims too close to the surface – where he is captured by a diver. On his travels to free Nemo, Marlin meets Dory who, despite having a short memory, agrees to help him in his search. On the way they face many dangers including sharks and jelly fish as they endeavour to free Nemo from a dentist’s fish tank. 1992 Alan Silvestri Fern Gully 1 hr 16 mins Ferngully is a rainforest in Australia where lives a fairy called Crysta. Believing that (20th Century Fox) humans are extinct, she is amazed when a logging company comes to the forest. Accidently she shrinks a young boy called Zak, who, when he realises the damage that logging does to the forest, tries to stop the destructive work. 2006 John Debney Lucas has been attacking the ant colony. 1 hr 28 mins The Ant Bully Tired of these attacks the ants shrink him (Warner Bros and Legendary to their size and cause him to live with them Pictures) until he learns what he has done. Directed by the ants, Lucas discovers a world he never knew existed. Z-4195 is a worker ant who wants to be 83 minutes 1998 John Powell and Antz noticed by princess Bala. He changes roles Harry Gregson- (DreamWorks Animation) with his friend Weaver, a soldier ant, hoping Williams to see Bala during a parade. Regrettably war breaks out, helping Z to become a hero, and thus he starts to spread the idea of individuality in the nest. When Barry B Benson graduates from 91 minutes Rupert Gregson- 2007 The Bee Movie Williams “bee college”, he is disappointed at his only (DreamWorks Animation & career choice: making honey. One day as he Paramount Pictures) travels outside the hive, Vanessa (a florist) saves Barry’s life. They becomes friends and when Barry finds that people actually eat honey he decides to take them to court. 63

66 VIDEO CLIPS/FILMS Title Year Length Synopsis Music Michael Brook 96 minutes This documentary is about former US Vice An Inconvenient Truth – Al Gore 2006 President Al Gore’s campaign to educate people about global warming. It comprises a comprehensive slide show and has been credited for raising awareness of global warming and the need for environmental sustainability. This TV series shadows Indigenous chef - series - N/A 2016 Wild Kitchen with Clayton Clayton Donovan as he journeys through Donovan: the Indigenous nations of the region, visiting ABC TV farms and providers to obtain the freshest ingredients for his appetising recipes. 2010 Clarence Stockee explores the Royal Botanic 4:14 N/A Tasty bush tucker by ABC Gardens in Sydney discovering plants used Gardening Australia by Indigenous Australians. Find out about http://splash.abc.net.au/home#!/ these native Australian bush foods and how media/30798/understanding- to prepare them safely. bush-foods N/A Maeve O'Meara, host of Food Safari is given a - series - 2013 Food Safari – A Look At Bush tour of Neville’s "supermarket" and "chemist", Tucker SBS out in the bush. http://www.sbs.com.au/food/ video/20651587800/Food- Safari-A-Look-At-Bush-Tucker 64

67 Suggested Resources MUSIC and SONGS Composer Title Year Accessed from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2qqj1_ILyA 1988 Peter Sculthorpe "Kakadu" Mangrove 1979 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucgYOMS7Kro Peter Sculthorpe Antarctica Josh Wynter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zn0vQFR6SCs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOwuniIgYXM Vangelis Theme from Antarctica Jack Johnston 2006 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqUdI4AIDF0&list=PL36CFBB3A The 3 R’s from CFF7917E Sing-A-Longs and Lullabies for the Film Curious George 2014 Paul Kelly and Kev From little things, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAONlfoNVuY Carmody big things grow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbaQ6hI0Elk 2009 John Butler, Dan From little things, big things grow Sultan & Missy Higgins Harry Kindergarten 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUBIQ1fTRzI The Needs of a Plant Music 5 things plants need to stay alive 1998 ABC Sing Book Compost Makers Work Song Fay White Poem Alexander Beetle http://allpoetry.com/poem/8518989-Forgiven-by-A.A.-Milne (Forgiven by A.A. Milne) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRSq5bWu8x8 Sung by Melanie Ugly Bug Ball Richard M Sherman http://www.lyricsfreak.com/b/burl+ives/ & Robert B Sherman the+ugly+bug+ball_20205920.html (Sung by Burl Ives) Soundtracks from the various videos/films as listed 65

68 WEB SITES Title Description Whether you have a water catchment issue at your school and need some Environment Education Victoria inspiration, want to plan your next event to be more sustainable or want students http://eev.vic.edu.au/resources/ to learn how to write better texts using sustainability as a theme; EEV has some fantastic resources to help you. All are available for free download. Based around common sustainability themes, including Energy, Water, Waste Cool Australia and Biodiversity, Cool Australia is a one stop shop for teachers wishing to www.coolaustralia.org/curriculum-materials/?gclid=CK6 bring sustainability into their curriculum. From learning activities to units of emPCh6coCFQslvQodVf4BRQ#body-wrapper work, Cool Australia provides detailed, up to date curriculum materials for both teachers and students. Cool Australia also offers AuSSI audits, which are most helpful when conducting audits for ResourceSmart Schools. A brilliant interactive website that is user friendly and ever changing. Sustainability Victoria Sustainability Victoria's statutory objective is to facilitate and promote environmental sustainability in the use of resources. Established under the http://www.sustainability.vic.gov.au/ Sustainability Victoria Act 2005, SV is a statutory authority with a board appointed by the Minister for Environment and Climate Change. CERES offers a wide range of services to assist teachers with education for CERES – Community Environment Park sustainability – in particular it is a place to visit and explore sustainability projects http://ceres.org.au/ and procedures. For resources and case studies shared by other schools visit the CERES Sustainability Hub. Launched in April 2009, Living Sustainably: the Australian Government's Living Sustainably: the Australian Government's National Action Plan for Education for Sustainability, was designed to provide all National Action Plan for Education for Sustainability Australians with the knowledge and skills required to live sustainably. The plan, www.environment.gov.au/sustainability/education/ which was designed and prepared by the National Council on Education for publications/living-sustainably-national-action-plan Sustainability by the Australian Government Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, is available to download from the website. Kids Teaching Kids aims to inspire future environmental leaders by empowering Kids teaching kids students to become confident, caring and informed citizens. Whilst raising www.kidsteachingkids.com.au awareness of both local and global environmental issues and driving action for change, the Kids Teaching Kids Program promotes positive wellbeing and helps build resilience in young people. Starting in the classroom and extending into the community through the Kids Teaching Kids Learning Model and Program, students are prepared to take up the challenges of saving our environment while responsibly managing their own learning through the Kids Teaching Kids Learning Model. Landlearn A state-wide educational program, LandLearn provides both structure and support for schools to incorporate sustainable land practices into the school www.landlearn.net.au/index.html curriculum. Based upon the studies of sustainable agriculture and natural resource management, LandLearn provides support for teachers and school communities, engages students in active, experiential learning, and promotes partnerships between school and community groups. The Zoo’s schools’ programs present students with opportunities to connect with Zoos Australia wildlife, build upon their understanding of authentic conservation issues and be www.zoo.org.au/education inspired to take action and help save wildlife. Zoos Victoria is the world’s first zoo to achieve carbon neutral certification, so what a great place for students Act Wild (Zoos Vic) to visit to see just how achievable being carbon neutral can be. Their sustainable practices include waste management, carbon management, energy efficiency, www.actwild.org.au water saving and environmental management, in addition to their efforts to help save endangered wildlife species. 66

69 Suggested Resources WEB SITES Description Title This website offers hundreds of free, online, educational games for kids, Sheppard Software with numerous levels, games and activities for learners of any age. The main www.sheppardsoftware.com/content/animals/ curriculum areas covered in this website are geography, mathematics kidscorner/foodchain/producersconsumers.htm and science. Geography for 2016 & Beyond With extensive experience as a science teacher/lecturer in France and the UK, Matt Podburry has pulled together his vast knowledge and expertise in www.geographypods.com/24-rainforests--deserts.html the geography curriculum in this user friendly website where he offers free classroom resources aimed specifically for students aged 11-18 years of age in the area of geography and/or science. Melbourne Water Focused on the urban water cycle, this website allows students to explore water as a resource and the biodiversity of our Victorian waterways, while helping them build http://education.melbournewater.com.au/ their understanding of current water use issues and empowering them to make positive change. All learning activities are in line with the Victorian Curriculum areas of science and geography and the water and biodiversity modules in ResourceSmart Schools. UNESCO UNESCO provides a multimedia teacher education program that contains 100 hours or professional learning (divided into 27 modules) for use in pre-service and www.unesco.org/education/tlsf/ in-service teacher training. This site is also well suited to the needs of curriculum developers, education policy makers and authors of educational material. Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future provides the support that teachers need to empower their students to develop and evaluate alternative visions of a sustainable future and to work creatively with others to help bring their visions of a better world into effect. Planet Ark Planet Ark Environmental Foundation is an Australian not-for-profit organisation with a vision of a world where people live in balance with nature. Established www.planetark.org in 1992, Planet Ark focuses on working collaboratively and positively to bring about a more sustainable future for all to enjoy. This website offers many positive environmental actions that you and your school can take up to help address current environmental issues. Global Education Australia If you are planning to enable your students to live actively as global citizens by participating in and shaping a better, shared future for the world, then this www.globaleducation.edu.au website is a must for you. Global Education Australia promotes understanding of sustainable futures and the importance of developing skills in critical and creative thinking and ethical understanding. It promotes open mindedness and a willingness to take action for change, respecting and valuing diversity, and being active in the development of a peaceful, just and sustainable world. Scootle Aligned to the new Australian Curriculum this site holds a number of digital resources to assist teachers with implementing the central concepts and skills http://www.scootle.edu.au/ec/p/home of the curriculum. This website requires a login so check that you are able to have access through your school system. It will definitely be worthwhile as the digital learning resources are very comprehensive. Earth Charter Australia The Earth Charter strives to motivate people to develop an understanding of global interdependence and to share responsibility for the care of the Earth www.earthcharter.org.au/home and the wellbeing of the human family. It is a declaration of hope, as it outlines principles for building a just, peaceful and sustainable world in the 21st century. This website represents an organisation that is working towards empowering Learnscapes (Australia) and supporting school communities to achieve their visions and create www.learnscapes.org/ stimulating learning and play environments. 67

70 WEB SITES Description Title Gyre Sailors 5Gyres is a community that fights ocean plastic pollution through education, science and activism. http://www.5gyres.org FoodMiles.com Food miles is a means to explore the environmental impact of foods, including how food actually gets from the place where it is grown/produced to your table, http://www.foodmiles.com/ and what happens to the waste – How far does this travel to the landfill area? You can find a user friendly food mile calculator tool on this site. This site has a number of links to other useful websites. It is the Australian Links to other useful websites Government’s National Action Plan for education for sustainability and aims http://www.educationforsustainability.com.au/resources/ to prepare all Australians with the skills and knowledge they need to live in useful-websites an environmentally sustainable way. 68

71 Suggested Resources WEB SITES – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Description Title Traditional Aboriginal Dreamtime Stories can be explored and analysed using Australian Curriculum Lessons – Dreamtime Stories the lesson plans provided on this site. www.ausraliancurriculumlessons.com.au/2013/11/09/ aboriginal-dreamtime-stories-unit-year-3-4/ Dust Echoes This website offers a great resource for Indigenous Australian dream time stories. It includes, Vocabulary/Glossary and study guides. www.abc.net.au/dustechoes/dustEchoesFlash.htm How the Koala got his stumpy tail is just one of the dreamtime stories you can Story Cove by August House find on this site. http://www.yotube.com/watch?v=itszep0duwl This map of Aboriginal Tribal territories and languages in Victoria is coloured Map of Aboriginal Tribal territories and languages in to easily identify different tribal areas. Victoria https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Map_Victoria_ Aboriginal_tribes_(colourmap).jpg The dreamtime story of the Ngarrindjeri People of the Murray River can be Ngurumderi – Dreaming of the Ngarrindjeri People explored on this site. Read the story to reveal the timeline of The Murray area, Murray River dating back 40,000 years. Discover other local Australian Indigenous stories (Discover Murray – Austraia’s Great River) and important information though the hyper-links provided. www.murrayriver.com.au/about-the-murray/ponde- dreamtime/ 69

72 Sustainability Victoria Level 28, Urban Workshop, 50 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne VIC 3000 Phone (03) 8626 8700 sustainability.vic.gov.au Published by Sustainability Victoria. Curriculum Connections ENG063 © Sustainability Victoria, July 2016

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