Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) for All orig May 2018 updated Feb 2019

Transcript

1 for All Social and Emotional Learning Access, Cultural Proficiency, and Cultural Responsiveness strive to systematically develop the social and Throughout Massachusetts, teachers and administrators 1 (SEL) students , for many reasons including promot ing academic of their emotional learning 2 At . achievement and prosocial behavior, as well as lowering emotional distress and conduct problems the same time, t he cultural backgrounds of our students conti nue to become ever more diverse and educators many of build ing a practice of culturally responsive our are 3 Th guidance in this document from the Massachusetts e teaching (CRT). Department of Elementary and ) Secondary Education ( Department SEL and CRT . It draws on input addresses the critical intersection of from the voices of a diverse group of Massachusetts educators and administrators, along with those of parents and nationally recognized , scholars in SEL and was crafted with the following goals in mind: For districts administrators :  and Provide tool s for examining the extent to which SEL is o culturally responsive. o Share resources and strategies for increasing the linkage between SEL and CRT .  For teach ers : o Make explicit connections between SEL and CRT . ponsive , o tools for enacting culturally res Foster reflection about current practice and provide SEL in schools and classroom s . from access epartment The D and encourages educators to consider SEL instruction on a continuum to ensure that exposure to continuum , we seek culturally responsive SEL. By introducing this a ll students - quality SEL, and ll educators are working to a have meaningful exposure to high respect , value, and leve rage students’ identities, back grounds, and cultures . As districts and sc hools continue to develop students’ social and emotional Culturally competencies, we collectively Culturally Access to SEL Responsive seek to ensure equity for all Proficient SEL SEL students. SEL Equity Continuum  to SEL refers to the ccess A all imperative that have opportunities for SEL learning experiences and skill development students ; as a part of a tiered system of supports in SEL refers to the creation of learning experiences that are bias - free and  C ulturally proficient and kgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges; of students’ diverse bac respectful Culturally responsive actively draw upon  SEL students’ diverse backgrounds, refers to practices that identities, strengths, and challenges as a strategy to . deepen learning 1 commonly uses the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL's), definition of The Department the knowledge, skills, attitudes, SEL: SEL is the process of developing students' and adults' social and emotional competencies — and behaviors that individuals need to make successful choices. CASEL has defined five core competencies for SEL represented on this page. 2 (Durlak, Weissberg, Dymnicki, Taylor, & Schellinger, 2011) 3 Cultural Proficiency: A Strategy to Address Equity Gaps in Students’ Achievement and Learning Experiences . 1

2 Each of these terms will be discussed in greater depth throughout the document. Each builds upon the other , with the ultimate goal being that all students have the chance to develop their social and emotional competencies in culturally responsive learning environment s . Access to SEL SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING ACCESS TO Regardless of zip code, Massachusetts students deserve school experiences that “ inculcate the principles of humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity, industry and frugality, honesty and 4 pun ctuality in their dealings; sincerity, good humor, and all social affections, and generous sentiments .” the Department While the needs and approaches of supporting social and emotional outcomes vary, W seeks to ensure that al Guidelines on Implementing SEL . l students have access to SEL e have published - 12 and a website Curricula dedicated to providing information and resources about SEL. , K (CASEL) has identified four general The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning to SEL instruction: approaches Free - sta nding SEL  that provide explicit, step - by step instructions to teach students social lessons and emotional competencies across the five core competencies; General teaching practices that create classroom and school - wide conditions that facilitate and  rt social and emotional development in students; suppo  Integration of skill instruction and practices that support SEL within academic curriculum ; the context of an and  Guidance to administrators and school leaders on how to facilitate SEL as a school - wide initiative . Massachusetts schools commonly implement multi - tiered system s of 5 support particularly around students’ academic and behavioral needs. The , Department also recommends a tiered approach to SEL, where educators provide high quality instruct ion and general practices that help all students the core competencies of SEL ( ); where educators and develop tier one students’ social and emotional nee ds support staff provide supplemental supports based on individual tier two ); and where more ( tensive supports are available when individual student needs are more in urgent and/or intensive ( ) . tier three Tier one SEL strategies will generally occur in whole - school, whole - class settings . T ier two and three supports ma y be provided through targeted group instruction, embedded within a classroom setting, in indivi dualized work with students, in counseling sessions , and/ or in other settings as appropriate . This type of system is central to the goal of DESE strategic priority to support social - emotional learning, ’s : to promote systems and strategies that foster safe, positive, healthy, culturally - health, and safety competent, and inclusive learning environments that address students’ varied needs and improve educational outcomes for all. 4 Massachusetts State Constitution , Section V, Chapter II 5 tiered system of A mulit - support can be defined as a comprehensive system of differentiated supports that includes: evidence - based interventions matched to based instruction, universal screening, progress monitoring, formative assessments, research student’s needs. 2

3 iscipline strategies and outcomes is one of many educational areas of focus that may Rethinking d efit from a tiered approach to SEL. ben Schools and districts are expected to periodically examine their 6 own discipline - related data and are encouraged to review their data submitted to the Department through the School Safety and Discipline Report, as well a s local data including but not limited to office 7 consider ways that strengthening tiered SEL to conduct a root cause analysis ; discipline referrals and to ; supports may assist with locally identified challenges and goals. The Department encourages more focused attention on equity across all three tiers of SEL practice. All students deserve the chance to develop positive social and emotional competencies, and all students deserve supplemental and intensive supports if they demonstrate the need. Inequities in s tatewide the Department disciplinary data are disturbing and has engaged with the field to support local efforts through a professional learning network. , African American students, Latino students, example of inequities in statewide As an trends disciplinary and students with disabilities with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) continue to be suspended at rates significantly greater than their peers. For instance , the rate for Afr ican American/Black students (9.3 percent) was nearly 3.5 times, and for Hispanic/Latino (7.7 percent) nearly 2.9 times, of that of white students (2.7 Additional Resource: 8 percent). tiered SEL supports This suggests that the nature of  Safe and Supportive Learning Environment Resources at all times for may not be consistent for all students , and that for Massachusetts by prepared reflection and additional or - further self ff and administrators sta the National Center for Safe and approaches to setting and supporting behavioral alternative Supportive Learning Environments - management, expectations for students (including self relationship skills, and more) may be necessary and helpful . Furthermore, there is evidence that when implemented well, multi - tiered systems of support have been shown to reduce office discipline referral (ODR) rates. School personnel frequently use ODR rates to evaluate student behavior and the behavio ral climate of schools. ODRs are associated with problematic behaviors and can be predictive of student aggression, drug use, 9 , 10 defiance, behavior disorders, and juvenile delinquency. to appropriate systems of positive A multi - tiered approach to social and emotional learning, in addition school culture, may improve safe and supportive behavior supports and other strategies to support a academic and behavioral outcomes for students. Ensuring equitable access to tiered social and emotional learning and supports is vital to ensure positive school experiences for all students in the Commonwealth. Curriculum Fram eworks Guiding Principles and families with clear and shared , provide teachers, students Massachusetts curriculum frameworks expectations for what all students should know and be able to do at the end of each year; they formalize the expectation that all students in the Commonwealth have access to the same academic content, 6 Student Discipline Regulations, 603 CMR 53.14 (2) 7 - Level Root Cause Analyses of Disproportionate Discipline Outcomes Supporting School 8 Student Discipline Data Reports and the Rethinking Discipline Initiative 9 Bui, X., Quirk, C., Almazan, S., & Valenti, M. (2010). Positive behavioral interventions and supports research and practice. Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education , 1 - 13. 10 Simonsen, B., Eber, L., Black, A. C., Sugai, G., Lewandowski, H., Sims, B., & Myer s, D. (2012). Illinois statewide positive behavioral Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, s. interventions and supports: Evolution and impact on student outcomes across year 14(1), 5 - 16. 3

4 regardless of their zip code, background, or abilities. The Department integrated SEL core competencies Curriculum ELA/Literacy and Mathematics as guiding principles in revi sions to the Massachusetts revisions to o ther subject area Frameworks, and intends to continue this practice in additional , to clarify the expectation that all students deserve access to SEL. standards Additional SEL Resources : D  resources to support SEL Guiding Principle for Mat hematics epartment  D epartment resources to support SEL Guiding Principle for ELA/ L iteracy  CASEL's SEL Resource Library Culturally Proficient SEL SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING CULTURALLY PROFICIENT – 2017, about 9 percent of 2016 in Massachusetts were people of color, while students of In educators 11 . nearly 40 color made up Given that our teaching force does not always percent of the student body aphics as educators demonstrate skill in reflect the same demogr our students, it is critical that all build backgrounds all racial and ethnic and in , ing a learning environment that teaching students from all students to be successful. As such, c ultural proficiency is paramount , and is supports therefore an area of focus for , educator preparation programs, and districts alike. T he Department has DESE the following Massachusetts Standards for established indicators regarding cultural proficiency in the : Effective Practice  Indicator II - C. Cultural Proficiency : Actively creates and maintains an environment in which students’ diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges are respected.  Indicator II - B. L earning Environment : Creates and maintains a safe and collaborative learning environment that motivates students to take academic risks, challenge themselves, and claim ownership of their learning. Culturally proficient learning experiences can provide students “ Many SEL programs bill themselves as mirror s well to reflect on t with s heir own culture and identity a nd culturally neutral. being racially a through s or sliding glass doors as hat enable students t window The reality is they aren’t. Teachers s and understanding or imagination to better grasp the culture need to understand how SEL is 12 hen building students’ For example, w identities of others. situated in racial politics. We still have - aw areness skills, culturally proficient SEL instruction self racial stratification. Society still respect s and honor s students’ individual and marginalizes students of color, English a nd also identities and family/community s background learners, and low ” income students. - support identities and students to consider how their s Author of , -- Culturally Zaretta Hammond Responsive Teaching and the Brain and how they perceive backgrounds are perceived by others others ’ identities and backgrounds . In a culturally proficient SEL lesson, self - awareness and social awareness are often tightly linked. 11 2018 Massachusetts State Equity Plan 12 ening for All Voices.” and National Seed tyle, Emily (1988). Curriculum As Window and Mirror. Oak Knoll School’s “List S Project ” originally appearing in Mirrors, Windows, and Sliding Glass Doors Sims Bishop, Rudine. The Ohio State University. “ , and Perspectives: Choosing and Using Books for the Classroom. Vo. 6. No. 3. Summe r 1990. 4

5 the Department CAL) survey with students in a “ Views of Climate and Learning ” (VO In 2017, piloted 8, and 10 , and plans to pilot a second iteration in 2018 . The data below comes from the grades 5, th graders to one of the questions in responses of 10 that survey and is an example of how VOCAL information can help support scho ols and districts in reflecting on school climate and culture . Cultural Proficiency in the Massachusetts School Climate Survey, 2017 Always Mostly Mostly Never Think of the last 30 days in school True True Untrue True Adults working at this school treat all students 10% 3% 46% 41% respectfully, regardless of a student's race, culture, 13 . family background, sex, or sexual orientation Representing and respecting students’ cultures and identities in SEL practices can affect school climate and safety in tangible ways. As noted in the Principles for Ensuring Safe and Supportive Learning 14 , r esearch shows that inclusion of LGBTQ topics in curricula Environments for LGBTQ Students corresponds to all students reporting that they feel safer in school, regard less of sexual orientation or gender identity . Whether through an analysis of VOCAL data or through locally developed instruments, attention to students’ perceptions of school climate can lead to improved outcomes for all students. Professional Learning The Department has provided the following statement regarding professional learning, cultural proficiency , and SEL on the Social and Emotional Learning in Massachusetts website: The Department strongly recommends sustained professional development and collaborative learning - ng. Developing students' social around issues of cultural competency and Social and Emotional Learni lf - worth in emotional competencies can provide an opportunity to develop a sense of positive se connection to a student's race, color, sex, gender identity, religion, national origin, and sexual orientation. Educators are encouraged to develop examples and illustrations of these competencies that are experiences of their students. In addition to contributing to congruent with the social and cultural academic success, SEL programs can also support the development of students' sense of autonomy, agency, and social justice. . has established standards for High Quality Professional Development (HQPD) Massachusetts In addition, a dult professional learning experiences must themselves be culturally proficient and grounded in strong SEL practice in order to be effective . For an example of how to design job - embedded professional development , see the Guidebook for Inclusive Practice Job - Embedded PD Planning Guide . Cultural Proficiency Resources: Additional Is Social Emotional Learning Really Going to Work for Students of -  (Education Week, Teacher, 6/7/17) Color?  Cultural Proficiency: A Strategy to Address Equity Gaps in Students’ Achievement and Learning Experiences . (MA DESE, 2017) 13 th n=45,009 10 graders. Massachusetts School Climate Survey, 2017 STATE REPORT. 14 approved by the Massachusetts Board of Elementary an Safe Environment – Principles d Secondary Education, March 24, 2015. 5

6 VE SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING CULTURALLY RESPONSI Culturally responsive teaching (CRT) is built on a foundation of culturally proficient practice. It depends culture and identity as assets culturally respectful and bias - free, and they . Lessons are on approaching “ Educators can also leverage culture use culture to build trust and to improve and deepen learning. ... relationships with students as well as develop the cognitive scaffolding that builds on the broader 15 knowledge students already have so that they can b ecome competent, independent learners . ” What is Culturally Responsive Teaching? “Culturally responsive teaching is using the cultural knowledge, prior experience, frames of reference, and performance styles of ethnically diverse students to make learning encounters more relevant to and effective for them. The use of cultural referents in teaching bridges and explains Culturally the mainstream culture, while validating and affirming students’ own cultures. responsive teaching uses students’ identities and backgrounds as meaningful sources for creating 16 optimal learning environments. ” upon culturally proficient practice by educators build , In culturally responsive SEL instruction t intentionally integrating knowledge of students’ culture and identi y into SEL i nstructional practice to ng students’ self hen supporti SEL skills. build students’ - management skills, culturally For example, w responsive SEL instruction might integrate music, dance, or culturally appropriate stories, identified by the students or their families, to teach strategies for overcoming challenges and meeting goals. Three Signature Practices ” Oakland Unified School District “ Engaging Practice One: Welcoming Ritual: Activities for Inclusion  Engaging Practice Two: - Sense Making and “Brain Breaks”  Optimistic Closure: Reflections & Looking Forward Engaging Practice Three:  The Department strongly encourages all educators to intentionally strive for c ulturally responsive SEL to . be foundational in their ding One additional resource that may be helpful in gui instructional practice this work is the Social - Emotional Learning Skills & Culturally Responsive Teaching Heuristic developed by TED ) . the Massachusetts Consortium for Social - Emotional Learn ing in Teacher Education (SEL - Conclusion: As Massachusetts classrooms become ever more diverse, the Department seeks to develop a common language for social and emotional learning that is accessible, culturally proficient, and culturally responsive . In support of this, the reflection guide on the following pages is offered as a way for educator teams to reflect on and self - assess their SEL practice through the lens of cultural proficiency and culturally responsive teaching. It is intended to start or deepen the conversation around high - quality SEL instruction and to prompt best thinking and collaboration. 15 Zaretta Hammond . 16 Curriculum Inquiry Gay & Ladson . Billings (2013). The Ontario Institu te for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. - 43:1. 6

7 Social Emotional Learning & Culturally Responsive Teaching and Reflection Guide self - assess can use this tool to their practices in developing students’ Social Educator teams discuss and through the lens of cultural proficiency and culturally responsive and Emotional Learning (SEL) skills . This tool aligns well to the Massachusetts Standards for Effective Practice and may be use d in teaching setting professional practice goals or identifying strategies for growth. Most specifically, the following indicators : may be most relevant For teachers : Indicator II -  Learning Environ ment : Creates and maintains a safe and collaborative learning B. environment that motivates students to take academic risks, challenge themselves, and claim ownership of their learning. Indicator II - C. Cultural Proficiency : Actively creates and maintains an e  nvironment in which students’ diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges are respected. For administrators: Indicator II - A .  : Develops and executes effective plans, procedures, routines, and Environment operational systems to address a full range of safety, health, and emotional and social needs of students. Indicator IV - B .  : Ensures that policies and practices enable staff members Cultural Proficiency and students to interact effectively in a culturally diverse environment in which stude nts’ backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges are respected. Additionally, Indicators II Specialized Instructional Support Personnel (SISP) rubric C of the - B and III - provide helpful alignment to cultural proficiency and SEL. ( E L The tool below is designed to crosswalk th instruction e five competencies of S self - awareness, self - management, social - awareness, relationship skills, responsible decision - making ) alongside the contin culturally responsive SEL ( access, proficiency, responsiveness ). After assessing basic access uum of to SEL, t he guide asks educators to reflect on specific examples or evidence of cultura lly proficient or responsive SEL practice relative to the ir : 1) lear ning environment, 2) instructional materials, and 3) instructional practice. Completing the tool will drive conversation about the extent to which efforts in each of these areas can be deepened for the benefit of our students. As a reminder: A ccess to SEL refers to the imperative that all students have opportunities for SEL learning  as a part of a tiered system of supports ; experiences and skill development C ultural proficiency  in SEL refers to the creation of learning experiences that are bias - free and respectful of students’ diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges; and  Culturally responsive SEL instruction refers to practices that actively draw upon students’ diverse backgrounds, identities, strengths, and challenges as a strateg y to deepen learning . 7

8 Instructions: In the table below, reflect on how you support students’ self - awareness through your learning environment , instructional materials , and instructional practice . How do you , or could you, provide culturally proficient and/or culturally responsive SEL experiences for your students? Students have access to S E Culturally responsive SEL Culturally Proficient SEL L instruction that supports: free and instruction is bias - instruction actively draws upon respectful: students identities and backgrounds: Learning Environment: Learning Environment: awareness: The ability to - Self accurately recognize one's emotions and thoughts and their influence on behavior. This includes accurately Instructional Materials: Instructional Materials: assessing one's strengths and nd possessing a limitations a - grounded sense of well . confidence and optimism Students have experiences with Instructional Practice: Instructional Practice: awareness through: self - - standing lessons  Free General teaching practices  Curriculum integration   School - wide initiatives None of the above  8

9 Instructions: In the table below, reflect on how you support students’ self - management through your learning environment , instructional materials , and instructional practice . How do you , or could you, provide culturally proficient and/or culturally responsive SEL experiences for your students? S SEL Students have access to E L Culturally responsive SEL y Proficient Culturall instruction is bias - free and instruction that supports: instruction actively draws upon respectful: students identities and backgrounds: Learning Environment: Learning Environment: The ability Self - management: to regulate one's emotions, thoughts, and behaviors effectively in different situations. This includes managing stress, controlling l Materials: Instructiona Instructional Materials: impulses, motivating oneself, and setting and working toward achieving personal and academic goals. Students have experiences with Instructional Practice: Instructional Practice: - management through: self Free - standing lessons   General teaching practices  Curriculum integration wide initiatives  School - None of the above  9

10 awareness - social In the table below, reflect on how you support students’ Instructions: through , and , or could . How do you instructional practice instructional materials , learning environment your provide culturally proficient and/or culturally respon you, sive SEL experiences for your students? Culturally responsive SEL S E L access to SEL Culturally Proficient Students have instruction is bias - instruction actively draws upon instruction that supports: free and respectful: students identities and backgrounds: Learning Environment: Learning Environment: Social awareness: The ability to take the perspective of and empathize with others from diverse backgrounds and ; to understand social cultures Instructional Materials: Instructional Materials: ; and ethical norms for behavior recognize family, school, and to and community resources and supports . Students have experiences with Instructional Practice: Instructional Practice: - through: awareness social  - standing lessons Free General teaching practices  Curriculum integration   School - wide initiatives None of the above  10

11 In the table below, reflect on how you support students’ through Instructions: relationship skills learning environment , instructional materials your instructional practice . How do you , or could , and you, provide culturally proficient and/or culturally responsive SEL experiences for your students? Students have access to S E L SEL Culturally responsive SEL Culturally Proficient - free and instruction is bias instruction that supports: instruction actively draws upon respectful: students identities and backgrounds: Learning Environment: Relationship skills: The ability Learning Environment: to establish and maintain hea lthy and rewarding relationships with diverse individuals and groups. This includes communicating clearly, listening actively, Instructional Materials: Instructional Materials: cooperating, resisting inappropriate social pressure, negotiating conflict constructively, and seeking and ded. offering help when nee Students have experiences with Instructional Practice: Instructional Practice: through: relationship skills Free - standing lessons  General teaching practices  Curriculum integration  - initiatives  wide School  None of the above 11

12 In the table below, reflect on how you support students’ responsible decision - making Instructions: learning environment , instructional through your , and instructional practice . How do you , materials or could you, provide culturally proficient and/or culturally responsive SEL experiences for your students? Students have access to S E L SEL Culturally responsive SEL Culturally Proficient - free and n is bias instructio instruction that supports: instruction actively draws upon respectful: students identities and backgrounds: Learning Environment: Responsible decision - Learning Environment: The ability to make making: constructive and respectful choices about personal behavior and social ons based on interacti consideration of ethical Instructional Materials: Instructional Materials: standards, safety concerns, social norms, the realistic evaluation of consequences of various actions, and the wellbeing of self and others. Students have experiences with Practice: Instructional Instructional Practice: making - responsible decision through: - standing lessons  Free  General teaching practices  Curriculum integration  - School wide initiatives  None of the above 2019 - SELforALLv2 12

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