SUN7%B1:7661CBK 038:0189 K

Transcript

1  EJIL 2001 ... Terrorism is Also Disrupting Some Crucial Legal Categories of International Law Antonio Cassese* Abstract The terrorist attacks on the US on 11 September 2001 have potentially shattering consequences for international law. It will be necessary to rethink some important legal categories and to emphasize general principles. Collective rather than unilateral measures should be taken as far as possible. Otherwise anarchy could ensue. 1 Introduction The terrorist attack of 11 September has had atrocious effects not only at the human, psychological and political level. It is also having shattering consequences for international law. It is subverting some important legal categories, thereby imposing the need to rethink them, on the one hand, and to lay emphasis on general principles, on the other. I shall not dwell on the use of the term ‘war’ by the American President and the whole US administration. It is obvious that in this case ‘war’ is a misnomer. War is an armed conflict between two or more states. Here we are confronted with an extremely serious terrorist attack by a non-state organization against a state. Admittedly, the use of the term ‘war’ has a huge psychological impact on public opinion. It is intended to emphasize both that the attack is so serious that it can be equated in its evil effects with a state aggression, and also that the necessary response exacts reliance on all resources and energies, as if in a state of war. I shall rather discuss two other issues: the legal characterization of the terrorist attack from the viewpoint of international criminal law, and the question of what sort of forcible action international law permits the US to take, and against whom. * Member of the Board of Editors. ... ... EJIL (2001), Vol. 12 No. 5, 993–1001

2 994 – 1001 EJIL 12 (2001), 993 2 The Definition of Terrorism: A Crime against Humanity? ned as serious offences, to be punished fi So far, terrorist attacks have usually been de under national legislation by national courts. The numerous international treaties on the matter oblige the contracting states to engage in judicial cooperation for the repression of those offences. In my opinion, it may be safely contended that, in addition, at least trans-national, state-sponsored or state-condoned terrorism amounts to an international crime, and is already contemplated and prohibited by international customary law as a distinct category of such crimes. Be that as it may, it is a fact that, when some states, in particular Algeria, India, Sri Lanka and Turkey, proposed that terrorism be considered as one of the international crimes to be subjected to the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (ICC), 1 namely as a crime against humanity, many states including the US opposed such proposal essentially on four grounds: (i) the offence was not well de fi ned; (ii) in their view the inclusion of this crime would politicize the Court; (iii) some acts of terrorism fi were not suf ciently serious to warrant prosecution by an international tribunal; (iv) generally speaking, prosecution and punishment by national courts were considered more ef fi cient than by international tribunals. Many developing countries also opposed the proposal for they felt that the Statute should distinguish between terrorism and the struggle of peoples under foreign or colonial domination for self-determination and independence. As a result, both that proposal and a later one 2 by India, Sri Lanka and Turkey were rejected. Recent cases are in line with this , the Court of Appeals of cautious attitude. In 1984, in Tel Oren v. Libyan Arab Republic 3 that since there is no agreement on the de fi nition of the District of Columbia held terrorism as an international crime under customary international law, this offence does not attract universal jurisdiction. Recently, on 13 March 2001, in a serious case of terrorism allegedly involving Ghadda fi , the French Court of Cassation held that terrorism was not an international crime entailing the lifting of immunity for heads of 4 state; it therefore quashed proceedings initiated against the Libyan leader. The terrorist attack of 11 September has been de ned as a crime against humanity fi by a prominent French jurist and former Minister of Justice, Robert Badinter, by the UN Secretary-General Ko fi Annan, as well as by the UN High Commissioner for 5 Distinguished international lawyers have taken the Human Rights, Mary Robinson. 6 same view. Indeed, that atrocious action exhibits all the hallmarks of crimes against 1 See A/CONF.183/C.1/L 27. 2 See A/CONF.183/C.1/ L 27/Rev 1. 3 726 F.2d 774 (D.C. Cir. 1984). 4 , Chambre criminelle, March 2001, See the text of the decision in Bulletin des arrêts de la Cour de Cassation – 9. See thereon the comments by Zappal à , in 12 EJIL (2001), 595 – 612, by Poirat in 105 no. 64, at 218 Dalloz RGDIP (2001), at 47 2633. – (2001) no. 32, 2631 – 91 and by Roulot in 5 Badinter and Annan have made statements to the French radio and CNN respectively. For the statement UN Daily Highlights of M. Robinson see , 25 September 2001, http://www.un.org/News/dh/ 20010925.htm 6 Le Monde , 21 September 2001, at 12. Also the British lawyer G. See for instance Alain Pellet, in Robertson, Q.C. had suggested this de fi nition (see The Times , 18 September 2001, at 18).

3 Terrorism is Also Disrupting Some Crucial Legal Categories of International Law 995 humanity: the magnitude and extreme gravity of the attack as well as the fact that it targeted civilians, is an affront to all humanity, and part of a widespread or systematic practice. It may happen that states gradually come to share this characterization and consider serious crimes of terrorism as falling under crimes against humanity (in extermination ’ or particular, under the subcategories of ‘ ’ or ‘ other inhumane murder ‘ acts included in Article 7 of the ICC Statute). If this occurs, the notion of crimes ’ against humanity would be broadened. However, the problem would then arise of fi (i) the speci c conditions under which terrorist attacks fall under this notion, and of (ii) whether the future ICC would be authorized also to adjudicate serious cases of terrorism. It is perhaps plausible to contend that large-scale acts of terrorism showing the atrocious features of the attacks of 11 September, or similar to those attacks, fall under the notion of crime against humanity as long as they meet the requirements of that category of crimes (whereas no special account should be taken of one of the speci fi c features of terrorism, namely the intent to spread terror among civilians). 3 Effects on the Law of Self-defence The impact of the 11 September tragedy on the law of self-defence is more worrisome. Until that date, in spite of legal controversies among both states and scholars, the legal picture was suf fi ciently clear. In the case of an armed attack by a state on another state, pending action by the Security Council or in the absence of any action by this body, the victim could react in individual , until such time as the Security self-defence Council stepped in. The state aggressed could also request assistance of other states, who could thus act in collective self-defence. Resort to force in self-defence was however subject to stringent conditions: (i) ‘ instant, overwhelming, leaving no the necessity for forcible reaction had to be choice of means, and no moment for deliberation ’ (according to the famous formula used by the US Secretary of State Webster in 1842 in the Caroline case and taken up by many for post-1945 self-defence); (ii) the use of force was to be exclusively directed to repel the armed attack of the aggressor state; (iii) force had to be proportionate to this purpose of driving back aggression; (iv) the use of force had to be terminated as soon as the aggression had come to an end or the Security Council had taken the necessary measures; (v) states acting in self-defence had to comply with the fundamental principles of humanitarian law (hence, for instance, respect for the civilian population, refraining from using arms causing unnecessary suffering, etc.). Intervention of the Security Council was another possible reaction to aggression. The Security Council, being unable to apply Article 42 of the UN Charter for lack of UN armed forces at its disposal, could however authorize the victim of aggression as well as other states to use force against the aggressor (this, as is well known, was done in

4 996 – 1001 EJIL 12 (2001), 993 1950 in the case of Korea, and in 1990, in the case of the Iraqi aggression against Kuwait). , some states (notably terrorist attacks c question of how to react to fi As to the speci Israel, the United States and South Africa) argued in the past that they could use force in self-defence to respond to such attacks, by targeting terrorist bases in the host country. This recourse to self-defence was predicated on the principle that such countries, by harbouring terrorist organizations, in some way promoted or at least ’ accomplices ‘ tolerated terrorism and were therefore : they were responsible for the so-called indirect armed aggression. However, the majority of states did not share let 7 alone approve this view. in response to small-scale use Furthermore, armed reprisals proper, have been regarded as unlawful both ‘ armed attack ’ of force short of an against states and against terrorist organizations. The events of 11 September have dramatically altered this legal framework. On 12 September the UN Security Council unanimously passed a resolution on the terrorist strikes (Res. 1368). This resolution is ambiguous and contradictory . In its preamble it recognizes the right of individual and collective self-defence; however, in operative para. 1 it de nes the terrorist acts of 11 September as a fi ’ ‘ , hence not threat to the peace 8 ‘ as an legitimizing self-defence under Article 51 of the UN Charter. ’ armed attack In operative para. 5 the resolution expresses the Security Council ‘ readiness to take all necessary steps to respond to the terrorist attacks . . . in accordance with its ; in other words, it declares responsibilities under the Charter of the United Nations ’ itself to be ready to authorize military and other action, if need be. Thus, by this resolution the Security Council wavers between the desire to take matters into its own hands and resignation to the use of unilateral action by the US. Probably the will of the US to manage the crisis by itself (with the possible assistance of states of its own choice), without having to go through the Security Council and regularly report to it, accounts for the ambiguity of the resolution. On the same day, the North Atlantic Council unanimously adopted a statement where it relied upon Article 5 of the NATO Statute, which provides for the right of collective self-defence in case of attack on one of the 19 members of the Alliance. By so doing, these 19 states opted for the solution based on Article 51; they preferred this avenue to that of a centralized use of force under the authority of the Security 9 Council. It would thus seem that in a matter of a few days, practically all states (all members 7 (1989-III), at 405 ‘ Terrorisme et droit international ’ , 215 HR See, among others, Guillaume, – 406, where the author mentions the judgment of the ICJ in the Nicaragua case (ICJ Reports (1986), at paras 211). 191 – 195, 205, 210 – 8 rmed in the threat to the peace ’ and ‘ the right of self-defence ’ have been reaf fi The references to the ‘ preamble of the subsequent resolution adopted by the Security Council on 28 September 2001 (res. 1373(2001)). 9 NATO, press release 124 of 2001 ( ‘ The Council agreed that if it is determined that this attack was directed from abroad against the United States, it shall be regarded as an action covered by Article 5 of the Washington Treaty, which states that an armed attack against one or more of the Allies in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all ). ’

5 Terrorism is Also Disrupting Some Crucial Legal Categories of International Law 997 of the Security Council plus members of NATO other than those sitting on the Security Council, plus all states that have not objected to resort to Article 51) have come to a terrorist attack by a terrorist organization to an armed aggression by a assimilate state , entitling the victim state to resort to individual self-defence and third states to act in collective self-defence (at the request of the former state). The magnitude of the terrorist attack on New York and Washington may perhaps warrant this . I shall leave here in abeyance the broadening of the notion of self-defence question of whether one can speak of ‘ instant custom ’ , that is of the instantaneous formation of a customary rule widening the scope of self-defence as laid down in Article 51 of the UN Charter and in the corresponding rule of customary law. It is too early to take a stand on this dif fi cult matter. Whether we are simply faced with an unsettling precedent ’ or with a conspicuous change in legal rules, the fact remains, ‘ however, that this new conception of self-defence poses very serious problems. Let me discuss the principal ones. So far, self-defence has been justi fi ed only against states , under the conditions set out above. As a consequence, the target was speci fi ed: the aggressor state. The purpose was clear: to repel the aggression. Hence also the duration of the armed action in self-defence was fairly clear: until the end of the aggression. Now, instead, all these conditions become fuzzy. Problems arise with regard to the target of self-defence, its , and the duration . admissible means timing , its target of the armed action in self-defence raises two serious The issue of the problems. First, while in ‘ classic ’ self-defence the target is of course the state author of the aggression, now it is the terrorist organization that must be targeted; it follows that force may be used against the territory of the state harbouring such organization. This violation of the sovereignty of that state is legally justi fi ed by its aiding and abetting terrorism, or in other words by its breach of the international ‘ duty ’ laid 10 down in various UN resolutions, ‘ to refrain from and incumbent upon any state, organizing, instigating, assisting or participating in terrorist acts in another state or acquiescing in organized activities within its territory directed towards the com- mission of such acts ’ . Thus, aiding and abetting international terrorism is equated with an ‘ armed attack ’ for the purpose of legitimizing the use of force in self-defence. The second problem concerns the range of target states. We know that the entire network of terrorist cells making up the organization that allegedly masterminded and organized the attack of 11 September sprawls across as many as 60 countries. Could all these countries become the target of armed action? De fi nitely not, otherwise the armed con fl ict may lead to a third world war. But how can one delimit the number of states against which armed force in self-defence may be legitimately employed? (I shall try to answer this question below.) self-defence must be an immediate reaction to ’ classic In addition, traditional or ‘ aggression; if the victim state allows time to elapse, self-defence must be replaced by 10 See General Assembly res. 2625-XXV, of 24 October 1970 (so-called Declaration on Friendly Relations), as well as Security Council resolutions 1189 (1998) of 13 August 1998 and 1373 (2001), of 28 September 2001.

6 998 EJIL – 1001 12 (2001), 993 action under the authority of the UN Security Council. Nor can the victim state resort to armed reprisals, which, as I said before, are held to be contrary to international law. In the case under discussion states seem instead to have come to accept a delayed . response Furthermore, while it is fairly easy to de fi ‘ traditional ’ self-defence must ne when duration of the action in self-defence may not be come to an end, in this case the established a priori ‘ war ’ will take years. for, it has been asserted, the means Things become even more complicated as regards the ‘ Classic ’ to be used. self-defence authorized resort to armed force against military objectives, within the bounds set by international humanitarian law. It would seem that now some states tend to legitimize any kind of resort to violence, including a vast range of means and methods that would even encompass extra-judicial assassination of terrorists or even the use of nuclear weapons. This may turn out to be a Pandora ’ s box, setting an extremely serious precedent for the international community. 4 The Need to Rely upon the General Principles of International Law These dramatic changes make reliance on the constituting the general principles foundation of the international community imperative and salutary. These principles, among other things, call upon states: (i) to pursue peace and refrain as much as possible from resort to armed violence, (ii) to respect human rights, (iii) to spare innocent civilians from belligerent action; (iv) to settle disputes or resolve crises within a multilateral framework, that is by refraining to act unilaterally, so as to limit arbitrary reactions as much as possible; (v) to pursue justice and consequently repress international crimes by bringing the alleged culprits to court. These principles may serve to restrain the use of force and prevent its spawning violent reactions capable of undermining the very foundations of the international community. ‘ in fi nite justice ’ . Thus it laid emphasis on The US initially code-named its action making justice rather than taking revenge or engaging in tit-for-tat action. It is suggested that to be consistent and to comply with the existing legal principles of the international community, the action by the US should proceed as much as possible along the following lines: (i) It should use unilateral action as little as possible. In the resolutions they have adopted on 12 September 2001, the UN Security Council (Res. 1368) and the General Assembly (Res. 56/1) clearly (and rightly) stressed the need for concerted

7 Terrorism is Also Disrupting Some Crucial Legal Categories of International Law 999 11 In the same vein, the Security Council, in Resolution . and multilateral action 1373 unanimously adopted on 28 September 2001, rightly decided on a set of measures all states are obliged to take under Chapter VII to suppress terrorism. The Security Council is thus emphasizing its own authority and the need for collective action. Within this framework, it would seem that, although (subject to the conditions set out below) the US need not require the authorization of the Security Council to take military action, it should at least report to it immediately and, so far as possible, request that body to direct at least some of the military or economic responses to the terrorist attack. (ii) As has been asserted, there is strong evidence suggesting that the terrorist organization that planned and executed the attacks is headquartered in Afghanistan. Since this state has long tolerated the presence and activities of terrorist organizations on its territory and is not willing to cooperate with the international community for detaining the terrorists, its territory may become a legitimate target. However, the use of military force must be proportionate , not to the massacre caused by the terrorists on 11 September, but to the purpose of such use, which is (i) to detain the persons allegedly responsible for the crimes, and (ii) to destroy military objectives, such as infrastructures, training bases and similar facilities used by the terrorists. Force be used to wipe out the Afghan leadership or destroy Afghan military may not installations and other military objectives that have nothing to do with the terrorist organizations, unless the Afghan central authorities show by words or deeds that they approve and endorse the action of terrorist organizations. In this last case one would be confronted with a condition similar to that described by the International Court of 12 : Justice in US Diplomatic and Consular Staff the terrorists would have to be treated as state agents and the Afghan state itself would bear international responsibility for their actions, with the consequence that the state ’ s political and military structures could become the legitimate target of US military action in self-defence. In any case, all the fundamental principles of international humanitarian law need to be fully respected. Furthermore, as soon as legitimate military objectives are destroyed, military action must cease. As for states that allegedly host and protect terrorist organizations linked to other ed for the US to decide on its fi the attacks of 11 September, it does not seem legally justi 11 ‘ all States to work together urgently to bring to justice the perpetrators, The Security Council called upon (operative para. 3), called upon the international community ‘ to redouble their ’ organizers and sponsors ’ efforts to prevent and suppress terrorist acts including by increased cooperation (operative para. 4) and expressed ‘ its readiness to take all necessary steps to respond to the terrorist acts ’ (operative para. 5). The , respectively to bring to General Assembly in paras 3 and 4 urgently called for ‘ ’ international cooperation ‘ justice the culprits and . ’ to prevent and eradicate acts of terrorism 12 See ICJ Reports (1980), at 36, para. 74. The Court held that the Iranian militants who had illegally occupied the US embassy and consular premises, once their action was approved and endorsed by the ’ Iranian government, became ‘ agents of the Iranian state, which therefore became internationally responsible for their action. As the Special Rapporteur on State Responsibility J. Crawford rightly stated, may have retroactive effect ’ acknowledgment and approval by a state of conduct ‘ as its own – 4). (International Law Commission, Fiftieth Session (1998), A/CN.4/490/Add. 5, paras 283

8 1000 12 (2001), 993 1001 EJIL – 13 First, the use of armed force against these states own whether or not to attack them. ict, might expand the political and military crisis and eventually lead to a world con fl contrary to the supreme goal of the UN (and indeed of the whole international community) to preserve peace and security. Second, self-defence is an to the exception ban on the threat or use of force laid down in Article 2(4) of the UN Charter, which has ). Like any rule jus cogens by now become a peremptory norm of international law ( strictly construed . It would thus laying down exceptions, that on self-defence must be seem that the US is not entitled to further select states as targets of its military action. Such attitude would run contrary to the concept of self-defence and to the aforementioned conditions, to which it is subject. We are not faced here with attack by fi ve or six states on another state, legitimizing the victim immediately to react fi militarily against all the aggressors, which are states well identi ed by the fact that they have participated in the aggression. Instead, we are confronted here with attacks emanating from non-state organizations, which may be hosted in various countries ’ possibly not easy to identify and, what is more important, whose degree of ‘ complicity may vary. It would be legally unwarranted to grant the state victim of terrorist attacks sweeping discretionary powers that would include the power to decide which states are behind the terrorist organizations and to what degree they have tolerated, or approved or instigated and promoted terrorism. A sober consideration of the general legal principles governing the international community should lead us to a clear conclusion: it would only be for the Security Council to decide whether, and on what conditions, to authorize the use of force against speci fi c states, on the basis of compelling evidence showing that those states, instead of stopping the action of terrorist organizations and detaining its members, harbour, protect, tolerate or promote such organizations, in breach of the general legal duty referred to above. bringing the persons (iii) In addition to using military force the US should also aim at , by detaining them or inducing the states which host accused of the crimes to justice them to hand them over. Although of course the Americans are eager to have their 14 own courts try the alleged culprits, the proposal recently made that those alleged perpetrators be handed over to the Hague International Criminal Tribunal for trial, after promptly revising its Statute, has much merit. An international trial would dispel any doubt about a possible bias (as has been noted, a New York jury ‘ would be too 15 ’ emotionally involved in the crime ). In addition, an international trial would give greater resonance to the prosecution and punishment of the crimes allegedly committed by the accused. fi (iv) If the US really wants to pursue justice it must not con ne itself to repressive a long-term methods. This would be a short-term response. Things must be viewed in perspective . Justice also encompasses social justice, that is, eradication of deep social 13 This would seem instead to be the US position. According to the US Secretary of Defence D. H. Rumsfeld, ‘ Our response may include fi ring cruise missiles into military targets somewhere in the world . . . our opponent is a global network of terrorist organizations and their state sponsors . . . we may engage militarily against foreign governments ’ ( The International Herald Tribune , 28 September 2001, at 6). 14 See Robertson, supra note 6. 15 Ibid.

9 Terrorism is Also Disrupting Some Crucial Legal Categories of International Law 1001 inequalities such as poverty, economic, social and cultural underdevelopment, ignorance, lack of political pluralism and democracy, and so on. It stands to reason that all these phenomena lie at the root of terrorism and contribute to fuel hatred and people who are desperate . . . become easy bigotry: as Ko fi Annan recently stated, ‘ 16 recruits for terrorist organizations . ’ The US could promote a potent multilateral effort, lasting several years, to come to grips with these huge problems. In addition, it could promote the gradual solution of such festering questions as that of the Middle East. 5 Conclusion In sum, the response to the appalling tragedy of 11 September may lead to acceptable legal change in the international community only if reasonable measures are taken, as much as possible on a collective basis, which do not collide with the generally accepted principles of this community. Otherwise, the road would be open to the setting in of that in the international community so eagerly pursued by anarchy terrorists. 16 Annan, 19 September Transcript of press conference of President Chirac and Secretary-General Ko fi 2001, at 4 (http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2001/sgsm7964.doc.htm).

Related documents

aldine.indd

aldine.indd

Aldine Press Books at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center The University of Texas at Austin A Descriptive Catalogue by Craig W. Kallendorf ‡ Maria X. Wells Austin Harry Ransom Humanities Resea...

More info »
Detailed Directory of Business Managers

Detailed Directory of Business Managers

Detailed Directory of Business Managment by Cluster, Area and Org Un *** Function Code: AQ - Acquisitions, BL - Billings, BP - Biweekly Payroll, GN - General, MP - Monthly Payroll, TR - Travel Please ...

More info »
OperatorHoursReport

OperatorHoursReport

John Bel Edwards Rebekah E. Gee MD, MPH SECRETARY GOVERNOR State of Louisiana Louisiana Department of Health Office of Public Health Certified Water and Wastewater Operators 2018 - 2019 Hours Hours li...

More info »
Exemption 6

Exemption 6

417 Department of Justice Guide to the Freedom of Information Act Exemption 6 Personal privacy interests are protected by two provisions of the Freedom of 1 Information Act, Exemptions 6 and 7(C). Und...

More info »
2016 05 10 New to Old

2016 05 10 New to Old

NEW ADDRESS OLD ADDRESS USPS 507 1ST AV PHEBA, MS 39755 31 1ST AV PHEBA, MS 39755 511 1ST AV 41 1ST AV PHEBA, MS 39755 65 2ND AV 21133 CLAY ST PHEBA, MS 39755 64 3RD AV 21121 CLAY ST PHEBA, MS 39755 9...

More info »
CityNT2019TentRoll 1

CityNT2019TentRoll 1

STATE OF NEW YORK 2 0 1 9 T E N T A T I V E A S S E S S M E N T R O L L PAGE 1 VALUATION DATE-JUL 01, 2018 COUNTY - Niagara T A X A B L E SECTION OF THE ROLL - 1 CITY - North Tonawanda TAX MAP NUMBER ...

More info »
ppacacon

ppacacon

111 TH C ONGRESS " ! LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL P RINT 111–1 2d Session COMPILATION OF PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT [As Amended Through May 1, 2010] INCLUDING P ATIENT P ROTECTION AND A FFORDAB...

More info »
doj final opinion

doj final opinion

UNITED STAT ES DIS TRICT COURT IC F OR THE D ISTR T OF CO LU M BIA UNITED STAT F AMERICA, : ES O : : la in t if f, P 99 No. on cti l A vi Ci : 96 (GK) -24 : and : TOBACCO-F UND, : REE KIDS ACTION F : ...

More info »
SAS/GRAPH 9.2 Reference, Second Edition

SAS/GRAPH 9.2 Reference, Second Edition

® SAS/GRAPH 9.2 Reference Second Edition TW12141_ColorTitlePage.indd 1 3/4/10 3:20:52 PM

More info »
Detailed Directory of Business Managers

Detailed Directory of Business Managers

Detailed Directory of Business Managment by Cluster, Area and Org Un *** Function Code: AQ - Acquisitions, BL - Billings, BP - Biweekly Payroll, GN - General, MP - Monthly Payroll, TR - Travel Please ...

More info »
Home Based Care Program Reduces Disability And Promotes Aging In Place

Home Based Care Program Reduces Disability And Promotes Aging In Place

At the Intersection of Health, Health Care and Policy Cite this article as: Sarah L. Szanton, Bruce Leff, Jennifer L. Wolff, Laken Roberts and Laura N. Downloaded from Downloaded from Gitlin Home-Base...

More info »
H 1095 Free Floating Subdivisions

H 1095 Free Floating Subdivisions

Free-Floating Subdivisions H 1095 refers to a form or topical subdivision that may be used free-floating DEFINITION : The term under designated subjects without the usage being es tablished editoriall...

More info »
Microsoft Word   Part A Report 2.1.doc

Microsoft Word Part A Report 2.1.doc

O ff i c e o f F i n a n c i a l M a n a g e m e n t o i h s a w f o e t a t s n g n t S o f W a S h i n g t o n tat e S f a c i l i t i e S P l a n n i n g t r at e g i c a n d M a n a g e M e n t S ...

More info »
otago036312

otago036312

CHILDREN: HEARD BUT NOT LISTEN ED TO? REN’S VIEWS IN DECIS ION MAKING UNDER S6 AN ANALYSIS OF CHILD OF THE CARE OF CHILDREN ACT 2004. Antoinette Robinson A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment...

More info »
HomileticDirectory

HomileticDirectory

FOR DIVINE WORSHIP CONGREGATION AND THE OF THE SACRAMENTS DISCIPLINE HOMILETIC DIRECTORY VATICAN CITY 2014

More info »
A/HRC/39/CRP.2 in Word

A/HRC/39/CRP.2 in Word

/HRC/39/CRP.2 A September 2018 17 only English Human Rights Council Thirty ninth session - 10 28 September 2018 – Agenda item 4 Human rights situations that require the Council’s attention Report of t...

More info »
ClubsListing

ClubsListing

1 of 127 Resident Lifestyle Group Company Listing Ctrl+F Search box will appear. Type in keyword,then hit Enter. Location Address Account Name City State Zip Primary Phone First Name Last Name 129 Ami...

More info »
435 441 458 467r e

435 441 458 467r e

WT/DS435/R, WT/DS441/R WT/DS458/R, WT/DS467/R 28 June 2018 Page: (18 - 1/884 4061 ) Original: English AUSTRALIA CERTAIN MEASURES CON CERNING TRADEMARKS, – PACKAGING IONS AND OTHER PLAIN GEOGRAPHICAL I...

More info »
NWCG Airtanker Base Directory, PMS 507 , NFES 002537

NWCG Airtanker Base Directory, PMS 507 , NFES 002537

A publication of the National Wildfire Airtanker NWCG Coordinating Group Base Directory PMS 507 April 2019 NFES 002537

More info »