Chatting with Kids About Being Online

Transcript

1 TM STOP.THINK.CONNECT. Chatting with Kids About Being Online

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS MOBILE PHONES: SOCIALIZING AND pg 28 COMMUNICATING ON THE GO Sexting Texting PROTECT YOUR COMPUTERS pg 34 P2P File Sharing INTRODUCTION pg 4 pg 38 PARENTAL CONTROLS pg 6 TALK TO YOUR KIDS pg 42 PROTECT YOUR PRE-TEEN’S PRIVACY ADVICE FOR PARENTS OF pg 9 KIDS AT DIFFERENT AGES GLOSSARY pg 46 SOCIALIZING ONLINE pg 14 Apps Cyberbullying pg 52 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES COMMUNICATING ONLINE pg 22 pg 54 STOP.THINK.CONNECT. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 3

3 These ways of socializing and communicating can be fulfilling and, yet, they come with INTRODUCTION certain risks: Inappropriate conduct. The Internet offers The online world can feel anonymous. Kids a world of opportunities. sometimes forget that they are still accountable People of all ages are: for their actions. Inappropriate contact. posting video from mobile devices Some people online have bad intentions, including building online profiles bullies, predators, hackers, and scammers. texting each other Inappropriate content. from their mobile devices You may be concerned that your kids could find creating alter egos pornography, violence, or hate speech online. in the form of online avatars You can reduce these risks by talking to your kids connecting with friends online they about how they communicate—online and off— don’t see regularly in person and encouraging them to engage in conduct they can be proud of. sending photos to friends This guide covers what you need to know, where broadcasting what they’re doing to to go for more information, and issues to raise hundreds of people with kids about living their lives online. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 5

4 The best way to protect your TALK TO YOUR KIDS kids online? Talk to them. Research suggests that when children want important information, most rely on their parents. Not sure where to begin? Consider the following: Initiate conversations. Start early. Even if your kids are comfortable approaching you, After all, even toddlers see their parents use all don’t wait for them to start the conversation. kinds of devices. As soon as your child is using Use everyday opportunities to talk to your kids a computer, a cell phone, or any mobile device, it’s about being online. For instance, a TV program time to talk to them about online behavior, safety, can cell phone featuring a teen online or using a and security. As a parent, you have the opportunity tee up a discussion about what to do—or not— to talk to your kid about what’s important before in similar circumstances. News stories about anyone else does. Internet scams or , for example, also cyberbullying can help start a conversation with kids about their Create an honest, experiences and your expectations. open environment. Kids look to their parents to help guide them. Be supportive and positive. Listening and taking their feelings into account helps keep conversation afloat. You may not have all the answers, and being honest about that can go a long way. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 7

5 ADVICE FOR PARENTS OF KIDS AT DIFFERENT AGES Young Kids Tweens Teens Communicate your values. Young Kids Be upfront about your values and how they When very young children start using a computer, apply in an online context. Communicating your they should be supervised closely by a parent values clearly can help your kids make smarter or caregiver. Parents may wish to choose the and more thoughtful decisions when they face websites their kids visit early on—and not let them tricky situations. leave those sites on their own. If little kids aren’t supervised online, they may stumble onto sites that could scare or confuse them. Be patient. Resist the urge to rush through conversations When you’re comfortable that your young with your kids. Most kids need to hear children are ready to explore on their own, it’s still information repeated, in small doses, for it to important to stay in close touch while they go from sink in. If you keep talking with your kids, your site to site. You may want to restrict access patience and persistence will pay off in the to sites that you have visited and know to be long run. Work hard to keep the lines of appropriate—at least in terms of their educational communication open, even if you learn your kid or entertainment value. has done something online you find inappropriate. // 9 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

6 Tweens For younger tweens, — parental controls During the tween years—ages 8 to including filtering or monitoring tools—can be 12—children start exploring more effective. However, many middle school kids on their own, but that doesn’t mean have the technical know-how to find a way to get you don’t want—or need—to be around them. If children aren’t already using the Internet for their schoolwork, this is when they’re close at hand. It’s important to be with likely to start. It’s also when they can discover them—or at least nearby—when they’re online. resources for hobbies and other interests. Many For this age group, consider keeping the tweens are adept at finding information online. computer in an area where the child has access That’s often helpful to the rest of the family, but to you or another adult. That way, they can be they still need adult guidance to help them “independent,” but not alone. understand which sources are trustworthy. As you consider what your tweens see and do on the Internet, think about how much time they spend online. Consider setting limits on how often they can be online and how long those sessions should be. Many tweens are adept at finding information online...but they still need adult guidance to help them understand which sources are trustworthy. www. dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 11

7 Teens Because they don’t see facial expressions, body Young tweens are likely to reflect the values of language, and other visual cues online, teens their parents. By the time they age into their teen may feel free to do or say things online that they years, they’re forming their own values and wouldn’t offline. Remind them that behind the beginning to take on the values of their peers. screen names, profiles, and avatars are real At the same time, older teens are maturing people with real feelings. physically, emotionally, and intellectually, and many are eager to experience more independence When you talk to your teen, set reasonable from their parents. expectations. Anticipate how you will react if you find out that he or she has done something Teens have more Internet access through cell online you don’t approve of. If your teen confides , or friends’ computers, mobile devices phones, in you about something scary or inappropriate as well as more time to themselves. So it isn’t they’ve encountered online, try to work together realistic to try to always be in the same room as to prevent it from happening again. Since your your teens when they’re online. They need to know teen is closing in on being an adult, she needs that you and other family members can walk in to learn how to behave and how to exercise and out of the room any time and can ask them judgment about using the Internet safely, securely, about what they’re doing online. and in accordance with your family ethic. It’s important to emphasize the concept of credibility to teens. Even the most tech-savvy kids need to understand that not everything they see on the Internet is true, that people on the Internet may not be who they appear to be, that information or images they share can be seen far Even the most tech-savvy kids need to and wide, and that once something is posted understand that not everything they see on online, it’s close to impossible to “take it back.” the Internet is true, that people on the Internet may not be who they appear to be, and that information or images they share can be seen far and wide. // 13 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

8 SOCIALIZING ONLINE What can you do? Remind your kids that online Social networking sites, actions can reverberate. chat rooms, virtual worlds, The words they write and the images they post have consequences offline. and blogs are how teens and tweens socialize Explain to your kids why online. Kids share pictures, it’s a good idea to post videos, thoughts, and plans only information that with friends, others who they are comfortable with share their interests, and others seeing. sometimes, the world at large. Some of your child’s profile may be seen by a broader audience than you or they are comfortable Socializing online can help kids connect with with, even if privacy settings are on. Encourage friends, and even their family members, but your child to think about the language they use it’s important to help your child learn how to online, the pictures and videos they post, and navigate these spaces safely. Among the pitfalls the consequences of altering photos posted by that come with online socializing are sharing someone else. Employers, college admissions too much information or posting pictures, video, officers, coaches, teachers, and the police may or words that can damage a reputation or hurt view your child’s posts. someone’s feelings. Applying real-world judgment and using common sense can help minimize those downsides. // 15 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

9 Talk to your teens about avoiding sex talk online. Remind your kids that once Research shows that teens who don’t talk about they post information online, sex with strangers online are less likely to come in contact with predators. In fact, researchers have they can’t take it back. found that predators usually don’t pose as children Even if they delete the information from a site, or teens, and most teens who are contacted by they have little control over older versions adults they don’t know find it creepy. Teens should that may exist on other people’s computers not hesitate to ignore or block them. and circulate online. Know what your Use privacy settings to restrict kids are doing. who can access and post on Get to know the social networking sites your kids your child’s profile. use so you know how best to understand their activities. If you’re concerned that your child is Some social networking sites, chat rooms, and engaging in risky online behavior, you may want blogs have strong privacy settings. Talk to your to search the social networking sites they use to kids about these settings and your expectations see what information they’re posting. Are they for who should be allowed to view their profile. pretending to be someone else? Try searching by their name, nickname, school, hobbies, grade, or community. Review your child’s friends list. You may want to limit your children’s online “friends” to people they actually know. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 17

10 Encourage your kids Help your kids understand what information should stay private. to trust their gut if they have suspicions. Tell them why it’s important to keep some things— about themselves, family members, and friends— Encourage them to tell you if they feel threatened by to themselves. Information like their Social Security someone or uncomfortable because of something number, street address, phone number, and family online. You can then help them report concerns financial information—say, bank account or credit to the police and to the social networking site. card numbers—is private and should stay that way. Most of these sites have links for users to report abusive, suspicious, or inappropriate behavior. Tell your kids not to APPS impersonate someone else. Do you download “apps” to a — — or your kids Let your kids know that it’s wrong to create sites, phone or social networking page? Downloading pages, or posts that seem to come from someone may give the apps’ developers access to personal else, like a teacher, a classmate, or someone they info that’s not even related to the purpose of the made up. app. The developers may share the information they collect with marketers or other companies. Create a safe screen name. Suggest that your kids check the privacy policy and their privacy settings to see what information Encourage your kids to think about the impression the app can access. And consider this: Is finding that screen names can make. A good screen out what flavor ice cream you are really worth name won’t reveal much about how old they are, — sharing the details of your life or your children’s? where they live, or their gender. For privacy purposes, your kids’ IM names should not be the same as their email addresses. // 19 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

11 Protect their profile. If your child finds a CYBERBULLYING profile that was created or altered without his or her permission, contact the company that runs Cyberbullying is bullying or harassment that the site to have it taken down. happens online. It can happen in an email, a text message, an online game, or comments on If the bullying Block or delete the cyberbully. a social networking site. It might involve rumors involves IM or another online service that or images posted on someone’s profile or passed requires a “friends” or “buddy” list, delete the around for others to see, or creating a group bully from the lists or block their user name or email address. or page to make a person feel left out. Help stop cyberbullying. If your child sees Talk to your kids about cyberbullying. Tell your cyberbullying happening to someone else, kids that they can’t hide behind the words they encourage him or her to try to stop it by not type and the images they post. Hurtful messages engaging or forwarding anything and by telling not only make the target feel bad, but they also the bully to stop. Researchers say that bullying make the sender look bad—and sometimes usually stops pretty quickly when peers can bring scorn from peers and punishment intervene on behalf of the victim. One way to from authorities. help stop bullying online is to report it to the site or network where you see it. Ask your kids to let you know if an online Recognize the signs of a cyberbully. message or image makes them feel threatened Could your kid be the bully? Look for signs If you fear for your child’s safety, contact or hurt. of bullying behavior, such as creating mean the police. images of another kid. Cyberbullying often Read the comments. Keep in mind that you are a model for your involves mean-spirited comments. Check out children. Kids learn from adults’ gossip and your kid’s page from time to time to see what other unkind behavior. you find. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 21

12 COMMUNICATING ONLINE Email, chat, IM, video What can you do? calling, and texting are Talk to your kids fast and convenient ways about online manners. to communicate. Politeness counts. You teach your kids to be polite offline; talk to them about being But the fundamentals—what courteous online as well. Texting may seem fast and impersonal, yet courtesies like “pls” we say, when we say it, and ) are common and “ty” (for please thank you and why we say it—are the same text terms. online and off. Common Using ALL CAPS, long rows of Tone it down. courtesy and common sense exclamation points, or large bolded fonts are the online equivalent of yelling. Most people are important parts of all don’t appreciate a rant. communication, regardless of Suggest “Cc:” and “Reply All:” with care. where and how it takes place. that your kids resist the temptation to send a message to everyone on their contact list. Avoid chain letters. Most chain letters or emails are nuisances at best and scams at worst. Many contain malware, like viruses or spyware. Ask your kids not to open or forward them. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 23

13 Talk to your kids about using Set high privacy preferences on your kids’ IM and video strong email passwords and calling accounts. protecting them. Most IM programs allow parents to control The longer the password, the harder it is to crack. Personal information, your login name, whether people on their kids’ contact list can see common words, or adjacent keys on the keyboard their IM status, including whether they’re online. Some IM and email accounts allow parents to are not safe passwords. Kids can protect their determine who can send their kids messages and passwords by not sharing them with anyone, including their friends. block anyone not on the list. Ask your kids who they’re in Remind your kids to protect touch with online. their personal information. Just as you want to know who your kids’ friends are offline, it’s a good idea to know who they’re Social Security Number, account numbers, talking to online. and passwords are examples of information to keep private. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 25

14 PHISHING about opening any attachment or Be cautious Phishing is when scam artists send text, email, or downloading any files from emails you receive, pop-up messages to get people to share their regardless of who sent them. Unexpected files personal and financial information. Then they use may contain viruses or spyware that the sender the information to commit identity theft. doesn’t even know are there. Use security software , and update it regularly. Here’s how you—and your kids—can avoid a ; review credit card and bank Read your mail phishing scam: account statements as soon as you get them to check for unauthorized charges. to text, email, or pop-up messages Don’t reply to [email protected] Forward phishing emails that ask for personal or financial information, —and to the company, bank, or organization and don’t click any links in the message. impersonated in the phishing email. You Resist the urge to cut and paste a link from also may want to report phishing email the message into your web browser, too. to the Anti-Phishing Working Group at If you want to check a financial account, for . [email protected] example, type in the web address from your billing statement. in these activities, too, Get your kids involved so they can develop good Internet security on the Don’t give personal information habits. Look for “teachable moments”—if you phone in response to a text message. Some get a phishing message, show it to your kids scammers send text messages that appear to help them understand that messages on to be from a legitimate business and ask you the Internet aren’t always what they seem. to call a phone number to update your account or access a “refund.” If you give them your information, they use it to run up charges in your name. // 27 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

15 MOBILE PHONES: SOCIALIZING AND COMMUNICATING ON THE GO Teach your kids to think about What Can You Do? safety when using a cell phone. Use photo- and video-sharing What age is appropriate for a kid to have a mobile by phone with care. phone? That’s something for you and your family to decide. Consider your kid’s age, personality, Most mobile phones now have cameras and video maturity, and your family’s circumstances. Is he or capability, making it easy for teens to capture and she responsible enough to follow rules you or the share every moment on the go. These tools can school sets for phone use? foster creativity, yet they also present issues related to personal reputation and safety. Encourage your Many online apps also are on mobile phones— teens to think about their privacy, and that of including social networking, blog posting, content others, before they share photos and videos via uploading, media sharing, and video editing. cell phone. It’s easy to post photos and videos Teach your kids to think about safety when using online without the knowledge—let alone the OK— a cell phone. of the photographer or the person in the shot. It could be embarrassing and even unsafe. It’s easier to be smart up front about what media they share than to do damage control later on. Don’t stand for mobile bullying. Mobile phones can be used to bully or harass others. Talk to your kids about treating others the same way they want to be treated. The manners and ethics you’ve taught them apply on phones. // 29 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

16 Use good judgment with Decide on the right options mobile social networking. and features for your kid’s phone. Many social networking sites have a feature that allows users to check their profiles and post Both your mobile carrier and the phone itself comments from their phones, allowing access should give you some choices for privacy from anywhere. That means the filters you’ve settings and child safety controls. Most carriers installed on your home computer won’t limit allow parents to turn off features like web access, what kids can do on a phone. If your teens are texting, or downloading. Some cell phones are going mobile with their profiles or blogs, talk made especially for children. They’re designed to them about using good sense when they’re to be easy to use and have features like limited social networking from their phones. Internet access, minute management, number privacy, and emergency buttons. Get familiar with social mapping. Be smart about smartphones. Many phones include web access. If your children Many mobile phones now have GPS technology are going to use a phone and you’re concerned installed: Kids with these phones can pinpoint about what they might find on the Internet, turn off where their friends are—and be pinpointed by their friends. Advise your kids to use these features only web access or turn on filtering. with friends they know in person and trust, and why not to broadcast their location to the world, 24-7. In addition, some carriers offer GPS services that let parents map their kid’s location. // 31 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

17 Develop cell phone rules. TEXTING Talk to your kids about when and where it’s Any kid with a cell phone probably uses it to send appropriate to use their cell phones. You also and receive text messages and images. It’s similar may want to establish rules for responsible use. to using email or IM, and most of the same etiquette Do you allow calls or texting at the dinner and safety rules apply. If your kids are texting, table? Do you have rules about cell phone use encourage them to: at night? Should they give you their cell phones while they’re doing homework or when they’re respect others. Texting shorthand can lead supposed to be sleeping? to misunderstandings. Think about how a text message might be read and understood before sending it. Set an example. ignore text messages from people they More mobile apps mean additional don’t know. distractions. It’s illegal to drive while texting, surfing, or talking on the phone in many learn how to block numbers from their states, but it’s dangerous in every state. Set an cell phone. example for your kids, and talk to them about avoid posting their cell phone number online. the dangers of driving while distracted. never provide financial information in response to a text message. SEXTING Sending or forwarding sexually explicit photos, videos, or messages from a mobile phone is known as “sexting.” Tell your kids not to do it. In addition to risking their reputation and their friendships, they could be breaking the law if they create, forward, or even save this kind of message. Teens may be less likely to make a bad choice if they know the consequences. // 33 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

18 PROTECT YOUR COMPUTERS What Can You Do? Use security software, and The security of your computer update it regularly. can affect the safety of your Anti-virus and anti-spyware software scan online experience—and your incoming communications for troublesome files; a kid’s. Malware is software firewall blocks communications from unauthorized that monitors or controls sources. Look for software that can reverse the damage and that updates automatically. your computer use, installs viruses, sends unwanted Keep your operating pop-up ads, redirects your system and web browser computer to websites you’re up-to-date, and learn about not looking for, or records their security features. your keystrokes. Malware on Hackers take advantage of operating system your computer could allow software and browsers that don’t have the latest someone to steal your family’s security updates. Increase the security of your computer by changing the built-in security and personal information. privacy settings in your operating system or browser. Check the “Tools” or “Options” menus to learn how to upgrade from the default settings. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 35

19 Watch out for “free” stuff. P2P FILE SHARING Free games, ring tones, or other downloads can Some kids share music, games, or software online. hide malware. Tell your kids not to download Peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing allows people to anything unless they trust the source and they’ve share these kinds of files through an informal scanned it with security software. network of computers running the same software. If your kids download copyrighted material, you could get mired in legal issues. Sometimes spyware, malware, or pornography can be hidden in a shared file. Some tips to help your kids share files safely: Install file-sharing software properly. Activate the proper default settings so that nothing private is shared. By default, almost all P2P file-sharing apps will share downloads in your “save” or “download” folder. That’s why it’s important to set it not to. If you don’t set the defaults properly, other P2P users may access files you never meant to share, including personal documents on your hard drive, like your tax returns or other financial documents. Before your kids open or play any downloaded file, advise them to use security software to scan it. Make sure the security software is up-to-date and running when the computer is connected to the Internet. // 37 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

20 PARENTAL CONTROLS What Can You Do? Parental control If you’re concerned about options include: what your kids—especially Filtering and blocking. elementary school kids—see These tools limit access to certain sites, words, when they surf the Internet, or images. Some products decide what’s filtered; there are tools to consider. others leave that to parents. Some filters apply to websites; others to email, chat, and IM. Keep in mind that while parental controls work well Blocking outgoing content. for young children, teens This software prevents kids from sharing personal who’ve been online for years information online, in chat rooms, or via email. probably won’t have much trouble working around them Limiting time. or finding other computers This software allows you to limit your kid’s time to use. online and set the time of day they can access the Internet. Browsers for kids. These browsers filter words or images deemed inappropriate for kids. // 39 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

21 The best way to protect your Kid-oriented search engines. kids online is to talk to them. These perform limited searches or screen search When children want important results for sites and material appropriate for kids. information, most rely on their parents. Children value the opinions Monitoring tools. of their peers, but tend to rely on their parents for help on the issues This type of software alerts parents to online activity without blocking access. Some tools that matter most. record the addresses of websites a child has visited; others provide a warning message when a kid visits certain sites. Monitoring tools can be used with or without a kid’s knowledge. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 41

22 PROTECT YOUR PRE-TEEN’S PRIVACY What can you do? The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act Take advantage of your COPPA rights. Your child’s (COPPA) helps you protect your children’s privacy personal information is valuable, and you can do a by giving you specific rights. Enforced by the lot to pr otect it: Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, COPPA requires websites to Be picky with your permission. get parental consent before collecting or sharing information from children under 13. The law covers Websites can request your consent in a number sites designed for kids under 13 and general of ways, including by email and postal mail. Before audience sites that know certain users are you give consent, make sure you know what under 13. COPPA protects information that information the site wants to collect and what it websites collect upfront and information that plans to do with it. And consider how much your kids give out or post later. consent you want to give—it’s not all or nothing. You might give the company permission to COPPA also requires these sites to post a privacy collect some personal information, for example, policy in a spot that’s plain to see. The policy must but not allow them to share that information provide details about what kind of information with others. the site will collect and what it might do with the information—for example, if it plans to use the information to target advertising to your kids or to give the information to other companies. The policy also should state whether those other companies have agreed to keep the information safe and confidential. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 43

23 Review the privacy policy. Know your rights. Just because a site has a privacy policy doesn’t As the parent, you have a right to see any personal mean it keeps personal information private. The information a site has collected about your child. policy can help you figure out if you’re comfortable If you ask to see the information, website with what information the site collects and how operators will need to make sure you really are it plans to use or share it. If the policy says there the parent or they may choose to delete the are no limits to what it collects or who gets to see information. You also have the right to retract your it, there are no limits. consent and have any information collected about your child deleted. Ask questions. Check out sites your kids visit. If you have questions about a site’s practices If a site requires users to register, see what kind of or policies, ask. The privacy policy should include information it asks for and determine your contact information for someone prepared to comfort level. You also can see whether the site answer your questions. appears to be following the most basic rules, like posting its privacy policy for parents clearly and conspicuously. Report any site that breaks the rules. If you think a site has collected information from your kids or marketed to them in a way that violates the law, report it to the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint . www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 45

24 GLOSSARY Chat room – An online space where you can meet and exchange information through messages displayed on the screens of others who are in the “room.” COPPA – The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act; it gives parents control over what information Avatar – A graphic alter ego you create to use websites can collect from their kids under 13. online; can be a 3D character or a simple icon, human or whimsical. – Bullying or harassment that Cyberbullying takes place online; includes posting embarrassing Badware – Bad software; includes viruses and pictures or unkind comments on a person’s profile spyware that steal your personal information, send or sending them via IM or email. spam, and commit fraud. (See Malware.) – Hardware or software that blocks Firewall Backing up – Making copies of computer data unauthorized communications to or from your in case something happens to your machine computer; helps keep hackers from using your or operating system and the information is lost. computer to send out your personal information without your permission. Blocking software – A program to filter content from the Internet and restrict access to sites or GPS – “Global Positioning System,” a global content based on specific criteria. navigation satellite system that is used in cars or phones to determine location and provide directions. Blog – Short for “web log,” a site where you regularly post personal observations. Hacking – Breaking into a computer or network by evading or disabling security measures. – A list of people who you can chat Buddy list with through an IM program. Instant messaging (IM) – Enables two or more people to chat in real time and notifies you when someone on your buddy list is online. www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect // 47

25 – Creative products that Intellectual property (IP) – Data that can be used Personal information have commercial value, including copyrighted to identify you, like your name, address, birth property like books, photos, and songs. date, or Social Security number. Limited user account – An online setting that – When scam artists send spam, Phishing grants someone access to some of the pop-ups, or text messages to trick you computer’s functions and programs, but allows into disclosing personal, financial, or other only an administrator to make changes that sensitive information. affect the computer. Privacy settings – Controls available on many – Short for “malicious software”; Malware social networking and other websites that you can includes viruses and spyware that steal personal set to limit who can access your profile and what information, send spam, and commit fraud. information visitors can see. (See Badware.) Profile – A personal page you create on a social – A secret word or phrase used with Password networking or other website to share information a user name to grant access to your computer about yourself and communicate with others. or protect sensitive information online. Security software – Identifies and protects Patch Software downloaded to fix or update – against threats or vulnerabilities that may a computer program. compromise your computer or your personal information; includes anti-virus and anti-spyware Peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing – Allows software and firewalls. you to share files online—like music, movies, or games—through an informal network of Sexting – Sending or forwarding sexually explicit computers running the same sharing software. pictures or messages from a mobile phone. – “Personal Digital Assistant”; can be used PDA as a mobile phone, web browser, or portable media player. // 49 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

26 – A computer-simulated online Virtual world Smart phone – A mobile phone that offers “place” where people use avatars—graphic advanced capabilities and features like a web characters—to represent themselves. connection and a portable media player. Virus – Malware that sneaks onto your SMS – “Short Messaging Service”; technology that allows text messages to be sent from one computer—often through an email attachment— mobile phone to another. and then makes copies of itself. – A website that allows Social networking site – A video camera that can stream live Webcam video on the web; may be built into the computer you to build a profile and connect with others. or purchased separately. – Software installed on your computer, Spyware without your consent, to monitor or control your computer use. Texting – Sending short messages from one mobile phone to another. – A child between 8 and 12 years old. Tween User name – An alias used with a password to grant access to accounts and websites. Video calling – Internet services that allow users to communicate using webcams. // 51 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

27 ADDITIONAL – A project of the Internet GetNetWise.org RESOURCES Education Foundation, the GetNetWise coalition provides Internet users with the resources to make informed decisions about their and their family’s use of the Internet. – iKeepSafe educational resources g iKeepSafe.or OnGuar – OnGuard Online provides dOnline.gov teach children of all ages–in a fun, age-appropriate practical tips from the federal government and the way–the basic rules of Internet safety, ethics, and technology community to help you guard against the healthy use of connected technologies. Internet fraud, secure your computers, and protect your privacy. – The United States Computer us-cert.gov Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) is – The Federal Trade FTC.gov/idtheft charged with providing response support and Commission’s website has information to help you defense against cyber attacks for the Federal deter, detect, and defend against identity theft. Civil Executive Branch (.gov) and information sharing and collaboration with partners. US-CERT – Common Sense CommonSenseMedia.org disseminates reasoned and actionable cyber Media is dedicated to improving the lives of security information to the public. kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they NetSmartz.org – The NetSmartz Workshop is an need to thrive in a world of media and technology. interactive, educational safety resource from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. – ConnectSafely, a project ConnectSafely.org of Tech Parenting Group, is for parents, teens, – The National Cyber Security StaySafeOnline.org educators, and advocates for learning about safe, Alliance seeks to create a culture of cyber security civil use of Web 2.0 together. and safety awareness by providing knowledge and tools to prevent cyber crime and attacks. – Cyberbully411 is an effort to CyberBully411.org provide resources for youth who have questions WiredSafety.org – WiredSafety provides help, about–or have been targeted by–online harassment. information, and education to Internet and mobile device users of all ages. // 53 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

28 TM is a national public awareness Stop.Think.Connect. STOP.THINK.CONNECT. campaign aimed at increasing the understanding of cyber threats and empowering the American public to be safer and more secure online. National Cybersecurity The Stop.Think.Connect. Campaign offers the Awareness Campaign following advice: Background – Before you use the Internet, take time Stop In 2009, President Obama directed a Cyberspace to understand the risks and learn how to spot Policy Review that has become the blueprint potential problems. from which our nation’s cybersecurity foundation – Take a moment to be certain the path Think will transform into an assured and resilient digital ahead is clear. Watch for warning signs and infrastructure for the future. As part of this policy consider how your actions online could impact review, the Department of Homeland Security your safety—or your family’s. was asked to create an on-going cybersecurity Stop.Think.Connect. awareness campaign— — Connect – Enjoy the Internet with greater to help Americans understand the risks that come confidence, knowing you’ve taken the right with being online. steps to safeguard yourself and your computer. The campaign is part of an unprecedented effort Stop. Think. Connect. Protect yourself and help among federal and state governments, industry, keep the web a safer place for everyone. and nonprofit organizations. Through these partnerships, the Stop.Think.Connect. Campaign For more information and to see how you can is reaching thousands of Americans, providing tips get involved with the campaign, please visit our on how to protect themselves, their families, and website at www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect . the nation. // 55 www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect

29 Stop.Think.Connect. is a national public awareness campaign aimed at increasing the understanding of cyber threats and empowering the American public to be safer and more secure online. provides practical tips from the federal OnGuardOnline.gov government and the technology community to help you guard against Internet fraud, secure your computers, and protect your privacy. Please visit www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect for more information on Stop.Think.Connect. programs and opportunities. The Stop.Think.Connect. toolkit contains the intellectual property of FTC.

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