access guide

Transcript

1 Public Access to the Rhode Island Coast A guide to parks, wildlife r efuges, beaches, fishing sites, boat ramps, pathways, and views along the Rhode Island coast 1

2 Block Island Additional copies of this publication are available from the Rhode Island Sea Grant Communications Office, University of Rhode Island Bay Campus, Narragansett, RI 02882-1197. Order P1696. Loan copies of this publication are available from the National Sea Grant Library, Pell Library Building, University of Rhode Island Bay Campus, Narragansett, RI 02882-1197. Order RIU-H-04-001. This publication is sponsored by R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council, by Rhode Island Sea Grant under NOAA Grant No. NA 16RG1057, and by the University of Rhode Island Coastal Resources Center. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of CRMC, CRC, or NOAA or any of its sub-agencies. The U.S. Government is authorized to produce and distribute reprints for governmental purposes notwithstanding any copyright notation that may appear hereon. Sustainable Coastal Communities Report #4404 This document should be referenced as: Allard Cox, M. (ed.). 2004. Public Access to the Rhode Island Coast . Rhode Island Sea Grant. Narragansett, R.I. 84pp. Designer: Wendy Andrews-Bolster, Puffin Enterprises Printed on recycled paper Rhode Island ISBN #0-938412-45-0 Please Note Of all the hundreds of potential public coastal access sites to the shoreline, including street ends and rights-of-way, this guide represents a selection of sites that are both legally available and suitable for use by the public. This guide is not a l egal document; it is simply intended to help the public find existing access sites to the coast. As of winter 2003–04, all descripti ons are accurate to the best of our knowledge. Each site was visited and descriptions verified to the best of our ability. However, inaccuracies may still exist in the text, since conditions are constantly changing and more sites are being adopted and managed for public use. Please send comments to: Monica Allard Cox, Rhode Island Sea Grant, University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI 02882. 2

3 Public Access to the Rhode Island Coast Written by Rhode Island Sea Grant Coastal Resources Center University of Rhode Island 1

4 Acknowledgements This second edition of Public Access to the Rhode Island Coast is updated from Lee, V. and P. Pogue. 1993. . Rhode Island Sea Grant, Narragansett, R.I. 75pp. Public Access to the Rhode Island Coast I would like to thank Adam Zitello who, as a University of Rhode Island (URI) Coastal Fellow, visited the sites and photographed and catalogued them. His work was instrumental in capturing the breadth of informa- tion included in this guide. I would also like to thank Kevin Cute, Marine Resources Specialist, R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council, who, with tireless advocacy for public access to the coast, has helped to make this guide as inclusive and accurate as possible. Special thanks goes to Wendy Andrews-Bolster for her many hours of painstaking work in designing this guide to be both beautiful and usable. I also gratefully acknowledge the efforts of the following people in providing content and/or reviewing site listings and maps for accuracy. • Tom Ardito, Narragansett Bay Estuary Program • Kim Botelho, R.I. Department of Environmental Management • Theresa Burke • David Byrnes, R.I. Saltwater Anglers Association • Carl G. Carvell, Weekapaug Fire District Michael Cassidy, Pawtucket Department of Planning and Redevelopment • Marilyn Cohen, North Kingstown Department of Planning • Betsy de Leiris, Norman Bird Sanctuary • • James W. Farley, The Mount Hope Trust Charlie Festa, University of Rhode Island • Lynn Furney, City of Cranston • Arthur Ganz, R.I. Department of Environmental Management • Dan Geagan, City of Warwick • Robert Gilstein, Town of Portsmouth • Geoff Grout, R.I. Economic Development Corporation • • William Haase, Town of Westerly • Charlotte Johnson, Rose Island Lighthouse • Richard Kerbel, North Kingstown Harbor Management Commission • Bob Kilmarx, Barrington Conservation Land Trust • Mil Kinsella-Sullivan, Common Fence Point Improvement Association • Karen LaChance, R.I. Economic Development Corporation • Eugenia Marks, Audubon Society of Rhode Island • Steve Medeiros, R.I. Saltwater Anglers Association • Don Minto, Watson Farm • Bob Moeller, R.I. Saltwater Anglers Association • Larry Mouradjian, R.I. Division of Parks and Recreation North Light, Block Island • Bill Mulholland, Pawtucket Parks and Recreation Department Lisa Nolan, Southeast Lighthouse Foundation • Andrew Nota, Narragansett Parks and Recreation Department • • John O’Brien, R.I. Department of Environmental Management Division of Fish and Wildlife Becky Pellerin, Town of North Kingstown • Michael Rubin, Rhode Island Special Assistant to the Attorney General • • Bob Rutkiewicz, Warren Conservation Commission • Lee Schisler, Audubon Society of Rhode Island • Frances Segerson, R.I. Department of Transportation • Raymond Sousa, Town of Barrington • Lori Urso, Wood-Pawcatuck Watershed Association • Lee Whitaker, Town of East Greenwich • Tim Wolken, Town of South Kingstown • Sandra Wyatt, Barrington Conservation Land Trust And thanks to Rhode Island Sea Grant staff for their assistance in preparation of this guide. Maps were adapted from base maps provided for the first edition by the URI Environmental Data Center. —Monica Allard Cox, Editor Rhode Island Sea Grant Communications 2

5 Table of Contents Coastlines Introduction ... 4 Public Access: A Tradition of Value ... 5 How to Use This Guide ... 6 Fall Fishing in South County ... 8 Saltwater Sportfishing Coastal Birding in Rhode Island ... 10 Laws and Licensing ... 7 The Wood and Pawcatuck Rivers ... 15 Safety Tips ... 7 Narragansett Bay ... 20 Ninigret Pond ... 21 Public Access Locations ... 9 Surfing in Rhode Island ... 25 Block Island ... 11 Designing Providence’s Riverfront Revival ... 44 Westerly ... 15 A Century of Change: Charlestown ... 19 Providence Harbor Shorelines ... 45 South Kingstown ... 19 Bringing Back the Blackstone ... 46 Continues on page 26 Salt Marsh ... 52 Narragansett ... 19 Osprey ... 58 Jamestown ... 31 The Quahog ... 64 North Kingstown ... 31 Narragansett Bay National Continues on page 38 Estuarine Research Reserve ... 65 East Greenwich ... 37 American Holly ... 74 Warwick ... 37 Piping Plover ... 74 Cranston ... 43 CRMC’s Public Right-of-Way Process ... 80 Providence ... 43 Pawtucket ... 43 East Providence ... 43 Barrington ... 53 Warren ... 53 Bristol ... 59 Portsmouth ... 65 Continues on page 70 Tiverton ... 65 Continues on page 70 Little Compton ... 69 Block Island Middletown ... 69 Newport ... 75 CRMC Rights-of-Way ... 82 Index ... 83 3

6 Introduction Rhode Island is richly endowed with a magnificent shoreline. Access to this shore is an essential part of the heritage of the people of the Ocean State. As a consequence of a long tradition of a variety of commercial uses of the shore, combined with forward-looking government policy to purchase coastal open space for public use, Rhode Island has a multitude of coastal access areas. This is a guide to 344 popular public access sites chosen from the many hundreds that exist. It is a guide to the variety of different kinds of access and recreational opportunities they provide, whether you wish to launch a boat on the Bay, swim at the ocean beaches, picnic at coastal parks, photograph ducks during fall migration, or seek solace and solitude along the shore. Sites chosen for this guide are either (1) owned by federal, state, or municipal government and managed for the public, (2) owned by private organizations who welcome the public, or (3) rights-of-way that have been officially designated by the R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC) and are suitable for public use. There are, of course, many opportunities for wonderful experiences on our coastal waters that are not in this guide. For instance, many popular commercial operations are not included, and every city street that ends at the shore is not included. 4

7 Public Access: A Tradition of Value The value of safeguarding access to the shoreline has a extend from mean high water three miles out to sea. Above mean long history in Rhode Island, reflected in the names of favorite high water, land and resources can be, and often are, privately 1 Places that were special to the Indians, such as sites. owned. Misquamicut (red fish or salmon) and Matunuck (lookout), are Access along the shore has been a common expectation and now state beaches. Neighborhood rights-of-way or street ends legal right for generations of Rhode Islanders. Trespassing across still provide access to the Kickemuit River (source of water), private property to reach the shore, however, is illegal. Since most Apponaug Cove (place of oysters), Sakonnet (place of black waterfront property in Rhode Island is privately owned, those geese), and the Woonasquatucket River (as far as the tide goes). seeking to reach the shore without trespassing must rely on the Pettaquamscutt Rock (round rock), site of one of the early various public lands and access ways that dot the coast. purchases of land from the Narragansett sachems by British colonists, still offers a lofty view of the Narrow River and the Role of CRMC mouth of Narragansett Bay. At the head of Narragansett Bay in As trustee of Rhode Island’s coastal resources and in Pawtucket (at the falls) is the Slater Mill, where the power of accordance with state and federal statutory mandates, CRMC has a water was first harnessed by Samuel Slater to drive textile shore is protected, responsibility to ensure that public access to the machinery, and where the American Industrial Revolution began. maintained, and, where possible, enhanced for the benefit of all. For the colonists, access to the shore was also essential: for CRMC recognizes that well-designed and maintained public fishing—a source of food and income—for transportation before access sites and improvements to existing public access sites can the highways were constructed (South Ferry, Fogland Point Ferry), enhance the value of adjacent properties. In addition, properly for pasturing animals (Ram Point, Hog Island), and for gathering designed, maintained, and marked public access facilities, in- seaweed to fertilize crops. Many rights-of-way originated as cluding adequate parking areas, can reduce the pressures for use “driftways”—areas used seasonally for gathering seaweed that of or infringement upon adjacent properties. had drifted onto shore and carting it away to spread over Certain activities that require the private use of public trust farmlands. Stinky Beach, so called because of the abundance of resources to the exclusion of other public uses necessarily impact rotting seaweed that once collected there, is located just north of public access. In general, these activities include commercial, Scarborough Beach, one of the most popular state beaches today. industrial, and residential developments and redevelopment Access to the shore was crucial for the rise of maritime projects, or activities that involve filling and/or building on or over commerce. Some of the lighthouses that were essential beacons tidal waters. This would also include the construction of structural for safe shipping now mark favorite access sites on Block Island, shoreline protection facilities. Watch Hill, Point Judith, and Beavertail. Ida Lewis Rock in New- Projects involving the alteration of coastal areas, including port Harbor is named for the lighthouse keeper who became a those that affect public rights-of-way to the coast, require permits national heroine for her decades of courageous service to the from CRMC. CRMC requires applicants to provide, where appropri- ships and sailors of Newport. At Point Judith, the stone breakwa- ate, access of a similar type and level to that which is being ters, now often lined with fishermen, were originally constructed impacted as the result of a proposed activity or development as a harbor of refuge for the thousands of sailing ships and project. Once projects receive council approval with public access steamboats that passed the point each year. components, these projects are eligible for limited liability protec- The importance of coastal access for transportation is still tion under R.I.G.L. 32-6-5(c). Projects seeking council approval evident in the stone piers of Jamestown Harbor and of South Ferry should also follow the general public access guidelines. For more Road in Narragansett that were former ferry landings. For over 200 information, visit the CRMC website at www.crmc.state.ri.us. years before the bridges were built, these ferries and others were the highway links across the Bay. The ferry from Bristol to Prudence Island has provided continuous service since the 1700s. Role of the R.I. Department of Environmental Shoreline access has also been critical for military defense. Management Forts and staging areas were constructed along our coast for The R.I. Department of Environmental Management (RIDEM) every major war in our history. These fortifications have been oversees the management, including maintenance and acquisition, turned to public use by the federal government and have become of state parks and beaches. RIDEM also oversees the management some of the most popular public parks: Fort Adams in Newport, of open space bond money for state or municipal acquisition and/or Fort Wetherill and Fort Getty in Jamestown, and the gun emplace- development of various coastal open space areas. RIDEM maintains ments at Fort Greene in Narragansett, now part of Fishermen’s boat ramps for fishing access to salt and fresh waters statewide. Memorial Park. What You Can Do Public and Private Rights Concerned about public access to the shore? Your involve- The shoreline can be defined as that part of the shore that is ment is important. If you believe that you know the location of a regularly covered by the tide. It is considered by common law to potential right-of-way or have any information that can assist be public land, held in trust for the public by the state. Each state CRMC at any point in the designation process, please contact has a different interpretation of what activities the public has a CRMC at (401) 222-2476. right to pursue in these areas. The Rhode Island Constitution specifically protects citizens’ rights to fish from the shore, to 1 Wright, M.I. and R.J. Sullivan. 1982. The Rhode Island Atlas. Rhode Island gather seaweed, to leave the shore to swim in the sea, and to walk Publications Society, Providence, R.I. 240 pp. along the shore. In Rhode Island, state waters of public domain 5

8 How to Use This Guide Key to Primary Uses This guide is designed to help you locate some of the different types of public access to the Rhode Island shore. The sites vary from small dirt paths that lead to fishing spots on Public Park the shore to local community parks, beaches, and state facilities managed for public recreation; from national wildlife refuges to privately held conservation lands that provide Path to Shore an opportunity for nature study. This guide is divided into six geographic regions starting with Block Island, continuing Boating h around the state’s coast from the south shore beach area to the harbors of the West Bay Beach with and Jamestown, to the urban shoreline of the Providence and Seekonk rivers in the upper Lifeguards Bay, to the East Bay, including the Sakonnet River and Mount Hope Bay, and ending at Newport. Insert maps of larger scale are provided for Newport, Bristol, Portsmouth, and Wildlife Refuge S Barrington. Each region is color-coded and has a map with sequentially numbered sites and a Scenic View description of each coastal access site and its facilities. Because the sites are divided Hiking/Walking geographically, some towns listings are divided. See the table of contents to find all town F listings. Rights-of-way designated by CRMC are listed at the back of the guide. The more Historic suitable of these sites appear on the maps of this guide. It is expected that changes will occur after this information is compiled, as a result of Fishing ß changes in maintenance and use. The authors and publisher are not responsible for these Ferry changes. Block Island Boat Basin 6

9 Saltwater Sportfishing Laws and Licensing Information is available from the RIDEM website at: www.state.ri.us/dem/. A pamphlet on general recreational and commercial fishing laws is available from the RIDEM Division of Fish and Wildlife by calling (401) 423-1920. All marine licenses are issued by RIDEM’s licensing section, 235 Promenade St., Providence, RI 02908, or call (401) 222-6647. Shellfishing During open season, no license is necessary for residents of Rhode Island. Any resident may take, in any one day during open season (if applicable), not more than a half- bushel each of quahogs, soft-shelled clams, surf clams, oysters, and mussels, and not more than one bushel of scallops, provided that none of these shellfish be offered for sale. The holder of a nonresident shellfishing license may take, on any one day, not more than one peck each of oysters, quahogs, soft-shelled clams, surf clams, or mussels. There is no taking of lobsters, blue crabs, or bay scallops by nonresidents. Licenses are required for lobsters and are only available to residents of Rhode Island. Additional restrictions apply in shellfish management areas. Finfishing No license is necessary for saltwater fishing in Rhode Island. Charlestown Breachway Minimum Size, Catch Limit, Closed Areas There are strictly enforceable minimum size and catch limits for fish, shellfish, lobsters, and crabs. For further information on minimum sizes and catch limits call RIDEM Division of Fish and Wildlife at (401) 423-1920. For current information on pollution and seasonal closures, call RIDEM Division of Water Resources at (401) 222-3961. Safety Tips Many areas of Rhode Island’s shoreline can be hazardous. Twice a day, high tide floods the shoreline with over 3 feet of water. Consult tide tables before exploring rocky beaches and tide pools. Check marine weather forecasts and stay on trails her- and paths. Steep or eroding bluffs and cliffs, rocky shores slippery with sea spray, rain, or ice, dilapidated piers, and treac ous coastal waters are dangerous. During the winter, Rhode Island’s coastal waters can be so cold that they may cause hypothermia in anyone exposed for more than a few minutes. Dangerous, swift currents can be hazardous to boaters or swimmers, particularly near breachways or inlets. A number of beaches and coastal areas do not have lifeguards. The following tips can help you stay safe while enjoying Rhode Island’s shoreline: Always accompany children into the water, even if it is shallow. • • When exploring rocky shores, avoid slippery rocks that are partially covered by algae in the warmer months and by ice during the winter season. Beware of broken glass on the shore. Safely dispose of any sharp fragments. • • Keep away from surf-casting fishermen. Do not attempt to pull out fishhooks from the skin, but seek medical attention immediately. • Stay away from storm-water and sewage outfalls. Unsanitary and toxic wastes are health hazards. Do not shellfish in waters posted as unsafe for shellfishing. RIDEM may change postings as they monitor during the • year. Boaters: Watch your wake. Always have children and non-swimmers wear personal flotation devices. All vessels, • rowboats, and canoes must carry one approved life preserver for each person on board. Be especially careful when operating boats in any area where swimmers or divers may be present. Divers are easily • recognized by the required red flag with a white diagonal slash that marks the approximate center of their activities. Leave a 50-foot radius around a dive flag to insure the safety of the divers below the surface. All vessels, if operated after sunset and before sunrise, are required to have lights. • Swim only near lifeguards. Watch out for rip currents, which are strong but narrow seaward flows. If you get caught • in one, don’t panic; swim parallel to the shore until you get out of the current, then return to the shore. If you can’t escape the current, call or wave for help. 7

10 Fall Fishing in South County Lures and bait are equally effective for Autumn is a great time for fishing from shore attracting fish, and making the best choice is a part along the South County coast. Schools of fish cruise of the adventure. Swimming plugs, metal squids, the shoreline, coming within reach of novices and poppers, and bucktail jigs are favored lures for experts alike as they follow the smooth sand game fish during the fall migration. Options for bait beaches that serve as fish “highways” for the fall include sea worms, clams, and squid strips, which migration. Here and there, natural structures entice scup all along the South County coastline. interrupt the highways, rerouting the fish to create Crabs, clams, or mussels work well for blackfish or concentrations of different species among the points, tautog lingering around rocky areas. Squid, eels, rock piles, sandbars, and sloughs. Because these and cut menhaden are morsels of choice for both natural structures harbor baitfish, the sportfish tarry stripers and bluefish. to find food. Anglers can tell by the flocks of diving Rhode Island has some of the best surf fishing seagulls that baitfish are plentiful and gamefish are in the United States, and the South County coastline actively feeding. Point Judith, Deep Hole, Watch Hill, has easy access to great fishing locations. Week- and Napatree Point are some of the most familiar end anglers can cast a leisurely line from a areas that lure both fish and anglers for good breachway jetty. Kids can discover the thrill of that hunting. telltale tug from the safety of a sandy beach. And Detours along the migration route also promise hard-core rod-and-reelers can reap the best of productive fishing. Breachways at Charlestown, autumn’s bounty from their own undiscovered Quonochontaug, and Weekapaug ponds distract fishing spots. migrating fish with opportunities for resting and feeding. The travelers’ respite rewards anglers with —By David Beutel and Tony Corey, Rhode Island access to a generous variety of edible species, from Sea Grant the large striped bass to the smaller scup. For some of the most popular recreational species, good fishing means timing the outing to match fishes’ feeding schedules. Dawn and dusk are prime times to fish for striped bass, bluefish, and weakfish. Daylight hours assure better success catching species such as tautog and scup. 8

11 Public Access Locations “The public shall continue to enjoy and freely exercise all the rights of fishery, and the privileges of the shore, to which they have been heretofore entitled under the charter and usages of this State.” —Rhode Island Constitution, Article I, Section 17 9

12 Coastal Birding in Rhode Island Rhode Island has a long and varied coastline that Birding programs are offered by ASRI, the Norman provides excellent birding opportunities throughout the Bird Sanctuary, Save The Bay, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife year. Each season offers its own species: songbirds Service, and the Narragansett Bay National Estuarine and shorebirds that migrate up the coast in spring, Research Reserve. These interpreted walks often use wading birds and terns that nest here in summer, coastal access points as destinations. hawks and swallows that funnel down the shore in fall, A good field guide and a pair of binoculars or a and waterfowl that spend winters here. spotting scope are usually the only equipment needed, Return visits to each of the birding hot spots listed but also take along an updated visitors’ road map since below are likely to result in different species in each space here does not permit detailed directions to the season. The viewing spots, all accessible by car or by suggested viewing areas. Among the best bird a relatively short walk, range from tidal marshes and identification guides for use in Rhode Island (also brackish ponds to rocky shorelines, barrier beaches, available at ASRI and other nature shops, as well as at mud flats, and fresh water. The diverse habitats are the most commercial bookstores) are the following: reason for the variety of birds. The Audubon Society of Rhode Island (ASRI), in • Peterson’s Field Guide to the Birds East of the Rockies cooperation with the Rhode Island Ornithological Club, • The Sibley Guide to Birds that lists Checklist of Rhode Island Birds publishes a • National Audubon Society Field Guide to Birds, 322 species that may be seen in the state at varying Eastern Region times through the year, along with 90 other species • Stokes Field Guide to Birds, Eastern Region that have wandered here but are only rarely found. The • National Geographic Society Field Guide to the checklist is available at ASRI’s nature shops (12 San- Birds of North America derson Road, Smithfield, and 1401 Hope St., Bristol). Coastal Birding Hot Spots in Rhode Island: Nannaquaket Pond, Tiverton Napatree Point, Westerly Sakonnet Point, Little Compton Weekapaug Breachway, Westerly Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge, Middletown Quonochontaug Pond and Breachway, Charlestown Brenton Point Park and Ocean Drive, Newport Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge, Charlestown Marsh Meadows, Fox Hill Pond, and Sheffield Charlestown Breachway and Marsh, Charlestown Cove, Jamestown Green Hill Pond, South Kingstown Beavertail State Park, Jamestown Trustom Pond National Wildlife Refuge and Moonstone Block Island National Wildlife Refuge, New Shoreham Beach, South Kingstown Matunuck Management Area and Succotash Marsh, —Audubon Society of Rhode Island South Kingstown Galilee Bird Sanctuary, Narragansett Point Judith and Camp Cronin, Narragansett Pettaquamscutt Cove and Middle Bridge, Narragansett Rome Point and Bissell Cove, North Kingstown Apponaug Cove, Warwick Conimicut Point, Warwick India Point Park, Providence Seekonk River, Providence/East Providence East Bay Bike Path: Watchemoket Cove to Boyden Conservation Area, East Providence Touisset Marsh Wildlife Refuge, Warren ASRI Environmental Education Center, Bristol Colt State Park, Bristol Fogland Point, Tiverton Emilie Ruecker Wildlife Refuge, Tiverton Seapowet Marsh, Tiverton 10

13 Block Island Standing boldly atop the Mohegan Bluffs of Block Island, the Southeast Lighthouse has testified to the power of ocean storms since its creation in 1874. The tower stands 67 feet high and sits on an octagonal-shaped granite base. Both the keeper ’s residence and light tower were constructed prima- rily of brick, with a cast iron lantern gallery perched at the tower’s pinnacle. The gallery houses a parapet lantern magnified by a large lens imported from France. The lamp first burned oil, but was converted to kerosene in the 1880s. In 1907, the lamp was replaced with an oil lamp, which increased the light’s intensity to 45,690 candlepower. In 1929, a rotating mechanism was installed to accomplish a flashing effect and the signal was changed from a white light to a green light in order to help mariners differentiate between the signals of other nearby lighthouses. The green flash could be seen as far out to sea as 22 miles. In 1990, the U.S. Coast Guard ordered the lamp to be replaced by a white electric aircraft beacon, which remains in the lighthouse today. Perhaps the most notable moment of the lighthouse’s history came in 1993, when the 2,000-ton structure was hydraulically lifted from its original location and transported 360 feet inland via a temporary rail system to avoid almost certain destruction by erosion, which had brought the edge of the cliffs within 55 feet of the lighthouse. Today, the lighthouse rests at a location that scientists say should be safe for another century (see page 13). Southeast Lighthouse Southwest Point 11

14 SANDY POINT 3 Y 2 R R E 1 DF N A L S KI C O L B – H IT D 26 JU N E W L O N D O N – BL OC K I S L A N D F POINT E RRY Y R R E F D 25 N A L 4 S I BLOCK CK O L B Corn Neck Rd. – ISLAND 15 T R O Great P SOUND W E Salt 16 N – Pond E C N E D I V 5 O R 24 P 17 6 18 19 ATLANTIC 7 20 23 OCEAN 8 21 22 BLOCK ISLAND S TAT E AIRPORT 14 Cooneymus Rd. Mohegan Tr. 9 10 13 11 12 0123 MILE NEW SHOREHAM 12 North Lighthouse

15 to strong surf. The main trail then and the ferry to Point Judith. Parking Block Island Key to Primary Uses winds north along high coastal bluffs is limited to 30 minutes in the ferry dock lot. to Settler’s Rock. This trail and the 1. Block Island National S • Picnic tables/benches, toilets, maze of trails leading off from it pro- Public Park Wildlife Refuge trash receptacles vide wonderful walking and bird The refuge encompasses the north- watching with views of farms, ponds, Path to Shore ern tip of Block Island (Sandy Point) and the coast. No mopeds are 8. Ballard’s Beach and includes the historic North Light- allowed on the road, and no mopeds Boating h Located off Water Street, at the east- house. The shoreline of the refuge or bikes are allowed on the trail. This ern end of Old Harbor, this sandy consists of a cobble beach that ex- is an environmentally sensitive area. Beach with beach is owned by Ballard’s Inn and tends from the Settler’s Rock parking • Picnic tables/benches Lifeguards is open to the public. The beach has area to Sandy Point, and a sandy/ picnic tables, lifeguards, and volley- cobble beach that extends several 4. Mansion Road Wildlife Refuge ball nets, and there is a restaurant S miles along the west side from Sandy At the eastern end of Mansion with a deck overlooking the beach. Point to Great Salt Pond. The uplands Scenic View There is a great view of Rhode Island Road—a sandy lane and right-of- of vegetated dunes provide a rook- Sound and Old Harbor from the beach way—is a beach below the bluffs ery for seagulls, and Sachem Pond is Fishing ß and from the harbor breakwater. that overlook the Atlantic Ocean. a feeding area for a wide variety of Ample on-site parking is available. It Parking is available. waterfowl. This is an ideal area for is an excellent site for picnics and • Toilets, trash receptacles walking, bird watching, and enjoying swimming in the summer and for the view in all directions. Four-wheel- wildlife observation off-season. This 9. Southeast Lighthouse drive vehicles with permits may drive right-of-way is circled by a one-way out to Sandy Point, where fishing is a Completed in 1874, Southeast Light- access road. popular activity. This is an environ- house is a museum open to the pub- • Fishing, hiking/walking mentally sensitive area—stay off lic for a nominal fee during the sum- vegetation and out of the dunes. Do mer season. The lantern is 204 feet 5. Scotch Beach Road not swim at Sandy Point, as it has Clayhead Nature Trail above the water and can be seen 35 dangerous tidal currents. Parking is miles out to sea. The property around This right-of-way is located at the available. the lighthouse is open to the public Scotch Road end, off Corn Neck • Trash receptacles and offers a spectacular view of the Road, with access to the northern ocean and Mohegan Bluffs. There is end of Frederick Benson Town no access to the beach at this site. Beach. 2. Settlers’ Rock Parking is available. • CRMC ROW#: E-2 At the end of Corn Neck Road, near a • Wildlife observation, trash recep- • Swimming, hiking/walking cobble beach on Rhode Island Sound, tacles a rock with a plaque marks the land- Ballard’s Beach 6. Frederick Benson ing site of the European settlers on Town Beach 10. Mohegan Bluffs Block Island in 1661. Across the road is scenic Sachem Pond, with a small, A long, sandy beach off Corn Neck Off Southeast Light Road, Mohegan sandy beach great for wildlife obser- Road on Rhode Island Sound, this is Bluffs drop 150 feet to the sandy vation. The parking area marks the a popular location for walking, sun- beach and crashing surf below. A access to Sandy Point, the Block bathing, and swimming, with a view short trail from the parking area leads Island National Wildlife Refuge, and of the ocean and Old Harbor. The to a vantage point at the edge of the the northern end of the Clayhead beach has a large parking area, bike bluffs. A long, wooden stairway leads Nature Trail. racks, and a pavilion. It is managed down to the beach. This state-man- Old Harbor Dock • CRMC ROW#: E-1 by the town of New Shoreham. Ac- aged site is well known for its excel- • Picnicking, trash receptacles cess may also be gained from Corn lent view of the island’s dramatic Neck Road. southern coastline and of historic • Picnic tables/benches, conces- Southeast Lighthouse. 3. Clayhead Nature Trail S sions, toilets, trash receptacles • Picnic tables/benches, swimming, This scenic nature trail winds through fishing, hiking/walking, trash shrubs, fields, and wetlands to the receptacles 7. Old Harbor Dock h Clayhead Bluffs along Block Island’s northeast shore. The trail starts at Located east of the ferry dock on Mansion Road Corn Neck Road and continues for a Water Street in Old Harbor, this town Mohegan Bluffs quarter mile along a dirt road to a dock has guest slips available. The parking area with bike racks. From dockmaster’s office is located here here the trail narrows and winds its and the dock is close to the center way to the coast. There is a small of town, restaurants, shops, hotels, beach where the trail reaches the shoreline that is often very rocky due 13

16 of Great Salt Pond. Parking is avail- tionally, this spot has been used as a 11. Scup Rock Property able at the road end. launching ramp and a public fishing This hard-to-spot right-of-way at the • CRMC ROW#: E-5 area. sandy extension of Pilot Hill Road • Fishing, historic interest, hiking/ • Picnic tables/benches, trash leads to a small parking lot. A 150-foot walking, wildlife observation receptacles path can then be taken to a beautiful Snake Hole Road vista overlooking Mohegan Bluffs. st 22. Ocean Avenue Bridge 17. Champlin’s Marina • CRMC ROW#: E-3 ß Located off West Side Road, this is a This bridge crosses over Trims Pond, full-service marina on Great Salt a tidal pond that is connected to 12. Snake Hole Road Pond with guest slips available. This Great Salt Pond in New Harbor. This At the intersection of Mohegan Trail site provides shopping, a playground, site is most often used by the public and Lakeside Drive, a gravel road for fishing, walking, shellfishing, and a video arcade, a movie theater, and heads south to a grassy path leading a variety of rentals. Parking is avail- kayak launching. to the shore. The path is steep at • Historic interest able. times so access should be reserved • Dock, picnic tables/benches, toilets, for the sure-footed. trash receptacles 23. Beach Avenue/ ß Dunns Bridge 13. Rodman’s Hollow S 18. Veterans Park The bridge over the Harbor Pond In a natural ravine located south of Channel, this site has traditionally Located on West Side Road, this site Cooneymus Road, a network of trails provided public access for fishing, affords a nice view of Great Salt winds through the conservation area scenic enjoyment, and shellfishing. Pond. A playground and parking are to the southern coast of the island. No parking is available. also available. Though there is no These trails provide a scenic location • Wildlife observation direct access to the water, it is a great Indian Head Neck Road for walking and bird watching. This place to take a break from biking. is an extremely sensitive area; stay 24. Mosquito Beach on the trails. No parking is available. 19. Block Island Boat Located on the southeast shore of the Basin Great Salt Pond, this parcel is west 14. Southwest Point/ of Corn Neck Road. The area encom- A full-service marina on Great Salt Cooneymus Road Pond with guest slips available, this passes 80,000 square feet and is Located on the southwest side of the site has picnic tables, a barbecue characterized by salt marsh and island, just north of Bluff Head, this area overlooking the harbor, and a beach. Shellfishing and landing small right-of-way consists of a sandy path Mosquito Beach small beach. Bike, car, and moped dinghies are traditional uses of this extending west from the intersection rentals are available. This is the ter- site. Parking is available for about 10 of Cooneymus Road and West Side cars at the boardwalk. minal for the Block Island-New Lon- Road to a cobble beach bordering the don ferry. The harbormaster’s office • Wildlife observation ocean. is also located here. Parking is avail- • CRMC ROW#: E-4 able. Fee. 25. Andy’s Way • Wildlife observation, fishing • Dock, concessions, toilets, trash This right-of-way consists of a dirt receptacles and sand road extending west from 15. Charlestown Beach Corn Neck Road to a sandy beach Located on the west side of the is- Ocean Avenue Bridge 20. Payne’s Dock bordering Great Salt Pond. Histori- land on six acres of ASRI property, cally, this area was the site of the This is a full-service marina in New this right-of-way consists of a path colonial fishing settlement on the Harbor on Great Salt Pond located at extending from Coast Guard Road to island. the end of Ocean Avenue with guest Block Island Sound. This site is one slips available. For the non-boater, • CRMC ROW#: E-6 of the few places in Rhode Island • Fishing, wildlife observation, trash the docks offer a spectacular view of where one can see the sun set over the pond. This is also the high-speed receptacles the water. No parking is available. ferry terminal. No parking is available. • Swimming, wildlife observation, • Picnic tables/benches, conces- 26. West Beach Road Charlestown Beach fishing sions, toilets, trash receptacles This is a sandy road on the northwest side of the island, extending west 16. Coast Guard Station/ 21. Indian Head Neck h from Corn Neck Road, past the land- Coast Guard Road Road fill, to a sandy cobble beach (West This town right-of-way is located at A gravel strip between Dead Eye Beach) bordering Block Island the end of Champlin Way, just west Dick’s and Smuggler’s Cove restau- Sound. of the New Shoreham Coast Guard rants leads from Ocean Avenue to a • CRMC ROW#: E-7 Station. It is a small but popular swim- boat ramp on Great Salt Pond. Tradi- • Wildlife observation, fishing West Beach Road ming beach in the protected waters 14

17 Westerly Misquamicut State Beach A watchtower and beacon were first installed at Watch Hill in West- erly around 1745, giving the Watch Hill area its name. After the tower was destroyed in a storm, Thomas Jefferson signed an act in 1806 to erect a full-scale lighthouse at Watch Hill. Completed in 1807, the 35-foot-tall Watch Hill lighthouse, constructed of wood, was the second built in Rhode Island after Beavertail in Jamestown. To prevent destruction of the tower by erosion, it was replaced in 1856 with a square granite lighthouse further inland. A two-story keeper ’s house was built that same year along with a granite seawall that encircled the property. The lighthouse alone could not prevent all mishaps from occurring along Westerly’s treacherous shores. Metis In 1872, the steamer , traveling to Providence, collided with a schooner. At first it was believed the damage wasn’t serious, but less than a mile from Watch Hill the Metis began to sink. Local residents saved 33 people, but lost their lives. A U.S. Life Saving Service Station was established a few years Metis about 130 others aboard the later at Watch Hill. During the Hurricane of 1938, lighthouse keeper Lawrence Congdon reported that waves broke over the top of the lighthouse, smashing the lantern glass, damaging the lamp and sending seawater into the tower. Congdon and his assistant keeper, Richard Frick, weathered the storm, but it took several weeks to repair the damages. The light was automated in 1986 and the Fresnel lens replaced with a modern optical lens. The lighthouse and all buildings are leased to the Watch Hill Lightkeepers Association. The Wood & Pawcatuck Rivers Though a challenge, you can put in on the east side of Wordens Pond and canoe across to the Pawcatuck. A strong The Wood and Pawcatuck river system, which may be head wind makes this a accessed from starting points in Exeter, South Kingstown, and workout! Once crossed, however, you will encounter the most several midpoints in between, offers 53 miles of accessible, pristine, and wild, section of the river—wonderful for explora- canoeable river corridor. Touted as Rhode Island’s most pristine tion. The Pawcatuck, from its origination at Wordens Pond to river system, the Wood and Pawcatuck rivers annually host its confluence with the Queen-Usquepaug River, is also known thousands of residents and visitors who enjoy canoeing, to some as the Charles River. There are public access points to kayaking, fishing, and hiking. the Pawcatuck in Charlestown, Richmond, and Westerly, in Even the novice can enjoy a paddle along the Wood River, and Rhode Island, and in Pawcatuck, Conn., as well. In the village access is available at the Route 165 check station in Exeter, the of Carolina there is an access to the Pawcatuck River just Pines access in Arcadia, at the Barberville Dam on Arcadia Road before the Route 112 bridge. Those who enter there in in Hope Valley where the Wood-Pawcatuck Watershed Associa- springtime enjoy the rapid ride to Richmond. In addition, the tion (WPWA) campus is also located, the Hope Valley baseball historic villages of Burdickville, Potter Hill, and White Rock can field, Switch Road in Hope Valley just south of the I-95 overpass, be found along the Pawcatuck route. and Woodville Dam in Woodville. There are a few smaller, lesser- The Wood and Pawcatuck rivers offer numerous opportuni- known put-ins as well. The major challenges faced on the Wood ties for outdoor enjoyment and scenic experiences for River include those caused by blow downs, or large trees that individuals, families, or organized groups. Canoe rentals are have fallen across the river. The impact of blow downs varies available in the area, and some businesses offer transportation with the level of the water. High water in the spring could bury of boats for convenience. More information on canoeing and the tree trunks, or cause them to emerge slightly from the kayaking the Wood and Pawcatuck rivers can be located in the surface. If the water is low enough, as it can be in the summer, it Wood-Pawcatuck River Guide map, produced by the WPWA can be possible to pass beneath the trees—or be completely and available at retail stores throughout the region. blocked from passage. The WPWA monitors river corridor passage and removes blow downs on a fairly regular basis. —By Lori Urso, Executive Director, Wood-Pawcatuck Water- The Pawcatuck River, though also suitable for the novice in shed Association general, does have areas where whitewater can present a bit of a challenge in high-water conditions. The Pawcatuck emerges from the Great Swamp at Wordens Pond in South Kingstown. 15

18 Rte 3 to I-95 Wood River HOPKINTON I 95 Rte 3 WESTERLY CONNECTICUT WESTERLY 1 Rte 78 Rte 1 2 CHARLESTOWN 3 Rte 1 4 Rte 1A Quonochontaug Pond 5 Rte 1A 6 Winnapaug Pond 17 15 7 20 22 19 21 18 Watch Hill Rd. 16 13 Pawcatuck River LITTLE 14 NARRAGANSETT WATCH BAY HILL 12 11 8 9 10 0123 MILES WESTERLY 16 Napatree Point

19 5. Frank Hall Boat Yard The area also offers excellent fishing h Westerly from the rocky shore near the ruined Key to Primary Uses This boatyard and marina facility is fort at the far end of the point. located on India Point Road and of- Napatree Point is accessible from 1. Main Street Boat fers a dock. Parking is available. Fee. h Public Park two paved parking lots on Bay Street. Ramp • Toilets, trash receptacles • Swimming, historic interest, trash This site is located on the Pawcatuck Path to Shore receptacles River between Union Street and 6. Lotteryville Marina h School Street. This state-owned con- Boating h Believed to be the oldest in the na- 10. Watch Hill Lighthouse crete boat launch, in excellent con- tion, this marina is located on dition, is located upriver from the Beach with Two-tenths of a mile from the inter- Avondale Road on the Pawcatuck Margin Street Launch. Ample park- Lifeguards section of Bluff Avenue and Larkin River and is privately owned. A boat ing is available for vehicles and trail- Road, this 1856 granite lighthouse ramp is available to nonmembers only ers. Wildlife Refuge sits at the end of a private road. on weekdays only due to a lack of S • Handicap access, fishing Vehicle access is restricted to local parking on the weekends. Parking is Scenic View residents, senior citizens, and handi- limited. Fee. capped persons by special arrange- 2. Viking Marina • Dock, trash receptacles h Fishing ment. Although entrance to the ß Located off Margin Street on the tidal lighthouse is prohibited, on a clear portion of the Pawcatuck River, the 7. Watch Hill Boatyard h day, the driveway past the gate of- Viking Marina is privately owned but Located on Pasadena Avenue, this fers a picturesque view of Napatree has one small boat ramp available for site offers public access to the Point, the Watch Hill mansions, and public use. The ramp is 10 to 12 feet Pawcatuck River (Colonel Willie Block Island to the east. No parking wide and public parking is located Cove). Ramp, moorings, and transient is available. one-half mile away. A restaurant and slips are available for a fee. Open • Picnicking, fishing, trash recep- store are located on the premises. year round, it is busy, and sometimes tacles Fee. full, on summer weekends. Parking is • Dock, toilets, trash receptacles available for a fee. 11. Bluff Avenue Watch Hill Lighthouse This right-of-way offers a 500-foot h 3. Margin Street Launch 8. Watch Hill Dock path that leads to a long stretch of Located on the right as you pull into Off Bay Street, on the edge of Watch sandy beach. Just east of Watch Hill Westerly Marina, the Margin Street Hill Harbor, a small park with six Lighthouse, beautiful views of the Launch is a town boat ramp and re- benches offers a great opportunity to mansions, rocky cliff faces, and Block stricted to use by town residents. stroll or sit and observe the harbor Island can be seen. No parking is Parking is available on site for 15 to activity. The municipal dock is also available. 20 cars with trailers. available for picking up or dropping • CRMC ROW#: A-2 (on appeal) • Dock off boaters just over the seawall. Lim- • Swimming ited parking is available. Viking Marina 4. River Bend Cemetery • Handicap access, historic interest, 12. Manatuck Avenue trash receptacles With an entrance at the corner of Located at the road end of Manatuck Beach (Route 1A) and Hubbard Avenue, this right-of-way provides streets, this beautiful old cemetery 9. Napatree Point S easy access to an extensive sandy along the Pawcatuck River consists Conservation Area beach. It is well marked, but no park- of rolling lawns, trees, and interest- At the southwestern tip of Rhode ing is available on site. ing gravestones. Although not an Island, a long sandy spit separates • CRMC ROW#: A-3 (on appeal) ideal site for access to the river, this Little Narragansett Bay from the • Swimming area offers many great views and ocean. Napatree Point is owned, excellent birding. Incorporated in Watch Hill Dock maintained, and managed primarily 1844, the cemetery’s ornate monu- by the Watch Hill Fire District. It ments and gravestones are examples offers a mile-long walk along the of the fine granite quarried in West- sandy spit either on the beach face erly more than a century ago. Park on or on the nature trails. This area is interior roads only. one of the most important migratory • Hiking/walking shorebird stopover points on the East Coast and provides a foraging area for wading birds and year-round habi- tat for a variety of species. There are Napatree Point spectacular hawk, songbird, and Bluff Avenue monarch butterfly flights in autumn. 17 River Bend Cemetery

20 20. Weekapaug 13. Misquamicut State 17. Atlantic Avenue #2 ß Beach Breachway This right-of-way is located between Located at the corner of Atlantic and Located on the south side of Atlantic Poles 46 and 47 and is a 12-foot-wide Avenue, Misquamicut Beach is Wawaloam avenues, this state-man- sandy path extending south from At- Rhode Island’s largest state-owned aged fishing area offers parking on lantic Avenue to the beach. No park- beach with 3,600 feet of frontage on both sides of the breachway. There ing is permitted on Atlantic Avenue. are concrete stairways built into the the Atlantic Ocean. The parking lot is A sign denotes the path location. Misquamicut State Beach open from Memorial Day to Labor rocks at three different locations on • CRMC ROW#: A-7 each side of the breachway that Day. Public changing facilities, park- • Swimming, hiking/walking ing, bathrooms, and changing rooms serve as ideal areas to sit and fish. for the handicapped are available. 18. Westerly Town The beach is part of 102 acres of 21. Weekapaug Point Beach state-owned land that also borders Overlook Located south of Atlantic Avenue, this Winnapaug Pond. Fee. Located on Spring Avenue, this sce- town-owned beach consists of ap- • Handicap access, picnic tables/ nic site overlooks a rocky, exposed proximately 10 acres with 550 feet of benches, concessions, hiking/ portion of the coast. Limited excur- ocean frontage. The beach pavilion walking, trash receptacles sions down onto the rocky beach are has showers, bathrooms, lifeguards, Weekapaug Breachway possible, tide and weather permitting. first aid, and a food concession stand. 14. New Westerly Town Parking is limited. The beach is restricted to Westerly Beach • Fishing, wildlife observation taxpayers. Parking for the beach is Located on both sides of Atlantic Av- available at two parking lots with a enue, in close proximity to Mis- total of 400 spaces. Handicapped 22. Quonochontaug S quamicut State Beach, this 3.12-acre bathrooms and parking are available. Conservation Area town-owned property contains al- From the bathhouse, there is a nice Quonochontaug Beach is one of the most 300 feet of beach frontage and view of Winnapaug Pond to the north. few remaining undeveloped, privately is open to the general public. Chang- Fee. owned barrier beaches in Rhode Is- ing rooms are available. This stretch • Handicap access, picnic tables/ land. The Quonochontaug Beach Lotteryville Marina of beach is popular with surfers, who benches, hiking/walking, trash Conservation Commission (QBCC), an are encouraged to visit during sum- receptacles umbrella organization of the Nopes mer evenings and off-season to mini- Island Association, Weekapaug Fire mize conflicts with other beachgoers 19. Atlantic Avenue #1 District, Shelter Harbor Fire District, and sunbathers. Parking is available. and Shady Harbor Fire District, man- This right-of-way near Pole 54 is a 12- • Concessions, toilets, trash recep- ages the area. Swimming areas with foot-wide sandy path extending south tacles lifeguards are restricted to property from Atlantic Avenue to the beach. owners and require a pass. The QBCC No parking is permitted on Atlantic 15. Atlantic Avenue #7 allows the public to park at this site Avenue. A sign denotes the path lo- during specified times, primarily off- This right-of-way is located adjacent cation. Manatuck Avenue season, and to gain access to the to Pole 72 and is a 12-foot-wide sandy • CRMC ROW#: A-6 beach and pond via well-marked path extending from Atlantic Avenue • Swimming, hiking/walking sand trails. A pamphlet of regulations to the beach. No parking is permitted and guidelines for use of the site is on Atlantic Avenue. This marked path available from the QBCC. is very accessible to the public. • CRMC ROW#: A-11 • Swimming, hiking/walking 16. Atlantic Avenue #9 This right-of-way to the beach is lo- cated within Atlantic Beach Park on Atlantic Avenue #1 Atlantic Avenue, adjacent to Pole 91. Watch Hill Dock It is a 12-foot-wide marked path ex- Atlantic Avenue #7 tending south from Atlantic Avenue over a paved parking area and a short stretch of sand to the beach. • CRMC ROW#: A-13 • Swimming, hiking/walking Atlantic Avenue #2 Quonochontaug Conservation Area 18

21 Charlestown Prior to the arrival of the Europeans, Narragansett Indians inhabited the region now known as Charlestown. They lived off the land, hunting, fishing, and raising crops. When the first European th century, plantations were quickly established to exploit the fertile coastal settlers arrived in the mid-17 lands. On August 22, 1738, a portion of Westerly was divided and named Charlestown after King Charles II. Today’s town boundaries were finally established in 1748 when the town of Richmond was divided at the Pawcatuck River. th century, residents of Charlestown began harnessing the Pawcatuck River to power In the early 19 textile mills. As the industry grew, so did the surrounding area. Other mills sprang up along the river, including saw, cotton, and wool mills. Over the years most of the mills have been converted into offices, but Kenyon Mills continues to produce textiles and serves as a symbol of the town’s history. South Kingstown Originally called King’s Towne and incorporated in 1674, the area included the present towns of South Kingstown, North Kingstown, and Narragansett. The first settlement was in South Kingstown, and it was there, in the Great Swamp Fight of 1675, that colonial soldiers from Rhode Island, Massa- chusetts, and Connecticut gave King Philip his greatest defeat. Farming was the main activity in early times. Prior to colonial settlement, however, the Narragansetts occupied the area, farming, hunting, and fishing. Although corn was their principal crop, they also produced squash, beans, and strawberries. Venison, cod, and shellfish were their primary sources of protein. Narragansett Ronald Robinson settled and purchased the land along the western shore of Narragansett Bay th century. Incorporated as a town in 1901, Narragansett’s from the Narragansett Indians in the late 17 earliest industry was a shipbuilding operation located at Middle Bridge on the Narrow River. As ship size outgrew the capacity of the Narrow River, the town turned to tourism as its primary source of income. th By the turn of the 20 century, Narragansett was an elegant summer resort. Many small summer cottages, as well as upscale hotels, were erected to accommodate the increasing number of tourists to the area. Soon, larger estates also dappled the shoreline. Many wealthy city families spent their weekends in Narragansett by taking the day ferry from Providence. Perhaps the most well-known landmark of its time was the Narragansett Casino. Located at the corner of Ocean Road and Narragansett Beach, the casino was Narragansett’s central attraction until 1900, when a devastating fire destroyed all but the main entrance towers. Today, the towers serve as the Narragansett Visitors’ Center. 19

22 Narragansett Bay Life in the Bay Fisheries Narragansett Bay is an estuary— a semi-enclosed inlet of the sea in One-celled floating algae called The Bay’s commercially important which seawater is diluted by fresh species include: phytoplankton are the basis of the water. Compared to other estuaries, Bay’s food chain—or, more • Demersal (bottom-dwelling) fish: Narragansett Bay is small- to accurately, food web. Like land winter flounder, summer flounder, medium-sized. Chesapeake Bay, the tautog, black sea bass plants, these microscopic plants largest estuary in the United States, • Pelagic fish (fish that feed in the use photosynthesis to convert covers more than 30 times the area carbon dioxide into organic mater- water column): bluefish, striped of Narragansett Bay. Still, Nar- bass, scup, squeteague (weakfish), ial that ultimately nourishes all ragansett Bay is big enough to take menhaden, Atlantic herring, and other life in the Bay. a good-sized bite out of little Rhode alewife (for use as lobster bait) Narragansett Bay, like any Island. It reaches two-thirds of the • Shellfish: quahog, oyster estuary, provides a variety of way up the state—with the result • Lobster different habitats for living things. that no Rhode Islander is more than Certain plants and animals are • Squid half an hour’s drive from the concentrated in particular areas shoreline—and covers about 10 where salinity and other conditions The demersal fish, as well as the percent of the state’s area. are best suited to their needs. For quahog and oyster, are Bay There are three entrances to residents that are able to live in the example, the most productive Narragansett Bay: the West Bay year round and during all quahog beds are in the less salty, Passage, the East Passage, and the more nutrient-rich waters of the stages of their life cycles. Most of so-called Sakonnet River, which is upper Bay. On the other hand, the commercially important pelagic not really a river but an arm of the lobster and blue mussel prefer the fish, as well as squid, migrate to sea. Only the East Passage, with an more oceanlike conditions of the Narragansett Bay in May or June. average depth of 44 feet, is deep Each year, about 100 different lower Bay. enough for large ships. species may visit the Bay at one The Bay’s three largest islands time or another. Geological History of are Aquidneck (the Indian name Narragansett Bay means “longest island”), Conanicut, Physical Characteristics and Prudence. Some 30 smaller 25,000 years ago: With the of Narragansett Bay islands, many of them little more Pleistocene Ice Age in full force than large rocks, also dot the Bay. • Length: 25 miles and sea level 300 feet lower than • Width: 10 miles today, Rhode Island lay buried • Volume: 706 billion gallons at under an ice sheet 400 feet thick. mid-tide The glacier extended as far as • Shoreline: 256 miles, including Block Island. Southward from there, island shorelines some 70 miles of frozen tundra led • Drainage basin (watershed): finally to the Atlantic coast. 1,853 square miles 10,000 years ago: Earth was warming. The glacier had receded —Excerpted from “An Overview of from Rhode Island, and the ocean Narragansett Bay” by Eleanor Ely, was rising but had not yet reached published by Rhode Island Sea its present level. Prehistoric Grant humans lived in the valleys that today are the passages of Narragansett Bay. They could walk across Rhode Island by simply crossing the small streams that ran through these valleys. 9,000 years ago: As sea level continued to rise, the Atlantic Ocean entered the East Passage of the Bay. 5,000 years ago: Narragansett Bay was filled almost to its present level. 20

23 Ninigret Pond Also known as Charlestown Pond, this 1,711-acre coastal Recreational activities oceanside and pondside are plentiful. lagoon is totally located within the town of Charlestown. A small Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge is located off Route 1, channel under Creek Bridge connects Ninigret with Green Hill bordering the northwestern side of the pond. There are two Pond in South Kingstown. The pond is bounded on the south by well-marked nature trails and plenty of parking at this federally barrier beaches, to the west by the village of Quonochontaug, and maintained site. Walking access to the pond is provided at the on the east by Charlestown Beach. The ocean breachway in the refuge and at the conservation area. southeastern end connects with Block Island Sound, and fresh Ninigret Park, a former naval air station, is north of the water flows into the pond from numerous small brooks and wildlife refuge and offers nature trails, basketball, volleyball, springs. tennis, and baseball opportunities, BMX bike courses, Fishing and shellfishing are very popular. Marine fisheries laws freshwater swimming at Little Nini Pond, and the Frosty Drew and regulations are available at Burlingame State Park and at all Nature Center, which offers nature programs. local marinas and bait shops. No licenses are needed for Rhode Ocean swimming is available at Blue Shutters Town Beach, Island residents, but nonresidents must be licensed to harvest Ninigret Conservation Area (state-owned) at the west end, and shellfish. Licenses are available at Ocean House Marina and Charlestown Town Beach at the eastern end of the pond. Westerly Wal-Mart. Commercial shellfish licenses are available East Beach barrier beach is undeveloped and owned by only to Rhode Island residents and nonresident property owners, RIDEM and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Vehicles may and may be obtained at RIDEM headquarters in Providence; call access the back dunes with a permit obtained at the (401) 222-3576. No license is required for rod-and-reel fishing, but Burlingame State Park facilities. maximum daily limits and minimum sizes must be obeyed. Shellfishing is prohibited in two areas. One lies east of a line For further information: across Tockwotten Cove to a point on the south shore adjacent to Charlestown Harbormaster: (401) 364-6810 Florence Street and is closed because of pollution. The second, a Burlingame State Park: (401) 322-8910 shellfish spawner sanctuary in the western end, is closed to RIDEM Law Enforcement: (800) 498-1336 protect shellfish brood stock; this forms a triangle, bounded by a flag pole at the Ninigret Conservation Area to the south, and to —By Arthur Ganz, the north by an orange-and-white sign at the end of Kennedy Salt Ponds Coalition and Lane and a sign at Lavin’s Landing Marina. RIDEM Supervising Biologist The range of boating activity is dependent on the depth of the water. Ninigret is generally shallow, with an average depth of less than 6 feet. The southern areas have been shoaled to an even more shallow depth by storm surges and windblown sand. The central basin is generally free of navigational obstructions. Rocks are located along the north side of “The Narrows,” located between Hall and Grassy points, south of the National Wildlife Refuge. Open fairway runs north through Fort Neck, but the channel leading to the ocean breachway is shallow and treacherous. The harbormaster marks the Charlestown Breachway channel with stakes; however, the breachway itself is dangerous and requires experienced sea- manship. Strict adherence to rules of the road and to the no-wake regulations are a must. Public access is available at several points. Four launching facilities provide parking for a fee. The state ramp is at the end of Charlestown Beach Road; the other three are owned by local marinas: Ocean House, Lavin’s Landing, and Shelter Cove. The three marinas offer restrooms, and Ocean House provides complete marina services. Windsurfers, kayakers, and canoists find Ninigret a mecca for their enjoyment. Launching may take place from the Ninigret Conservation Area, all marinas, and at Creek Bridge, Charlestown Beach Road, where kayak rentals are available. 21

24 South Kingstown continues on page 26. Rte 2 Rte 112 CHARLESTOWN SOUTH KINGSTOWN Rte 2 & 112 Rte 110 Rte 1 WESTERLY Moonstone Beach Rd. Matunuck 11 Schoolhouse Rd. 14 Rte 1 Green Hill Rd. 12 Cards Pond 10 Trustom Green Hill Pond 16 9 Pond 15 13 8 Rte 1 7 Ninigret Pond 5 3 6 4 Quonochontaug Pond 2 1 0123 MILES CHARLESTOWN & SOUTH KINGSTOWN 22

25 Charlestown, South Kingstown & Narragansett Key to Primary Uses 7. Shelter Cove Marina Charlestown h here in season. On the ocean side, a Public Park beautiful sandy beach is great for Shelter Cove Marina is located on sunbathing or walking. Four-wheel- 1. Quonochontaug Charlestown Beach Road. Parking is ß Path to Shore drive vehicles are allowed behind the Breachway available. Fee. dunes only with a RIDEM permit. • Dock, concessions A popular fishing spot for striped Boating h Bring your binoculars: Waterfowl, bass, winter flounder, snapper, and wildlife, and shorebirds can be found, bluefish, this state-owned 49-acre 8. Perry Creek Beach with h especially during the fall and spring parcel runs parallel to the east side Accessway Lifeguards migrations. Parking is available. Fee. of the Quonochontaug Breachway. This site consists of a small dirt road • Handicap access, swimming, Parking is available at the end of Wildlife Refuge extending north from the town beach toilets, trash receptacles S West Beach Road for cars and boat parking lot (off Charlestown Beach trailers. The boat ramp located at this Scenic View Road) to a sandy shoreline area bor- 5. Charlestown Breach- site provides access to Block Island ß dering Perry Creek. The tidal creek way Beach and Boat Sound, but it is very dangerous due Fishing links Ninigret Pond to Green Hill ß Ramp to swift currents running through the Pond. This site is suitable only for breachway. This site includes a This state-managed parcel consists small craft and kayaks due to the RIDEM shellfish management area. of approximately 2 acres. It is located shallowness of the creek. Across the A walk toward the wetland area off the west end of Charlestown creek on the north side is a small area fringing Quonochontaug Pond Beach Road and borders Ninigret with a concession stand, bait shop, affords a beautiful view of the entire Pond on the north and Block Island ramp, small boat docks, and a good pond and some excellent bird watch- Sound on the south. The area con- view of Ninigret Pond. Parking is ing. sists of a wide sandy beach on the available. • Toilets ocean, a rock jetty, which is a popu- • Fishing, wildlife observation lar fishing site, a recreational vehicle Quonochontaug Breachway campground along the east arm of 2. Blue Shutters Town 9. Ninigret National S the breachway, and a wetland area Beach Wildlife Refuge bordering Ninigret Pond. This is a Located near the end of East Beach Located just off Route 1, bordering great family spot due to its guarded Road, this town-owned property of- the northwestern side of Ninigret beach and close fishing opportuni- fers many amenities such as show- Pond, this 400-acre federally main- ties. A boat ramp is located at the ers, on-site pay parking, and conces- tained site consists of grasslands, north end of the breachway on the sions. This beautiful, wide, sandy brush and shrub, uplands, freshwa- pond. Activities include fishing, beach is located just west of the ter ponds, salt marsh, a barrier swimming, beach-walking, and Blue Shutters Town Beach Ninigret Conservation Area. beach, and a portion of the former windsurfing. Ninety parking spaces • Picnic tables/benches, toilets, Charlestown Naval Auxiliary Landing are available on site, and there is an trash receptacles Field. There are two well-marked na- entrance fee during the summer sea- ture trails—a must for nature photog- son. 3. Lavin’s Landing h raphers and bird watchers. There is • CRMC ROW#: B-1 Marina plenty of parking available. Watch out • Picnic tables/benches, toilets, trash for poison ivy and ticks. Lavin’s Landing Marina, located on receptacles • Handicap access, picnic tables/ Meadow Lane, offers bait, tackle, benches, fishing, toilets, trash and fuel for sale. Parking is available. 6. Charlestown Town Charlestown Town Beach receptacles Fee. Beach • Dock South of Charlestown Beach Road, a section of the beach is owned by the 4. East Beach/Ninigret town and is open to the public. Pay S State Facilities parking is available for approximately At the east end of East Beach Road, 300 cars about 500 feet across the a two-mile-long barrier beach sepa- road from the beach. rates Ninigret Pond from Block Island • Hiking/walking, trash receptacles Sound. Ninigret Pond offers excellent Perry Creek Accessway windsurfing, canoeing, and shell- fishing. This is also a RIDEM shell- fish management area. Winter Green Hill Beach flounder, clams, quahogs, blue crabs, eel, and bay scallops can be found 23

26 10. Ninigret Park South Kingstown A former naval air station, Ninigret Park is just north of the Ninigret Na- 13. Green Hill Beach tional Wildlife Refuge. The park offers Located off Green Hill Beach Road, a wide variety of amenities, includ- this site is a sandy, dune-backed ing nature trails, full-court basketball, beach offering no parking. Most of volleyball, tennis, baseball, BMX bike the beach is lined with residences, courses, freshwater swimming, fit- condominiums, and other beachfront ness trails, and a senior center. While development. A right-of-way located the park does not offer direct shore Roy Carpenter’s Beach here consists of a sandy path lead- access to Ninigret Pond, there is ing to Green Hill Beach. freshwater swimming available at • Swimming Little Nini Pond. Plenty of parking is available. Wildlife is abundant here, 14. Trustom Pond as seen from the nature trails. The S National Wildlife Frosty Drew Nature Center offers a Refuge series of nature programs. • Handicap access, picnic tables/ This 640-acre national wildlife refuge benches, concessions, historic surrounds Rhode Island’s only unde- interest, toilets, trash receptacles veloped coastal salt pond. Access is from Matunuck Schoolhouse Road. From the parking area, three miles of 11. Fort Ninigret Ninigret Park gently sloping foot trails weave Located at the end of Fort Ninigret through the refuge leading to points Road, which extends south from Post along the north shoreline of Trustom Road, near Cross’ Mills, the site of Pond. The site has three wildlife ob- Fort Ninigret occupies a bluff over- servation towers and is a beautiful looking the northern end of Ninigret place to visit each season of the year. Pond. Once an Indian stronghold and Because it is a wildlife refuge, dogs, trading center, the park is maintained bicycling, horseback riding, and mo- as a memorial to the Narragansett torcycling are prohibited. and Niantic tribes. Although there is • Picnic tables/benches, swimming, no access to the pond, this is a great toilets, trash receptacles place for picnicking, kite flying, or viewing the pond and barrier beach. Ocean House Marina 15. Moonstone Beach Parking is limited. • Wildlife observation Part of the Trustom Pond National Wildlife Refuge, this is one of Rhode Island’s more isolated and beautiful 12. Ocean House Marina h beaches. The beach is fenced off at Located off Town Dock Road on Fort a mean high-water mark to protect Neck Cove, Ocean House Marina is the sand dune habitat and the endan- privately owned, but offers a public gered piping plovers that nest on the boat launch for a nominal fee. The beach. The end of Moonstone Beach marina is situated in a well-protected Road is a public right-of-way. No cove of Ninigret Pond in a pictur- parking is available. esque setting. In addition to a boat Trustom Pond National Wildlife Refuge • Swimming, hiking/walking ramp, Ocean House also has a bait shop, boat repair, and trailer parking 16. Roy Carpenter’s for customers. Beach • Handicap access, dock, picnic tables/benches, fishing, toilets, Hidden by the dense bungalow com- trash receptacles munity south of Cards Pond Road, this private beach is open to the public for a fee. A wooden pavilion, beach rent- als, a general store, a snack bar, and parking for a fee are available. • Picnic tables/benches, toilets, trash receptacles Moonstone Beach 24

27 Surfing in Rhode Island sandy beach breaks are a great spot for less experienced Surfing has been an integral part of Rhode Island’s rich surfers to have as much fun as the experts. Waves at a coastal culture since the mid-1950s. Rhode Island sandy beach break tend to provide shorter rides than established itself on the surfing world’s map by providing those at a point. Since the swells are nearly parallel to surfers with well-known breaks such as Matunuck, the shoreline, each section of the wave reaches shallow Ruggles, and Point Judith. Having over 30 surf spots within water simultaneously, causing the wave to close out. its 40 miles of open-water coastline, Rhode Island serves However, bottom contour irregularities and sandbars as the Northeast’s premier surfing location, rivaled only by cause some sections of a wave to break earlier than Cape Cod. Rhode Island’s coastline consists of sandy and others and make the wave “ridable” for at least a short gravel beaches, as well as rocky points, creating a variety time. of surf breaks. During the summer, crowded beach conditions require A rocky point break, such as Narragansett’s Point Judith, authorities to designate sections of some beaches as provides surfers with a diverse array of wave types, “swimming only.” Although this helps to make the ranging from long, lazy rollers to heavy, hollow barrels. The beaches safer for swimmers, it inhibits surfers from geography of the point allows these large swells to spreading out, and ultimately makes it difficult to surf on approach the land at an angle, causing each wave to crowded days. To avoid the crowds, try surfing in the gradually break to the right or left. Such conditions prevent morning or the evening, or avoid the popular beaches the waves from crashing over all at once, a phenomenon altogether. known as “closing out” in the surfing community. The gradually breaking waves at Point Judith provide surfers —By Charlie Festa, former URI Coastal Fellow for Rhode with longer rides and help to establish the point as a Island Sea Grant preferred surfing location. These waves are not for beginners, however. Point Judith’s rocky shoreline, heavy undertow, and dangerously powerful waves render it a surf spot suitable for only the most experienced surfers. During storm swells, such as those produced by late summer offshore hurricanes, wave heights at Point Judith can reach and exceed 15 feet. For a safer, more relaxed surfing experience, Rhode Island also offers several beach breaks, such as Narragansett Town Beach or Newport’s Easton’s Beach. Although providing less consistent surf, Rhode Island’s 25

28 Charlestown Prior to the arrival of the Europeans, Narragansett Indians inhabited the region now known as Charlestown. They lived off the land, hunting, fishing, and raising crops. When the first European th century, plantations were quickly established to exploit the fertile coastal settlers arrived in the mid-17 lands. On August 22, 1738, a portion of Westerly was divided and named Charlestown after King Charles II. Today’s town boundaries were finally established in 1748 when the town of Richmond was divided at the Pawcatuck River. th century, residents of Charlestown began harnessing the Pawcatuck River to power In the early 19 textile mills. As the industry grew, so did the surrounding area. Other mills sprang up along the river, including saw, cotton, and wool mills. Over the years most of the mills have been converted into offices, but Kenyon Mills continues to produce textiles and serves as a symbol of the town’s history. South Kingstown Originally called King’s Towne and incorporated in 1674, the area included the present towns of South Kingstown, North Kingstown, and Narragansett. The first settlement was in South Kingstown, and it was there, in the Great Swamp Fight of 1675, that colonial soldiers from Rhode Island, Massa- chusetts, and Connecticut gave King Philip his greatest defeat. Farming was the main activity in early times. Prior to colonial settlement, however, the Narragansetts occupied the area, farming, hunting, and fishing. Although corn was their principal crop, they also produced squash, beans, and strawberries. Venison, cod, and shellfish were their primary sources of protein. Narragansett Ronald Robinson settled and purchased the land along the western shore of Narragansett Bay th century. Incorporated as a town in 1901, Narragansett’s from the Narragansett Indians in the late 17 earliest industry was a shipbuilding operation located at Middle Bridge on the Narrow River. As ship size outgrew the capacity of the Narrow River, the town turned to tourism as its primary source of income. th By the turn of the 20 century, Narragansett was an elegant summer resort. Many small summer cottages, as well as upscale hotels, were erected to accommodate the increasing number of tourists to the area. Soon, larger estates also dappled the shoreline. Many wealthy city families spent their weekends in Narragansett by taking the day ferry from Providence. Perhaps the most well-known landmark of its time was the Narragansett Casino. Located at the corner of Ocean Road and Narragansett Beach, the casino was Narragansett’s central attraction until 1900, when a devastating fire destroyed all but the main entrance towers. Today, the towers serve as the Narragansett Visitors’ Center. 19

29 Narragansett Bay Life in the Bay Fisheries Narragansett Bay is an estuary— a semi-enclosed inlet of the sea in One-celled floating algae called The Bay’s commercially important which seawater is diluted by fresh species include: phytoplankton are the basis of the water. Compared to other estuaries, Bay’s food chain—or, more • Demersal (bottom-dwelling) fish: Narragansett Bay is small- to accurately, food web. Like land winter flounder, summer flounder, medium-sized. Chesapeake Bay, the tautog, black sea bass plants, these microscopic plants largest estuary in the United States, • Pelagic fish (fish that feed in the use photosynthesis to convert covers more than 30 times the area carbon dioxide into organic mater- water column): bluefish, striped of Narragansett Bay. Still, Nar- bass, scup, squeteague (weakfish), ial that ultimately nourishes all ragansett Bay is big enough to take menhaden, Atlantic herring, and other life in the Bay. a good-sized bite out of little Rhode alewife (for use as lobster bait) Narragansett Bay, like any Island. It reaches two-thirds of the • Shellfish: quahog, oyster estuary, provides a variety of way up the state—with the result • Lobster different habitats for living things. that no Rhode Islander is more than Certain plants and animals are • Squid half an hour’s drive from the concentrated in particular areas shoreline—and covers about 10 where salinity and other conditions The demersal fish, as well as the percent of the state’s area. are best suited to their needs. For quahog and oyster, are Bay There are three entrances to residents that are able to live in the example, the most productive Narragansett Bay: the West Bay year round and during all quahog beds are in the less salty, Passage, the East Passage, and the more nutrient-rich waters of the stages of their life cycles. Most of so-called Sakonnet River, which is upper Bay. On the other hand, the commercially important pelagic not really a river but an arm of the lobster and blue mussel prefer the fish, as well as squid, migrate to sea. Only the East Passage, with an more oceanlike conditions of the Narragansett Bay in May or June. average depth of 44 feet, is deep Each year, about 100 different lower Bay. enough for large ships. species may visit the Bay at one The Bay’s three largest islands time or another. Geological History of are Aquidneck (the Indian name Narragansett Bay means “longest island”), Conanicut, Physical Characteristics and Prudence. Some 30 smaller 25,000 years ago: With the of Narragansett Bay islands, many of them little more Pleistocene Ice Age in full force than large rocks, also dot the Bay. • Length: 25 miles and sea level 300 feet lower than • Width: 10 miles today, Rhode Island lay buried • Volume: 706 billion gallons at under an ice sheet 400 feet thick. mid-tide The glacier extended as far as • Shoreline: 256 miles, including Block Island. Southward from there, island shorelines some 70 miles of frozen tundra led • Drainage basin (watershed): finally to the Atlantic coast. 1,853 square miles 10,000 years ago: Earth was warming. The glacier had receded —Excerpted from “An Overview of from Rhode Island, and the ocean Narragansett Bay” by Eleanor Ely, was rising but had not yet reached published by Rhode Island Sea its present level. Prehistoric Grant humans lived in the valleys that today are the passages of Narragansett Bay. They could walk across Rhode Island by simply crossing the small streams that ran through these valleys. 9,000 years ago: As sea level continued to rise, the Atlantic Ocean entered the East Passage of the Bay. 5,000 years ago: Narragansett Bay was filled almost to its present level. 20

30 Ninigret Pond Also known as Charlestown Pond, this 1,711-acre coastal Recreational activities oceanside and pondside are plentiful. lagoon is totally located within the town of Charlestown. A small Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge is located off Route 1, channel under Creek Bridge connects Ninigret with Green Hill bordering the northwestern side of the pond. There are two Pond in South Kingstown. The pond is bounded on the south by well-marked nature trails and plenty of parking at this federally barrier beaches, to the west by the village of Quonochontaug, and maintained site. Walking access to the pond is provided at the on the east by Charlestown Beach. The ocean breachway in the refuge and at the conservation area. southeastern end connects with Block Island Sound, and fresh Ninigret Park, a former naval air station, is north of the water flows into the pond from numerous small brooks and wildlife refuge and offers nature trails, basketball, volleyball, springs. tennis, and baseball opportunities, BMX bike courses, Fishing and shellfishing are very popular. Marine fisheries laws freshwater swimming at Little Nini Pond, and the Frosty Drew and regulations are available at Burlingame State Park and at all Nature Center, which offers nature programs. local marinas and bait shops. No licenses are needed for Rhode Ocean swimming is available at Blue Shutters Town Beach, Island residents, but nonresidents must be licensed to harvest Ninigret Conservation Area (state-owned) at the west end, and shellfish. Licenses are available at Ocean House Marina and Charlestown Town Beach at the eastern end of the pond. Westerly Wal-Mart. Commercial shellfish licenses are available East Beach barrier beach is undeveloped and owned by only to Rhode Island residents and nonresident property owners, RIDEM and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Vehicles may and may be obtained at RIDEM headquarters in Providence; call access the back dunes with a permit obtained at the (401) 222-3576. No license is required for rod-and-reel fishing, but Burlingame State Park facilities. maximum daily limits and minimum sizes must be obeyed. Shellfishing is prohibited in two areas. One lies east of a line For further information: across Tockwotten Cove to a point on the south shore adjacent to Charlestown Harbormaster: (401) 364-6810 Florence Street and is closed because of pollution. The second, a Burlingame State Park: (401) 322-8910 shellfish spawner sanctuary in the western end, is closed to RIDEM Law Enforcement: (800) 498-1336 protect shellfish brood stock; this forms a triangle, bounded by a flag pole at the Ninigret Conservation Area to the south, and to —By Arthur Ganz, the north by an orange-and-white sign at the end of Kennedy Salt Ponds Coalition and Lane and a sign at Lavin’s Landing Marina. RIDEM Supervising Biologist The range of boating activity is dependent on the depth of the water. Ninigret is generally shallow, with an average depth of less than 6 feet. The southern areas have been shoaled to an even more shallow depth by storm surges and windblown sand. The central basin is generally free of navigational obstructions. Rocks are located along the north side of “The Narrows,” located between Hall and Grassy points, south of the National Wildlife Refuge. Open fairway runs north through Fort Neck, but the channel leading to the ocean breachway is shallow and treacherous. The harbormaster marks the Charlestown Breachway channel with stakes; however, the breachway itself is dangerous and requires experienced sea- manship. Strict adherence to rules of the road and to the no-wake regulations are a must. Public access is available at several points. Four launching facilities provide parking for a fee. The state ramp is at the end of Charlestown Beach Road; the other three are owned by local marinas: Ocean House, Lavin’s Landing, and Shelter Cove. The three marinas offer restrooms, and Ocean House provides complete marina services. Windsurfers, kayakers, and canoists find Ninigret a mecca for their enjoyment. Launching may take place from the Ninigret Conservation Area, all marinas, and at Creek Bridge, Charlestown Beach Road, where kayak rentals are available. 21

31 South Kingstown continues on page 26. Rte 2 Rte 112 CHARLESTOWN SOUTH KINGSTOWN Rte 2 & 112 Rte 110 Rte 1 WESTERLY Moonstone Beach Rd. Matunuck 11 Schoolhouse Rd. 14 Rte 1 Green Hill Rd. 12 Cards Pond 10 Trustom Green Hill Pond 16 9 Pond 15 13 8 Rte 1 7 Ninigret Pond 5 3 6 4 Quonochontaug Pond 2 1 0123 MILES CHARLESTOWN & SOUTH KINGSTOWN 22

32 Charlestown, South Kingstown & Narragansett Key to Primary Uses 7. Shelter Cove Marina Charlestown h here in season. On the ocean side, a Public Park beautiful sandy beach is great for Shelter Cove Marina is located on sunbathing or walking. Four-wheel- 1. Quonochontaug Charlestown Beach Road. Parking is ß Path to Shore drive vehicles are allowed behind the Breachway available. Fee. dunes only with a RIDEM permit. • Dock, concessions A popular fishing spot for striped Boating h Bring your binoculars: Waterfowl, bass, winter flounder, snapper, and wildlife, and shorebirds can be found, bluefish, this state-owned 49-acre 8. Perry Creek Beach with h especially during the fall and spring parcel runs parallel to the east side Accessway Lifeguards migrations. Parking is available. Fee. of the Quonochontaug Breachway. This site consists of a small dirt road • Handicap access, swimming, Parking is available at the end of Wildlife Refuge extending north from the town beach toilets, trash receptacles S West Beach Road for cars and boat parking lot (off Charlestown Beach trailers. The boat ramp located at this Scenic View Road) to a sandy shoreline area bor- 5. Charlestown Breach- site provides access to Block Island ß dering Perry Creek. The tidal creek way Beach and Boat Sound, but it is very dangerous due Fishing links Ninigret Pond to Green Hill ß Ramp to swift currents running through the Pond. This site is suitable only for breachway. This site includes a This state-managed parcel consists small craft and kayaks due to the RIDEM shellfish management area. of approximately 2 acres. It is located shallowness of the creek. Across the A walk toward the wetland area off the west end of Charlestown creek on the north side is a small area fringing Quonochontaug Pond Beach Road and borders Ninigret with a concession stand, bait shop, affords a beautiful view of the entire Pond on the north and Block Island ramp, small boat docks, and a good pond and some excellent bird watch- Sound on the south. The area con- view of Ninigret Pond. Parking is ing. sists of a wide sandy beach on the available. • Toilets ocean, a rock jetty, which is a popu- • Fishing, wildlife observation lar fishing site, a recreational vehicle Quonochontaug Breachway campground along the east arm of 2. Blue Shutters Town 9. Ninigret National S the breachway, and a wetland area Beach Wildlife Refuge bordering Ninigret Pond. This is a Located near the end of East Beach Located just off Route 1, bordering great family spot due to its guarded Road, this town-owned property of- the northwestern side of Ninigret beach and close fishing opportuni- fers many amenities such as show- Pond, this 400-acre federally main- ties. A boat ramp is located at the ers, on-site pay parking, and conces- tained site consists of grasslands, north end of the breachway on the sions. This beautiful, wide, sandy brush and shrub, uplands, freshwa- pond. Activities include fishing, beach is located just west of the ter ponds, salt marsh, a barrier swimming, beach-walking, and Blue Shutters Town Beach Ninigret Conservation Area. beach, and a portion of the former windsurfing. Ninety parking spaces • Picnic tables/benches, toilets, Charlestown Naval Auxiliary Landing are available on site, and there is an trash receptacles Field. There are two well-marked na- entrance fee during the summer sea- ture trails—a must for nature photog- son. 3. Lavin’s Landing h raphers and bird watchers. There is • CRMC ROW#: B-1 Marina plenty of parking available. Watch out • Picnic tables/benches, toilets, trash for poison ivy and ticks. Lavin’s Landing Marina, located on receptacles • Handicap access, picnic tables/ Meadow Lane, offers bait, tackle, benches, fishing, toilets, trash and fuel for sale. Parking is available. 6. Charlestown Town Charlestown Town Beach receptacles Fee. Beach • Dock South of Charlestown Beach Road, a section of the beach is owned by the 4. East Beach/Ninigret town and is open to the public. Pay S State Facilities parking is available for approximately At the east end of East Beach Road, 300 cars about 500 feet across the a two-mile-long barrier beach sepa- road from the beach. rates Ninigret Pond from Block Island • Hiking/walking, trash receptacles Sound. Ninigret Pond offers excellent Perry Creek Accessway windsurfing, canoeing, and shell- fishing. This is also a RIDEM shell- fish management area. Winter Green Hill Beach flounder, clams, quahogs, blue crabs, eel, and bay scallops can be found 23

33 10. Ninigret Park South Kingstown A former naval air station, Ninigret Park is just north of the Ninigret Na- 13. Green Hill Beach tional Wildlife Refuge. The park offers Located off Green Hill Beach Road, a wide variety of amenities, includ- this site is a sandy, dune-backed ing nature trails, full-court basketball, beach offering no parking. Most of volleyball, tennis, baseball, BMX bike the beach is lined with residences, courses, freshwater swimming, fit- condominiums, and other beachfront ness trails, and a senior center. While development. A right-of-way located the park does not offer direct shore Roy Carpenter’s Beach here consists of a sandy path lead- access to Ninigret Pond, there is ing to Green Hill Beach. freshwater swimming available at • Swimming Little Nini Pond. Plenty of parking is available. Wildlife is abundant here, 14. Trustom Pond as seen from the nature trails. The S National Wildlife Frosty Drew Nature Center offers a Refuge series of nature programs. • Handicap access, picnic tables/ This 640-acre national wildlife refuge benches, concessions, historic surrounds Rhode Island’s only unde- interest, toilets, trash receptacles veloped coastal salt pond. Access is from Matunuck Schoolhouse Road. From the parking area, three miles of 11. Fort Ninigret Ninigret Park gently sloping foot trails weave Located at the end of Fort Ninigret through the refuge leading to points Road, which extends south from Post along the north shoreline of Trustom Road, near Cross’ Mills, the site of Pond. The site has three wildlife ob- Fort Ninigret occupies a bluff over- servation towers and is a beautiful looking the northern end of Ninigret place to visit each season of the year. Pond. Once an Indian stronghold and Because it is a wildlife refuge, dogs, trading center, the park is maintained bicycling, horseback riding, and mo- as a memorial to the Narragansett torcycling are prohibited. and Niantic tribes. Although there is • Picnic tables/benches, swimming, no access to the pond, this is a great toilets, trash receptacles place for picnicking, kite flying, or viewing the pond and barrier beach. Ocean House Marina 15. Moonstone Beach Parking is limited. • Wildlife observation Part of the Trustom Pond National Wildlife Refuge, this is one of Rhode Island’s more isolated and beautiful 12. Ocean House Marina h beaches. The beach is fenced off at Located off Town Dock Road on Fort a mean high-water mark to protect Neck Cove, Ocean House Marina is the sand dune habitat and the endan- privately owned, but offers a public gered piping plovers that nest on the boat launch for a nominal fee. The beach. The end of Moonstone Beach marina is situated in a well-protected Road is a public right-of-way. No cove of Ninigret Pond in a pictur- parking is available. esque setting. In addition to a boat Trustom Pond National Wildlife Refuge • Swimming, hiking/walking ramp, Ocean House also has a bait shop, boat repair, and trailer parking 16. Roy Carpenter’s for customers. Beach • Handicap access, dock, picnic tables/benches, fishing, toilets, Hidden by the dense bungalow com- trash receptacles munity south of Cards Pond Road, this private beach is open to the public for a fee. A wooden pavilion, beach rent- als, a general store, a snack bar, and parking for a fee are available. • Picnic tables/benches, toilets, trash receptacles Moonstone Beach 24

34 Surfing in Rhode Island sandy beach breaks are a great spot for less experienced Surfing has been an integral part of Rhode Island’s rich surfers to have as much fun as the experts. Waves at a coastal culture since the mid-1950s. Rhode Island sandy beach break tend to provide shorter rides than established itself on the surfing world’s map by providing those at a point. Since the swells are nearly parallel to surfers with well-known breaks such as Matunuck, the shoreline, each section of the wave reaches shallow Ruggles, and Point Judith. Having over 30 surf spots within water simultaneously, causing the wave to close out. its 40 miles of open-water coastline, Rhode Island serves However, bottom contour irregularities and sandbars as the Northeast’s premier surfing location, rivaled only by cause some sections of a wave to break earlier than Cape Cod. Rhode Island’s coastline consists of sandy and others and make the wave “ridable” for at least a short gravel beaches, as well as rocky points, creating a variety time. of surf breaks. During the summer, crowded beach conditions require A rocky point break, such as Narragansett’s Point Judith, authorities to designate sections of some beaches as provides surfers with a diverse array of wave types, “swimming only.” Although this helps to make the ranging from long, lazy rollers to heavy, hollow barrels. The beaches safer for swimmers, it inhibits surfers from geography of the point allows these large swells to spreading out, and ultimately makes it difficult to surf on approach the land at an angle, causing each wave to crowded days. To avoid the crowds, try surfing in the gradually break to the right or left. Such conditions prevent morning or the evening, or avoid the popular beaches the waves from crashing over all at once, a phenomenon altogether. known as “closing out” in the surfing community. The gradually breaking waves at Point Judith provide surfers —By Charlie Festa, former URI Coastal Fellow for Rhode with longer rides and help to establish the point as a Island Sea Grant preferred surfing location. These waves are not for beginners, however. Point Judith’s rocky shoreline, heavy undertow, and dangerously powerful waves render it a surf spot suitable for only the most experienced surfers. During storm swells, such as those produced by late summer offshore hurricanes, wave heights at Point Judith can reach and exceed 15 feet. For a safer, more relaxed surfing experience, Rhode Island also offers several beach breaks, such as Narragansett Town Beach or Newport’s Easton’s Beach. Although providing less consistent surf, Rhode Island’s 25

35 NORTH KINGSTOWN 61 60 Rte 138 KINGSTON Rte 108 59 SOUTH 58 Narrow River KINGSTOWN 57 56 Rte 1 55 Rte 1A 54 53 WAKEFIELD Worden’s Pond 51 52 25 50 49 26 48 24 Rte 110 Rte 1 47 46 Rte 108 45 44 Point Ocean Rd. Judith Pond Rte 1 NARRAGANSETT 23 27 31 30 22 43 32 28 29 Matunuck Matunuck Beach Rd. Potter Schoolhouse Rd. Pond 33 42 Trustom 34 20 35 41 Pond 17 18 40 21 36 39 19 38 37 POINT JUDITH 0123 MILES SOUTH KINGSTOWN & NARRAGANSETT 26 East Matunuck State Beach

36 21. East Matunuck State 25. Marina Park 17. South Kingstown h Key to Primary Uses Beach Town Beach This municipal park, just south of Located south of Succotash Road, Route 1, is located at the head of Point Where Matunuck Beach Road Public Park this state beach is popular during the Judith Pond on Salt Pond Road, reaches the shore, there is a town summer season for swimming and across the street from several mari- beach facility with picnic areas, Path to Shore off-season for walking. From the nas, a town boat ramp, and a restau- boardwalks, a playground, a volley- pavilion, there is a beautiful view over rant. A large grassy area, formerly ball court, and dirt paths leading to Boating h the dunes of the Succotash Salt known as Heritage Field, is the site the beach. Several stores within Marsh, a state-managed wetlands for a number of annual events such walking distance carry food, Beach with conservation area. On a clear day, as carnivals and boat shows. Also in sundries, and beach supplies. The Lifeguards Block Island is visible on the horizon. Marina Park is the URI Sailing Club. parking facility accommodates ap- Public parking is available all year Beginning and intermediate sailing proximately 80 vehicles. The beach Wildlife Refuge S with a fee in the summer. classes are offered during the sum- charges a fee in the summer season, • Handicap access, picnic tables/ mer. The public can join the URI Sail- but is open to both town residents Scenic View benches, concessions, toilets, trash ing Club for a nominal fee. There are and nonresidents. receptacles benches available and 30 parking • Handicap access, picnic tables/ Fishing ß spaces. benches, fishing, wildlife observa- • Dock, trash receptacles Ferry tion, toilets, trash receptacles 22. Kenport Marina h Located on Succotash Road, this pri- 18. Deep Hole Fishing vately run marina has a boat ramp ß Narragansett Area available to the public for a nominal fee. Parking for non-customers is Located near the end of Matunuck h 26. Long Cove Marina available on a first-come first-served Beach Road, this small pocket of basis. A bait shop and ship store are sandy beach is set aside for Rhode Located west of Route 108, approxi- also available. A restaurant and a fish Island fishermen. However, compat- mately one mile south of Route 1, this market are situated nearby. ible uses such as surfing are allowed. privately owned campground con- • Dock, fishing, toilets, trash Parking is available for approximately sists of 200 to 300 campsites for tents, receptacles 30 cars. campers, and recreational vehicles. South Kingstown Town Beach There is public access to the boat ramp that leads to Point Judith 23. Gooseberry Road 19. Ocean Avenue h Town Ramp Pond. Parking is available. Fee. At the narrow end of Ocean Avenue, • Picnic tables/benches, toilets, trash A town right-of-way at the end of a stair pathway leads down to the receptacles Gooseberry Road, next to Channel west end of East Matunuck State Marina, this public access has an Beach. Though this is great beach 27. Knowlesway asphalt boat ramp in good condition. access, no parking is available. Extension This site is not frequently used be- • CRMC ROW#: D-4 cause there is no public parking • Swimming, fishing, hiking/walking At the end of Knowlesway Extension, Deep Hole Fishing Area available. west of Route 108, a paved right-of- • Trash receptacles way provides access to Point Judith 20. Matunuck S Pond. This site consists of a small Management Area grassy park and a stairway to the 24. Pond Street Ramp h Off Succotash Road, north of East pond. At the end of Pond Street, this marked Matunuck Beach, this area encom- • CRMC ROW#: C-1 right-of-way on Billington Cove, Point passes over 145 acres of salt marsh • Picnicking, swimming, wildlife Judith Pond, is one of the town’s four and wetlands on Potter Pond, Point observation, hiking/walking, trash public boat ramps. The site and the Judith Pond, and Block Island Sound. receptacles ramp are in good condition. The ramp Popular activities in this area include is next to private marina facilities. No canoeing, bird watching, and fishing. Ocean Avenue parking is available. It is an ideal setting to observe many • Dock, fishing migratory bird and waterfowl species in the fall and spring. On occasion, nature walks are offered through the area. Parking is available at the west end of the state beach lot for a fee. • Historic interest Kenport Marina Matunuck Management Area Gooseberry Road Town Ramp 27 Marina Park

37 32. State Pier #3 28. Fisherman’s along the rocky shore. From here, one Memorial State Park can walk to Sand Hill Cove Beach, a In the heart of Galilee, next to the mile to the east. Although on-site West of Route 108, Fisherman’s Me- Block Island Ferry terminal, this state parking is available, the small park- morial State Park is a campground pier bustles with activity supporting ing lot fills quickly on nice days. that has 182 campsites, three game the commercial fishing fleet and • Concessions, toilets, trash recep- fields, and two tennis courts. During charter deep-sea fishing boats. tacles the summer there is an entrance fee Southland Ferry Cruises offers boat to the campgrounds, and advance tours around Point Judith Pond dur- 36. Roger Wheeler State reservations are recommended. ing the summer. This site is extremely Beach There is a spectacular view of Point busy; limited parking is available on Judith Pond, Narragansett Bay, and nearby streets. Ample pay parking is Popularly known as Sand Hill Cove Block Island Sound from the overlook available throughout Galilee. Beach, this state-owned beach is lo- platform located at the site of the old • Concessions, toilets, trash recep- cated at the east end of Sand Hill Galilee Bird Sanctuary bunker, part of U.S. Army Fort Greene. tacles Cove Road. A great place for the fam- During the summer, RIDEM holds ily, the beach offers ample parking (at evening nature education programs least 1,500 spaces), lifeguards, 33. Block Island Ferry for the public. On the grounds’ north- Terminal changing facilities, toilets, picnic ar- west corner, a pathway leads to a eas, concessions, and playground The main ferry terminal for public state shellfish management area. equipment. This site is a safe place transport to Block Island is located Parking is available. for swimming because of the long, in Galilee. When the ferry is not at the • Handicap access, picnic tables/ wide, sandy beach and breakwater- dock, this site provides an interest- benches, historic interest, fishing, protected, calm waters. Fee. ing view of harbor activities. There is Bluff Hill Cove Access toilets, trash receptacles • Handicap access, picnic tables/ ample parking for a fee in nearby lots. benches, hiking/walking, trash • Handicap access, picnic tables/ 29. Galilee Bird receptacles benches, concessions, toilets, trash S Sanctuary receptacles Located south of the Galilee Escape 37. Point Judith State Park Road and across the street from 34. State Pier #4 Formerly Camp Cronin, a military ß Roger Wheeler State Beach is a 172- camp, this site has a long rocky Across the breachway from the ferry acre tidal wetland. This environmen- shoreline fronting the Atlantic Ocean terminal in Jerusalem, at the end of tally sensitive wetland habitat is ideal near the Point Judith Lighthouse and Succotash Road, a state-owned Knowlesway Extension for bird watching. However, the area is a good spot for surf fishing. Block property and pier provide access to has no access except along its outer Island is visible in the distance. This the main channel of Point Judith edge. No parking is available. site also provides access to the east Pond. This is a popular spot for rec- • Fishing arm of the Harbor of Refuge break- reational finfishing that can be water, a popular fishing area. On-site reached by following Succotash 30. Bluff Hill Cove Access parking is available. ß Road to its end in Jerusalem. Jerusa- • Swimming, hiking/walking, wildlife North of the Galilee Escape Road is lem is part of Narragansett and was observation, toilets an area of wetlands and tidal flats once connected to Galilee in the that is a state shellfish management 1800s before the U.S. Army Corps area. It is one of the state’s most 38. Point Judith constructed the permanent breach- Fisherman’s Memorial State Park Lighthouse popular recreational shellfishing way in its present location. Parking sites. Parking is available along the is available. At the southern end of Ocean Road Galilee Escape Road. stands the Point Judith Lighthouse, • Wildlife observation an octagonal brick building erected 35. Salty Brine State Beach in 1816. The lighthouse, which is still 31. Galilee at Great in use, is not open to the public. The h This small state beach is within the Island Bridge grassy slope around the lighthouse confines of the protected Point Judith has a fine view of the ocean where, Located off the Galilee Escape Road Harbor of Refuge. The adjacent two miles off the coast, the last Ger- at the southeast end of the Great breachway, which is stabilized by Salty Brine State Beach man U-boat was sunk during World Island Bridge, this state-owned fish- rock jetties, connects Point Judith War II. Beware of the loud foghorn ing access site has a boat ramp with Pond to the sea. The rock jetties sounding out to the passing ships on parking for cars and trailers. provide access for fishing or for the foggy days. On a good day you will • Dock, toilets sure-footed who want to watch the find many of Rhode Island’s best surf- activities in the harbor. Divers also ers in the water. Parking is available frequent the area to dive for lobsters nearby. and observe the underwater world • Hiking/walking Galilee at Great Island Bridge 28 Roger Wheeler State Beach

38 39. Rose Nulman 48. State Pier #5 44. Black Point h ß (Tucker’s Dock) Memorial Park Located off Ocean Road, just north of Adjacent to the Point Judith Light- Located off Ocean Road, near the Scarborough State Beach, this state house, this park provides scenic well and the intersection of South fishing area consists of a wooded dirt ocean views and has ample parking. Pier Road, this site offers boat path that extends toward the Bay • Picnic tables/benches launching, fishing, surfing, and a sce- from a parking lot just north of the old nic view of Narragansett Bay. Park- stone carriage house ruins. The path ing is available for about 15 cars. leads to a dramatic rocky shore of 40. Pilgrim Avenue There is also a bulkhead with pilings boulders and tide pools. This is a Extension to tie up to in a small, usually well- great place to relax and throw out a Just north of Point Judith, at Pilgrim protected cove. This site is commonly fishing line, but use caution when Point Judith Lighthouse and Calef avenues (Pole 17), is a sce- known as Monahan’s Dock. The ramp walking out on the rocks, particularly nic right-of-way that consists of a is steep and slippery at low tide. during periods of high waves. On-site paved roadway about 50 feet wide • Concessions, historic interest, trash parking is available. and 166 feet long that extends east- receptacles • CRMC ROW#: C-5 (on appeal) ward to a cobble beach. This is one • Wildlife observation of several road ends in the area that 49. Ocean Road offers surfing access. 45. Bass Rock Road • CRMC ROW#: C-2 A walkway extends 0.8 mile from Narragansett Beach south along A right-of-way extending east of Rose Nulman Memorial Park Ocean Road, under the Towers, to Ocean Road, this site is difficult to find 41. Calef Avenue State Pier #5 (Tucker’s Dock). This is because it is unmarked and can be A right-of-way just north of Point a popular place to walk, to watch the easily confused with the many private Judith at Pole 8, this site consists of sunrise, or to sit on the wall and driveways in the area. The site offers a grassy strip 50 feet wide and 140 watch the passersby. When the wind a terrific view of Narragansett Bay feet long, extending east from the in- is blowing and the surf is up, this area and the Atlantic Ocean and is often tersection of Louise Avenue and is populated with surfers. Free park- used by recreational fishermen. Be- Calef Avenue to a cobble beach. No ing is available along Ocean Road but ware of treacherous wave conditions parking is available. Pilgrim Avenue Extension fills up quickly on hot summer days. and dangerous rocky shoreline. • CRMC ROW#: C-3 • Concessions, fishing, trash recep- • CRMC ROW#: C-6 tacles • Trash receptacles 42. Conant Avenue Road End 50. Casino Park 46. Newton Avenue This scenic right-of-way overlooks Located off Route 1A, across the At the end of Newton Avenue, off the ocean and consists of a rocky street from Narragansett Town Ocean Road, a well-worn footpath shoreline with a path used by surfers Beach, this grassy area with a dis- leads to a dramatic rocky shore. This Calef Avenue and kayakers. No parking is available. tinctive gazebo offers an ocean view is a site where ancient bedrock, • CRMC ROW#: C-7 and is the site of concerts and art known as Narragansett Pier granite, • Fishing shows during the summer. There is surfaces. Fishing and wildlife obser- limited parking along Ocean Road. A vation are popular but dangerous due 43. Scarborough State variety of shops and restaurants is to treacherous waves and slippery Beach nearby. The area may be reserved for rocks. One of the state’s most popular special events for a fee. • CRMC ROW#: C-13 beaches, this facility has gazebos, • Picnic tables/benches, trash recep- • Trash receptacles Scarborough State Beach picnic areas, benches, a wooden tacles boardwalk with concessions, chang- 47. Hazard Avenue ing facilities, toilets, and showers. 51. Narragansett Town This site, a right-of-way at the end of The wide sandy beach is ideal for Beach Hazard Avenue, off Ocean Road, swimming, walking, and a variety of Located off Route 1A, this is a very consists of a well-worn footpath to oceanside activities. Includes Scar- popular summer beach spot. The spectacular granite rock formations. borough South Side, which offers wide, sandy beach is perfect for Fishing is popular but dangerous due access to grassy playing fields and walking, sunning, picnicking, swim- to the treacherous waves and slip- tailgating. Ample on-site parking is Newton Avenue ming, kayaking, and surfing. The town pery rocks. available and accessible from Ocean offers seasonal fitness classes, con- • CRMC ROW#: C-9 Road. Fee. certs, beach camps, junior lifesaving • Trash receptacles • Handicap access, trash receptacles programs, and special events. There is a parking lot for which a fee is charged during the summer daytime hours. A beach pavilion and chang- Conant Avenue Road End 29

39 59. Pettaquamscutt Park 55. Middle Bridge ing rooms are available, but there is ß (South Kingstown) a rental fee. A shopping area contain- Seasonal fishing is popular from the ing several restaurants, public rest- High over the Narrow River is the his- causeway and bridge over the Nar- rooms, and a grocery store is located toric site of the original purchase of row River. At the southwest end of the nearby. Fee. surrounding lands by British colonists bridge there is a path to the Narrow • Handicap access, picnic tables/ from three sachems of the Narra- River identified by a historic marker. benches, fishing, trash receptacles gansetts in 1657. There is a trail to the There is restricted parking along top of the rock and a sweeping view Middlebridge Road and at the east State Pier #5 (Tucker’s Dock) 52. Canonchet Farm of the Narrow River. The trail starts end of the bridge on a private lot for at the town park at the base of the a fee. Kayak rentals are on the east Located off Route 1A, opposite rock. Parking on the road is re- side of the bridge. Narragansett Town Beach, Can- stricted. • Trash receptacles onchet Farm offers hiking trails and • Historic interest, hiking/walking, fishing in salt ponds bordering trash receptacles, picnic tables/ 56. Pettaquamscutt Cove Pettaquamscutt Cove. South County S benches National Wildlife Museum is located here and contains Refuge articles of early Rhode Island life and 60. Pettaquamscutt industry. There are also an animal Ocean Road h Along the southeastern shore of the Avenue petting farm and plenty of parking on Narrow River, this federally desig- the grounds. The museum is open in This right-of-way at the end of nated national wildlife refuge con- the summer, beginning May 1, Wed- Pettaquamscutt Avenue may be used tains over 150 acres of tidal marshes, nesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. as a ramp to launch small boats or mudflats, and estuary and is home to • Wildlife observation, toilets, trash kayaks. Due to the shallow depth of the black duck. An access road leads receptacles the Narrow River, this site is best off the west side of Scenic Route 1A used at high tide. just north of the bridge over the Nar- • CRMC ROW#: C-10 row River. This is a great place to 53. Narrow River Inlet have a picnic and watch the sun set Hazard Avenue Just east of Sprague Bridge, on the over the river. Parking is available. 61. South Ferry Road south side of the Narrow River inlet, • Fishing is a small parking area and a path to The old Jamestown ferry landing at the tidal waters of the Narrow River. the end of South Ferry Road off Route 57. Narrow River Boat h This site offers access to a popular 1A also consists of a small cobble Ramp (South Kingstown) fishing site underneath the bridge beach on the West Passage. Dutch and an excellent place to launch a This state-owned boat ramp is in Island, Jamestown, and the James- kayak. good condition and offers several town Bridge may be seen in the dis- • Trash receptacles parking spaces. Take Middlebridge tance. This is a multi-use site for Road to Pollock Avenue. Boaters swimming, fishing, boating, and Narragansett Town Beach should be aware that Narrow River windsurfing. The site is adjacent to 54. Old Sprague Bridge ß has several bridges along its length Overlook the URI Graduate School of Ocean- that could pose an obstacle to boats ography. Parking is available. East of Scenic Route 1A is the site of with high superstructures or towers. • CRMC ROW#: C-8 Old Sprague Bridge. The bridge abut- Parking is available. ments provide a view of the • Fishing Pettaquamscutt Refuge and the Narrow River. Depending on tidal 58. Route 1A Overlook conditions, this area can be quite Pettaquamscutt Cove populated with shore birds. This is a A parcel of land owned by the R.I. nice site for a picnic or a fishing ex- Department of Transportation and cursion. There is parking available for known as The Overlook extends from cars on both sides of the river. Boston Neck Road (Route 1A) east- • Handicap access ward to the shore of Narragansett South Bay. The lot is just south of Browning Ferry Road Drive. It slopes steeply down to the shore so that when it is mowed it pro- vides a spectacular view of the lower View to Middle Bridge West Passage. No on-site parking is available. • Wildlife observation, hiking/walking Narrow River Inlet Old Sprague Bridge Pettaquamscutt Avenue 30

40 Jamestown Beavertail Lighthouse was built in 1749. It was the first lighthouse in Rhode Island and third in the country following the 1716 Boston Harbor light and the 1746 Great Point light on Nantucket. Although this wooden tower burned to the ground just four years later, the tower that replaced it lasted until the present granite lighthouse was constructed in 1856. The base of the older tower was exposed by the Hurricane of 1938 and now is marked by a granite plaque erected by the Jamestown Historical Society. Today, the lighthouse is part of a state park that has seen a major increase in visitors, many of whom come to Beavertail to sightsee, whether from the comfort of a vehicle, from one of the four scenic overlooks, or from the rocky coastline. Also, Beavertail boasts some of the best saltwater fishing around, and its rocky shoreline provides fishermen with countless locations to cast into the surf. North Kingstown Roger Williams established a temporary trading post in the Wickford area in 1637, and four years later, Richard Smith built a trading post there as well, on land he acquired from the Narragansetts. He later occupied the building, known as Smith’s Castle, with his family. It was burned during King Philip’s War, and later rebuilt and expanded as a plantation. Today, Smith’s Castle is owned by the Cocumscussoc Association and is open to the public. It serves as an example of the type of plantation th house and grounds that existed along the Rhode Island shore, from Wickford to Westerly, in the 18 century. Mackerel Cove, Jamestown 31

41 North Kingstown continues on page 38. 31 32 30 29 6 28 Rte 1 JAMESTOWN 5 27 4 Rte 4 North Main Rd. 26 East Shore Rd. 3 Rte 1A GOULD 7 ISLAND 2 1 Rte 138 8 JAMESTOWN Rte BRIDGE NORTH 138 Snuff Mill Rd. 23 KINGSTOWN 22 25 9 Gilbert 10 Stuart 21 Rd. NEWPORT BRIDGE DUTCH Rte 1 ISLAND 24 20 11 18 ROSE South Ferry Rd. ISLAND Rte 138 19 14 17 16 12 Beavertail Rd. 13 SOUTH Middlebridge Rd. Rte 1A KINGSTOWN NARRAGANSETT 15 BEAVERTAIL Rte 1 0123 MILES JAMESTOWN & NORTH KINGSTOWN 32 Marsh Meadows

42 Jamestown & North Kingstown Key to Primary Uses Public Park 9. Conanicut Island 4. Buccaneer Way Jamestown S Sanctuary When traveling north on Seaside Path to Shore 1. Spirketing Street Owned by the Conanicut Island Land Drive, be on the lookout for this 15- h Boating This right-of-way, at the end of Trust and located north of the foot-wide, grassy path to the water Spirketing Street, consists of a path Jamestown Police Station on located between Dory Street and Beach with running alongside a neighboring Canonicus Avenue, this site offers Champlin Way. Scuba diving is popu- Lifeguards driveway and a set of concrete steps well-maintained wooded trails out to lar at this site. leading down to a cobble beach. This the east side of Marsh Meadows, • CRMC ROW#: G-9 Wildlife Refuge S is a great place to watch the sun set with scenic views of the marsh and with great views of West Passage. the hills beyond. While there is no Scenic View 5. Capstan Street • CRMC ROW#: G-2 parking on site, parking is available This right-of-way at the end of Cap- Fishing with permission at the police station ß stan Street offers a grassy path down across the street. 2. Garboard Street Historic to a cobble shoreline. This grassy, 10-foot-wide right-of- • CRMC ROW#: G-12 10. Potter Cove/Taylor Hiking way at Pole 32 provides a short walk F Point west from the end of Garboard Street 6. Broad Street Two different parking areas located and Seaside Drive. A path through At the end of Broad Street off East just north of the Newport Bridge, off some shrubs allows for access to a Shore Road, on the northeast end of Bayview Drive, provide a very scenic cobble beach overlooking the Conanicut Island, is a right-of-way to view of the East Passage. A long, nar- Jamestown Bridge. a quiet, rocky beach with a spectacu- row beach hugging Potter Cove can • CRMC ROW#: G-11 lar view of upper Narragansett Bay be reached by stairs descending from and the entrance to Mount Hope Bay. one parking lot. Popular activities in- 3. Seaside Beach In the early 1900s, this was the loca- clude scuba diving, windsurfing, This town property on the west end tion of a steamboat landing for travel kayaking, fishing, clamming, and pic- of Seaside Drive is a multi-use site, between Providence, Jamestown, nicking on the shale rock outcrops including a grassy picnic area, sandy and Newport. surrounding the cove and reached beach, rock jetty for fishing, and a • CRMC ROW#: G-1 from the easternmost parking lot. sandy boat ramp. The boat ramp is a • Fishing, trash receptacles • Trash receptacles great place to hand-launch craft. On- site parking is available for about 15 7. Carr Lane Conanicut Island Sanctuary 11. East Ferry h cars. Where Carr Lane joins East Shore In the heart of downtown Jamestown • Picnic tables/benches, swimming, Road is a public right-of-way that may is the site of the old landing for the toilets, trash receptacles be difficult to spot because there is Newport-Jamestown ferry, with a no sign. A grassy path from East public fishing pier, a beach, a touch- Shore Road leads about 20 yards and-go dock, and a boat ramp. The through a clearing to a cobble beach, ramp is adequate, but there are “No which offers a spectacular view of Trailer Parking” signs posted. This the Newport Bridge to the south and area is close to stores, restaurants, the Mount Hope Bridge to the north. and the commercial district of This site is a suitable picnicking area Jamestown. The town’s harbor for cyclists or hikers. bustles with summer boating enthu- • CRMC ROW#: G-10 siasts. There is a grassy commons • Fishing Gilbert Stuart Birthplace with access along the waterfront for Buccaneer Way walking, jogging, or just sitting on the 8. Decatur Avenue benches and observing the ships passing through the East Passage to A grassy, 20-foot-wide path extends the ports of Providence and Fall River. east from the Decatur Avenue road Public parking is available, but fills up end to a cobble beach overlooking quickly in the summer. the Newport Bridge. Spirketing Street • Trash receptacles • CRMC ROW#: G-13 • Fishing Seaside Beach & Boat Ramp 33

43 12. RIDEM Fish and fee in the summer, and advance res- sible through low brush or by stone ß Wildlife Marine ervations are recommended for stairs in numerous locations. Look out Fisheries Center camping and recreational vehicles. for breaking waves and slippery • Dock, picnic tables/benches, rocks close to the water. Fishing is This scenic site, adjacent to Fort hiking/walking, wildlife observation, good. Educational signs describe Wetherill State Park, offers a path, toilets, trash receptacles coastal habitats and ships that fre- located in front of the visitor parking quent the East Passage. The park is area, out to bluffs overlooking cobble popular throughout the year as a beaches. There is a pretty view of 18. Fox Hill Salt Marsh East Ferry S place to observe the sea both in calm Aquidneck Island and lots of boat At the entrance to Fort Getty Park is and stormy weather from the road traffic. On the other side of the fish- an ASRI wildlife refuge of low-lying that loops through the park. Ample eries center is an accessible dock marshland. There is a good view of on-site parking is available. The light- area that provides fishing access. the entire refuge from atop the hills house museum is open from June to Parking is available. and ruins of Fort Getty across the September, Wednesday through Sun- • Handicap access street. Parking is available at Fort day, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Getty (seasonal fee). Entry gained • Handicap access, picnicking, with permission of ASRI. The Kit 13. Fort Wetherill State hiking/walking, wildlife observation, Wright Nature Trail on the west side Park toilets, trash receptacles of the marsh provides access to the This park is located on Fort Wetherill water. Road, off Walcott Avenue. In addition RIDEM Marine Fisheries Center 16. Conanicut Battery on to the ruins of Fort Wetherill, much of Prospect Hill 19. Sheffield Cove Marsh this state facility consists of a grassy S This site, located off Beavertail Road lawn with picnic tables and benches While parked at Mackerel Cove on Battery Lane, was the location of fringed by rock bluffs overlooking Beach, take a walk across the street an earthen gun battery during the sheltered coves and cobble beaches. and along one of several paths th Revolutionary War. In the 20 century, Several one-way roads wind about through the marsh grass for a beau- underground observation posts were the park and lead to small parking lots tiful view of both coves. Although the added to help direct coastal batter- with panoramic views of Nar- head of the cove is cobble, it is bor- ies elsewhere in the West Passage ragansett Bay. Many footpaths lead dered by low marsh grass and may of Narragansett Bay during World to rocky outcrops that provide spec- have many beautiful birds. Owned by Wars I and II. Well-kept trails provide tacular views from 50-foot-high bluffs. Beavertail State Park ASRI, it is a place for birding, wildlife an easy walk around the site and out The park has an access point for photography, and painting. No on-site to beautiful views of the West Pas- scuba divers eager to view the out- parking is available. sage, with interpretive signs provid- crops from below sea level. This site • Fishing ing a self-guided tour. Parking is also has a steep boat ramp in poor available. condition. Plenty of on-site parking is 20. West Ferry • Picnicking, wildlife observation available. At the end of Narragansett Avenue • Handicap access, fishing, toilets and adjacent to the Dutch Harbor 17. Fort Getty boatyard, there is a long paved pier Located on Fort Getty Road off 14. Mackerel Cove Beach extending into Dutch Harbor. The Taylor Point Beavertail Road, this recreation facil- Situated at the head of a long cove, southern side of the pier is accessible ity is the site of a World War I and there is a sandy cobble beach, while to the public by permit. The town pro- World War II fortification to guard the the remainder of the cove has a rocky vides well-maintained pilings, entrance to Narragansett Bay. It is shore. This well-protected, shallow outhaul stringers, and transient moor- popular in the summer for camping, cove is ideal for family swimming. ings. There is no on-site boat ramp boating, fishing, and swimming. A Boats and windsurfers are allowed or dock. Sweeping views of Dutch total of 115 campsites are available— only after 5 p.m. and during the off- Harbor, Fort Getty, Dutch Island, and 15 for tents, 100 for trailers. season. On-site pay parking is avail- the Jamestown Bridge to the north Windsurfers and small sailboats fre- able. abound. No parking is available. quent this area. The town maintains • Picnicking, concessions, toilets, • Trash receptacles Fort Wetherill State Park st an outhaul for tying up fishing boats trash receptacles and a boat ramp that is in good con- dition. There is a fee to use the ramp 15. Beavertail State Park during the camping season. The out- At the end of Beavertail Road, at the door pavilion and grills are available southern tip of Conanicut Island, is the for group picnics with a permit. The site of Rhode Island’s first lighthouse. rocky shore is inviting to the explorer It offers a spectacular vista of the and rock walker. Ample on-site park- Atlantic coastline. This peninsula park ing is available. There is an entrance is bordered by a rocky shore acces- Broad Street 34

44 21. Marsh Meadows North Kingstown S Wildlife Preserve Surrounding the east end of Great h 24. Walmsley Lane Creek Marsh is a wetland wildlife Located at the end of Walmsley Lane conservation area, rich in wading off Tower Hill Road/Route 1, this birds and ducks, with an osprey nest- mostly wooded 5-acre parcel pro- ing pole. The marsh can be seen from vides limited access to the Narrow North Main Road as it crosses over River as well as access to the adja- the marsh. ASRI owns the northern cent URI boat house. Access to this Fox Hill Salt Marsh section of the marsh. No parking is area is off a primitive dirt road with available. limited on-road parking. The primary use of this area is for the launching 22. Watson Farm of kayaks, canoes, and other small, Conanicut Battery non-motorized watercraft. It also pro- Watson Farm, on North Main Road, vides a unique opportunity to enjoy is an 18th-century working farm, with the scenic beauty of the Narrow River cattle, sheep, horses, and a large and its abundant wildlife. vegetable garden. Run by the Soci- ety for the Preservation of New En- gland Antiquities, the 280-acre farm 25. Gilbert Stuart ß Birthplace offers self-guided hiking trails through pastures, hayfields, and Located at the head of the tidal Nar- woodlands out to the western shore row River on Gilbert Stuart Road, off of the island; group tours; and spe- th - Route 1A, this site is an operating 18 cial events. Open Tuesday, Thursday, century snuff mill, the first in America Pathway at Beavertail State Park and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., from with a waterwheel. In early spring, June 1 through October 15. There is herring swim up the Narrow River a small entrance fee. Parking is avail- from the sea past the mill and into able. Carr Pond to spawn. Limited on-site parking is available. Open seasonally. 23. Hull Street Fee. • Picnic tables/benches, wildlife This hard-to-spot right-of-way, situ- observation, trash receptacles ated at Pole 11 in a residential neigh- borhood, is located off Beach Avenue and is the first street south of the 26. Chafee Nature S Preserve Jamestown Bridge. Look for an open grassy area. There is a very steep Located off Boston Neck Road, the decline to a cobble beach that pro- Chafee Nature Preserve, commonly vides a spectacular view of the West referred to as Rome Point, consists Fort Getty Passage and the Jamestown Bridge. of 230 acres of state-owned land tra- • CRMC ROW#: G-7 versed by a series of trails leading to • Fishing Narragansett Bay. The town of North Kingstown holds a conservation easement over the land. The preserve is often host to harbor seals, who haul out on rocks in the water during win- ter months. There are also several ar- chaeological and historic resources throughout the site. There is a fee for special group tours of the site (con- tact RIDEM). Parking is available. West Ferry • Fishing Sheffield Cove Marsh Potter Cove/Taylor Point 35

45 27. Bissel Cove place to park and watch the activity S of Wickford Harbor. There are also Located at the end of Worsley recreational fishing opportunities. Avenue, this site allows users the op- There is no public launching facility portunity to access Bissel Cove and here. Narragansett Bay by foot, bicycle, or • Handicap access, picnic tables/ boat. Navigation is difficult here benches, toilets, trash receptacles because of the rocks close to shore. Otherwise, this is a quiet area offer- 30. Wickford Municipal h ing a great location for canoeing, Dock kayaking, and birding. Shellfishing on Bissel Cove shore is prohibited. No parking is This site is located off Brown Street available. along the shoreline adjacent to the • Fishing, hiking/walking municipal parking lot. The town main- tains 160 feet of transient docking facilities. A ramp leads from the wa- 28. North Kingstown Town Beach terfront park to the docks. A water- front walkway parallels the shoreline Located at the end of Beach Street, and offers a great opportunity to en- this is a pleasant place to picnic, to joy the panorama of an active harbor. walk on the beach, or to swim in the • Picnicking roped-off area in the Bay. The sandy beach is long and narrow and backed 31. Pleasant Street by a 3-foot-high bulkhead. Just be- hind the beach is a large grassy area This site is located at the end of North Kingstown Town Beach shaded by tall trees, with picnic Pleasant Street, off Main Street. The tables, grills, and playground equip- right-of-way is situated between two ment. Across the street are the North privately owned establishments, Kingstown Senior Center, the Cold Wickford Yacht Club and Pleasant Spring Community Center, and the Street Wharf. It is possible to launch Wickford Art Association. During the small boats from this site. Limited summer, daytime parking is restricted parking is available. to town residents. • Handicap access, concessions, 32. Wilson Park fishing, toilets, trash receptacles This town-owned park on West Main Street in Wickford contains a boat 29. Wickford Municipal ramp, sports fields, basketball and Wharf tennis courts, a playground, and a At the end of historic Main Street short recreational path that winds from Brown and West Main streets, around Mill Cove. Parking for Wickford Municipal Wharf this municipal wharf is situated trailered vehicles is available at the among other commercial piers and boat ramp at the end of Intrepid Drive. hosts both commercial fishing and • Dock, picnic tables/benches, wild- recreational boats. It is a pleasant life observation, trash receptacles Intrepid Drive Boat Ramp Wickford Harbor 36

46 North Kingstown continued East Greenwich Incorporated in 1677 along the western shore of Narragansett Bay, East Greenwich, originally Green Town, was named after Greenwich County of Kent, England. The Old Kent County Court- house, built in 1805, served as a seat of Rhode Island state government until 1854. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, it is one of the five original state houses in Rhode Island and is recognized as one of the few surviving Federal/Georgian buildings of its size in the state. In the early 1990s it stood vacant and deteriorating, facing indefinite closure. Restoration began in 1993, and the courthouse was finally reopened as East Greenwich Town Hall in 1995. Warwick Prior to the colonial settlement of Warwick, the land was occupied by the Cowesett, Shawomet, and Pawtuxet tribes, all members of the larger Narragansett Indian tribe. The Narragansetts traveled seasonally in the area, taking advantage of the rich natural resources of the Bay in the summer and upland resources in the winter. Samuel Gorton purchased Warwick from the Narragansetts, and the land was cleared for farms. Warwick is a particularly rich area for studying the prehistoric people of southern New England. In the 1950s, several sites near Apponaug Cove in Warwick were excavated. Evidence of the people who settled there dates back 2,100 years. Prehistoric quahog shells and deer bones serve as evidence for the Narragansetts’ hunting and gathering lifestyle. 37

47 Warwick continues on page 48. Alt Rte 117 Rte 117 27 Rte 1 95 26 WARWICK Rte 113 25 24 Rte 117 21 23 17 15 14 13 12 16 18 20 11 19 GREENWICH BAY Rte 1 22 10 2 9 Division St. 1 Ives Rd. 8 7 6 5 4 3 F o r g e EAST R d . GREENWICH . set Rd s e n d i u Q d. R ALLEN r e HARBOR ch t 34 Rte 1 e l F Newcomb Rd. NORTH KINGSTOWN Roger Willams Way QUONSET POINT 33 0123 MILES NORTH KINGSTOWN, EAST GREENWICH & WARWICK East Greenwich Overlook 38

48 North Kingstown, Warwick & East Greenwich Key to Primary Uses Warwick North Kingstown ties. There is a public boat launch Public Park ramp (high tide only) and a fishing 33. Compass Rose Beach 1. Potowomut Neck area with plenty of parking for h Path to Shore trailered vehicles at the west end of Located off Roger Williams Way in Several rights-of-way run from Ives the park, a public golf course, an the Quonset-Davisville Port and Com- Boating Road to Greenwich Bay. Located in a h equestrian park and trails, ball fields, merce Park, this area consists of an very quiet residential neighborhood, a popular swimming beach, rest- 800-linear-foot sandy beach owned Beach with these sites are generally footpaths rooms, and many picnic areas. There by the R.I. Department of Transpor- Lifeguards situated between private homes, of- is also a concrete walk, extending the tation, leased by the R.I. Airport Cor- fering no parking. Sandy Point Beach length of the beach, that is handicap poration, and managed by the R.I. Scenic View is located at the end of Ives Road, accessible and includes benches and Economic Development Corporation. where there are approximately 12 small gazebos providing shade from While only beach launches are al- parking spaces. Another alternative the sun. Special events, such as sum- lowed, the site is frequently utilized for the runner, bicyclist, or walker mer concert series, are offered at the to launch small watercraft. In the would be to park in Goddard State park’s performing arts center. Ample summer, Compass Rose Beach is Park (about three miles away) before on-site parking is available. host to several races and other ma- going to the area. Potowomut Neck • Wildlife observation, dock, trash rine-related recreational activities. offers many scenic vistas of Green- receptacles Parking is available. wich and Narragansett bays and the • Swimming, fishing, hiking/walking head of the Potowomut River. The rights-of-way located in this area are: East Greenwich Bradford Avenue, Elkins Avenue, 34. Allen Harbor h Rocky Hollow Road Access ts Charlotte Drive and Sidney Avenue 3. Rocky Hollow Road Complex intersection, Charlotte Drive and Rob- Access at Crompton Within the Quonset Point Industrial ert Avenue boat ramp, Charlotte Drive Avenue Park, Allen Harbor is a well-protected and Collins Avenue intersection, Off Crompton Avenue, south of the harbor and an ideal site for boaters. Charlotte Drive and Hopkins Avenue Harbor Heights condominiums and Many public amenities are offered at intersection, Beachwood Drive, Ives next to a marina, is a public right-of- the town marina, including plenty of Road end, and Beachwood Drive and way to Greenwich Cove. parking, bathrooms, and picnic Baycliff Drive intersection. • CRMC ROW#: H-2 benches. There is a concrete boat ramp available for a small entry fee. 2. Goddard State Park Parking is available. 4. Bridge Street Access at • Dock, trash receptacles Crompton Avenue Located on Ives Road, off Forge Road, this year-round facility is a wonder- A wide, grassy strip just north of the ful park to escape to in the summer Harbor Heights condominiums on for swimming, in the fall for hiking/ Crompton Avenue, this public right- walking the trails, horseback riding, of-way offers pedestrians access to and observing the changing leaves, Greenwich Cove. There is no parking and in the winter for cross-country available. Bridge Street Access skiing. Situated on Greenwich Bay, • CRMC ROW#: H-5 the facility offers a number of activi- h 5. East Greenwich Town ts Allen Harbor Complex Overlook and Boat Ramp Situated off Water Street, next to the municipal transfer station, the mu- nicipal overlook and boat ramp offer both visual access and boating ac- Long Street Access cess to Greenwich Bay. Parking is available at the overlook, where you East Greenwich Town Overlook ts can reach the water’s edge by a flight of stairs or at the boat ramp. • Handicap access, dock, picnic tables/benches, fishing, trash receptacles Division Street Access 39

49 6. Barbara M. Tufts Warwick 14. Apponaug Cove h Playground This is a well-protected cove located Off Water Street, just north of the 10. Chepiwanoxet Island east of Post Road and east of the rail- municipal overlook, this town-owned road track, in the northwestern part Though called Chepiwanoxet Island, play area offers fun for the kids and a of Greenwich Bay. One of the town this site is actually a peninsula spectacular view of Greenwich Cove boat ramps is located here. The cove located on the western shore of and Goddard Park. Cement steps lead is busy with recreational and com- Greenwich Bay, halfway between Barbara M. Tufts Playground down to Greenwich Cove. Public mercial boats, fishing boats, and sail- Greenwich Cove and Apponaug parking is available. boats. The waterfront has private and Cove. Access to this 10-acre parcel, • CRMC ROW#: H-1 public docking facilities. Public docks purchased by the city with help from • Picnic tables/benches, trash and parking are located along the the Champlin Foundation and The Na- receptacles western side of the cove. ture Conservancy, is via Alger Road. • Picnicking, wildlife observation, The site is unimproved and offers trash receptacles 7. Long Street Access at sweeping views of Greenwich Bay Water Street proper. Parking is available. • Wildlife observation 15. Nausauket Road This right-of-way is located on Water Street among several marinas. This public access site, located at the No on-site parking is available, but 11. Masthead Drive southerly end of Nausauket Road, parking is available on Queen Street. Nausauket Road provides views from the northwest ts One block east of Post Road, this in- • CRMC ROW#: H-3 corner of Greenwich Bay. Parking is teresting area has a shipyard, mari- • Trash receptacles prohibited. nas, restaurants, marine retail shops, • CRMC ROW#: J-24 and a scenic waterfront walk along 8. King Street Access at Greenwich Bay. There is a small Water Street gravel path in front of one of the res- 16. Sylvia Drive taurants overlooking the marina, with A public right-of-way located off This right-of-way is a 200-foot grassy a large picnic table available for pic- Water Street, just south of Division path down a gradual slope to a sandy nickers who want to observe the ac- Street, King Street ends at Greenwich beach on Greenwich Bay. It is a great tivities of the marina and shipyard. On Cove. A seafood restaurant is located place to take a walk on the beach. the south side of the marina, a rock here. No parking is available. • CRMC ROW#: J-9 jetty offers some protection from the • CRMC ROW#: H-4 • Swimming waves and a good spot for rod-and- • Historic interest reel fishing. Plenty of parking is avail- 17. Warwick City Park able. 9. Division Street Access Located on Long Street, off West • CRMC ROW#: J-37 at Water Street Shore Road (Route 117) about one- • Handicap access, dock, toilets, This site is located next to the East half mile east of Apponaug, this large trash receptacles Greenwich Yacht Club on Water city facility has much to offer, from Street. A five-minute walk from Main basketball, tennis, and ball playing to 12. Arnold’s Neck Park Arnold’s Neck Park ts Street, this area is ideal for watching secluded nature walks, a beach, and This site is a nice area for picnics and harbor activities. Goddard Park is lo- playgrounds. This is an excellent for observing the hawks, geese, and cated across the cove. Seafood res- facility for the handicapped and those ducks in the fringing marsh across taurants are a short walk away. with bikes or strollers because there the cove. Parking is available for ap- • CRMC ROW#: H-6 are benches and a boardwalk ex- proximately 60 cars and trailers. • Picnic tables/benches, trash recep- tending the length of the beach along There are picnic tables, a municipal tacles Brush Neck Cove. The wetland areas dock, and a restaurant nearby. at the ends of the beach are ideally • Handicap access, trash receptacles suited for observing shore birds and other coastal wildlife. There are also 13. Ray’s Bait many miles of trails for hiking/walk- h ing, running, or bicycling. There is a Ray’s Bait & Tackle owns this boat nominal entrance fee to the water- ramp on Arnold’s Neck Drive, located front in the summer. Parking is avail- off Route 1 and next to the bait shop. able. Parking is available. Fee. • Swimming, fishing, historic interest, • Dock, trash receptacles toilets, trash receptacles Sylvia Drive 40

50 21. Wharf Marina 18. Seaview Beach 25. Bayside Beach h Wharf Marina is located on Wharf Located at the end of Pender Avenue, This site is located at the west end of Suburban Parkway, off Oakland Road in Warwick Cove and offers a between Conimicut Point and Long- boat ramp in excellent condition. meadow Beach, Bayside Beach is Beach Avenue, across Brush Neck situated in a quiet residential area. Cove from City Park and adjacent to Parking is available. Fee. the tidal channel. Although this site This site is best suited for beach • Dock, toilets, trash receptacles walking along the cobbles and rocky is not well maintained, it is a popular local spot for soft-shell clam digging. shore and observing the Warwick 22. Narragansett Bay Swimming is not advised because Lighthouse in the distance. Avenue • Trash receptacles there are no lifeguards on duty and The road/right-of-way on the western there are strong currents in this area. end of Narragansett Bay Avenue runs On-site parking is available behind approximately 500 feet from the cor- the beach. ner of Crawford Avenue to the shore • Fishing, trash receptacles of Greenwich Bay. Parking is prohib- ited. 19. Oakland Beach • CRMC ROW#: J-28 At the southern end of Oakland Beach Avenue, off Route 117 East, is 23. Ogden Avenue h a wide, sandy municipal beach on Extension Greenwich Bay. The beach extends Located in a quiet residential neigh- about 900 feet along the shore and borhood between two private homes, provides a shallow swimming area at the intersection of Ogden Avenue with lifeguards on duty in the summer. and Burnett Drive, this site has a The shoreline is engineered, as evi- steep boat ramp best suited for denced by the rock groins, and de- launching smaller boats at high tide. signed to contain sand and prevent There are “No Parking” signs posted Goddard State Park erosion. These structures provide the on-site. visitor with an added opportunity to • CRMC ROW#: J-38 walk along the rocks, to look for in- • Fishing tertidal creatures, or to cast a line for fish. There are also a grassy com- 24. Longmeadow Fishing mons area, a ball field, nearby con- Area cessions, and toilets available in the At the end of Samuel Gorton Avenue, summer. Two concrete boat ramps this long, rocky beach is a good area and a handicapped-accessible dock for walking. There is a boat ramp in are available. There is a nominal poor condition. Limited parking is parking fee during the summer. available. • Picnic tables/benches, trash • Trash receptacles receptacles 20. One Bay Avenue h Restaurant One Bay Avenue Restaurant offers a Warwick City Park boat ramp and dock and is located on Suburban Parkway. Parking is avail- able. Fee. • Trash receptacles Oakland Beach Longmeadow Fishing Area 41

51 26. Conimicut Point 27. Shawomet Boat point provides limited parking close h Ramp Recreation Area to the beach and there is also an un- marked ramp for handicap access to This multipurpose recreation area At the end of Shawomet Avenue, off the paved walk around the rotary, the Stokes Street and adjacent to has boat access (Shawomet Boat beach, and the grassy picnic area. Conimicut Point Recreation Area on Ramp), fishing spots, picnic areas, Restrooms and ample additional several rights-of-way, and wonderful upper Narragansett Bay, this sandy parking are about 200 yards from boat ramp is suitable for hand-carried views of Narragansett Bay. The city here. The park is closed between boats or for trailered boats with four- park is located at the tip of Point Av- sunset and sunrise. Shellfishing north enue and is well identified with direc- wheel-drive vehicles. There is park- of the park on the point is prohibited ing available for approximately 15 tional signs. The point extends as a due to pollution. sandy spit jutting out into Narra- trailered vehicles. • Picnic tables/benches, swimming, • Fishing gansett Bay towards Conimicut Light- trash receptacles house. On the north side of the point are the Shawomet Avenue rights-of- way and the Bellman Avenue right- of-way. On the south side of the point, a bit more isolated and protected from boat wakes, is a sandy beach ideal for sunbathing. The rotary at the Warwick City Park 42

52 Warwick continued Cranston In 1638, Roger Williams purchased what is now the eastern part of Cranston from the Narragansett Indians. The town was named for Samuel Cranston, governor from 1698 until 1727. Cranston was incorporated as a town in 1754. Its early industry was mainly textiles. As the Industrial Revolution took hold, immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Canada, Germany, Sweden, Greece, and Armenia arrived to work in the mills. For nearly 100 years, Cranston also served as home to Rhode Island’s famous Narragansett Brewery. In 1888, six local businessmen organized the Narragansett Brewing Company with a brewmaster from Berlin, Germany. The company constructed a brick brewing house and produced its first beer in December 1890. The Narragansett Brewing Company was situated on New Depot Avenue, Cranston Street, and Garfield Avenue. The brewery closed for good in 1983 due to high production costs. Providence The worst hurricane to hit New England in recorded history struck on September 21, 1938. People in Providence found themselves in the midst of a devastating storm virtually without warning. The so-called “Florida cyclone” killed some 600 people in New England and did at least $306 million in damage in 1938 dollars (about $3.5 billion today). The storm’s intensity, direction, and timing combined to flood Providence with a 20-foot storm surge. The flood and the fear of similar future events prompted calls for restricting the ocean’s ability to flow into the Providence River. Another severe hurricane struck in 1954, and construction on the Fox Point Hurri- cane Barrier began in 1960 and was completed in 1966. Located 750 feet upstream from Fox Point in Provi- dence, where the Providence River flows into the Narragansett Bay, the Fox Point Hurricane Barrier serves two central functions. First, it serves to retard high tides from potential storm surges in Narragansett Bay, and second, it maintains river flow so that water levels do not get too high behind the barrier. The barrier can be seen from Corliss Landing (see page 49). Pawtucket During the late 18th century, Rhode Island pioneered the Industrial Revolution thanks in large part to Samuel Slater, who introduced textile-manufacturing technology to the United States. In 1790, Slater estab- lished his first mill—one of the first factories in the United States—on the Blackstone River. Three years later, in Pawtucket, he built Slater Mill, the first American factory to successfully produce cotton yarn with water- powered machines. Other mills were soon established throughout Rhode Island and New England. By the first half of the 19th century, there were more than 100 mills in Rhode Island that employed thousands of men, women, and children. Today, visitors can tour Slater Mill and meet costumed interpreters who explain and demonstrate what life was like as America began moving from the farm to the factory (see page 50). East Providence East Providence was first settled by Roger Williams and his followers in 1636, after he had been banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. When, only months after arriving there, Williams was informed that the area was actually in Massachusetts, he was forced to move again to the area now occupied by the city of Providence. East Providence continued to be part of Massachusetts for over 200 years until 1861 when the U.S. Supreme Court ordered that its boundary line be relocated to fall within the borders of Rhode Island. 43

53 Designing Providence’s Riverfront Revival Twenty years ago, the once-meandering rivers of downtown Providence had become, essentially, a set of pipes. Over them squatted “the widest bridge in the world,” a deck of roadways featuring the rotary known as Suicide Circle. The lower undoubtedly unaware that the Woonasquatucket and Moshassuck rivers—along with their watercourses were all but lost just two confluence, the upper Providence River—were almost completely decades ago. hidden beneath a sea of asphalt. In 1990, Warner’s firm turned its In early 1982, William D. Warner, a planner and architect, proposed attention to the state’s next major a study that would look at reconnecting Providence with its lost transportation undertaking: rebuilding waterfronts. The timing was fortunate, as the R.I. Department of Interstate 195. Warner again teamed Transportation was just beginning a project to relocate the railroad up with the Providence Foundation downtown. “So you can see we were under the gun,” said Warner and the National Endowment for the during an interview at his office, a renovated mill in Exeter, R.I. Arts and developed the Old Harbor “They’re already building this thing, and we’re getting funding to Plan, which proposed moving the commence a study.” highway seaward of the Fox Point In 1983, Warner’s firm, William D. Warner Architects & Planners, Hurricane Barrier. embarked on the project with funding from the National Endowment State transportation planners for the Arts, the Providence Foundation, and the R.I. Department of approved the proposal, and construc- Transportation. From the outset, the study included public participa- tion has begun on the project, which tion workshops. “That was key,” said Warner, “because the people will uncover 45 acres of waterfront didn’t even know where their rivers were. I said, ‘Look, folks, it doesn’t land in downtown Providence for use have to be this way.’” as parks, streets, and for private “We began to develop a groundswell of interest to uncover the development. The project includes the rivers,” he continued, “to make them accessible. At the same time, we extension of the Riverwalk to Fox solved the traffic problem, which made it a real project because the Point, improving the pedestrian funding came from the Federal Highway Administration to build it.” connection between downtown and The state’s transportation planners recognized the value of the India Point Park. Warner’s vision will, proposal and, by late 1984, approved a $60-million project to unearth once again, reunite a part of Provi- the rivers and extend Memorial Drive, improving traffic flow through dence with a vital element of the city’s the downtown. Construction was completed 12 years later, in 1996. heritage—Narragansett Bay. Warner designed 12 low, graceful, arched bridges to span Providence’s reborn rivers and designed Waterplace Park and Narragansett —By Tom Ardito, Editor, Riverwalk. Now one can rent a kayak, ride a Venetian gondola, dine Outreach and Policy Bay Journal, and overlooking the river, or simply stroll along the water’s edge. Since Coordinator, Narragansett Bay Estuary completion of the project, more than a million people have attended Program Barnaby Evans’ WaterFire, an occasional installation of flaming torches and surreal music on the rivers. Many of these visitors were This article first appeared in the Narragansett Bay Journal, available on-line at www.nbep.org/journal/. Providence Riverwalk 44

54 A Century of Change: Providence Harbor Shorelines Over the course of the 20th century, about 350 acres of coastal waters along the edges of the Providence River were filled for shipping, roadways, and industry. The map on the left shows that, by 1894, the shoreline of downtown Providence had largely been filled, but the banks of the lower Providence River were still largely natural, except for the construction of rail lines. Salt marshes and tidal creeks occupied the edges of Watchemoket Cove in East Providence and the now- forgotten Corliss Cove in south Providence. The 1987 map on the right shows that, in less than 100 years, these natural shorelines were completely buried beneath shipyards, oil tanks, the state’s largest wastewater treatment plant, and a strip joint or two. The same kinds of changes, on a lesser scale, have transformed shorelines all around Narragansett Bay. From Quonset Point to Fall River, salt marshes, coastal ponds, and shallow waters have been filled to build wharves, naval bases, and highways, to dispose of mud from channel dredging, and to protect houses and roads from storms. The pace of change slowed greatly after 1972, when the Clean Water Act gave federal and state governments the ability to protect wetlands and water by limiting dredge-and-fill operations. In the 21st century, some of Narragansett Bay’s shorelines may begin moving in the opposite direction, migrating landward as sea level rises. More likely, this trend will lead to increased demand for engineering measures—like seawalls and shoreline fill—to protect coastal property from the rising sea. Narragansett Bay Journal, and —By Tom Ardito, Editor, Outreach and Policy Coordinator, Narragansett Bay Estuary Program This article first appeared in the Narragansett Bay Journal, available on-line at www.nbep.org/journal/. 1894 1987 45

55 Bringing Back the Blackstone The time was ripe for Billington’s message. Slowly— “Back then,” laughs Bob Billington, recalling the more by dint, one suspects, of his persistent enthusi- early days of the Blackstone Valley Tourism Council, asm than anything else—it began to take hold. In 1986, “you couldn’t say ‘Blackstone Valley’ and ‘tourism’ in Sen. John Chafee spurred the creation of the the same sentence without getting a big guffaw.” Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor, a Nobody’s laughing now. Since its formation in the “special type of national park...to preserve and early 1980s, Billington has built the tourism council from interpret...the unique and significant value of the a shoestring organization into an internationally Blackstone Valley,” according to the National Parks recognized leader in “urban ecotourism.” Perhaps more Service, which administers it. The bill provided funding important from Billington’s perspective is the change through the heritage corridor to improve the natural that the council has brought about: an entirely new and cultural resources of the Blackstone: in 2002, appreciation for the Blackstone River among the roughly $1 million in grants. The heritage corridor and communities that line its banks in northern Rhode Island the tourism council were natural partners, and and southeastern Massachusetts. Early on, it took some Billington was appointed to serve on the commission doing. established to guide the work of the corridor. “I spoke with every Rotary, Lions, and Kiwanis Club, In 1989, Billington hatched another implausible every mayor and city council in the Blackstone Valley,” scheme—to get people out in boats on the Blackstone he remembers, in an effort to convince them that the River. He contacted Luther Blount, a prominent Blackstone River could be an asset to their hard- shipbuilder in Warren. As it turned out, Blount’s scrabble mill towns. grandparents had met while working at Slater Mill in Their initial skepticism was understandable. Just 30 Pawtucket. Billington met Blount on the banks of the or 40 years ago, the Blackstone, sometimes called “the Blackstone to share his vision of tourboats on the river hardest working river in America,” was nearly dead, a and seek his advice. fetid conduit for waste and a source of hydropower, “Luther said, ‘I think you can do it,’” Billington with little biological value. But passage of the federal recalls. “He said, ‘I’ve got a couple of boats, I use them Clean Water Act in 1972 regulated discharges from on the Carribean in the winter, they don’t do anything in factories and city sewers; by the 1980s, the Blackstone, the summer—why don’t you lease them from me?’ while still a far cry from an alpine stream, was improv- They were glass-bottom boats. We used to say it was ing. the shopping-cart-and-rusty-oil-drum tour!” By any name, the venture was “an overwhelming success,” says Billington. “People actually wanted to get out on the river.” The tourism council’s weekend tours sold out at $7.50 a head. Even today, Billington seems astonished at the public enthusiasm for those first river tours. “My view of the Blackstone growing up was just foam and suds—it was just awful,” he recalls. “Now you hear people say, ‘I’ve lived to see the Blackstone come back.’” Narragansett Bay Journal, —By Tom Ardito, Editor, and Outreach and Policy Coordinator, Narragansett Bay Estuary Program This article originally appeared in the Narragansett Bay Journal, available online at www.nbep.org/journal/. Slater Mill 46

56 In 1993, the Blackstone Valley Tourism Council launched the 33-foot Blount-built Blackstone Valley a 49-passenger aluminum-hulled vessel Explorer, powered by twin 25-horsepower outboards. “We nicknamed it ‘The Convincer’ because it’s the boat we used to convince people that the Blackstone was worth saving,” says Billington. “Many of them were public officials. They’d get out on the river and their blood pressure would go down. Senators would go back to Washington and say, ‘I’ve been on the river.’” To date, 175,000 passengers have gained a new perspective of Explorer . the Blackstone from the deck of the Explorer over dams, allowing it to A crane lifts the work different areas of the river. The council’s ecologist, Tammy Gilpatrick, leads on-board nature tours for school , engaging the kids in hands-on water-quality groups testing and teaching them about pollution issues as well as the natural history of the river. The Explorer also takes children and adults on river history tours, with trained guides to help passengers understand 300 years of changes along the Blackstone. In 2000, an English canal boat, the was Samuel Slater, Slater is a kind of floating B&B added to the fleet. The that offers overnight trips in the Lonsdale area in Lincoln, perhaps the prettiest and most natural reach of the lower Blackstone. “People come from all over the country to sleep on the Blackstone River,” says Billington, still Spirit of the slightly amazed. A 20-foot pontoon boat, the also runs tours of the Blackstone Blackstone Valley, Gorge on the Rhode Island-Massachusetts border. For information on the Blackstone Valley Tourism Council’s riverboat tours, call (401) 724-2200 (www.tourblackstone.com). 47

57 14 PAWTUCKET 95 13 15 12 16 Seekonk River Rte 114 11 PROVIDENCE 10 7 9 Rte 44 8 MASSACHUSETTS 17 18 195 6 19 Providence River EAST PROVIDENCE Alt Rte 1 Rte 114 95 Rte 103 5 CRANSTON 20 4 Barrington River 3 21 1 22 2 23 24 Rte 117 25 30 26 Rte 136 Rte 1 29 Washington Rd. Narragansett Pkwy. BARRINGTON WARREN WARWICK Brickyard Airport Rd. Pond Alt Rte 117 Rte 117 Rte 103 95 T.F. GREEN Nayatt Rd. AIRPORT 0123 MILES WARWICK, CRANSTON, PROVIDENCE, PAWTUCKET & EAST PROVIDENCE 48 India Point Park

58 Warwick, Cranston, Providence, Pawtucket & East Providence Key to Primary Uses Providence Cranston Warwick Public Park 29. Gaspee Point Drive 1. Aborn Street Boat h h 6. Collier Point Park h Ramp Path to Shore This right-of-way at the end of This site, owned by Narragansett Gaspee Point Drive provides a con- A concrete ramp is located off Broad Electric Company, is on Henderson h Boating crete slab boat ramp and access to Street, at the end of Aborn Street. Street and is open from dawn to dusk. Narragansett Bay. Parking is avail- However, it is usable only at high tide, Parking is available. Scenic View able for eight trailered vehicles. because the entire cove is navigable • Trash receptacles • CRMC ROW#: J-22 only at high tide. Although no park- Fishing • Trash receptacles ß ing is permitted in the immediate 7. Waterplace Park area, there is parking for more than This 4-acre park features a 240-foot- Historic 20 cars at the nearby city-owned 30. George B. Salter diameter pond and reconstructed Commercial Street parking lot. Grove riverwalk in the heart of downtown • CRMC ROW#: K-2 Off the scenic Narragansett Parkway, Providence along the historic water- at the end of Landon Road, this state front. This site hosts outdoor con- 2. Seaview Park park overlooks Narragansett Bay and certs and, on spring, summer, and has several grassy knolls ideally Located on a cul-de-sac at the end early fall evenings, is also the loca- suited for picnicking. There is a dirt of Seaview Avenue, this small park tion of WaterFire, an installation by ramp leading to a well-protected overlooks historic Pawtuxet Cove. artist Barnaby Evans that centers cove, best suited to launching small The area is enclosed on three sides around a series of 100 bonfires that boats at high tide. The park has pic- with a three-rail wood fence and has blaze just above the surface of the nic tables and plenty of parking. This a picnic table and park benches. three rivers that pass through the site is unsafe for swimming due to There is no parking on the cul-de-sac. middle of downtown Providence. Stillhouse Cove poor water quality. • CRMC ROW#: K-3 • Handicap access, picnic tables/ • Fishing, hiking/walking, trash • Trash receptacles benches, concessions, trash receptacles receptacles 3. Ocean Avenue 8. Corliss Landing At the foot of Ocean Avenue, next to the Rhode Island Yacht Club, five Corliss Landing is a small city park on steps in a concrete seawall lead to a South Water Street with several beach that is accessible only at low tide. benches facing the Providence River, • Scenic view the Narragansett Electric Plant, and the hurricane barrier that was built to protect downtown Providence 4. Stillhouse Cove Ocean Avenue from flooding during a hurricane. The A grassy strip at the southern end of park is surrounded by shops and res- Narragansett Boulevard overlooks George B. Salter Grove taurants of the Old Harbor District the Rhode Island Yacht Club, and is close to downtown Provi- Stillhouse Cove, and the Providence dence. Only streetside parking is River. There is an unmarked asphalt available. boat ramp in poor condition leading • Hiking/walking, trash receptacles to the Providence River. The ramp is situated on a muddy, rocky shore and is usable only at extreme high tides. The town plans to construct a con- Aborn Street Boat Ramp crete, 15-foot-wide concrete ramp by 2005. No on-street parking is avail- able. Seaview Park • Picnicking, wildlife observation 5. Arnold Avenue Arnold Avenue ends in a small grassy area. In spite of a chain link fence on top of the concrete seawall, this is a pleasant spot to bring a lunch and enjoy the view of the river. Corliss Landing 49

59 9. India Point Park follow signs. Parking is available. Fee. Pawtucket • Handicap access, picnic tables/ This city park on India Street offers benches, hiking/walking, toilets, 12. Max Read Field views of downtown Providence and trash receptacles the city’s working waterfront. A bulk- This athletic field complex is located head provides protection for asphalt on Pleasant Street next to Francis J. 15. School Street Pier paths and grassy areas for jogging, Varieur Elementary School. The 13.8- ß walking, and playing ball. India Point acre site contains football, baseball, A steep cobblestone road leads from Park is a pleasant place to bring a and softball fields, and a quarter-mile India Point Park School Street (Route 114) to this lunch and enjoy a view of the Provi- running track. Beyond the playing facility on the Seekonk River, owned dence River from one of the many fields are a few benches and a steep by the city of Pawtucket. The pier is wooden benches or picnic tables. set of stairs leading to the banks of currently used primarily for fishing, The dock for the Block Island Ferry is the Seekonk River. Concessions and though there is a cement boat ramp also located here. Parking is avail- restrooms are open only during in fair condition. Plenty of on-site able. games. On-site parking is available. parking is available. The city plans to • Handicap access, trash receptacles • Fishing, hiking/walking, trash develop a riverfront park on this receptacles 7-acre waterfront site. 10. Richmond Square • Handicap access Max Read Field Parking Lot 13. Pawtucket Town h Landing 16. Metropolitan Park This parking lot at the end of Pitman Street offers no facilities but has a This boat-launching ramp is located Also known as the Seekonk River scenic view of the Seekonk River. on Taft Street beneath the Division Reservation, this 15.8-acre park is the A 10-foot-high bluff makes this a Street bridge. This is a great place to site of the Pawtucket Boys’ and Girls’ possible fishing spot. Several steep launch a boat into the Seekonk River Club on School Street (Route 114). A paths make it possible to access the or to relax on a bench. Off-street small amount of the acreage is cobble shoreline. parking for boat trailers is available wooded, and the remainder of the site • Hiking/walking both across the street and just south contains tennis courts, two baseball Richmond Square Parking Lot of the ramp. diamonds, and a soccer field. A • Handicap access, dock, fishing, his- 11. Blackstone Park paved walk leads around the ball toric interest, trash receptacles fields to a scenic sitting area above This 40-acre city park has 2,400 feet the Seekonk River. The site com- of shore frontage on the Seekonk mands a nice view of the Swan Point 14. Slater Mill Historic River. It is located on the East Side of and Riverside cemeteries across the Site Providence, just north of Richmond water. Access to the water is danger- Square, at the end of Waterman Located on the Blackstone River at ous, as there are no steps or paths Street. The park is equipped with the head of Narragansett Bay, this down the steep slope. Ample parking benches, picnic tables, and trash National Historic Landmark includes makes this municipal site a spot to facilities. Winding paths and streets three historic buildings, a dam, a have lunch, relax, enjoy the river, and provide pleasant routes for jogging, power canal, and a riverside park. Old Blackstone Park st play ball. fishing, and bicycling. Parking is lim- Slater Mill (1793) was the first factory • Handicap access, picnic tables/ ited to roadside spaces. in America to manufacture cotton benches, historic interest • Wildlife observation yarn with water-powered machines. Today, the mill museum includes the original historic mill, operating textile machinery in the Wilkinson Mill (circa 1810), and a restored residence, the Sylvanus Brown House. The museum provides self-guided tours with inter- pretations done by staff at each of the three buildings. An adjacent visitors’ center contains a theater, a gift shop, and information on both the Slater Mill and the Blackstone River Valley School Street Pier National Heritage Corridor. The mu- seum is open every day during the summer and on weekends in the spring and fall. Nearby, the riverside Hodgson Rotary Park is a scenic spot for a picnic. Take exit 27 off I-95 and Pawtucket Town Landing Metropolitan Park 50

60 24. Crescent Park 20. East Bay Bicycle East Providence Path—Riverside This city park is on the site of the Square Leg former Crescent Amusement Park, a 17. John Lewis Park This popular state bike path currently favorite summertime stop for steam- This small waterfront park has views starts at India Point Park in Provi- boats loaded with city residents to India Point and the Seekonk River dence and passes through East during the 1890s. The only ride re- and is located adjacent to East Provi- Providence, Barrington, Warren, and maining is the Looff Carousel, circa dence Yacht Club at the terminus of Bristol along the old railroad bed. 1895. The park features plenty of on- Mauran Avenue at Pier Road. Park- Bold Point Park There is a small park just off the bike site parking. The carousel runs noon ing is available. path at Vintner Avenue consisting of to 9 p.m. from Wednesday through • Handicap access, picnic tables/ a tot lot, basketball court, and picnic Sunday in the summer. Access to the benches, trash receptacles tables. Parking is available. park is from Crescent View Avenue. • Handicap access, concessions, • Handicap access, picnic tables/ 18. Bold Point Park wildlife observation, trash recep- benches, concessions, toilets, trash This city park on the east side of the tacles receptacles Providence River has a good boat ramp and a sturdy dock. The 2.1-acre 21. Sabin Point Park 25. Rose Larisa park is nicely landscaped and has a Memorial Park Located at the end of Shore Road, this great view of the Providence water- waterfront park commands sweeping This 10.6-acre city park is located front. Plenty of on-site parking is views of the upper Bay. Facilities across the street from Crescent Park, available. Located on Pier Road, just Veterans’ Memorial Parkway include a boat ramp, dock, lighted on the west side of Bullock Point Av- south of Exit 4 from I-195. Fishing is basketball courts, a tot lot, covered enue, overlooking Narragansett Bay. prohibited. picnic tables, and plenty of on-site It features walking trails, benches, • Handicap access, picnic tables/ parking. picnic areas, lawns, scenic over- benches, trash receptacles • Fishing, hiking/walking, trash looks, landscaping, and a 1,280-foot receptacles public beach, accessible by two 19. Veterans’ Memorial wooden staircases, and is open from Parkway Easter to Columbus Day. Parking is 22. Providence Avenue The west side of the parkway has available. Playground three separate parking areas, all on • Trash receptacles Located on Providence Avenue, bluffs, with sweeping views of the which begins at Crescent View Av- Beach Road Extension Providence River and the Providence 26. Bullock Cove Access enue across from Crescent Park, on waterfront. These scenic overlooks the north end of Bullock Cove, this This site on Carousel Drive offers a are ideal spots to park your car and park has a baseball diamond and bas- grass path down to a marsh area on eat lunch. Further south on the park- ketball courts. The waterfront area of Bullock Cove. Though no parking is way, Squantum Woods Park offers the park has not been developed, but available, it is a short walk from the picnic areas and trails that overlook there are wooded paths at the far end Looff Carousel and its parking lot. a coastal cove and tidal marsh. These of the parking lot leading to the shore. • Wildlife observation park areas are connected by the East Plenty of on-site parking is available. Bay Bicycle Path. • Picnic tables/benches, trash • Handicap access, picnic tables/ receptacles Sabin Point Park benches, trash receptacles 23. Beach Road Extension This city right-of-way on the North end of Bullock Point has a long sandy beach that is well suited for walking, but is presently deemed to be unsafe for swimming, due to bacteria levels in upper Narragansett Bay. • Trash receptacles Crescent Park Providence Avenue Playground 51

61 Salt Marsh Most of what you see in a salt marsh is grass of the genus —cordgrass ( Spartina alterniflora ) near the Spartina Spartina patens water, and salt-marsh hay ( ) above the level of the average tides. Going inland, there are zones dominated by spike grass, black grass, and switch grass, with reeds and cattails where freshwater creeks enter the marsh. Finally, above the highest tides, is a belt of shrubs, including bayberry. At the base of the grasses growing in the flooded part of the marsh are found algae in the form of filaments or tiny diatoms. The salt-marsh ecosystem is actually created, in part, by the plants that make up the bulk of the living things found there. The cordgrass is known as a pioneer species, which colonizes bare mud flats. Blades of dead cordgrass accumulate among the live plants, held by stems and roots, trapping sediments to form a layer of peat. Layers of peat eventually accumulate to raise the landward part of the salt marsh to the high-tide level. Salt-marsh hay can then begin to grow on the higher ground, protected from constant flooding by the tides. Peat forms from the salt-marsh hay as well, further raising the level of the marsh so that the landward edges are protected from flooding by all but the highest storm-driven tides. The plant community supports an animal community by providing both food and shelter. Parts of the grasses are eaten by insects, while diatoms and filamentous algae are consumed by tiny worm-like and shrimp-like creatures, as well as fish like mummichog and sheepshead minnow, and mollusks, such as snails and mussels. These, in turn, are eaten by crabs such as the fiddler crab, cancer crab, blue crab, lady crab, and horseshoe crab—which really is more closely related to spiders than to crabs. Birds, such as herons, ducks, terns, and plovers, feed on fish, crabs, and worms, as well as on the seeds of the grasses. Mammals are represented by mice, shrews, raccoons, skunks, minks, and weasels. This is the salt-marsh ecosystem, a community of plants and animals controlled by the tide. A Guide to Rhode —By Jim Donaldson, former URI oceanography graduate student. This article first appeared in Island’s Natural Places. 52

62 Barrington Before the Pilgrims landed, Barrington was occupied by the Wampanoag Indians. In 1632, a trading post was established at Tyler Point near the present Barrington Yacht Club. What is now called Barrington was then called by its Indian names, Sowams and Pokanoket. In 1653, the early Pilgrims purchased the land from the Wampanoags; Massasoit, a chief of the Wampanoag tribe, was paid 35 pounds in return. Myles Standish received much of the land in West Barrington north of the present Rhode Island Country Club, although he chose not to live there. Standish called the area “The Garden of the Plymouth Patent and the Flower of the Garden” because of its fertile soil and scenic location. Barrington became part of Rhode Island in 1746, and was incorporated in 1770. In the 1790s, salt works were established here for evaporation of the waters of Narragansett Bay. Warren Warren, like Tiverton, was given to Rhode Island from Massachusetts in the settlement of a boundary dispute in 1746, and was incorporated as a town the following year. The town was named after Admiral Sir Peter Warren, who commanded the British fleet that cooperated with the New England troops in the capture of the fortress of Louisberg. The town was pillaged and partially burned by Hessian troops during the Revolutionary War. In the early days, Warren held its place in world commerce mostly by shipbuilding. Its plentiful water supply from the Warren and Kickamuit rivers, together with its location on Narragansett Bay, soon helped to make it a thriving industrial center. 53

63 EAST BAY BICYCLE PATH MASSACHUSETTS Rte 103 17 18 River Barrington 16 21 Palmer River 19 Rte 136 Bullock 15 Cove 20 22 23 13 BARRINGTON Barrington 24 WARREN Inset 14 Brickyard Pond 33 Long Ln. Rte 103 9 25 Nayatt Rd. 26 Warren River 10 11 32 Touisset Rd. 27 12 Rumstick Rd. 31 Kickemuit River 28 30 29 35 34 1 36 Allen Ave. Rte 114 2 Bullock Cove 3 BRISTOL Bay Spring Ave. E A Rte 136 S T Narragansett Ave. B Woodbine 4 A BARRINGTON YB I C Y Latham Ave. C L 5 E Shore Dr. P A T H Washington Rd. 6 Annawamscutt 7 Appian Way 0123 MILES 8 BARRINGTON & WARREN 54

64 Barrington & Warren Key to Primary Uses Barrington 11. Watson, Clark, Bluff, 6. Willow Way Public Park and Waterway This public right-of-way includes 500 Extensions 1. Haines Memorial Park feet of beach that is considered un- Path to Shore These four street ends are parallel to safe for swimming. Located at the The 73-acre state park is ideal for each other and all lead to the exten- end of Willow Way, the beach area h boat launching, fishing, picnicking, Boating sion of Barrington Beach. Watson, overlooks upper Narragansett Bay. A and playing ball. Ample parking is Clark, Bluff, and Waterway all have wetland behind the beach provides available on both sides of the park, Beach with trash facilities, but parking is prohib- excellent bird watching opportuni- which straddles Narragansett Av- Lifeguards ited on all four streets. ties. enue. The boat ramp, in excellent • Swimming, hiking/walking • Hiking/walking condition, offers access to Bullock Wildlife Refuge S Cove, which has several full-service marinas. This is a good place to park 12. Barrington Town 7. Annawamscutt Road Scenic View Beach for access to the East Bay Bicycle This road ends at the shore in a pleas- Path. No fishing is permitted from the Fishing This is a long, sandy beach with com- ant area of crushed shells and sand, ß dock. manding views of Narragansett Bay. with a grand view of upper Nar- • Handicap access, picnic tables/ Lifeguard hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ragansett Bay. Roadside parking is benches, hiking/walking, toilets, daily in the summer season. There prohibited. Water is unappealing and trash receptacles are showers and restrooms at the unfit for swimming. site. During the summer, the munici- • Hiking/walking 2. Allen Avenue pal beach is restricted to town resi- dents who have paid the permit fee. This public right-of-way is located at 8. Appian Way The beach is, however, open to any- the end of Allen Avenue next to the Owned by the Barrington Land Con- one in the off-season. Parking is Cove Haven Marina. Access to the servation Trust, this site, though well available. water is obstructed by debris and disguised as a private drive, is a 50- • Handicap access, picnic tables/ Haines marsh vegetation. foot dirt path leading to Narragansett Memorial benches, hiking/walking, trash Park Bay. There is a small point with a receptacles 3. Bay Spring Avenue pleasant sandy area on one side and a wetland on the other. This site is Located at the end of Bay Spring Av- 13. Barrington Police h great for bird watching. No roadside enue, this public right-of-way over- Station Boat Ramp parking is available. looks Bullock Cove and has a boat This boat ramp is located on the • Hiking/walking ramp in poor condition that is used Barrington River just north of by shellfishermen. No parking is Barrington Harbor. Boat ramp and available. 9. Nayatt/Daunis Road trailer parking are available for town This scenic right-of-way consists of residents with permit. The ramp is 4. Woodbine Avenue a path along Mussachuck Creek that adjacent to the East Bay Bicycle leads to a cobble beach on Narr- A public right-of-way is located at the Path. Fee. agansett Bay. There is no on-street end of the avenue on Bullock Cove. • Hiking/walking, trash receptacles Appian Way parking. There is no boat access to the water, • CRMC ROW#: P-2 but the site makes for a scenic pic- 14. Veterans’ Memorial • Fishing, hiking/walking nic spot. Park A 200-acre town park is located next 10. Elm Lane 5. Latham Park to the YMCA and surrounds Brick A public right-of-way on the south This small town park is open to the Yard Pond. The pond is very shallow end of Elm Lane, this site commands public until 9 p.m., when car traffic is and only suitable for canoes, row- a nice view of Narragansett Bay and prohibited. The park has a nice view boats, and shallow-draft sailboats. has a bulkhead well suited for fish- of the entrance to Bullock Cove and Barrington Town Beach The park is a great spot for such ing. No parking is available. has an open grassy field ideal for kite activities as fishing, jogging, and bird flying. Parking is available. watching. Open from sunrise to sun- • Picnic tables/benches, hiking/ set. Parking is available. walking, wildlife observation, trash • Picnic tables/benches, trash receptacles receptacles Latham Park Allen Avenue 55

65 20. Wamsetta Avenue 15. Walker Farm 24. Brown Street h Extension Hand-carry boat hauling and launch- This 30-acre town park includes a Brown Street Extension curves boat ramp and a dock that is suited ing only are permitted at this town around a municipal pumping station for fishing. It is located off County right-of-way on the Barrington River. and ends at a wetland with a small The launching site is not well marked; Road and overlooks the west side of path along the southwestern shore of Hundred Acre Cove. Parking is avail- it is comprised of grassy and sandy Belcher Cove. Although it has no able. patches leading to the water. Walker Farm facilities, this public right-of-way is a • Trash receptacles nice spot for bird watching or taking 21. Belvidere Avenue a rest from bicycling along the bike 16. Osamequin Nature S Located on the upper Palmer River, path. Trails and Bird this town right-of-way has a nice Sanctuary view of the quiet river and its wet- h 25. Wheaton Street Boat Two to three miles of trails wind lands. Ramp through the sanctuary adjacent to • Wildlife observation This town boat ramp is located at the Hundred Acre Cove and bordering wetlands, making this an ideal place end of Wheaton Street on the War- 22. East Bay Bicycle for observing migratory waterfowl ren River. The ramp is flanked by a Path—Barrington Leg and shore birds. No hunting, camp- fish company on one side and the Osamequin Nature Trails The path is ideal for walking, biking, ing, fires, or swimming is allowed in Warren Sewage Treatment Plant on and rollerblading. The bridges over the other. The boat ramp is in fair this town-owned sanctuary. Parking the Barrington and Palmer rivers are is for town residents only, by permit. condition and is a bit steep. Parking great locations for skipjack fishing. is limited. There is a small dock for Motorized vehicles are prohibited on quahog boats. 17. Knockum Hill the bike path. Parking is available at S Reserve various locations along the path. 26. Warren Town Beach This town-owned nature reserve is • Handicap access, picnic tables/ home to endangered bird species and On the Warren River, north of Burr’s benches, concessions, wildlife diamondback terrapin, and therefore Hill Park, is a 2.3-acre town beach. observation, trash receptacles Knockum Hill Reserve several restrictions apply: No ve- The shoreline has a sandy beach with hicles, hunting, horseback riding, or a seawall and a grassy area with a Warren firearms are allowed on the site. A small playground. A lifeguard is on quarter-mile walk down a dirt road duty in the summer. No dogs, bi- 23. East Bay Bicycle leads to an overgrown wooded area cycles, or fires are allowed on the Path—Warren Leg that eventually leads down to the beach. Parking is restricted to town This state-owned bike path on the old water. A number of trails make this a residents during the summer. Fee. railroad grade offers scenic views of good place for walking and bird • Picnic tables/benches, toilets, trash several coastal water bodies: Palmer watching. Access may be gained receptacles River, Belcher Cove, Warren River, Juniper Street from George Street on the and upper Narragansett Bay. The Barrington/Swansea border. No 27. Burr’s Hill Park best places to park your car are at parking is available. Located south of Warren Town Colt State Park in Bristol, Haines Park • Fishing Beach, this 7.6-acre park offers base- in Barrington, and the Franklin Street ball, basketball, tennis, and a nice park-and-ride in Warren. The path is 18. Acre Avenue view of the water from the parking lot not limited to bikers; it is also enjoyed Located on Hundred Acre Cove, this or from several paths that run through by walkers, joggers, and roll- public right-of-way has an overgrown the park. The park is close to the East erbladers. Motorized vehicles are 50-yard path that crosses wetlands Bay Bicycle Path. Parking is re- prohibited. before reaching the water. The site stricted to town residents during the • Handicap access, picnic tables/ is ideal for bird watching and shell- summer. benches, concessions, wildlife ob- fishing. • Picnic tables/benches, historic servation, fishing, trash receptacles interest, toilets, trash receptacles 19. Juniper Street The end of this road is a public right- of-way and a shellfishing spot. Warren Town Beach Wheaton Street Boat Ramp Wamsetta Avenue 56

66 35. Shore Drive 28. Maple Street A shoreline access sign marks this There are four rights-of-way on town right-of-way on the Warren Shore Drive, one of which is marked with a faded access sign. River. There is a grassy area under a tree and a small seawall that make • CRMC ROW#: R-6 to R-9 this a pleasant place to stop while on the adjacent East Bay Bicycle Path. 36. Touisset Marsh S • CRMC ROW#: R-1 Wildlife Refuge Maple Street • Boat ramp This 66-acre refuge, owned by ASRI, fronts on the Kickemuit River and 29. Harris Avenue Chace Cove and offers splendid views of both. In addition to the wa- Located on the Kickemuit River, this ter, the refuge includes open fields right-of-way ends in a small marshy and forested areas, thereby provid- and sandy area. This area gets mostly ing diverse habitats that attract local use. numerous birds and other forms of • CRMC ROW#: R-4 wildlife. A network of trails runs through the property. Parking is avail- 30. Clark Road able behind the Touisset Fire Station This town right-of-way ends in a off Touisset Road. mudflat on the Kickemuit River. The Barker Avenue st area is suitable for hand-launched boats. 31. Patterson Avenue This right-of-way has a small path leading around a wetland on the Kickemuit River. This is a good spot for bird watching. No parking is avail- able. • CRMC ROW#: R-3 Brown Street Extension 32. Parker Avenue Parker Avenue ends in a very over- grown dirt path that juts out into the Kickemuit River. This is a good place for bird watching. • CRMC ROW#: R-2 33. Barker Avenue ß At the end of Barker Avenue, a 50- yard gravel path leads to the rem- nants of stone columns on both sides Road to Town Landing Shore Drive of the Kickemuit River. This is a good place for fishing. • Wildlife observation 34. Road to Town Landing At the end of Maple Road, it seems that the road has become a private drive, but don’t be fooled. This road end provides a peaceful place to sit and look out across the Bay. Vehicle traffic should be kept to a minimum. Harris Avenue • CRMC ROW#: R-10 Burr ’s Hill Park 57

67 Osprey The osprey ( ) is a large, majestic bird of prey, with a 3-foot wing- Pandion haliaetus span, dark brown back, white or slightly mottled underparts, and a white head with a dark eye stripe. The time to see ospreys in Rhode Island is April through August—the birds use southern New England as their breeding grounds. Large concentrations of nesting ospreys can be found at the Great Swamp Management Area, South Kingstown, and at Napatree Point in Westerly. Migrants continue to be seen in the area into fall. Feeding Ospreys feed almost exclusively on live fish. Their feet have short, sharp spines that cover the foot pads and toes for holding their prey, and the talons are long and razor sharp. The legs are long and without feathers, allowing the birds to extend their reach under water. When hunting, ospreys usually hover over the water until they spot their prey, then plunge, feet first, into the water to grab it. Breeding and Nesting Ospreys are monogamous and often return to the same nest site year after year. The birds can be seen nesting in trees, on telephone poles, on channel markers, or on specially constructed platforms. Once they arrive at the breeding grounds, males search for a suitable nest site and begin to perform their courtship aerial display above the nest site—often called the “fish-flight” or “sky dance”—to attract a mate. Once a pair has settled at a nest site, the female gives begging calls to her mate to bring food. During “courtship feeding,” females are fed almost exclusively by their mates, doing almost no hunting on their own. Both male and female share incubation duties, although the male continues to bring food to his mate, and later to the brood. By 30 days old, the young have attained 70 to 80 percent of their adult weight. Threats Osprey populations were decimated between 1950 and 1975 due to the effects of the pesticide DDT, which made its way up through the food chain to the birds, often thinning eggshells and poisoning or killing some embryos, so that few eggs hatched. During that period, 90 percent of ospreys nesting between Boston and New York City disappeared. A ban on DDT in 1972, combined with construction of special platforms to provide the recovering population with nesting sites, has resulted in a remarkable comeback. The platforms helped the birds to overcome two hindrances to survival—a decrease in natural nesting sites due to development, and an increase in nest predators, in particu- lar, the raccoon. Nesting distribution is now roughly similar to that seen historically. Osprey may be seen nesting on platforms at the Osamequin Bird Sanctuary in Barrington, and in other wildlife refuges throughout the state. A Guide to Rhode Island’s Natural Places , produced by —This article first appeared in Rhode Island Sea Grant. 58

68 Bristol th In 1785, the town of Bristol hosted its first annual 4 of July parade, beginning what has become the longest-running unbroken series of Independence Day observances in the country. Bristol has several Federal-period homes in its historic downtown section of the parade route, rendering it an ideal place for the parade. Each celebration is planned a year in advance by a committee of volun- teers. The parade on July 4th is actually the pinnacle of a five-week schedule of concerts, receptions, dances, athletic events, and exhibits. 59

69 33 32 31 WARREN 10 30 11 29 28 12 26 27 Rte 114 24 Rte 136 25 23 13 BRISTOL 22 21 14 20 Hopeworth Rd. 15 16 19 MOUNT HOPE BAY Bristol Inset 17 18 FERRY HOG TIVERTON ISLAND Mill PORTSMOUTH Pond 1 Bay View Ave. BRISTOL HARBOR Hope St. 2 Thames St. State St. 3 Court St. 4 5 Church St. 6 Constitution St. 7 8 0123 MILES BRISTOL 9 60

70 8. Union Street 4. Rockwell Park Bristol Key to Primary Uses Located at the end of Union Street, Located just north of the Prudence off Hope Street (Route 114), this is a Island ferry dock on the Bristol Har- 1. Mill Pond Inlet 40-foot-wide right-of-way with a bor waterfront, this area has been Public Park Located off the south side of redeveloped as a waterfront park grassy area and benches. It leads Poppasquash Road, at the inlet to Mill with benches, brick walkways, a down to a seawall and a ramp walk- Path to Shore Pond on Bristol Harbor, this site is a way to a sand and gravel beach. This small playground, and a wooden “T” small pull-off parking area. There is site is ideal for wading and for view- dock extending into the water. This Boating h a nice view of the upper end of the is a nice place to sit or walk out on ing the harbor and boats. harbor, Mill Pond, and the East Bay Beach with • CRMC ROW#: S-5 the dock for a view of the harbor and Bicycle Path. The site is marked with Lifeguards • Trash receptacles boats. Two-hour parking is available a faded public coastal access sign. along Thames Street. Wildlife Refuge Very limited roadside parking is avail- • Trash receptacles S 9. Walley Street able. Scenic View Located at the extension of Walley • CRMC ROW#: S-19 5. Prudence Island Ferry Street, off Hope Street (Route 114), • Hiking/walking, wildlife observation Fishing ß this site is a 30-yard-wide lawn slop- The passenger and vehicle ferry to ing down to a set of steps that leads Prudence Island leaves from the Ferry 2. Independence Park to a cobble shoreline of Bristol Har- Church Street Wharf, off Thames This is a grassy town park on the bor. The grassy area is good for sun- Street. The ferry dock is located next Historic shores of Bristol Harbor, off Thames bathing, picnicking, or viewing the to Rockwell Park, just north of the end Street, between the extensions of harbor and boats. There is a public of Church Street. Parking adjacent to Franklin and Oliver streets. There is coastal access sign at the right-of- the ferry dock is restricted to season a wide concrete road parallel to the way. ticket holders, but there is a parking shoreline, with room for parking. The • CRMC ROW#: S-6 lot down the street for those taking shoreline has a rock wall used for • Trash receptacles the ferry, and there is two-hour park- fishing and a wide cement slab boat ing available on Thames Street. ramp. Adjacent to the beach there is 10. ASRI Environmental parking for vehicles with trailers. A S Education Center 6. Firefighters’ Memorial town naval war monument is located Park The centerpiece of ASRI’s educa- on the lawn. This park marks the tional endeavors, located on the 28- Next to a rug factory and the Pru- southern end of the East Bay Bicycle acre Claire McIntosh Wildlife Refuge, dence Island Ferry, this grassy town Path. this site includes an exhibit hall, an park offers a view of the urban • Picnic tables/benches, hiking/ auditorium, classrooms, a gift shop, waterfront of Bristol Harbor and sev- Rockwell Park walking, trash receptacles walking paths, and a quarter-mile- eral benches to rest on. No swimming or fishing is allowed from the pier next long boardwalk that enables visitors 3. State Street Pier and h to visit a freshwater marsh, a brack- to the Prudence Island ferry dock. Boat Launch Two-hour parking is available on the ish marsh, and a salt marsh. At the This pier is located off the end of street. boardwalk’s terminus is a spectacu- State Street next to the Bristol town lar view of Narragansett Bay. There boat launch ramp. The single-width is an admission fee for entering the 7. Constitution Street ramp provides access to the harbor exhibit hall but no other fees for walk- An extension of Constitution Street, via a narrow channel between two ing the trails or boardwalk. Parking past Thames Street in downtown piers. There is plenty of parking for is available near the exhibit hall at Bristol, this right-of-way provides trailers near the ramp and on the 1401 Hope Street (Route 114). Firefighters’ Memorial Park access to a small beach via a ramp State Street Pier, but parking is lim- through the seawall at the end of the ited to town residents with stickers. road. It is located between the Coast Parking for vehicles without trailers Guard station on the south and a car- is available on the street. There is a pet factory and Elks Lodge on the public coastal access sign at the north. Two-hour parking is available right-of-way. on Thames Street. • CRMC ROW#: S-20 • CRMC ROW#: S-4 • Fishing, trash receptacles Independence Park State Street Pier Prudence Island Ferry and Boat Launch 61

71 11. East Bay Bicycle 17. Low Lane of on-site parking is available. There Path—Bristol Leg is an admission fee during the sum- At the end of Low Lane, off Ferry Road mer. The southern end of this bike path in (Route 114), is a 150-foot-long over- • Concessions, toilets, trash recep- Bristol is at Independence Park. The grown dirt path leading down to a tacles path is a scenic, paved path follow- cobble beach and a small break- ing the old railroad bed. From the water on upper East Passage. This 15. Colt State Park park, it runs along Narragansett Bay, site offers a nice view of the New- East Bay Bicycle Path passes just inland of Mill Pond, near port Bridge, Hog Island, and passing Located off Route 114 and fronting the Colt State Park, and winds north boats. It is possible to walk a short upper part of Narragansett Bay and along the Bay into Warren. The path distance down the beach in either Mill Gut Pond and Salt Marsh, this is extends 14.5 miles from Bristol to direction. “No Parking” signs are a large state park with expansive Providence. Parking for the bike path posted on both sides of the street. lawns gently sloping down toward in Bristol is at Independence Park • CRMC ROW#: S-18 the Bay. A two-mile promenade along and off Asylum Road (entrance road the park’s seawall is popular with to Colt State Park). In addition to bi- 18. Ferry Road strollers and joggers. From the prom- h cycling, the path offers opportunities Walley Street enade and other vantage points, Colt Situated between the Mount Hope for walking, scenic views of the State Park offers sweeping views of Bridge and Roger Williams University, shoreline, and bird watching. Motor the Bay, of Prudence Island to the this paved road leads to a cobble vehicles are prohibited on the path. west, and of Mill Gut Salt Marsh to beach on Mount Hope Bay. “No Park- • Handicap access, picnic tables/ the east. There is a loop road with ing” signs are posted. This is a good benches, concessions, fishing, numerous pull-offs and picnic areas place to launch a boat. toilets, trash receptacles as well as plenty of room for a wide • Fishing variety of recreational activities. 12. Beach Road Ample parking is available. 19. Mount Hope Farm F • Handicap access, boat ramp, Located at the end of Beach Road, off Mount Hope Farm, on Metacom Av- dock, picnic tables/benches, Hope Street (Route 114), this site is a enue, consists of 127 acres of fields, concessions, swimming, fishing, narrow, paved right-of-way leading to woods, lawns, and ponds, with ap- historic interest, wildlife observa- a guardrail and two benches over- proximately 1,500 feet of waterfront tion, toilets, trash receptacles looking upper Narragansett Bay. on Church Cove. The property in- Parking is limited on the narrow cludes stone walls, terraces, flowers, 16. Coggeshall Farm streets. vegetable gardens, and indigenous Museum • CRMC ROW#: S-1 trees, along with several historic • Wildlife observation Beach Road Located on Colt Drive, between buildings. Hours of operation vary by Poppasquash Road and the Colt State season and are posted at the en- 13. Fales Road Park loop road, this area is leased trance. Public access and parking from the park and run as a nonprofit An extension of the west end of Fales are available south of the main en- th organization. It is a working 18 -cen- Road, off Hope Street (Route 114), this trance, on South Pasture Road. To tury farm—a restoration project right-of-way is a concrete ramp lead- accommodate handicapped individu- th -century centered around an 18 ing down to a cobble beach on als who are unable to walk around farmhouse and barnyard complex, Narragansett Bay. Not suitable as a the farm, the Mount Hope Trust will complete with livestock and a black- trailered boat launch, it offers a nice occasionally open the farm to vehicle smith shop. The museum offers no view of the Bay and is popular for Colt State Park traffic only. Handicapped stickers are st direct access to the water, but there shellfishing. required. Such openings will be is a nice view across Mill Gut Pond to • CRMC ROW#: S-3 posted at the farm and announced in the old stone bridge at the entrance the newspaper. Fishing, shellfishing, to Narragansett Bay. Open daily 10 and swimming are prohibited. Group 14. Bristol Town Beach a.m. to 6 p.m.; no admission fee, but outings must be scheduled in ad- Located off Asylum Road, adjacent to reservations are necessary for group vance. Colt State Park, this town facility fea- tours. Limited parking is available. • Picnicking, wildlife observation tures a sandy, gravelly beach fronting • Hiking/walking, trash receptacles upper Narragansett Bay. There is a nice grassy area behind the beach, plenty of picnic tables/benches, a playground, and basketball, tennis, and softball facilities. A well-main- tained skateboard park is available to those with experience. Lifeguards are on duty during the summer. Plenty Coggeshall Farm Museum 62 Bristol Town Beach

72 29. Sherman Avenue 20. Mount Hope Fishing 24. Platt Street (Narrows h ß Access Coastal Access) This site is a paved extension of Located off Annawamscutt Drive, this This site is off King Philip Avenue near Sherman Avenue with a concrete access has a single-width concrete the junction with Platt Street. A set boat ramp to a dirt beach on the boat ramp into shallow water, with a of concrete stairs and a path lead Kickemuit River. Small boats can be breakwater fronting Mount Hope down to a grassy area with benches launched here. There is a coastal and a nice view of Mount Hope Bay, Bay. Adjacent to the boat ramp is a access sign at the right-of-way. Sherman Avenue cobble beach and a fringing marsh. Bristol Narrows, and Fall River. A set • CRMC ROW#: S-12 of stairs leads from here to the cobble One can walk along the shoreline in • Wildlife observation beach below. It is well marked with a either direction for fishing or for a view of Mount Hope Bay and Fall large sign. 30. San Miguel Drive River. There is parking for about 10 • CRMC ROW#: S-27 A paved extension of San Miguel • Trash receptacles vehicles with trailers or about 20 ve- Drive ends at a gentle dirt ramp and hicles without trailers, with possible a fringing marsh on the Kickemuit additional parking along the entrance 25. Narrows Road River. Boats could possibly be hand road. At the end of Narrows Road, at Pole launched here, but it would be a bit San Miguel Drive • Wildlife observation 42, a tricky path down some rocks tricky. There is no parking in the right- leads to a cobble beach on Mount of-way. A coastal access sign marks 21. Annawamscutt Drive Hope Bay. A road on the left leads to the site. Located at the east end of the Narrows Fishing Area. • CRMC ROW#: S-11 Annawamscutt Drive, off Metacom • CRMC ROW#: S-15 • Wildlife observation Avenue (Route 136), this site is a wide, paved right-of-way. Those who make 26. Narrows Fishing Area 31. Fatima Drive ß the descent down a short stairway This long, sandy peninsula is a great This is a narrow right-of-way at the will find a cobble beach with a sce- place to launch shallow-hulled boats east end of Fatima Drive, off Everett Platt Street nic view of Mount Hope Bay and Fall or to cast a line. Shellfishing is pro- Street. It leads between two fences River. It is also possible to walk the hibited. to a seawall above a fringing salt shoreline to the south and connect • CRMC ROW#: S-26 marsh on the Kickemuit River. No with the Mount Hope Fishing Access. • Trash receptacles parking is permitted in the right-of- • CRMC ROW#: S-17 way. • CRMC ROW#: S-10 27. Kickemuit Avenue 22. King Philip Avenue • Fishing This is a paved right-of-way at the Located off King Philip Avenue, be- extension of Kickemuit Avenue, lead- tween Leahy and Annawamscutt 32. Franca Drive ing to a narrow dirt path through the drives, a paved drive amongst trees Fatima Drive reeds and down the rocks to a marsh Located at the extension of Franca leads to a wide, grassy right-of-way shoreline of the Kickemuit River. A Drive, off Hawthorne Street, this is a leading about 40 yards down to a coastal access sign is located at the paved right-of-way located in a resi- cobble beach with a view of Mount right-of-way. dential area between two houses, Hope Bay and Fall River. Don’t be • CRMC ROW#: S-14 leading to a steep concrete ramp to fooled by “No Trespassing” signs; • Wildlife observation the Kickemuit River. It is possible to this is public access. launch boats here, but it would be • CRMC ROW#: S-28 tricky, and there is no trailer parking. 28. Smith Street There is a coastal access sign at the Located at the extension of Smith Narrows Fishing Area 23. Sunrise Drive right-of-way. Street, off Kickemuit Avenue, this This site is a paved extension of Sun- • CRMC ROW#: S-9 scenic right-of-way is a paved exten- rise Drive leading to a rocky step- sion leading to the remnants of a run- down and to a rocky beach with a 33. North Street down concrete boat ramp, to a gravel nice view of Mount Hope Bay, the path, and on through a fringing marsh A narrow extension of North Street Bristol Narrows, and Fall River. There on the Bristol Narrows section of the off Slocum Road, this right-of-way is is a coastal access sign at the right- Kickemuit River. There is a coastal a dirt road leading about 30 yards to of-way. access sign located at the right-of- the shoreline of the Kickemuit River. • CRMC ROW#: S-16 way. There is a nice view of the river and • CRMC ROW#: S-13 boats, and the spot could be used for launching small boats. However, there is no on-site parking available. A coastal access sign marks the site. Mount Hope Fishing Access • CRMC ROW#: S-7 Sunrise Drive • Wildlife observation 63

73 The Quahog that Rhode Islanders The shellfish age can be determined by counting ocean (salinity about 35 parts per the growth rings on its shell. As thousand), so quahogs are often call a quahog possesses an impres- quahogs get older, they grow more found in estuaries (such as sive variety of names, and even the slowly, so the growth rings get very Narragansett Bay) where the mix- word “quahog” (which comes from close together and difficult to count ing of fresh and salt water provides the Narragansett Indian name accurately. Researchers estimate ideal conditions. “poquauhock”) has an alternate that the largest ones (4 inches or Although quahogs can be found spelling, “quahaug,” and a number more in length) are as much as 40 along the North American Atlantic of pronunciations: KO-hog, KWO- years old. coast from Canada’s Gulf of Saint hog, and KWA-hog. The quahog’s Quahogs—like soft-shell clams, Lawrence to Florida, they are par- Mercenaria scientific name, oysters, scallops, and mussels— ticularly abundant between Cape , is derived from a Latin mercenaria are classified as bivalve mollusks Cod and New Jersey. Farther north, word meaning “wages” and was because they have hinged shells most waters are too cold for qua- chosen because Indians used qua- made up of two halves, or “valves.” hogs, restricting them to just a few hog shells to make beads that were Bivalves obtain their food by filter relatively warm coves; while to the used as money (called wampum). In feeding. Water is taken in through a south, quahogs have more preda- much of the United States, quahogs siphon and passed over the gills, tors, such as blue crabs. are simply called “hard clams” or which are specially adapted to filter Pollution in Narragansett Bay “hard-shell clams.” out food (microscopic algae and affects the quahog industry be- Still other names are based on a other small organic particles). The cause the filter-feeding process quahog’s size. Little necks (or filtered water is then expelled via concentrates not only food particles “necks”) are the smallest legal size, another siphon. A large clam can but also many pollutants—including measuring 1-inch thick at the larg- filter about a gallon of water in one disease-causing bacteria and est thickness; chowders are the hour. viruses and toxic compounds. Thus, largest size; and cherrys tones are in Quahogs prefer salinities be- even pollutants that are present between. tween 18 and 26 parts per thousand. only in low levels in the water can In Rhode Island, quahogs grow to This is less salty than the open accumulate to dangerous levels in legal size in three to four years if filter feeders. RIDEM maintains a conditions are good. A quahog’s list of shellfish areas closed to pollution. It is available at: www.state.ri.us/dem/. For more information about shellfishing regu- lations, see page 7. —By Eleanor Ely, th In the early 20 century, Rhode Island Sea Grant oysters dominated commercial shellfishing in Narragansett Bay. But the oyster population gradually declined after the 1920s, and, at the same time, the quahog fishery expanded. Here, handrakers display a bullrake used to harvest quahogs, which became such an economically important resource that, in 1987, the humble quahog was elevated to the status of Rhode Island’s official state shell. 64

74 Portsmouth In early August of 1778, American forces attacked the 7,000 British, Hessian, and Provincial troops occupying the town of Newport. By the end of the month, with militia enlistments expiring and British reinforcements on the way from New York, the American commanders decided to aban- don the siege lines and the island. At dawn on August 29, the British discovered the American lines were abandoned and troops had retreated to Portsmouth. Hoping to catch the 10,000 Continental and State troops, British General Pigot ordered British forces to advance from their defensive line at Newport. Pigot ordered reinforcements from Newport to attack the American troops. However, the British forces were outnumbered and despite three attacks, they were unable to take control of the troops in Portsmouth. Americans retreated off the island unmolested, with the last troops departing just hours before thousands of British reinforcements arrived by ship into Newport Harbor. Tiverton The Indian territory now occupied by Tiverton and neighboring Little Compton was known as Pocasset. Tiverton was named after Tiverton, England, and was incorporated by Massachusetts in 1694. One of five towns received from Massachusetts by royal decree, Tiverton was given to Rhode Island on January 27, 1746, in the resolution of a border dispute. Narragansett Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve NBNERR South NBNERR North The Narragansett Bay National Estuarine Research that makes up only 0.4 percent of Rhode Island’s land Reserve (NBNERR) is one of 25 reserves in the National mass. As an example of the importance of this habitat, the Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS). The NERRS pitch pine forest on Prudence is the only known nesting was established by the National Oceanic and Atmo- site for pine warblers on any of the islands in spheric Administration in recognition of the Coastal Zone Narragansett Bay. The semi-barren areas are almost Management Act of 1972. NBNERR was established in dune-like in appearance and support five of the seven 1980, making it the first reserve to be designated in New species of tiger beetles found in Rhode Island, including England. The reserve protects a total of 2,533 acres of Cicindela tranquebarica . A number of the threatened land on Prudence, Patience, Hope, and Dyer islands and other sand-loving invertebrates live in this area as does 1,843 acres of water adjacent to these properties. Chrysopsis falcata . the rare sickle-leaved golden aster, Nationally, the NERRS protects approximately 1 million The dry meadows have a number of uncommon flowers acres of estuarine waters and upland habitats. and grasses growing in them that in turn support an array Located in the middle of Narragansett Bay and a short Faronta of insects, including the pink-streak moth, ferry ride from Bristol, Prudence Island offers ample rubripennis . This globally rare moth has never been found opportunities to study coastal and upland habitats. One of at any other location in Rhode Island. the most interesting and rare habitats on the reserve is If you are interested in visiting this unique habitat, the pine barrens at the south end of the island. Although NBNERR offers tours of the reserve throughout the year, the area has a relatively low amount of biodiversity, the and the Learning Center is open from June to September. rarity of the species living in this area makes it an For more information on Prudence Island and reserve interesting place to visit. Within the pine barrens you will programs, please call (401) 683-6780. See also page 68. find pitch pine forests, semi-barren areas, and dry meadows. The soil found in this habitat is called —By Kim Botelho, Education Coordinator, Poquonock soil. This is an extremely dry, well-drained soil NBNERR 65

75 Portsmouth and Tiverton continue on page 70. MOUNT HOPE BAY BRISTOL Portsmouth Rte 138 Inset Rte 24 T1 P20 T2 FERRY HOG TIVERTON ISLAND Rte 77 P19 T3 Rte 114 Rte 177 T4 PRUDENCE HOPE ISLAND ISLAND PORTSMOUTH Sakonnet River Rte 138 Rte 77 Rte 114 DYER ISLAND P18 COMMON FENCE P1 POINT P2 P3 MOUNT HOPE BAY THE HUMMOCK Anthony Rd. PORTSMOUTH Rte 138 Hummock Ave. Sandy Point Light, Prudence Island Rte 138 P4 THE COVE P5 P6 Riverside St. P7 Boyd Ln. Point Rd. P8 0123 P9 MILES P10 P12 P11 P13 PORTSMOUTH P14 & TIVERTON P15 P16 Sakonnet River 66 P17

76 Portsmouth & Tiverton Key to Primary Uses Portsmouth P9. Ivy Avenue an extensive gravel parking area. Public Park There are other possible launching This right-of-way is located in Island spots along the cobble shoreline of Park at Pole 14, at the intersection of P1. Mount Hope View Path to Shore the peninsula. This well-protected Road Ivy Avenue and Seaconnet Boule- cove offers boaters easy access to vard. The right-of-way is a grassy Boating h This site is located in the Common both the Sakonnet River and Mount path leading about 20 yards between Fence Point area at Pole 56S, at the Hope Bay. The area is also popular two houses to a small rocky bank on Beach with northernmost end of Anthony Road. with quahoggers and bird watchers the Sakonnet River. A shoreline ac- Lifeguards The path starts between a picket but is unsafe for swimming. cess sign is present. fence and a fire hydrant. The trail • Picnicking, fishing, hiking/walking, • CRMC ROW#: V-7 Wildlife Refuge S winds through the brush about 500 trash receptacles • Fishing feet to a rocky point surrounded by a Fishing cobble beach and intertidal areas. ß P5. Cedar Avenue P10. Gould Avenue The point affords an excellent view Located in Island Park at Pole 6, this of Mount Hope Bay, the surrounding This right-of-way is located in Island right-of-way consists of a narrow coastal areas, and the Mount Hope Park at Pole 9, at the extension of path that extends northeast from the Bridge, and it is a nice spot for walk- Gould Avenue off Seaconnet Boule- intersection of Cedar Avenue and ing and bird watching. This area is vard. A steep, paved boat ramp pro- Beach Street to a cobble area bor- closed to shellfishing. A faded access vides access to the Sakonnet River. dering the cove. A public access sign sign is present. No parking is avail- The site is marked with a blue shore- is present. able. line access sign. • CRMC ROW#: V-4 • CRMC ROW#: V-1 • CRMC ROW#: V-9 • Wildlife observation, hiking/ walking fishing, trash • Picnicking, recep- • Fishing tacles P6. Green Street P11. Island Park Avenue Teddy’s Beach P2. Narragansett Road Located in Island Park, just off the This right-of-way, located at Pole 6 Coral Street intersection, this very Located in the Common Fence Point at the intersection of Island Park narrow right-of-way runs off Green area at Pole 40, this site is a right-of- Avenue and Seaconnet Boulevard, is Street to a grass path leading to a set way at a bend in the road near the a grass strip leading to a stone wall of concrete steps to a salt marsh and northern end of Narragansett Road. bordering the Sakonnet River. There tidal flat area at the south end of Blue A 30-foot dirt path leads to a sandy is a blue shoreline access sign. Bill Cove. This site is marked by a blue cobble beach that is well suited for a • CRMC ROW#: V-10 shoreline access sign. summer picnic. No parking is available. • Fishing • CRMC ROW#: V-6 • CRMC ROW#: V-3 • Wildlife observation P12. Fountain Avenue Common Fence Point P7. Stone Bridge Ramp h A right-of-way located at Pole 3 in the P3. Anthony Road This state-owned boat ramp is middle of Fountain Avenue, this site located on the Sakonnet River next A 50-foot-wide grassy right-of-way at is a grass strip leading about 20 yards to Stonebridge Marina on Point Road. Pole 39 offers a shady place to stop to a concrete wall extending south to This ramp provides access to upper and enjoy beautiful views of Mount a cobble beach bordering the Sakonnet River. Suitable for boats up Hope Bay and the Mount Hope Sakonnet River. There is no parking to 20 feet at half-tide and above. Park- Bridge. An opening in the rail fence in the right-of-way. The site is marked ing is available. indicates the right-of-way. No park- with a blue shoreline access sign. ing is available. Just west down the street is a con- Mount Hope View Road • CRMC ROW#: V-2 P8. Teddy’s Beach crete boat ramp with no available • Picnicking parking. Located at the end of Park Avenue on • CRMC ROW#: V-12 Point Road, just south of the Old P4. Gull Cove State Boat • Fishing h Stone Bridge, this state-managed Ramp area has a small crescent of sandy Located off Route 24/138 North, just beach with a sloping grassy area be- before the Hummocks Road and hind it. It is a nice spot for swimming, Common Fence Point exits, this state sunbathing, picnicking, and viewing property is on a peninsula situated in the river and the Gould Island Refuge. the cove off the Sakonnet River. The No lifeguards are present. facility has a single-width concrete • Picnic tables/benches, wildlife Gull Cove slab boat ramp in fair condition and observation 67

77 P13. Aquidneck Avenue P18. Narragansett Bay Tiverton S National Estuarine Located near Portsmouth Park, this Research Reserve T1. Riverside Marine site is a right-of-way off Aquidneck h (NBNERR) Avenue. This narrow right-of-way is Riverside Marine is located on Riv- NBNERR includes approximately 60 a grass path leading to a set of small erside Drive. The ramp is busy on percent of Prudence Island as well concrete steps between two houses weekends and parking fills up quickly. as Patience, Hope, and Dyer islands. and to a cobble shore of the Sakonnet NBNERR North Parcel Fee. NBNERR facilities are concentrated River. The site is marked with a blue • Dock, trash receptacles at the south end of Prudence Island shoreline access sign, and a cross- and include a learning center with walk leads to the right-of-way. T2. Sakonnet Bridge h exhibits on the flora, fauna, and his- • CRMC ROW#: V-13 Access tory of the island, a water quality • Fishing Off Riverside Drive, under the monitoring lab, and an indoor class- Sakonnet Bridge, is a hard-packed room. Just down the road from the P14. Tallman Avenue sand boat launch area. There is room NBNERR learning center, you will find Located near Portsmouth Park, at the for several vehicles with trailers to the T-wharf, a popular fishing spot NBNERR South Parcel intersection of Tallman and Atlantic park across the street. Parking for and seal haul-out location. There is a avenues, this right-of-way is a paved vehicles without trailers is available floating dock on the north side of the walkway leading to a concrete ramp on the street. Riverside Marine boat T-wharf and a dock at Potter’s Cove and a set of concrete steps to a state- launch is located just to the north. Not at the north end of the island that can owned cobble beach on the a scenic spot, but good access to the be used by boaters for loading and Sakonnet River. The site is marked Sakonnet River and Mount Hope Bay. unloading only. Other access to the with a blue shoreline access sign. • Fishing reserve is via the Prudence Island • CRMC ROW#: V-15 Ferry from Bristol. The NBNERR • Picnic tables/benches, hiking/ Learning Center is open June to Sep- T3. Grinnell’s Beach walking Sandy Beach tember and is about 3.5 miles from the Located off Main Road (Route 77), just ferry landing. Due to a high popula- south of the Stone Bridge Pier, this P15. East Corys Lane tion of deer ticks, camping is not al- small crescent of beach has a lowed on any of the reserve proper- Located near Portsmouth Park, off restroom facility with showers and ties. Parking is available. East Corys Lane at the junction with changing rooms, a children’s play • Picnic tables/benches, swimming, Atlantic Avenue, this right-of-way is area, and a lifeguard in the summer fishing, hiking/walking a 20-yard grassy path leading to a at a designated swimming area. cobble shoreline bordering the There is a nice view of the Sakonnet Sakonnet River. The site is marked P19. Sandy Beach River and Gould Island. Parking is S with a blue shoreline access sign. available for 50 cars, with a fee in the Located off the main road west of the There is a view of the river from the summer. turnoff to NBNERR North Parcel, this Grinnell’s Beach road. • Picnic tables/benches, fishing, is a beautiful, long, sand and cobble • CRMC ROW#: V-14 hiking/walking, trash receptacles beach on Narragansett Bay with a pristine salt marsh behind the beach. P16. Child Street This is a good spot for walking and T4. Nannaquaket Bridge ß birding, with a view of the marsh, the Located in Portsmouth Park, this A bridge across the tidal inlet to Bay, and Hope Island. Access via an right-of-way is a paved road exten- Nannaquaket Pond provides good unmarked, bumpy dirt road is difficult. sion leading to a cobble beach bor- fishing access. There is a small park- • Swimming, picnicking dering the Sakonnet River. A public ing area for 20 cars on the west end access sign is present. of the bridge. There are also steps to • CRMC ROW#: V-16 P20. NBNERR the pond from an adjacent sidewalk. East Corys Lane S • Fishing (North Parcel) • CRMC ROW#: T-3 • Hiking/walking, trash receptacles See P18 above for description. P17. Morningside Lane Located near Portsmouth Park, at the end of Morningside Lane off Water Street, this right-of-way is a grassy path with concrete stairs leading down to a cobble beach on the Sakonnet River. A shoreline access Sakonnet Bridge Access sign is present. • CRMC ROW#: V-17 Nannaquaket Bridge 68

78 Portsmouth & Tiverton continued Little Compton Construction of the Sakonnet Lighthouse at Sakonnet Point in Little Compton began in 1883. An iron pier was placed on Little Cormorant Rock, about 800 yards offshore, and then filled with con- crete. The lighthouse was completed in October 1884 and served as Rhode Island’s easternmost beacon. The Hurricane of ’38 destroyed many houses and took 13 lives at Sakonnet Point. The lighthouse survived but was left with a large crack in its base. After Hurricane Carol in 1954 caused additional damage, the U.S. Coast Guard decided to decommission and abandon the lighthouse. In 1985 the structure was donated to The Friends of Sakonnet Point Lighthouse, Inc., who raised $100,000 for its restoration. On March 22, 1997, Sakonnet Point Light was relit after 43 years, flashing a red signal that is visible for seven nautical miles. Although Sakonnet Point Light can be seen from the shore of Little Compton, a boat is needed for a closer look. Middletown Middletown, between Newport and Portsmouth, got its name from being in the middle of the island of Rhode Island (Aquidneck), which was one of the earliest colonial settlement sites in Rhode Island. Middletown was originally an agrarian community. Because of this, there are few native trees now growing in the township, the original forests having been cleared for farms. As a result of a petition to the General Assembly requesting political independence from Newport, Middletown was set off as a separate town and incorporated in 1743. Today the town hosts a wealth of commercial and retail activity. Weaver Cove 69

79 T5 P21 T6 T7 TIVERTON TIVERTON DYER FOUR ISLAND Sakonnet CORNERS River Rte 179 Rte 114 P22 T8 P24 PORTSMOUTH Union St. Neck Rd. T9 P23 LC1 NEWPORT S TAT E Long Hwy. AIRPORT Rte 138 Rte 77 Peckham Rd. Rte 114 LITTLE COMPTON MIDDLETOWN Third Beach Rd. Sakonnet River Indian Ave. M11 Quicksand Pond M10 Swamp Rd. LC2 Rte 77 Easton Pond M9 LC5 Shaw Rd. M8 M5 Memorial Blvd. M1 M7 M6 M4 M2 M3 Sakonnet Point Rd. SACHUEST POINT LC3 Bellevue Ave. RHODE ISLAND LC4 SOUND SAKONNET POINT 0123 MILES PORTSMOUTH, TIVERTON, LITTLE COMPTON & MIDDLETOWN 70 Norman Bird Sanctuary

80 T9. Fogland Beach Tiverton Portsmouth Key to Primary Uses Fogland Beach provides an excellent P21. Melville windsurfing area and a beautiful view T5. Two Rod Way Campground of the Sakonnet River and the Ports- Public Park This right-of-way at the end of Two Recreational Area mouth shoreline. The cove area to the Rod Way, off Seapowet Road, offers north of the beach is convenient for Located off Sullivan Road, a right turn Path to Shore a great view of the Sakonnet River. It nature study. Amenities include off Stringham Road, one-half mile also provides access to the coastal changing rooms, showers, and a from Route 114, this town facility has Boating h trails of the Emily Ruecker Wildlife children’s playground. Parking is sites for 57 tents and 59 trailers and Refuge. The extension of this road is available for a fee in the summer. is open April through October. There Beach with a good place to hand-launch a boat • Picnic tables/benches, fishing, is access to the shoreline of Narr- Lifeguards into a protected cove. hiking/walking, toilets, trash agansett Bay via a bumpy dirt road. • CRMC ROW#: T-6 receptacles Although overgrown, the shoreline Wildlife Refuge • Fishing S provides opportunities for walking Little Compton and viewing the East Passage of the Scenic View T6. Emily Ruecker Bay. On-site parking is available. Fee. S Wildlife Refuge • Picnic tables/benches, swimming, Fishing LC1. Town Way ß This 50.5-acre refuge owned by ASRI toilets, trash receptacles At the western end of Town Way, off encompasses freshwater, brackish, West Main and Old Main roads, there and marine habitats as well as P22. Weaver Cove Boat h is room for about 10 cars to park and wooded uplands and fields. A net- Ramp a short path down to a cobble beach work of trails runs through the refuge on the Sakonnet River. At low tide, it Located off Burma Road, one mile and follows the shores of the is possible to walk along the cobble south of Stringham Road, this con- Sakonnet River. This is an ideal spot beach to the mouth of Almy’s Creek, crete public boat ramp offers plenty for walking and bird watching year and from there, partway into of vehicle and trailer parking. A dock round. There are trail maps available Donovan’s Marsh, a well-preserved with handicap access is also avail- at the entrance at the parking area tidal creek and unditched salt marsh. able for use. and trailhead, located off Seapowet From the beach, there is a nice view • Fishing, hiking/walking, trash Road. Melville Campground of the Sakonnet River and Sachuest receptacles Point. A sign is posted indicating that T7. Seapowet Marsh and S this is not a public swimming beach P23. Sandy Point Beach Point Fishing Area and there are no lifeguards. Located at the end of Sandy Point Located off Seapowet Avenue, this • CRMC ROW#: W-2 Avenue, off Route 138, this is a wide, refuge area includes a variety of • Wildlife observation, trash recep- sandy beach about one-half mile coastal habitats. There is a parking tacles long, forming a point in the Sakonnet area along a cobble beach north of River. The beach has a dirt parking the bridge over the Seapowet River LC2. Taylor’s Lane McCorrie Lane Fishing Area lot and a small bathhouse with and walking or driving access to This site is a right-of-way at the end restrooms. This is a well-protected Seapowet Point. There is a marsh on of Taylor’s Lane, off West Main Road. beach for swimming and a nice place the point, popular for shellfishing. The At the end of this road there is park- for walking along the shore. There is beach is a good spot for walking, fish- ing for about 10 cars and a dirt path a parking fee for nonresidents. ing, bird watching, or enjoying the about 10 yards long leading down to • Picnic tables/benches, fishing, wild- view of the river. There is also a small a small sand and cobble beach on the life observation, trash receptacles gravel boat ramp south of the bridge Church Bay portion of the Sakonnet that provides access to an extensive River. It is possible to walk out to salt marsh and tidal creek area. P24. McCorrie Lane ß Two Rod Way Church Point by scrambling along Fishing Area • Historic interest boulders at the tide line. There is a At the end of McCorrie Lane, a large, nice view of the mouth of the T8. Fogland Road sandy parking area offers access to h Sakonnet River, Sachuest Point, and an extensive cobble beach perfect for A right-of-way located at the end of the Atlantic Ocean. swimming, fishing, or hand-launching Fogland Road, at the junction with • CRMC ROW#: W-1 a boat. No parking is available. High Hill Avenue, leads to a concrete • Trash receptacles • Trash receptacles boat ramp on the Sakonnet River. There is a view of the Sakonnet River and Fogland Beach from here. Park- Emily Ruecker Wildlife Refuge ing is available at nearby Fogland Beach. • CRMC ROW#: T-4 • Fishing 71 Fogland Beach Seapowet Marsh

81 LC3. Sakonnet Harbor M5. Hanging Rock Road Middletown ß Parking Area At the end of Bluffhead Road, off Located at the western end of Hang- Sakonnet Point Road, at the mouth of M1. Atlantic Beach ing Rock Road, at the junction of the Sakonnet River, there is a break- Located on Aquidneck Avenue just Paradise Avenue and Purgatory water that forms the entrance to west of the junction with Purgatory Road, this is a small parking area at Sakonnet Harbor. The breakwater is Road, this site provides access to the the western end of Sachuest (Sec- good for walking, fishing, watching Sakonnet Harbor st eastern end of Atlantic Beach with ond) Beach overlooking Sachuest fishing boats, or just checking out the short-term parking for Middletown Bay (Atlantic Ocean) with access to view across the river, into the harbor, residents. This site has a sandy the beach and to Purgatory Chasm. or out to sea. There is no public ramp beach fronting Easton Bay (Atlantic This site is also a favorite spot for here, only private docks. On-site Ocean) with good surf and a nice many Rhode Island surfers. Parking parking is available. view of the Cliff Walk and the man- fee. • Trash receptacles sions across the bay. There is a small • Concessions, toilets, trash recep- grassy field, Dunlap-Wheeler Park, tacles h LC4. Sakonnet Harbor with a few benches near the parking Fishing Access area. Large public parking lots and M6. Second Beach concessions are a quarter-mile to the Located off Sakonnet Point Road at west at Easton’s (First) Beach in New- The main parking lot for this beach is the southern end of Route 77, this site port. Board sailing and surfboard has two cement plank ramps across located off Sachuest Point Road. This rentals are located nearby. site has a wide, sandy, 8,000-foot- a beach into Sakonnet Harbor and a • CRMC ROW#: Y-9 long beach fronting Sachuest Bay sheltered basin with access to the • Fishing, hiking/walking, trash recep- (Atlantic Ocean) and is an excellent Sakonnet River and the Atlantic tacles Ocean. There is a parking area for place for swimming, surfing, walking, trailers across the road and a nice and sunbathing. The beach is well known and gets quite crowded dur- view of the Haffenreffer Wildlife Ref- M2. Northwest End of Sakonnet Harbor uge. Parking is limited to 48 hours. ing the summer. Facilities include a Esplanade Shore Fishing Access • CRMC ROW#: W-3 large parking lot (fees charged) and Drive a concession area with food, rest- This public right-of-way, located just rooms, changing rooms, and picnic LC5. South Shore Beach at the bend in the road, offers a short tables/benches. Fee. path down a concrete stairway onto Located at the end of South Shore • Handicap access, trash receptacles Easton’s Beach. Road, this is a long, sandy beach on • CRMC ROW#: Y-8 (on appeal) the Atlantic Ocean, with a large dirt M7. Sachuest Point • Swimming, fishing, trash receptacles parking lot, portable toilets, and life- S National Wildlife guards. There is a parking fee for Refuge nonresidents during the summer; M3. Tuckerman Avenue Atlantic Beach st Located at the eastern end of weekly and seasonal passes are (opposite Wolcott Sachuest Point Road, this refuge available. There is a beautiful view of Avenue) forms the point between the the Atlantic with Cuttyhunk and the This right-of-way is a very tricky dirt Sakonnet River and Second Beach, Elizabeth Islands in the distance, a path, but well worth the effort. This where the river joins the sea. A net- picturesque salt pond (Tunipus Pond), rocky shoreline offers a great place to sit work of trails traverses the point with and a farm located behind the park- and take in a beautiful ocean view. trailside exhibits along the way. The ing lot. One can walk east along the • CRMC ROW#: Y-11 (on appeal) uplands at the point are dominated by beach across a shallow tidal creek • Fishing shrubs and grasses, and the shore- to Goosewing Beach, a wildlife ref- line is part cobble, part rock. Over 200 uge, which is now owned by The M4. Purgatory Chasm species of birds have been spotted Nature Conservancy. There are some Located on Tuckerman Avenue just here during the year, including the restrictions here to protect nesting south of the junction with Purgatory largest colony of harlequin ducks in piping plovers. Parking for fishing is Road, it is a short walk to a rocky cliff the eastern United States. Sportfish- available in the evening and off-sea- that overlooks Sachuest Bay and a ing for striped bass, bluefish, and tau- son. bridge over a deep natural chasm in tog is popular. A visitors’ center is • Trash receptacles the bedrock. From the cliff, there is a open Wednesday through Sunday, beautiful view of the ocean, Second and bird walks are held on most sum- Town Way st Beach, Sachuest Point, and the mer and fall weekends. Parking is Norman Bird Sanctuary. This area is available. also accessible from the Hanging • Handicap access, picnic tables/ Rock Road parking area via a short benches, toilets, trash receptacles walk along the rocks. Northwest End of Esplanade 72 Shore Drive

82 M10. Norman Bird M8. Third Beach M11. Taggart’s Ferry S Sanctuary Road Located at the end of Third Beach The parking lot and sanctuary head- This popular fishing spot is located off Road, this town-owned site offers a Indian Avenue and is a 50-foot-wide quarters are located at 583 Third protected, sandy beach fronting the path leading to the mouth of the Beach Road, north of its junction with Sakonnet River and is ideal for swim- Hanging Rock Road and Indian Av- Sakonnet River. Parking is available. ming and boating. There is a concrete enue. At the headquarters, there is an • CRMC ROW#: Y-6 boat ramp and areas marked off for • Trash receptacles extensive network of trails winding swimming, boating, and anchoring. through fields, forest, wetlands, and The site is suitable for boats up to 18 rocky ridges. The sanctuary property feet. A walk along the beach toward extends on the south side of Hanging the Sachuest Point Wildlife Refuge Rock Road through meadows and provides a good opportunity for ob- marshland, and includes the Maid- serving waterfowl. There are no fees ford River where it flows into the in evening or off-season. Parking is Sakonnet River. The sanctuary also available. owns the section of Third Beach run- • Handicap access, picnicking, fish- ning from the public portion of Third ing, toilets, trash receptacles Beach north across the Maidford River and up to Peabody’s Beach. The M9. Third Beach Road beach can be accessed from the This right-of-way is located at the south on the public beach or by the north end of Third Beach. It is a foot- Taggart’s Ferry Road public right-of-way at the north end path with a boardwalk through dune of the beach. The diversity of unde- grass to the beach. The beach north veloped coastal ecosystems provide and south of the access way is pri- habitat for a wide variety of wildlife vate. Don’t be deceived by a chain and birds throughout the year. Rocky across the right-of-way; this is pub- outcrops offer sweeping views. A lic access. No parking is available. natural history museum is located in • CRMC ROW#: Y-4 the old barn and a gift shop in the sanctuary visitors’ center. There is a trail fee for nonmembers. There is no fee to walk the beach. Guided bird walks are offered free on Sunday mornings. • Historic interest, toilets, trash Second Beach receptacles Third Beach Tuckerman Avenue Norman Bird Sanctuary Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge Third Beach Road 73

83 American Holly Piping Plover While traveling through Tiverton and The presence of the piping plover is one indicator of a healthy Little Compton, you’ll notice that the beach. Because these small shorebirds require a pristine environ- Ilex opaca , is quite American holly, ment for successful nesting, their presence indicates an unspoiled common. The reason for this is primarily beach and minimal human intrusion. But as beaches have been used temperature. Holly is a southern plant increasingly for human activities, the piping plover has been less and is found in Rhode Island at the successful in its nesting efforts, and the population has declined. By northernmost extent of its range. On the the mid-1980s, Rhode Island’s population, reflecting the regional west side of Narragansett Bay, holly is trend, had dropped so precipitously that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife generally not found north of Route 138 Service (FWS) included the bird on the Endangered Species List as and usually grows within five miles of the federally threatened. To protect fragile nesting areas, FWS began coast. The close proximity of Narragan- roping off upper dune areas of popular Moonstone Beach during the sett Bay to all of Tiverton and Little Comp- summer season. Although controversial, this move helped stabilize ton moderates the temperature here and the beach’s plover population, then estimated at only two pairs. creates perfect growing conditions for Piping plovers breed on sparsely vegetated outer beaches, holly. scraping out a shallow nest in the sand for their eggs. Both parents A Guide to —This article first appeared in share incubation duties for the four speckled eggs the female lays. , produced Rhode Island’s Natural Places Unlike many birds, piping plovers do not feed their chicks. Within by Rhode Island Sea Grant. hours of hatching, the young leave the nest to follow their parents in search of food—running along the shoreline, foraging for insects and other marine invertebrates. It takes about 28 days for the eggs to hatch and another month for the chicks to fledge. During this time, the birds are extremely vulnerable. The eggs and flightless chicks are exposed to predation, especially when incubating adults are flushed from the nest by intruders. Also, the sandy-colored camouflage of adults, chicks, and eggs makes them susceptible to inadvertent destruction by humans. Chicks, the size of cotton balls, need to feed continuously in order to grow. But frequent disturbances, such as foot traffic, send them scuttling from intertidal feeding areas to the protection of the dunes, and may disrupt and disorient them to such a degree that they weaken and die. Habitat protection and management efforts have helped boost the piping plover population, both in Rhode Island and along the Atlantic Coast. Undeveloped beaches, including Napatree Point, Ninigret Conservation Area, and Goosewing Beach, provide safe habitat for these threatened birds, which numbered 71 nesting pairs in 2003. Doing your part • Nesting areas are fenced off and marked with signs. When visiting the beach, respect these protection devices and do not disturb the birds or their nests. • Pets on the beach are a special danger to plovers. Please leave them at home during plover season, March through September. • Trash and food left behind on the beach can draw predators, which can eat plover eggs and chicks. Please properly dispose of all food or trash from your day at the beach. A Guide to Rhode Island’s Natural —This article first appeared in Places , produced by Rhode Island Sea Grant. 74

84 Newport th In the 19 century, Newport was a center of Victorian extravagance in architecture, drawing millionaires, minted by the Industrial Revolu- tion, who competed amongst themselves to build ever more elaborate “summer cottages.” Many of the great mansions built during those times were ideally located along Newport’s Cliff Walk, which had begun as an Indian footpath. Serious development of Cliff Walk started Narragansett Avenue around 1880, and a number of the estate owners spent the next 50 years improving the walk piece by piece. Over the last 150 years, the public and some of the wealthy estate owners have clashed over access rights both along and to the shore. A combination of long-term public use, the rights granted by the colonial charter, and a passage in the Rhode Island Constitution that grants the public “rights of fishery and the privileges of the shore to which they have heretofore been entitled,” has ensured the legal right of people to walk on the cliffs. For a full description of this site, see page 79. Easton’s Beach Fort Adams Rose Island 75

85 NEWPORT BRIDGE 14 NEWPORT ROSE Newport ISLAND Harbor Inset 15 Easton Pond 28 GOAT ISLAND 27 Memorial Blvd. 26 Ochre Ave. 16 Thames St. FORT ADAMS Bellevue Ave. Narragansett Ave. STATE PARK 25 Webster St. 24 23 Shepard Ave. Ruggles Ave. Harrison 22 Ave. Ridge Rd. Bellevue Ave. 20 17 19 18 Ocean Ave. 21 BRENTON POINT 0123 MILES NEWPORT Bowen’s Wharf 76

86 7. Storer Park drop-off. Parking is limited along Newport Key to Primary Uses Thames Street. Located on Newport Harbor, just • Handicap access, concessions, north of the Goat Island causeway, 1. Van Zandt Avenue ß historic interest, hiking/walking, this park is situated on land donated Public Park Located just south of the Newport trash receptacles by the federal government after Bridge is a well-maintained pier that World War II. The park has an ample Path to Shore extends west from the intersection of 12. Brown and Howard grassy area for picnicking, fishing, Van Zandt Avenue and Washington Wharf and recreation. It is within easy walk- Boating h Street to Narragansett Bay. There is ing distance of the Gateway Center This right-of-way is a paved road that no on-site parking available. parking facility and the harbor shop- Beach with extends west from the intersection of • CRMC ROW#: Z-7 ping district. Lifeguards Dennison Street and Thames Street • Picnic tables/benches, trash recep- • Picnic tables/benches, trash recep- to Pole 4D and then southeast to a tacles tacles Wildlife Refuge section of steel bulkhead bordering S Newport Harbor. No on-site parking 2. Battery Street Scenic View is available. 8. Goat Island ß Located just south of the Newport Connector 1 • CRMC ROW#: Z-18 Bridge, this site consists of a right- Fishing • Historic interest, hiking/walking Linking Newport to Goat Island, the ß of-way that extends west from the causeway is a popular spot for fish- intersection of Battery Street and Historic 13. King Park ing. A paved road and two concrete Washington Street to a bulkhead that sidewalks extend from the circle in This is a small, grassy park off retains Battery Park and offers a nice Hiking/Walking front of the hotel to the west side of F Wellington Avenue, with playground view of Narragansett Bay. There is the causeway and Newport Harbor. equipment, plenty of benches, and a limited on-site parking available. Curbside parking is available. small but unobstructed beach area • CRMC ROW#: Z-8 • CRMC ROW#: Z-17 (with Connector 2) with lifeguards during the summer. • Picnic tables/benches, fishing, trash • Trash receptacles Parking in lot with sticker only. receptacles • Handi cap access, boat ramp, hiking/ 9. Goat Island walking, trash receptacles ß 3. Pine Street Connector 2 NEWPORT BRIDGE This right-of-way, adjacent to Battery Located on the east side of the Park, is a good place to launch a causeway, this site consists of a Van Zandt Ave. kayak. The flat, rocky shore makes for paved road, two concrete sidewalks, 1 a durable, easy-to-negotiate surface. two paved parking areas, and an area No parking is available. Battery St. of large rocks on the shore. It extends 2 Third St. • CRMC ROW#: Z-9 west from Washington Street to the 3 Farewell St. • Trash receptacles Washington St. east side of the causeway to Newport America's Cup Ave. Harbor and just south of Storer Park. 4. Willow Street • CRMC ROW#: Z-16 (with Connector 1) h Thames St. 4 • Trash receptacles Willow Street ends in a boat ramp in Elm St. 5 6 poor condition, suitable for canoes 8 7 and kayaks. No parking is available. 10. Perotti Park • CRMC ROW#: Z-13 Located just south of Long Wharf, this 9 Long Wharf site is a small, linear park hugging 5. Poplar Street Landing h downtown Newport Harbor. There 10 are park benches and a scenic view This landing is suitable for launching GOAT Thames St. of the Newport boating scene. No ISLAND canoes or kayaks. No parking is available. parking is available. • Handicap access, concessions, 6. Elm Street h NEWPORT trash receptacles HARBOR This right-of-way is just south of the Newport Bridge. It consists of a 11. Ann Street Pier 11 paved road and walk, leading to a Located off Thames Street, one block concrete ramp and wooden pier, that 12 south of Christie’s Landing, this site extends west from the intersection of is a public dinghy dock consisting of Elm Street and Washington Street to a long wooden pier, benches, and a a cobble beach bordering Nar- small area for boats to dock. Boat ragansett Bay. There is no on-site rentals are available. Adjacent to the parking available. dock is a small cobble beach. This • CRMC ROW#: Z-15 13 spot is ideal for boater pick-up and • Fishing, trash receptacles Wellington Ave. 77

87 14. Rose Island Wildlife 20. Gooseberry Beach Ferry provides water taxi service to S Refuge Bowen’s Wharf, Goat Island, Rose This is a small, quiet beach in a large Island, and Jamestown. Parking is This 16-acre site was a Navy storage cove, with a well-protected swim- available. facility for explosives during World ming area. Dogs, floats, jet skis, open • Handicap access, boat ramp, Wars I and II. Today it is a protected fires, ball playing, and spearguns are picnic tables/benches, hiking/ prime nesting habitat for migratory not allowed. Parking is available for walking, wildlife observation, trash birds; thus, walking around the perim- a fee. Van Zandt Avenue receptacles eter of the island is prohibited be- • Picnic tables/benches, conces- tween April 1 and August 15. Small sions, fishing, hiking/walking, 17. Ocean Avenue boats may be beached, but only at the toilets, trash receptacles lighthouse. When the refuge is open, This state-maintained coastal road visitors must stay on the beaches and 21. Ledge Road from the end of Bellevue Avenue to abide by the signs. From late Octo- Castle Hill and Ridge Road offers Located near the southern end of ber to early April, harbor seals may breathtaking views of the Atlantic Bellevue Avenue, before Ocean be seen on the north end and at Cit- Ocean, rocky shoreline, and historic Drive, this right-of-way provides ac- ing Rock on the east side of the mansions. Bailey’s Beach (private), cess to the end of Cliff Walk. Unlike island. Fee. King Park Gooseberry Beach, Hazard’s Beach the other parts of Cliff Walk, this end (private), Price’s Neck Access, and of the walkway is not paved. Caution 15. Rose Island Light Brenton Point State Park are located should be taken, as this section con- Station and Fort off Ocean Avenue. Parking is avail- sists of boulders, dirt paths, and nar- Hamilton able. row passages along the bluffs. This • Fishing, hiking/walking, wildlife The Rose Island Lighthouse was built is a popular site for skin and scuba th observation century on the site of an in the 19 diving and fishing. th 18 -century fort. It was active until • CRMC ROW#: Z-3 1970, when it was abandoned and fell 18. Brenton Point State • Wildlife observation, trash recep- Elm Street into disrepair. The Rose Island Light- Park tacles house Foundation restored the light- Located off Ocean Avenue at Brenton house and adjacent fort and offers Point, this state park has lots to offer. tours seasonally. This 1.5-acre pub- During World War II, it was consid- lic park is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily ered a strategic location for the de- from July 1 to Labor Day. Access is fense of the mouth of Narragansett via the Jamestown Ferry. Overnight Bay. The area is frequently used by visitors are welcome at the light- students to observe the many tidal house year-round. Reservations re- pools, plants, and animals that live Brenton Point State Park quired. Fee. along the rocky shoreline. There is a • Picnic tables/benches, swimming, one-mile walking path along the fishing, wildlife observation, hiking/ oceanfront, complete with nature walking, toilets study information displays. Fishing for Battery Street tautog, mussels, and lobsters is also 16. Fort Adams State popular along the shore. There is a Park large, open, grassy area ideal for pic- nicking and flying kites. Plenty of free Located off Ocean Drive, this state parking is available. facility is one of the largest seacoast King’s Beach • Handicap access, picnic tables/ fortifications in the United States, benches, toilets, trash receptacles containing a visual record of military history from the 1820s to the end of World War II. Displaying original 19. King’s Beach and ß granite, brick, and earthworks as well Fishing Access th -century gun emplacements, as 20 Next to Price’s Neck, off Ocean Av- the park has many public facilities, enue, is a state-maintained fishing Ocean Avenue including a bathing beach with area in a well-protected cove. There restrooms and showers, two fishing is also a large, open, grassy area piers, two soccer fields, and a rugby west of the site and a small cobble field. Guided tours of the fort are beach to the south of the parking Ledge Road available daily from mid-May through area. There is plenty of on-site park- October. Fort Adams is also the loca- ing available. tion for Sail Newport Sailing Center, • Swimming, picnicking, wildlife the Museum of Yachting, and the observation Eisenhower House. The Jamestown 78

88 26. Cliff Terrace 22. Ruggles Avenue 28. Easton’s Beach (First Beach) Located off Memorial Boulevard, off Located just south of The Breakers Located at the end of Memorial Bou- Cliff Avenue, this site is near the be- mansion, off Bellevue Avenue, this levard, north of Cliff Walk, this is a ginning of Cliff Walk. There is access right-of-way ends at the historic Cliff great spot for the family because to Cliff Walk, but no parking. Walk. There is no on-site parking. of its many facilities and amuse- • CRMC ROW#: Z-4 ments that include bumper boats, 27. Cliff Walk F miniature golf, a carousel, an arcade, 23. Shepard Avenue Beginning at Memorial Boulevard, and lawn bowling. This site also has Located just north of The Breakers off this 3.5-mile scenic walkway over- lifeguards, restrooms, showers, looks the rocky bluffs and the Atlan- Bellevue Avenue, this site provides rental bathhouses, a snack bar, and Poplar Street tic Ocean as well as the adjoining access to Cliff Walk. Streetside handicapped facilities. A cement famous Newport summer mansions. parking fills up with visitors to The boardwalk extends the length of the Although the pathway is paved most Breakers. beach, ideal for strollers and wheel- • Trash receptacles of the way, great caution should be chairs. Although there is plenty of pay taken, as the trail is potentially dan- parking available, on summer week- gerous in some locations. The site is 24. Webster Street ends the lots usually fill up by noon. only partially wheelchair-accessible, • Picnic tables/benches, fishing, Located just south of “40 Steps,” off as there are rocks and stairs in some hiking/walking, trash receptacles Bellevue Avenue, this right-of-way areas. Parking is available. provides access to Cliff Walk and to • Wildlife observation, fishing, trash Ruggles Avenue some exceptionally scenic views of receptacles the mansions, Rhode Island Sound, and Salve Regina University. • CRMC ROW#: Z-1 25. Narragansett Avenue (40 Steps) Located at the eastern end of Narragansett Avenue, this site pro- vides access to the mid-point of Cliff Webster Street Walk. It has been restored as a beau- Ann Street Pier Willow Street tiful National Historic Landmark. Forty granite steps lead sharply down the face of the rocky bluffs above the ocean. Some parking is available. • CRMC ROW#: Z-2 • Handicap access, fishing, toilets, trash receptacles Pine Street Storer Park Gooseberry Beach st Cliff Walk Perotti Park 79

89 warrant the inference that the land CRMC’s Public Right-of-Way Process had been laid out, appropriated, or dedicated by the landowner to the public. An occasional use of land by a few persons living in the area or by abutters to the property without any claim of right is insufficient to What Is a Public Right-of-Way to the Shore? establish a public right-of-way. A public right-of-way to the shore is a piece of land over which the Ways that have been obtained by 6) public has the right to pass on foot, or, if appropriate, by vehicle, in the public’s adverse use . Privately order to access the tidal waters of Rhode Island. owned paths to the shore that have been used for a period of 10 con- How Is a Public Right-of-Way Established in Rhode Island? secutive years by the public may become rights-of-way, but only if Generally, there are six legal methods of establishing a public right- the requirements of the R.I. General of-way in Rhode Island: Laws are met (R.I.G.L. Chapter 34-7). This method is commonly known as state’s tidal waters. After a city or 1) Roadways that have been laid out, an easement by prescription. An town planning commission has recorded, opened, and maintained easement is a right to use the land given notice of the proposed sub- by a city or town council. These are of another in a specified manner. In division plat, held public hearing(s), commonly known as city- or town- order to create a public right-of- and approved the subdivision plat, accepted streets. To become a way by this method, the public has and that plat has been recorded in public right-of-way, the city or town the burden of establishing actual, the city’s or town’s land evidence must follow the statutory method for open, notorious, hostile, and con- records, the roads or ways are laying out public highways. Many of tinuous use of a way under a claim available for public use. the public rights-of-way in Rhode of right for 10 years. In addition, the Island’s coastal communities fall law specifically does not allow a Ways that have been offered to 4) into this category. public right-of-way to be estab- the public by dedication and ac- lished by footpaths; the pathway cepted by public use or by official Highways by grant or use (R.I.G.L. 2) has to have been used by carriages city or town action (implied Chapter 24-2). This statute provides or vehicles. This is a common law dedication). that all lands that have been quietly, method of establishing public peaceably, and actually used, rights-of-way. In order for there to improved, and considered as public CRMC Public Right-of- be a common law dedication, there highways for 20 years by a city or Way Designation Process must be a clear intent by the owner town council shall be taken and to donate the land and a clear CRMC has the authority to considered to be public highways acceptance of that land by the designate public rights-of-way to as if the lands had been regularly public. Once a parcel of land has the tidal waters of the state (R.I.G.L. laid out, recorded, and opened by been dedicated, the transfer is 46-23.6). A CRMC public right-of- the city or town council. In order for irrevocable. The landowner’s intent way designation clarifies the status this statute to apply, a city or town to dedicate the land can be evi- of a public right-of-way and must give notice of its intentions to denced by the recordation of a plat provides shore goers with clear and declare the land as a public high- map showing the right-of-way as legally defined pathways to the way and must prepare and record a public or by language contained in shore. The designation of public plat of the highway in the land a deed(s). Many public rights-of- rights-of-way also ensures the evidence records of the city or town way to Rhode Island’s shoreline preservation and protection of where the land lies. have been established by dedica- these access sites for subsequent tion. Ways that have been approved generations of Rhode Islanders. 3) by recordation of a subdivision plat. CRMC carries on a continuous Highways that have been used by 5) Rhode Island’s subdivision statute process of discovery and designa- the public since time immemorial. authorizes cities and towns to tion of rights-of-way using a This is an old common law concept. control the subdivision of land standing right-of-way subcommit- The law provides that to create a within their borders (R.I.G.L. tee. Because of administrative and public right-of-way by use, the Chapter 45-23). A subdivision, of legal requirements, the right-of-way evidence must show that the use necessity, requires roads and ways. designation process is complex and has been general, uninterrupted, Sometimes, a subdivision contains requires a substantial investment of continuous, and adverse so as to roads or ways that lead to the time and resources. 80

90 Therefore, CRMC typically takes a other words, the public has the right town-by-town approach to identify to pass over and use the land in a Public Access Created via CRMC and investigate potential public manner consistent with the Permit rights-of-way. The CRMC designa- condition of the site no matter who tion process begins with a fact- owns it. When CRMC designates a In addition to creating public access by legislative not finding investigation and a title public right-of-way, it does mandate to discover and designate public rights-of-way determine the ownership of the site. search conducted by CRMC’s or the to the shore, CRMC creates public access via Section CRMC is prohibited from addressing town’s legal counsel. This investiga- 335 regulations in the Rhode Island Coastal Resources questions of ownership. tion is usually at the request of a Management Program. These regulations require that a Determining the ownership of a coastal city or town. In many cases, public access plan be included when CRMC issues a public right-of-way can be CRMC’s efforts are supplemented permit for: complicated and often requires with research by the various court action. Frequently, if a site has municipal departments. During the • Commercial and industrial development or been actively used by the public, the fact-finding process, evidence redevelopment projects public may in fact own the site. pertaining to the existence of a • New marinas or significant expansions to marinas CRMC does not create “new” right-of-way is gathered from land • Activities that involve the filling of tidal waters public rights-of-way; it merely evidence records, deeds, tax • Publicly funded beach nourishment projects recognizes and places an official assessor records, public works designation on previously existing records, town documents, and court Projects That Include a Section 335 conditions. It is the landowner and/ records. A visual inspection of Public Access Plan a creates or a city or town that potential sites is also made to public right-of-way; CRMC merely gather evidence pertaining to the Bristol Stone Harbour Condominiums identifies these sites. If CRMC has exercise of dominion over a Thames Street Landing not designated a site, it does not potential right-of-way including Weetamoe Farms Condominiums mean that a public right-of-way maintenance, repair, and upkeep. Wharf Tavern does not exist. In fact, a public All evidence is reviewed for Little Compton right-of-way may exist, but CRMC accuracy and relevance by the Sakonnet Point Club may not have enough information to CRMC right-of-way subcommittee legally designate it or CRMC may and presented at a public hearing in Narragansett not have investigated the site. the town or city inv olved. If, based Knowlesway Extension (at Point Judith Pond) on the evidence gathered and public Newport testimony received, the subcommit- Can a Public Right-of- Casey’s Marina tee determines with reasonable Newport Onshore Way Be Blocked or probability that a public right-of-way The Inn at Long Wharf (Marina) exists, a recommendation is made to Abandoned? West Wind Marina (Waite’s Wharf) the full council to designate the site. Once a site has been designated North Kingstown If the full council approves the right- as a public right-of-way, CRMC Blue Beach (R.I. Economic Development Corporation) of-way subcommittee’s recommen- Compass Rose Beach (R.I. Economic Development Corporation) prohibits any activities that would dation, then a final written decision Jamestown Bridge (R.I. Department of Transportation) obstruct the public’s use of the site is rendered containing factual Keiffer Park (R.I. Economic Development Corporation) and pursues legal actions against findings and conclusions of law. If North Kingstown Town Marina individuals that block or impede the Spink’s Neck Beach (R.I. Economic Development Corporation) there is not an appeal or after an public’s access at designated appeal has been resolved in favor of Portsmouth rights-of-way. CRMC, then the decision is recorded Carnegie Abbey Once a public right-of-way has in the land evidence records and Melville Marina been designated by CRMC, it Mount Hope Marine Terminal filed with the Secretary of State’s cannot be abandoned by a city or Office. town without prior approval of Providence Collier Point Park (Narragansett Electric) CRMC (R.I.G.L.46-23-6.2). In Providence Place Mall What a CRMC- addition, a public right-of-way that Shooters (Currently R.I. Department of Transportation property) has not been designated by CRMC, Designated Right-of- but is nevertheless a public way, Tiverton Way Means Village at Mount Hope Bay (Starwood) cannot be abandoned without formal abandonment proceedings. Once a public right-of-way has Warwick Moreover, highways that have been been designated, the public Dickerson’s Marina designated public by the actions of possesses a passageway to gain Greenwich Bay Marina a landowner or acquired by access to the tidal waters of the prescription cannot be lost due to state. Like an easement, a public non-use and the public cannot lose right-of-way relates to the public’s its rights due to adverse possession. use, not the public’s ownership. In 81

91 CRMC Rights-of-Way Willow Street Z13 Patterson Avenue R3 Steamboat Street G3 Barrington Z14 Poplar Street R4 Harris Avenue Spindrift Street G4 P1 Shore Road Elm Street Z15 R6 Shore Drive (3) G5 Eldred Avenue P2 Daunis R-O-W Z16 Goat Island Connector (28-B) Shore Drive (5) R7 G6 Mast Street Bristol Goat Island Connector (28-A) Z17 Shore Drive (6) R8 G7 Hull Street Beach Road S1 Z18 Brown & Howard Wharf Shore Drive (7) R9 Capstan Street G12 Gibson Road S2 Z19 Lee’s Wharf R10 Road to Town Landing G11 Garboard Street S3 Fales Road Howard’s Wharf Z20 G8 Champlin Way Warwick S4 Constitution Street Sisson’s Wharf Z21* Buccaneer Way G9 Bradford Street J1 S5 Union Street Waites Wharf Z22* Decatur Avenue G13 Elkins Avenue J2 Walley Street S6 Spring Wharf Z23 G10 Carr Lane Charlotte Drive (north side) #1 J3 1 S18 Low Lane High Street North Kingstown J4 Charlotte Drive (north side) #2 North Street S7 Little Compton J5 Charlotte Drive (north side) #3 Phillips Street F5 Butterworth Avenue S8 Charlotte Drive #4 J6 Continuation of Taylor’s Lane W1 F6 Loop Drive S9 Azalea Drive W2 Town Way Beachwood Drive (east side) #1 J7 F7 Loop Drive (2) Fatima Drive S10 1 W3 Sakonnet Harbor Boat Ramp Beachwood Drive (east side) #2 J8 Town Wharf S11 San Miguel Drive 1 J9 Sylvia Drive Allen Harbor Complex Sherman Avenue S12 Middletown 1 J10 Sheffield Street Wilson Park S13 Smith Street Tuckerman Avenue J11 Reynolds Avenue S14 Kickemuit Avenue Y1* btwn Lots 104/105 Pawtucket J12 North Shore Street Narrows Road S15 Shore Drive Y3 Bishop Street M1 J13 Waterfront Drive Sunrise Drive S16 Y4 Third Beach Road J14 Cooney Street Annawamscutt Drive S17 Portsmouth Southeast end of Esplanade Progress Street J15 Poppasquash Road (beach lot) S19 V1 Mount View Road & Shore Drive Y5 Burnett Road (east side) #1 J16 Burton Street S23 Anthony Road V2 Taggarts Ferry Road Y6 J17 Burnett Road (east side) #2 S20 State Street Narragansett Road V3 Kingfisher Avenue Y7 J18 Burnett Road (east side) #3 S21 Franklin Street Cedar Avenue V4 Y8* Northwest end of Esplanade Shawomet Avenue (north side) J19 S22 Oliver Street V5 Point Street Y9 Western end of Purgatory Rd. Shawomet Avenue (north side) J20 S25 Bayview (Clipper Way) Green Street V6 Shore Drive, opp. Lot 107 Y10* J21 Bellman Avenue Narrows Peninsula S26 V7 Seaconnet Blvd. (northeasterly Tuckerman Avenue, Gaspee Point Drive (abandoned) J22 Platt Street S27 corner of land of Wm. Herbert) Y11* opp. Wolcott Avenue Butler Court J23 Aaron Avenue S29 V8* Seaconnet Blvd. Nausauket Road J24 Narragansett S24 Peck Avenue V9 Seaconnet Blvd. (northeasterly J25 Ives Road Knowlesway Extension C1 King Philip Avenue S28 corner of land of Don Ibbotson) Tiffany Avenue/Progress Street J26 Extension of Pilgrim Avenue C2 V10 Seaconnet Blvd. (northeasterly Charlestown J28 Narrangansett Bay Avenue Calef Avenue C3 corner of land of Virginia Arruda) B1 Breachway J29 Off Shawomet Avenue Black Point C5* Ruth Avenue V11 East Beach Road B2 J30 Off Ship Street (Ship Court) Bass Rock Road C6 V12 Fountain Avenue Suburban Parkway- Conanicus Road C11 Cranston V13 Aquidneck Avenue Formerly Delaware Avenue J31 Conant Avenue Road End C7 K1 Aborn Street (south side) V14 Atlantic Avenue Peck Lane-Pawtuxet Village J32 C12 Foddering Farm Road Extension K2 Aborn Street (westerly side) (Easterly end of East Corys Lane) Off Cooney Street/Extension Hazard Avenue Road End C9 Seaview Avenue (west side) K3 V15 Atlantic Avenue J33 of Lilac Street Newton Avenue Road End C13 (Easterly end of Tallman Avenue) East Greenwich Rock Avenue/Bromley Avenue J34 Pettaquamscutt Avenue C10 V16 Child Street London Street H1 Off Reynolds Avenue J35 C8 South Ferry Road Morningside Lane V17 Rocky Hollow Road J36 H2 Priscilla Avenue Wandsworth Street Extension C14 Long Street H3 Masthead Drive-Old Courtland Ln. J37 Providence New Shoreham (Block Island) King Street Ogden Avenue off Burnett Road J38 H4 L1 Irving Avenue Settlers’ Rock E1 H5 Bridge Street Westerly Butler Avenue L2 E2 Scotch Beach Road Division Street H6 A14 Avondale Road Scup Rock Property E3 South Kingstown East Providence A2* Bluff Avenue Cooneymus Road E4 D1 Statice Drive Third Beachway N4 A3* Manatuck Avenue E5 Coast Guard Road Dawn Drive D2 N5 Fourth Beachway Atlantic Avenue (1) A6 Andy’s Way E6 Daybreak Drive D3 N6 Fifth Beachway A7 Atlantic Avenue (2) E7 West Beach Road Ocean Avenue D4 Narragansett Beachway N1 A8* Atlantic Avenue (4) Newport N2 First Beachway Atlantic Avenue (5) A9 Tiverton Webster Street Z1 Second Beachway N3 Atlantic Avenue (6) A10* State Avenue T2 Z2 Narragansett Avenue N7 Sixth Beachway A11 Atlantic Avenue (7) T1 Carey Lane Z3 Ledge Road N8 Seventh Beachway A12* Atlantic Avenue (8) Nannaquaket Bridge T3 Ruggles Avenue Z4 Eighth Beachway N9 Atlantic Avenue (9) A13 T4 Fogland Road Seaview Avenue Z5 Ninth Beachway N10 T5 Land south of Sakonnet Bridge Z6 Cypress Street Tenth Beachway N11 *On appeal. Sites so noted indicate CRMC T6 Two Rod Way Van Zandt Avenue Z7 decisions that are being challenged Eleventh Beachway N12 South of Stone Bridge T7 Z8 Battery Street through the courts. Sites that have been de- Riverside Drive N13 Pine Street Z9 termined not public are not on this list. For Warren Jamestown more information, contact CRMC. Cherry Street Z10 R1 Maple Street G1 Broad Street 1 Z11 Chestnut Street Designation number pending Parker Avenue R2 Spirketing Street G2 Walnut Street Z12 82

92 35 Chafee Nature Preserve George B. Salter Grove 49 Index 14 Champlin’s Marina 35 Gilbert Stuart Birthplace Charlestown Beach 77 Goat Island Connector 49 Aborn Street Boat Ramp 14 (Block Island) 39 Goddard State Park Acre Avenue 56 Charlestown Breachway Beach 78 Gooseberry Beach Allen Avenue 55 and Boat Ramp 23 27 Gooseberry Road Town Ramp 39 Allen Harbor Complex Charlestown Town Beach 23 67 Gould Avenue Andy’s Way 14 Chepiwanoxet Island 40 Green Hill Beach 24 77 Ann Street Pier Child Street 68 67 Green Street Annawamscutt Drive (Bristol) 63 Clark Road 57 68 Grinnell’s Beach Annawamscutt Road (Barrington) 55 13 Clayhead Nature Trail Gull Cove State Boat Ramp 67 Anthony Road 67 Cliff Terrace 79 55 Haines Memorial Park Appian Way 55 Cliff Walk 79 Hanging Rock Road Parking Area 72 Apponaug Cove 40 Coast Guard Station/Coast 57 Harris Avenue 68 Aquidneck Avenue Guard Road 14 29 Hazard Avenue Arnold Avenue 49 62 Coggeshall Farm Museum 35 Hull Street 40 Arnold’s Neck Park 49 Collier Point Park Independence Park 61 18 Atlantic Avenue #1 62 Colt State Park India Point Park 50 18 Atlantic Avenue #2 39 Compass Rose Beach Indian Head Neck Road 14 18 Atlantic Avenue #7 Conanicut Battery on Island Park Avenue 67 Atlantic Avenue #9 18 Prospect Hill 34 Ivy Avenue 67 Atlantic Beach 72 33 Conanicut Island Sanctuary 51 John Lewis Park Audubon Society of Rhode Island Conant Avenue Road End 29 56 Juniper Street Environmental Education Conimicut Point Recreation Area 42 27 Kenport Marina 61 Center 61 Constitution Street Kickemuit Avenue 63 13 Ballard’s Beach Corliss Landing 49 King’s Beach and Fishing Access 78 40 Barbara M. Tufts Playground 51 Crescent Park 77 King Park 57 Barker Avenue Decatur Avenue 33 King Phillip Avenue 63 Barrington Police Station 27 Deep Hole Fishing Area King Street Access at Water Boat Ramp 55 Division Street Access at Street 40 Barrington Town Beach 55 40 Water Street Knockum Hill Reserve 56 29 Bass Rock Road East Bay Bicycle Path 27 Knowlesway Extension 77 Battery Street (Barrington) 56 55 Latham Park 55 Bay Spring Avenue East Bay Bicycle Path (Bristol) 62 Lavin’s Landing Marina 23 41 Bayside Beach East Bay Bicycle Path Ledge Road 78 14 Beach Avenue/Dunns Bridge 51 (Riverside Square) 27 Long Cove Marina Beach Road (Bristol) 62 East Bay Bicycle Path (Warren) 56 Long Street Access at Water Beach Road Extension East Beach/Ninigret State 40 Street (East Providence) 51 23 Facilities 41 Longmeadow Fishing Area 34 Beavertail State Park East Corys Lane 68 17 Lotteryville Marina Belvidere Avenue 56 33 East Ferry 62 Low Lane Bissel Cove 36 East Greenwich Town Overlook 34 Mackerel Cove Beach 29 Black Point 39 and Boat Ramp 17 Main Street Boat Ramp Blackstone Park 50 East Matunuck State Beach 27 Manatuck Avenue 17 Block Island Boat Basin 14 Easton’s Beach (First Beach) 79 13 Mansion Road Block Island Ferry Terminal 28 Elm Lane (Barrington) 55 57 Maple Street Block Island National Wildlife Elm Street (Newport) 77 17 Margin Street Launch 13 Refuge 71 Emily Ruecker Wildlife Refuge Marina Park 27 23 Blue Shutters Town Beach 62 Fales Road Marsh Meadows Wildlife 17 Bluff Avenue Fatima Drive 63 35 Preserve 28 Bluff Hill Cove Access Ferry Road 62 Masthead Drive 40 Bold Point Park 51 Firefighters Memorial Park 61 Matunuck Management Area 27 Brenton Point State Park 78 Fisherman’s Memorial State Park 28 50 Max Read Field Bridge Street Access at Crompton 71 Fogland Beach 71 McCorrie Lane Fishing Area Avenue 39 Fogland Road 71 Melville Campground Recreational 62 Bristol Town Beach 78 Fort Adams State Park Area 71 33 Broad Street 34 Fort Getty 50 Metropolitan Park Brown and Howard Wharf 77 Fort Ninigret 24 30 Middle Bridge 56 Brown Street Extension 34 Fort Wetherill State Park 61 Mill Pond Inlet Buccaneer Way 33 67 Fountain Avenue Misquamicut State Beach 18 51 Bullock Cove Access 34 Fox Hill Salt Marsh Mohegan Bluffs 13 56 Burr’s Hill Park Franca Drive 63 Moonstone Beach 24 Calef Avenue 29 Frank Hall Boat Yard 17 Morningside Lane 68 30 Canonchet Farm 13 Frederick Benson Town Beach 14 Mosquito Beach 33 Capstan Street Galilee at Great Island Bridge 28 62 Mount Hope Farm Carr Lane 33 Galilee Bird Sanctuary 28 63 Mount Hope Fishing Access 29 Casino Park 33 Garboard Street Mount Hope View Road 67 Cedar Avenue 67 49 Gaspee Point Drive 68 Nannaquaket Bridge 83

93 Napatree Point Conservation RIDEM Fish and Wildlife Teddy’s Beach 67 17 Area 34 Marine Fisheries Center Third Beach 73 Narragansett Avenue (40 Steps) 79 River Bend Cemetery 17 Third Beach Road 73 41 Narragansett Bay Avenue Riverside Marine 68 57 Touisset Marsh Wildlife Refuge Narragansett Bay National 57 Road to Town Landing (Warren) Town Way (Little Compton) 71 68 Estuarine Research Reserve 61 Rockwell Park Trustom Pond National 67 Narragansett Road Rocky Hollow Road Access 24 Wildlife Refuge Narragansett Town Beach 29 at Crompton Avenue 39 Tuckerman Avenue (opposite Narrow River Boat Ramp 30 Rodman’s Hollow 14 72 Walcott Avenue) Narrow River Inlet 30 28 Roger Wheeler State Beach 71 Two Rod Way 63 Narrows Fishing Area Rose Island Light Station 61 Union Street 63 Narrows Road and Fort Hamilton 78 Van Zandt Avenue 77 Nausauket Road 40 Rose Island Wildlife Refuge 78 Veterans’ Memorial Park 55 Nayatt/Daunis Road 51 Rose Larisa Memorial Park 55 (Barrington) 18 New Westerly Town Beach Rose Nulman Memorial Park 29 Veterans’ Memorial Parkway Newton Avenue 29 30 Route 1A Overlook 51 (East Providence) Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 23 Roy Carpenter’s Beach 24 14 Veterans Park (Block Island) 24 Ninigret Park 79 Ruggles Avenue Viking Marina 17 73 Norman Bird Sanctuary 51 Sabin Point Park Walker Farm 56 36 North Kingstown Town Beach Sachuest Point National 61 Walley Street North Street 63 72 Wildlife Refuge Walmsley Lane 35 Northwest End of Esplanade 68 Sakonnet Bridge Access Wamsetta Avenue 56 Shore Drive 72 Sakonnet Harbor 72 Warren Town Beach 56 Oakland Beach 41 Sakonnet Harbor Fishing Access 72 Warwick City Park 40 Ocean Avenue Bridge 28 Salty Brine State Beach Watch Hill Boatyard 17 14 (Block Island) 63 San Miguel Drive Watch Hill Dock 17 49 Ocean Avenue (Cranston) Sandy Beach (Prudence Island) 68 17 Watch Hill Lighthouse 78 Ocean Avenue (Newport) Sandy Point Beach (Portsmouth) 71 49 Waterplace Park Ocean Avenue 29 Scarborough State Beach Watson, Clark, Bluff, and 27 (South Kingstown) School Street Pier 50 Waterway Extensions 55 24 Ocean House Marina Scotch Beach Road 13 35 Watson Farm 29 Ocean Road Scup Rock Property 14 Weaver Cove Boat Ramp 71 41 Ogden Avenue Extension Seapowet Marsh and Point Webster Street 79 13 Old Harbor Dock 71 Fishing Area 18 Weekapaug Breachway 30 Old Sprague Bridge Overlook Seaside Beach 33 Weekapaug Point Overlook 18 One Bay Avenue Restaurant 41 41 Seaview Beach West Beach Road 14 Osamequin Nature Trails and Seaview Park 49 West Ferry 34 Bird Sanctuary 56 72 Second Beach 18 Westerly Town Beach Parker Avenue 57 13 Settlers’ Rock 41 Wharf Marina 57 Patterson Avenue Shawomet Boat Ramp 42 56 Wheaton Street Boat Ramp 50 Pawtucket Town Landing 34 Sheffield Cove Marsh 36 Wickford Municipal Dock 14 Payne’s Dock 23 Shelter Cove Marina Wickford Municipal Wharf 36 77 Perotti Park 79 Shepard Avenue 77 Willow Street (Newport) Perry Creek Accessway 23 Sherman Avenue 63 Willow Way (Barrington) 55 Pettaquamscutt Avenue 30 57 Shore Drive 36 Wilson Park Pettaquamscutt Cove National Slater Mill Historic Site 50 Woodbine Avenue 55 Wildlife Refuge 30 Smith Street 63 30 Pettaquamscutt Park Snake Hole Road 14 29 Pilgrim Avenue Extension South Ferry Road 30 Pine Street 77 South Kingstown Town Beach 27 Platt Street (Narrows Coastal South Shore Beach 72 63 Access) Southeast Lighthouse 13 Pleasant Street 36 Southwest Point/Cooneymus 28 Point Judith Lighthouse Road 14 28 Point Judith State Park Spirketing Street 33 Pond Street Ramp 27 28 State Pier #3 Poplar Street Landing 77 State Pier #4 28 Potowomut Neck 39 29 State Pier #5 (Tucker’s Dock) 33 Potter Cove/Taylor Point State Street Pier and Boat Providence Avenue Playground 51 61 Launch Prudence Island Ferry 61 49 Stillhouse Cove 72 Purgatory Chasm Stone Bridge Ramp 67 Quonochontaug Breachway 23 77 Storer Park Quonochontaug Conservation 63 Sunrise Drive 18 Area 40 Sylvia Drive Richmond Square Parking Lot 50 Taggart’s Ferry Road 73 Ray’s Bait 40 68 Tallman Avenue 71 Taylor’s Lane 84

94 Block Island Photo Credits Photos by Adam Zitello, except: Cover: Ann Madden Inside front cover, Background: Puffin Enterprises Page 1: Puffin Enterprises Page 2, North Lighthouse: Charlie Festa © Page 4: Istockphoto Inc. Page 7, Top, Lobster: Puffin Enterprises Page 8: Puffin Enterprises Page 9: Puffin Enterprises © Page 10, Egret: Istockphoto Inc.; All others: Puffin Enterprises Page 11, Upper right and background: R.I. Economic Development Corporation Page 12, North Lighthouse: R.I. Economic Development Corporation Page 15, Top: Puffin Enterprises; Canoe: Wood-Pawcatuck Watershed Association Page 16, Napatree Point: Puffin Enterprises Page 19: Charlie Festa Page 20, Top: Rhode Island Sea Grant; Bottom: Puffin Enterprises Page 22: Charlie Festa Page 25: Charlie Festa Page 29, Point Judith Lighthouse: Puffin Enterprises; Rose Nulman Memorial Park: Charlie Festa Page 30, View to Middle Bridge: Puffin Enterprises Page 31: Puffin Enterprises Page 32: Puffin Enterprises Page 33, Spirketing Street (sign), Conanicut Island Sanctuary, Buccaneer Way: Monica Allard Cox Page 34, East Ferry, RIDEM Fish and Wildlife Marine Fisheries Center, Taylor Point: Monica Allard Cox Page 35, Beavertail State Park, Conanicut Battery: Monica Allard Cox; Potter Cove/Taylor Point: Puffin Enterprises Page 36, Wickford Harbor: Puffin Enterprises Page 39, Rocky Hollow Access, Bridge Street, Division Street: Monica Allard Cox Page 40, Barbara Tufts Playground: Charlie Festa Narragansett Bay Journal Pages 44 through 46: Page 47, Riverboat: Blackstone Valley Tourism Council; Ranger: Blackstone River Watershed Council Page 48: Puffin Enterprises Page 50, Blackstone Park (canoeist), Pawtucket Town Landing, School Street Pier: Monica Allard Cox Page 51, Providence Avenue Playground, Crescent Park: Monica Allard Cox; Bold Point Park: Puffin Enterprises Page 58: Puffin Enterprises Page 59, Bristol Parade: Courtesy R.I. Tourism Division; Colt State Park: Monica Allard Cox Page 62, Coggeshall Farm Museum: Monica Allard Cox Page 64, Quahog: Charlie Festa; RHi X3 9276: Avery Lord. Two Fishermen on Shore with Clams, Rake and Basket. © The Rhode Island Historic Society Page 66: Puffin Enterprises Page 67, Common Fence Point: Puffin Enterprises Page 69: URI Coastal Resources Center Page 70: Norman Bird Sanctuary Page 71, Fogland Beach: Monica Allard Cox Page 73, Third Beach Road: Monica Allard Cox; Boy: Norman Bird Sanctuary Page 74, Upper piping plover: Malia Schwartz; Top insert and lower piping plover: Audubon Society of Rhode Island; American holly: Monica Allard Cox Page 75, Bottom: Puffin Enterprises Page 78, Battery Street: Charlie Festa Inside Back Cover, Background: Puffin Enterprises Back Cover: Monica Allard Cox 3

95 4

Related documents