MDE Top 10 in 10 Years Goals and Strategies

Transcript

1 GOALS & STRATEGIES

2 The Right to Educational Opportunity To realize Michigan becoming a Top 10 education state in 10 years, the long-term embrace to the existing structure and system of education needs to be challenged and reshaped, giving everyone an opportunity to succeed – from the students, to the educators, parents, and business community. No matter where students live, they should have access to the same high-quality educational opportunities as any other student in Michigan. Likewise, teachers across the state should have equitable opportunities to learn and excel in their profession no matter where they live and teach. Michigan must ensure that each and every child can read and do math, be a creative thinker and problem-solver, and be an informed, open-minded, and engaged citizen in our society. To become a Top 10 education state, Michigan needs to create a coherent system with a challenging curriculum, then give it ample time to work. We must recognize that Poverty Matters – not to be used as an excuse, but as a purpose to design a Michigan system of education that motivates and excites all children about learning, keeps them in school, and provides them with hope and knowledge for a successful future. Michigan must establish an educational system that grants indelible rights for all education stakeholders to succeed – a system focused more on what is best for children and their learning, and less on governance. The debate of school governance too often is the canvas that shrouds the real purpose of education opportunity. This framework is a vision of the goals and strategies needed to propel Michigan to be a Top 10 state, developed with input from education stakeholders across the spectrum of the state. A more detailed Action Plan now will be developed that sets forth timelines, implementation, and measures of success. 2

3 In response to a request for suggestions on how to make Michigan a Top 10 state for education within the next 10 years, the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) and State Board of Education (SBE) received input from numerous stakeholders groups, education partners, and individual citizens. This valuable information was provided via formal presentations to the SBE, written submissions, one-on-one and group meetings with the State Superintendent, and through more than 750 responses collected through a dedicated website. GUIDING PRINCIPLES • To be successful at becoming a Top 10 performing state in 10 years, Michigan must develop a cohesive strategy for the children, and implement that plan with continuity for coherent and multiple years. Education reform takes time; we must implement, use evidence and data to correct course, and continue with progress on key goals. • A “Can-Do Culture” that focuses on student-directed learning and student outcomes, and the work on the instruction must take priority. • Data and accountability will be used to help drive resources and ovement activities for students and educators. Attention focus impr will be on transpar ency in support of key goals for the entire system to make M ichigan a Top 10 state for education. • Poverty matters, not to be used as an excuse, but as a purpose to design a Michigan system of education that tes and excites all children about learning, motiva keeps them in school, and provides them with 3 wledge for a successful future. hope and kno

4 To realize Michigan becoming a Top 10 education state within the next 10 years, the existing structure and system of education must be challenged and reshaped. Michigan must establish an educational system that grants indelible rights for all stakeholders to succeed – a system focused more on what is best for children and their learning. This is a framework of the strategic goals necessary to move Michigan forward. STRATEGIC GOALS Provide every child access to an aligned, high-quality Reduce the impact of high-risk factors, including P-20 system from early childhood to post-secondary poverty, and provide equitable resources to meet the 4 1 attainment – through a multi-stakeholder collaboration needs of all students to ensure that they have access with business and industry, labor, and higher to quality educational opportunities. education–to maximize lifetime learning and success. Ensure that parents/guardians are engaged and 5 Implement, with strong district and building leadership, supported partners in their child’s education. high-quality instruction in every classroom through 2 a highly coherent, child-centered instructional model Create a strong alignment and partnership with job where students meet their self-determined academic providers, community colleges, and higher education 6 and personal goals to their highest potential. to assure a prepared and quality future workforce, and informed and responsible citizens. Develop, support, and sustain a high-quality, prepared, 3 and collaborative education workforce. Further develop an innovative and cohesive state education agency that supports an aligned, coherent 7 education system at all levels (state, ISD, district, and school). 4

5 vide every child access to an aligned, high-quality P-20 system from early childhood to post- Pro Goal 1: secondary attainment – through a multi-stakeholder collaboration with business and industry, labor, and higher education – to maximize lifetime learning and success. STRATEGIES Strategy 1.1: Encourage policies that promote engagement of families from a child’s birth that encourage optimal development of children prior to kindergarten. This includes: a) Focusing investments on evidence-based programs from birth to age three, including home visitation and high quality child care. b) Allocating funding to provide early intervention services to the infants and toddlers with disabilities and Goal developmental delays identified through Early On. c) Complete development of and promote understanding of the alignment of birth through third grade developmental and learning expectations. Strategy 1.2: Expand access to quality publicly-funded preschool for all four-year-olds by 2020; three-year-olds by 2025. 1 Strategy 1.3: Ensure that every Michigan student has the opportunity to take meaningful steps toward their postsecondary career while still in high school, including: a) Up to sixty transferable college credits or a recognized industry credential/certificate through access to quality dual enrollment, early middle colleges, and/or career/technical education. b) Access to Advanced Placement and/or International Baccalaureate programs. c) Increase the number of career counselors in support of this strategy. d) Hold districts harmless r egarding costs for enrolled students. e) All public school districts have access to affordable post-secondary options. Strategy 1.4: Ensure that the P-20 accountability system has aligned expectations and outcomes, and that appropriate data and measures are used to survey the transition of Michigan’s children between various stages of the P-20 pipeline. Strategy 1.5: Ensure that the P-20 system includes multiple opportunities for civics education to ensure students are informed and responsible citizens. 5

6 Goal 1: Provide every child access to an aligned, high-quality P-20 system from early childhood to post- secondary attainment – through a multi-stakeholder collaboration with business and industry, labor, and higher education – to maximize lifetime learning and success. STRATEGIES Strategy 1.6: Enhanced high school career and college guidance capacity and training to: I mprove college/career readiness, enrollment, and completion metrics. a) Goal A lign K-12 assessments with post-secondary institution’s entry/readiness requirements. b) c) Encourage voluntary local K-12/higher education partnerships. d) I mplement recommendations relative to career/college readiness outlined in the Reaching for Opportunity Report . 1 Develop and implement a strategy to better understand and support Michigan public schools’ capacity Strategy 1.7: to provide career- and college-ready coursework and instruction to all students, including postsecondary and vocational training: Establish a c onsortium of postsecondary and vocational training educational entities, K-12 educational entities, a) K-12 advocacy organizations, labor, and Michigan businesses to: A ssess needs to strengthen and build capacity in the system. I. A lign educational and support systems. II. Promote active engagement of school leaders in community collaborative efforts leading toward Strategy 1.8: business/industry/labor and philanthropic investment. Strategy 1.9: Support strong local boards of education, focused on transparency, fiscal responsibility, and raising student achievement, to assure that all students graduate Career- and College-Ready. 6

7 Goal 2: Implement, with strong district and building leadership, high-quality instruction in every classroom through a highly coherent, child-centered instructional model where students meet their self-determined academic and personal goals to their highest potential. STRATEGIES Strategy 2.1: Develop and implement a collaborative, integrated, and transparent P-20 personalized learning system for each student in districts and schools. a) Align the system to the Michigan Merit Curriculum, Michigan’s Career- and College-Ready standards, and r elevant and appropriate personalized learning policy. Goal b) Provide guidance so that students, in conjunction with teachers, counselors, and parents, develop individualized goals alig ned to their strengths, challenges, and interests. c) Develop a coherent assessment system to support the personalization of learning for all students. Strategy 2.2: Establish and implement with fidelity a high-quality multi-tiered system of supports (universal 2 education). a) Establish and implement with fidelity a high-quality, multi-tiered Positive Behavior Intervention and Support (PBIS) process. b) Implement the current initiative for early literacy (recommended by the Governor’ s Third Grade Reading Work Group Report and the legislature) in collaboration with the Governor’s Michigan K-12 Literacy Commission that focuses on ensuring literacy for all students by third grade and beyond. c) Develop and implement evidence-based, results-driven programs to meet the needs of all students, including differentiated services and instruction for special populations (and particular focus on English learners, students with disabilities, economically-disadvantaged students, and African American students. ) d) Implement multi-tiered behavioral supports to reduce suspension and expulsion practices. Include engagement of community-based Integrated Student Supports (whole-child) organizations with an evidence- based model t o engage the broad spectrum of community partners (law enforcement, courts, mental health, ganizations, etc.) to assist in a comprehensive approach to behavioral interventions. faith-based or e) Implement the Governor’s Special Education Reform Task Force recommendations. Provide a safe, secure, and healthy school environment by fostering a positive school climate and culture. f ) 7

8 Goal 2: Implement, with strong district and building leadership, high-quality instruction in every classroom through a highly coherent, child-centered instructional model where students meet their self-determined academic and personal goals to their highest potential. STRATEGIES Strategy 2.3: Implement Deeper Learning competencies/experiences across content areas. Strategy 2.4: Adopt and implement with fidelity, high Career- and College-Ready standards for and expectations of all students and ensure that educators monitor student learning against standards so that results are actionable in Goal real-time. a) Ensure a viable curriculum is accessible to all students. b) Develop an infrastructure to support the implementation of Deeper Learning pedagogy. Strategy 2.5: Develop and implement an effective monitoring and feedback system for all stakeholders utilizing reflective dialogue and opportunities for collaboration. 2 a) Focus educator effectiveness activities, including observation-based evaluation systems, on the provision of quality feedback to support instruction. b) Develop supports for all stakeholders in the P-12 system to incorporate quality feedback that improves learning outcomes. Strategy 2.6: Ensure that all students within the P-12 system are able to engage in a well-rounded learning experience that builds upon active engagement in language, culture, creativity, and physical activity in an appropriate learning environment. a) Develop a P-12 system wherein every student in Michigan graduates with the ability to read, write, speak, and listen in their primary language and at least one additional world language, with certification in languages reflected on their high school diploma/transcript. b) Develop a P-12 system wherein every student in Michigan engages in music, art, and performing and applied arts throughout their learning experience. c) Develop a P-12 system wherein every student in Michigan is able to engage in integrated STEM and STEAM programming, with certification for STEAM competencies to be included on their high school diploma/transcript. 8

9 “Principals are pleased to see that Michigan’s Top 10 in 10 goals are instructionally focused and centered around increasing student achievement.” Wendy Zdeb, Executive Director, Michigan Association of Secondary School Principals Implement, with strong district and building leadership, high-quality instruction in every classroom Goal 2: through a highly coherent, child-centered instructional model where students meet their self-determined academic and personal goals to their highest potential. Goal STRATEGIES Strategy 2.7: Ensure that all P-12 students are able to access and utilize information supports and technologies as learning tools throughout their learning experience. e that all students have access to libraries and media centers within their school, district, and/or community. a) Ensur Ensure that such resources are appropriately staffed to ensure system integrity. 2 Ensur b) e that all students have access to personalized learning technologies that can be used by the learner to enhance and support learning wherever possible. Strategy 2.8: Provide an integrated system of guidance to develop and support district and school leadership competencies, to accelerate student achievement, including: a) Oper ations, systems, and infrastructure. b) e and climate of productive learning. A cultur C c) urriculum, instruction, and assessment supported by technology with necessary classroom level resources provided. “Making Michigan a top ten education state will require strong leadership, a deep commitment to accountability and capacity-building, and an unwavering focus on what all Michigan students need to succeed. We hope this is the first step toward a better direction for Michigan students’ future.” Amber Arellano, Executive Director, The Education Trust-Midwest 9

10 Goal 3: Develop, support, and sustain a high-quality, prepared, and collaborative education workforce. STRATEGIES Strategy 3.1: Identify each component of the entire educator pipeline. The term “educator” includes all roles in the education workforce – teachers, principals, administration, support staff, counselors, etc. This pipeline includes recruitment, preparation, placement, mentoring and induction, evaluation, and ongoing professional development. Two important components of this pipeline that will be addressed are: a) D evelopment of a new system of training and induction for educators, based on the model of novice, practicing, and master levels. This model will enhance the mentoring and induction process and also will leverage Goal Michigan’s existing teaching talent by utilizing exemplary educators who can serve as coaches and mentors of other educators. b) I mplementation of Michigan’s educator evaluation law with fidelity, with an emphasis on continuous improvement and support for educators; delivering high-quality, standards-aligned professional development that is targeted based on individual educator needs; and ensuring a focus on high quality instructional practice 3 and instructional leadership. Strategy 3.2: Coherent, state- and district-provided professional development, jointly developed with educators. a) M ajor initiatives (such as early literacy, educator evaluations, assessment literacy, and curriculum alignment) will utilize a professional development plan that includes statewide deployment of high-quality professional development to all educators. A b) ll MDE-funded activities that take place on a local or regional level will require a professional learning plan that is aligned to Michigan’s professional learning standards. Strategy 3.3: Fully implement “Michigan’s Plan to Ensure Equitable Access to Excellent Educators” that includes: a) I nitiatives and interventions designed to attract and retain quality educators in high-needs schools and districts. b) S trategic research and evaluation activities to identify shortages in the educator workforce and formulate plans to address them. c) Iden tify areas where additional incentives or supports are needed in the education workforce and develop policies or programs to meet this need. 10

11 “Top performing states invest strategically and consistently in the main drivers of achievement: high expectations for all students; excellent teaching sustained by strong support and professional development; early childhood education; making - sure all student get great college and career guidance, and get started earning post secondary credits while in high school; put more resources behind students that due to poverty have further to travel, and hold all schools accountable for quality. ” John Austin, President, State Board of Education Develop, support, and sustain a high-quality, prepared, and collaborative education workforce. Goal 3: Goal STRATEGIES Address the perception of educators as professionals by improving educator employment conditions; Strategy 3.4: by promoting and celebrating educators; and by collaborating with educators on appropriate policy and 3 programming decisions. Develop incentives to support teachers remaining in the teaching profession and becoming master Strategy 3.5: teachers. t an effort leading to more National Board Certifications for teachers. a) Suppor “Michigan educators have said “Ask Us” before setting education policy. The SBE and Superintendent Whiston have done exactly that by involving us in their work to build a coherent plan to make Michigan a top ten education state once again.” Gretchen Dziadosz, Executive Director, Michigan Education Association 11

12 “Superintendents from around the State of Michigan support the Top 10 in 10 goals and look forward to working in a collaborative manner to ensure this vision is achieved.” Chris Wigent, Executive Director, Michigan Association of School Administrators Reduce the impact of high-risk factors, including poverty, and provide equitable resources to meet Goal 4: the needs of all students to ensure that they have access to quality educational opportunities. STRATEGIES Goal Strategy 4.1: Focus investment on implementing evidence-based, independently-evaluated, results-driven Integrated Student Supports (whole-child) provided in collaboration with community partners who place staff in schools to facilitate access to community resources for clothing, nutrition, physical, behavioral, social-emotional, mental health, post-secondary access, career readiness, tutoring, mentoring, and other supports necessary for students to stay in school, be promoted, and graduate on time. Specifically this includes: 4 F a) ull implementation of all requirements of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) meal patterns, regulations, including school breakfast, lunch, and afterschool snacks and supper. b) Enc ourage eligible schools to participate in Community Eligibility Provision (CEP). Enc ourage access to school health services via expansion for school nursing, school mental health and school- c) based health centers. d) oordinated P-20 partnerships and initiatives with other state, local, and private agencies with Expand specific c proven evidence-based practices, with the goal of expanding access to coordinated service programs and family advocacy supports. Priority given to programs proven to increase attendance, positive behaviors, and improved coursework. 12

13 Goal 4: Reduce the impact of high-risk factors, including poverty, and provide equitable resources to meet the needs of all students to ensure that they have access to quality educational opportunities. STRATEGIES Strategy 4.2: Support extended learning opportunities and activities that are coordinated with other learning programs as part of the P-20 system. Goal I ncrease and coordinate opportunities for quality out-of-school time learning aligned with the State Board of a) Education Michigan Out-of-School Time Standards of Quality. b) C onsideration of a balanced calendar approach. Strategy 4.3: Provide and promote evidence-based practices to create efficiencies at the local administrative level to 4 focus more resources in the classroom such as (School Funding Committee recommendations): S treamlining administrative functions and reducing reporting requirements. a) C b) oordinated approaches to: I. Enr ollment. II. ransportation. T III. e options– to determine that all children get the educational opportunity for quality education options. Choic IV. Opening new schools . c) Sink ing Fund millages assessed on a regional basis, allowing for building maintenance, educational technology, physical school environment, and pupil transportation purposes. d) P romote the efficient, flexible, and differentiated use of current resources, including better coordination of local, state, and federal funds to get to agreed-upon educational outcomes. evelop targeted funding and grant programs to complement the general funding formula. e) D 13

14 Goal 4: Reduce the impact of high-risk factors, including poverty, and provide equitable resources to meet the needs of all students to ensure that they have access to quality educational opportunities. STRATEGIES Strategy 4.4: Develop and promote models to address the differential cost of providing high-quality education to students and target resources accordingly, including: D etermining the cost of educating children/students who need more intensive instruction and attention. a) b) D etermining the cost for educating children/students in early childhood (specifically quality preschool settings), early elementary, late elementary, middle and high school levels. c) I ncrease Section 31a/at-risk funding and investigate a tiered distribution formula that prioritizes higher Goal concentrations of poverty (will be based on recommendation of School Funding Committee and the adequacy study). d) A ddress statewide facility and infrastructure needs. Strategy 4.5: Develop a system to ensure that all students have equitable access to Career and Technical Education 4 and Special Education resources regardless of where they live and which school they attend. Strategy 4.6: Modify funding formulas to better align revenues and costs for districts facing declining enrollment. e formulas to better match budget priorities with revenue to allow districts to have more predictability to a) Enhanc know earlier what revenue is available to them. B etter manage access to quality choices including the use of quality standards. b) I. D evelop a process that manages the opening and closing of schools. Strategy 4.7: Implement an assessment and accountability system that reduces the impact of high-risk factors while helping ensure equitable resources. This includes: a) A n assessment system that includes a focus on growth and measures college-ready standards, along with higher- order thinking, allows for the monitoring of progress over time, and provides actionable data for administrators, teachers, and parents. b) A sta te accountability and support system that focuses on transparency and high standards of accountability for all schools, and that holds schools accountable for closing achievement gaps while dramatically improve systems of support and capacity-building for struggling and chronically low-performing schools. 14

15 “We have a tremendous opportunity, working together as a state, to lift student achievement using these goals and strategies. This requires open minds and the will from all involved to make it work.” State Superintendent Brian Whiston Goal 5: Ensure that parents/guardians are engaged and supported partners in their child’s education. STRATEGIES Strategy 5.1: Develop and implement an authentic family engagement and communications plan that: Goal rovides information on key education initiatives at the state, community, local, and classroom level. P a) b) Suppor ts the Top 10 in 10 goals. ents actively in education of children. c) Engages par P rovides districts resources to build parent/guardian involvement and engagement. d) evelops a campaign that promotes the importance of education and parental involvement. e) D M eets parents where they are more comfortable – community or cultural centers, places of worship, etc. f ) 5 Enlists non- g) education outlets (community groups, commerce, etc.) to communicate the message. Strategy 5.2: Target authentic family engagement in supporting and monitoring their children’s education and/or behavioral goals. P rovide choices for families, including open education options and access to easy-to-understand information a) regarding those choices. reate an easy-to-navigate and understandable school information and accountability system that is consistent b) C across all schools. Enc ourage districts to implement agreements between parents, the school, educators, and students, signed by c) each, outlining the academic and personal goals toward each student’s education. 15

16 Goal 5: Ensure that parents/guardians are engaged and supported partners in their child’s education. STRATEGIES Strategy 5.3: Expand access to coordinated and free human service/family advocacy supports. Strategy 5.4: Recognize parents/guardians as lifelong learners by: Goal a) Expanding ac cess to free adult literacy programming. b) P romoting nationally-recognized alternatives to GED, connected with credit and credential/certificate earning, and career path programs at Michigan community colleges or other workforce job-training programs. C ustomizing graduation/diploma standards for adult learners. c) d) Suppor ting schools in offering parent education, both on general childhood development issues and on skills 5 which can help complement work in the classroom. Enc e) ouraging the development of Grand Rapids Public Schools Parent University-type programming at the district or ISD level to provide direct assistance and educational opportunities for parents. Strategy 5.5: Implementation of PTA’s National Standards for Family-School Partnerships as the model for family and community involvement: a) W elcoming all families into the school community. C ommunicating effectively. b) c) Suppor ting student success. d) Speak ing up for every child. e) Shar ing power. ollaborating with community. f ) C 16

17 Create a strong alignment and partnership with job providers, community colleges, and higher Goal 6: education to assure a prepared and quality future workforce, and informed and responsible citizens. STRATEGIES Strategy 6.1: Coordinate with the Workforce Development Agency, employers, and other stakeholders on strategies to increase internships, work-based learning opportunities, and service learning for students. Strategy 6.2: Develop policy recommendations so any postsecondary course paid for with state funding will count as college credit at all postsecondary institutions in Michigan. Goal Strategy 6.3: Advocate for policy change so all students have access to instruction through an affordable postsecondary institution. a) Advocate for and implement (where appropriate) the recommendations from the career readiness study funded b y the Governor (report due March of 2016). b) Ensure that all students, including, but not limited to, students with disabilities, have access to CTE and 6 postsec ondary options. Strategy 6.4: Align P-20 providers’ efforts with business/industry and workforce development agencies to support job training and soft skills so students are career-ready. Strategy 6.5: Continue to expand the number of statewide articulation agreements with community colleges and four-year institutions to provide postsecondary credit for advanced high school coursework in CTE. Strategy 6.6: Develop and implement a strategy to better understand and support Michigan public schools’ capacity to provide career- and college-ready coursework and instruction to all students, and how well – including postsecondary and vocational training: a ) Establish a consor tium of postsecondary and vocational training educational entities, K-12 educational entities, K -12 advocacy organizations, labor, and Michigan businesses to: I. Assess needs to strengthen and build capacity in the system. Align educational and support systems. II. 17

18 Goal 7: Further develop an innovative and cohesive state education agency that supports an aligned, coherent education system at all levels (state, ISD, district, and school). STRATEGIES Strategy 7.1: Work together with the State Board of Education, State Superintendent, and other key stakeholders on education policy issues in order to raise student achievement and support local districts. F orge and expand partnerships with the legislature and governor to help align legislation, policy, funding, and a) MDE activities into a coherent system. b) F orge and expand partnerships with educational organizations. c) Suppor t and implement the recommendations from the Governor’s Special Education Reform Task Force. Goal d) Suppor t and implement assessment literacy. Strategy 7.2: Accelerate student achievement by adjusting the structure of the department through the implementation of the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) in collaboration with national experts. Implementation of the SSIP will enhance the infrastructure with ISDs, districts, schools, and classrooms ensuring initiatives are fully implemented throughout the entire educational system. 7 Strategy 7.3: Promote a culture of innovation and continuous improvement within the broad educational system by: U tilizing the Innovation Council for districts to apply for flexibility/waivers to develop model programs with an a) emphasis on proactive support rather than punitive measures. b) Iden tifying, promoting, and rewarding the implementation of promising practices throughout the entire educational system by creating an MDE website for promising practices. c) S eeking new and creative solutions in support of accelerated student success. P romoting the development of model classrooms. d) e) Enac ting a research agenda to validate promising practices that should be scaled up. Strategy 7.4: Develop a customer service culture throughout the MDE. a) S trengthen relationships with schools and districts by having MDE staff provide consistent, direct assistance, remove barriers where possible, and celebrate successes. b) S trengthen relationship with ISDs and educational organizations by enhancing partnerships and communication channels and emphasizing collaboration. ncrease face-to-face field service visits to provide information up front before monitoring takes place. c) I 18

19 how these goals and strategies were developed WEB SURVEY Online survey o pen for public input from Sept. 20 – Nov. 1, 2015 • • 765 total responses, with close to 4,200 recommendations • 2,875 open tex t responses • Responses from 66 counties • Approximately 40 MDE Staff participated in sorting data into categories State Board of education action • Over 30 education stakeholder organizations presented their input on what would make Michigan a Top 10 in 10 education state within the next 10 years. • Approved guiding principles and goals on December 8, 2015. stakeholder input • Emailed specific recommenda tion of strategies to accomplish the approved goals. Met over two months to further define and refine these strategies. • 19

20 glossary https://www.michigan.gov/documents/ Deeper Learning Balanced Calendar snyder/3rd_Grade_Reading_Workgroup_ The Great Lakes and Midwest Regional An approach to structuring the school Report_490977_7.pdf Deeper Learning Initiative is a collaboration calendar in which breaks in instructional between the Great Lakes Comprehensive time are spread throughout the year instead Grand Rapids Public Schools (GRPS) Center and the Midwest Comprehensive of concentrated in a long summer break. Parent University Center, designed to help states identify, An example would include a school with An action group formed by parents to help explore, and advance state-level policy, three 60-day academic sessions and 20-day current, prospective, and GRPS volunteers guidance, and supports that drive deeper breaks. become an active partner in their children’s learning practices. http://mi.gov/documents/mde/waiver_ academic career. Through a robust offering http://deeperlearning-cc.org/ labor_day_1-23-08_224652_7.pdf of classes, parents learn methods to help their children reach their full potential. Early On Community Eligibility Provision https://parents.grps.org/ Early On is an early intervention system Community Eligibility is the opportunity servicing children birth to three years of for schools with high percentages of low- Integrated Student Supports age with a developmental delay and/or a income children to provide free breakfast A school-based approach to supporting disability and their families. and lunch to all students. It increases students’ academic success by developing www.Michigan.gov/earlyon participation by children in the school meal or securing and coordinating services programs, reduces labor costs for schools, that target academic and non-academic Governor’s Third-Grade Reading simplifies paperwork for Food Service barriers to achievement. These may include, Workgroup Report Directors, removes the stigma from “free” but are NOT limited to: targeted learning On March 1, 2015, Governor Snyder students and increases federal revenues. In interventions for individual student needs, established a Third-Grade Reading short, it allows for a healthier student body before and after school programs for Workgroup to analyze Michigan’s third- and a healthier school meal budget. tutoring and mentoring, non-traditional grade reading proficiency rate and to http://www.fns.usda.gov/school-meals/ learning opportunities such as online or provide recommendations for how community-eligibility-provision community-based coursework, physical and to improve this proficiency rate. The mental health services, and social service workgroup released this report on June 3, supports. 2015. 20

21 glossary (continued) http://legislature.mi.gov/doc. involvement practices. Outlines specific Michigan’s Plan to Ensure Equitable aspx?mcl-380-1212 types of involvement as being especially Access to Excellent Educators beneficial to children’s academic success. Michigan’s State Plan to Ensure Equitable State Board of Education Michigan Out- http://www.pta.org/nationalstandards Access to Excellent Educators charts a course of-School Time Standards of Quality to ensure that students of color and students The Michigan Out-of-School Time (MOST) Reaching for Opportunity Report from low-income families are served Standards of Quality are designed to In 2014, leaders in higher education formed by teachers of comparable experience assist schools and other organizations in a Postsecondary Credential Attainment and effectiveness to those serving white developing high quality, comprehensive OST Workgroup to develop an action plan for students and students from more privileged programs for all children and youth in grades allowing Michigan citizens to acquire more backgrounds. K-12. The standards are based on research postsecondary credentials. The workgroup https://www2.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/ concerning quality programs for school-age produced a report titled Reaching for equitable/miequityplan060115.pdf children and youth. Opportunity. https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/ http://mitalentgoal2025.org/wp-content/ National Board Certification MOST_SBE_APPROVED_031213_422342_7. uploads/2015/12/Reaching-for-Opportunity- Michigan has supported the National Board pdf 2015-Report1.pdf Certification process since 1993, enabling approximately 394 Michigan teachers STEM and STEAM Sinking Fund to achieve National Board Certification. STEM is an acronym for the fields of science, A Sinking Fund is a fund established by Teachers who hold a valid National Board technology, engineering, and mathematics. a school (or other governmental entity) Certificate in the content area that they are STEAM is a similar acronym adding the arts. by setting aside revenue over a period of endorsed meet the state’s definition of a time to fund a future capital expense, or highly qualified teacher. repayment of a long-term debt through http://boardcertifiedteachers.org/ a millage assessed as a local tax. Under Michigan law, Sinking Funds may be used for PTA’s National Standards for Family- major repairs, renovations, construction, and School Partnership land. Legislation has been introduced to also A framework for strengthening parent/ allow such funding for technology and safety family involvement reflecting recent research enhancements. and improved parent and community 21

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Select a state to see the income limits for the counties in that state. Rural Development Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program ME WA VT ND MT RI NH CT NY MN OR MA WI ID SD MI WY PA NJ IA DE O...

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