Leader's Guide: What About Our Money? A Faith Response

Transcript

1 Leader ’ s Guide WHAT ABOUT OUR MONEY? A FAITH RESPONSE CRYS ZINKIEWICZ

2 What About Our Money? A Faith Response Leader’s Guide by Crys Zinkiewicz © 2018 United Methodist Women 475 Riverside Drive, Room 1501 New York, NY 10115 www.unitedmethodistwomen.org This Leader’s Guide and material from it may be reproduced without adaptation for noncommercial purposes provided the following notice appears with the excerpted material: “What About Our Money? A Faith Response Leader’s Guide © 2018 United Methodist Women. All rights reserved. Used by permission.” Copyrighted material within the book cannot be reproduced without permission from copyright holder. Hymns and songs used in the Leader’s Guide may be projected or reproduced for classroom use only. Please include the credit and permission information indicated in this guide. 2

3 United Methodist Women Purpose The organized unit of United Methodist Women shall be a community of women whose purpose is to know God and to experience freedom as whole persons through Jesus Christ; to develop a creative, supportive fellowship; and to expand concepts of mission through participation in the global ministries of the church. The Vision Turning faith, hope and love into action on behalf of women, children and youth around the world. Living the Vision We provide opportunities and resources to grow spiritually, become more deeply rooted in Christ and put faith into action. We are organized for growth, with fexible structures leading to effective witness and action. We equip women and girls around the world to be leaders in communities, agencies, workplaces, governments and churches. We work for justice through compassionate service and advocacy to change unfair policies and systems. We provide educational experiences that lead to personal change in order to transform the world. 3

4 TABLE OF CONTENTS Leading the Study: The Big Picture ...5 ...8 Leading the Study: The Nitty-Gritty ... 13 Session 1: Godʼs Kin-dom (Introduction and Chapter 1) ... To Post .. 16 ... Resources: What About Our Money? 17 Small Group Assignments ... 18 Session 2: The Water We Swim In (Chapters 2 and 3) ...22 Small Group Assignments ...26 Contrast Exercise ...30 Session 3: Our Well-Being (Chapters 3, 4, and 6) 31 ... ...35 Small Group Assignments Deep Listening Exercise...36 Session 4: Where Is God Calling Our Money? (Chapters 5–7) ... 37 Living Wages for All ...41 Small Group Assignments: Needs and Opportunities ...43 Art Possibilities ...47 About the Author ... ... 48 4

5 LEADING THE STUDY: THE BIG PICTURE What About Our Money? A Faith Response, hank you for accepting the leadership of this study, - You may be a first-timer in this role, or you may be someone with much leader by Susan K. Taylor . T ship experience and may be saying to yourself, “Leading? No big deal.” But, indeed, your willingness to lead is a big deal. Without leaders like you, hundreds—even thousands—of women and men would not have this opportunity to grow in their faith, understand their world better, find practical help for their own well-being, or explore the implications of our Christian faith in today’s contexts and motivate participants for mission engagement. Think of the ripples you are creating! So, thank you, again! A Crucial Question “What about our money . . .” is a difficult question, but when paired with “. . . in light of our faith?” it is vital— . This study will help us grapple with the personal and the communal aspects of our relation- life-giving as in ship with and our decisions about money, understand the external forces that create injustice and inequalities, and discover ways to live more faithfully as stewards and advocates. Rarely do people have discussions about money and faith. What better place, what better time than here and now, among supportive pilgrims as we make this journey together? Let’s get started! Welcoming Undergirding all that you do as a leader is the tone you set for the group. Anyone walking into a new situation with new people has reservations. The warmth of your greeting will help put newcomers at ease. As you model and encourage hospitality within the group, you add to their readiness to learn. Having ground rules, posted and read, or facilitating the group in creating ground rules is another way to assure everyone that this group is a safe place for them to build a community of grace together. How Adults Learn In order to assist participants in this study, you need to understand the three keys to adult learning: the im- portance of tapping into multiple types of intelligence, the necessity of engagement, and the crucial role that struggle plays in learning. 1. Multiple intelligences. From your life experience you already know how diverse people can be, including in the ways in which they learn. Developmental psychologist Howard Gardner has identified eight “intelli- 5

6 gences” that describe various avenues people gravitate toward as their preferred learning style: logical, visual, “ musical, verbal, movement, nature, groups, or solitary. These are known as the multiple intelligences. ” ‹ Small groups. In these sessions we will be working primarily as the whole group or in smaller groups. Generally, the instructions will suggest four small groups, but if your group is very large, you may find it better to create more small groups and assign duplicate tasks. “Small” groups usually function best with four to eight people. For example, creating two groups of five rather than one larger one of ten will likely work better even if both groups have the same assignment. However, as the study leader, you will know what’s best in light of your group members, space allowances, and time constraints. When calling for reports, invite one of the duplicate groups to speak and then ask the second one to fill in with any additional or differing results from their conversation. Some activities call for time for the participants to work individually in si - Individual work. ‹ lence. This solitary approach draws on the intrapersonal strength identified as one of the multiple intelligences. Building in points within an otherwise interpersonal (group) experience for this intrapersonal (alone) time honors the need of some participants to gather their thoughts or reflect on what they have experienced. Everyone will benefit to some degree. Being engaged. The strength of each of the multiple intelligences will vary from individual to individual, 2. but all adults have a need to be engaged in order to learn. Adults need to have their: ‹ Emotions engaged. We all need to encourage our curiosity, concern, and compassion and involve the heart with questions like: Do I belong? Am I valued? We also need to involve the head, asking: How does this affect me? How is this relevant to what I care about? Body engaged. ‹ Even if movement is not an individual’s preferred intelligence, every body needs - to move. As a society, we are learning more about the importance of exercise, yet in adult edu cation we often find that adults are expected to sit for long periods of time. Moving is good for the brain, for learning, even if the movement is merely taking a stand-up-and-stretch break or performing the task of resetting the chairs from a large group discussion to create areas for small groups to work. Encourage your group to stand when appropriate and to move around regularly. Give them permission and encouragement to move as they need to for their own comfort. has a twenty-minute attention span; others ‹ Attention re-engaged. Some say the average adult declare that adults’ attention must be re-engaged every seven to eight minutes. (Short attention spans are not just for children!) One of the great things about working in small groups is that the changing elements within the assigned task and the changing of who is speaking within the discussion naturally re-engage the participants’ attention. Shifting from one activity to another as a group also helps. 3. Especially as participants move deeper into the study, you may see individuals or even groups Struggle. who are in turmoil. Assure them that the conflict they feel may be the tension of needing to let go of the old in order to move onto the new—new ideas, new insights, new attitudes. Indeed, the struggle may be cleans - ing. In Session 3, in particular, the participants are invited to open up to a level of vulnerability that may precipitate internal conflict. Be sensitive to that possibility and be reassuring. Struggle is a good thing, not something to be feared or hidden. This group provides a safe and loving place to work through any distress. 6

7 Community You should see a sense of community developing very quickly in your group. Community is one of God’s gifts to us, and many of the participants will come with both the desire and skills for building community even in a brand-new group. Using small groups and mixing up those groups is an effective tool for building relation- ships and community. In small groups, individuals who are reluctant to speak up in a large or unfamiliar setting will find it easier to talk. More people will have “air time”—a chance to air their thoughts—and know they are heard. Participants will also have more opportunities to feel the acceptance and support that is bedrock to community. - However, you may observe a common phenomenon related to group work. Sometimes the following se quence occurs within groups: forming, norming, storming, and only then performing. Groups come together (forming) and attempt to do as they are “supposed to” (norming), but they bang up against the challenge of the diversity within their membership (storming). As they listen to and respect one another, they will be able to work through and accept the value of differing priorities, perceptions, styles, and so on and come to a place where they are most effective (performing). If storming happens, simply affirm that it is a natural process not to be feared or avoided. Encourage the group as they work through it and hold out the goal of performing to them. Follow-up Since you have contact information for all the participants, you may wish to follow up after the event in one or more ways: ‹ Include everyone as a group in your prayers, or over the course of a week or two select a different person or persons for whom to pray. ‹ Ask a local United Methodist Women circle to pray at one of their meetings for your study group. ‹ Send a copy of the creed(s) and ideas developed in Session 4 to each participant to make a wider impact. ‹ Invite participants to let you know of any changes they have incorporated into their lives or local United Methodist Women groups as a result of this study. ‹ W rite a personal note of appreciation and encouragement to each participant. Use the postal ser - vice or e-mail, as you choose . You have the gifts and graces for leadership, and this leader’s guide, along with the study book, will provide you with additional help. More importantly, you are not alone. The Holy Spirit is not only your companion for this journey but also your guide. As you prepare and lead, keep an open channel to your helpmate through your prayers. Blessings on you! 7

8 LEADING THE STUDY: THE NITTY-GRITTY Room Setup Set up one small table for nametags. Please do your best to create reusable nametags, according to Principle 10: Toxin Reduction from United Methodist Women’s 13 Steps to Sustainability: Be creative and wise about nametags. Invite participants to bring their own nametag (reusing one they already have). If you are supplying nametags, if possible reuse ones you already have. Be careful of the use of ribbons and other petroleum-based enhancements. If you need to buy more, choose a type that does not use PVC and elimi- nates unnecessary components like holders and pouches. Encourage attendees to turn in their name badge for reuse . (www.unitedmethodistwomen.org/climate-justice/sustainability/toxin-reduction) Consider the needs of participants, including note-taking, and the activities planned for each session when arrang- ing the room. Flexibility to rearrange the space is critical for moving in and out of small groups and activities. Tables may inhibit this flexibility; however, in Session 4 you need to make some tables available for those who choose to do the art project. Have two easels with chart pads available near the front of the room. The Room as a Visual Aid Create a worship center using items that represent topics discussed in the study, for example: news headlines, fake dollars, and depictions of luxury (mammon) in contrast with the cross, the United Methodist Women Bible, and photos from response magazine of mission projects. Post the goal for the study and the ground rules (found at the end of Session 1). In Session 1, you will read them to the group, but having them visible throughout all of the sessions will allow participants to refer to them as needed. (You may also wish to post the specific session goals at the beginning of each meeting.) Post the work of the small groups from Sessions 1, 2, and 4. In most cases, having these sheets accessible will least be important for at one subsequent activity. After each session, feel free to rearrange the sheets or take them down in order to make room to post additional work. 8

9 Supplies Make the following items available for every session: Items for the worship center ‹ Plenty of markers in at least four different colors (including washable markers to create dots on ‹ participants’ hands indicating their small group assignments) ‹ Sustainable nametags ‹ Large sheets of paper (chart pads are helpful for writing ease) ‹ At least two easels Tape or another means for posting things on the wall (check with the Mission u site for guidelines) ‹ ‹ Pens or pencils ‹ Regular size paper (can be scrap paper) for individual worksheets ‹ Construction paper Poster paper ‹ and The Faith We Sing ‹ or copies of the songs to pass out or project The United Methodist Hymnal ‹ Bibles—at least three of the same translation, preferably the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) For Session 1: ‹ Group assignments handouts (multiple copies per group; see “Tips on Timing”) Resources handouts (one for each person) ‹ For Session 2: ‹ Group assignments handouts (multiple copies per group) Contrast exercise instructions (multiple copies per group) ‹ 3" x 3" sticky notes (7–10 for each person) ‹ Fine-tip markers ‹ ‹ “Fish in the Water” illustration as a visual aid ( optional ) optional “Bridge Over Troubled Waters” song, either the video from YouTube or a recording ( ) ‹ ‹ Projection equipment (see “Media and Technology” section; optional ) For Session 3: ‹ (copies to share) The United Methodist Hymnal ‹ Skit assignment slips (only one per small group) ‹ “Talking sticks” (one for each wisdom circle) 9

10 For Session 4: ‹ Group assignments handouts (multiple copies per group) Art possibilities instructions ‹ optional ‹ Laptop(s) ( ) ‹ List of participants and their contact information Media and Technology The success of these sessions does not rely on media; however, the experience can be enriched by the use of specific media presentations. If you choose to use the recommended videos or recordings, take extra steps to ensure that the delivery goes smoothly and isn’t ineffective because the “technology didn’t work.” You will need to check and double check your setup before the start of each session. Make sure you are comfortable operating the technology or that you have designated someone who is tech-savvy to handle setting up the equipment and running it during the presentations. For Session 2: Play the song, “Bridge Over Troubled Waters.” The following YouTube rendition includes the lyrics on the video. Search: “Bridge Over Troubled Waters—with lyrics.” Your group may appreciate this version so they 1 . (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjNgn4r6SOA) can sing along with ease To show the video version you will need the appropriate equipment (computer and projector, plus a screen or monitor or blank wall). Be sure to download the video of the song to your computer. Otherwise you will need to make sure you have access to an Internet connection to play the video. Check and double check! Always make sure videos will be clearly visible to all participants. Go to the farthest corner of the room and be sure that you can read the lyrics of the song you want the audience to read. Check and double check! The alternative is to supply an audio recording. If you bring a recorded version, the speakers and other equip- ment needed will depend upon your device. Whether you use a CD and CD player or MP3 files and an MP3 player, be sure the sound can be clearly heard by everyone. The bigger the crowd, the stronger the speakers need to be to reach the listeners. Go to the farthest corner of the room and listen. Be sure you can hear the recording clearly. Check and double check! For Sessions 2–4: Allow the use of personal smartphones. The participants will be challenged to learn very quickly about systems, social justice issues, and opportunities in these sessions. Smartphones give users access to information beyond what can be supplied in the limited pages of the study book. Celebrate that fact because knowledge is empower - ing. Remind users that the Internet is a source of facts and truth but also of misinformation and bias. Whatever information they choose to build on, they need to consider the reliability of the source and seek corroboration. 10

11 Tips on Timing Every group is different, so treat these time designations in the plan for each session as guidelines not require- ments. However, note that the times indicated in each plan already add up to two hours! So, if one activity runs long, you will need to adjust the length of another activity or leave something out. With so many variables (number of people, how well an activity works or doesn’t work, for example), time in each session will be dynamic, but it is finite. Begin on time and end on time, and pace the group in between. Some tips for managing the time during each session: ‹ - Moving chairs or changing locations within the room as participants switch be Allow for transitions. tween large and small group activities can eat away time. Minimize the distance participants must move and be intentional about encouraging people to make transitions quickly and smoothly. ‹ Use the handouts for small group instruction. If you make the handouts available, you don’t need to go over the instructions with everyone. The handouts are clear and specific for each group. Be sure groups have more than one copy (one for every two or three people); this way they can collectively figure out the instructions and also have the information to refer back to as they move from one step to another. Your role is to circulate from group to group, encouraging them and clarifying their task or the process, as needed. for large group note-taking or list-making. As group members report, the Use two writers at the easels ‹ writers will alternate, allowing the conversation to move forward more steadily without everyone having to wait for one note to be written before another thought can be shared. Remind the participants that the break time is brief, but encourage them to stand Keep breaks short. ‹ up and walk around the room to get some movement. Of course, restroom trips are important. As small groups wind down and get ready for transition, participants may use that time for restroom needs. Encourage Leadership in Others Part of your task as leader is to develop leadership in others. The more participants who feel confident and competent to lead, the better! These participants will be able to reach and ignite others within their own spheres of influence throughout their lifetimes. Assign specific tasks based on skills and talents. - You will need music leadership, both for singing and ac companiment, for the opening and closing worship in each session. (United Methodist Women has obtained permissions for the songs suggested in this leader guide, but if you choose to project or print the words to any other hymns or songs, you must follow the law : You are responsible for obtaining permission and including the copyright notice on the sheet or slide. If you use hymnals, this legal requirement is not necessary .) Look also for tech-savvy help . Sessions 3 and 4 offer opportunities for persons with those interests and skills to shine. 11

12 Every group will need someone who can get the group organized and on task Encourage small group leaders. every time. Rather than designate leaders (usually people with already proven skills), allow leaders to emerge from within the small groups. That approach may mean someone takes “baby steps,” finding the courage and support to take on a piece of the leadership. Great! Each supported and affirmed action, no matter how small, can lead to greater skill and willingness. United Methodist Women and the Cooperative School environment of Mission u should serve as loving and effective training grounds. Music Permissions Permission to photocopy or project songs for classroom use only are covered by the following licenses. Please destroy all copies made of the music after the session is complete. Appropriate credit information, listed below, should be included in any reproductions. “Gather Us In,” Words and Music: Marty Haugen © 1982 GIA Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinted under One License #A-709087. “Give Thanks,” words and music by Henry Smith © 1978 Integrity’s Hosanna! Music. Used under CCLI license, song #20285. “Nothing Can Trouble (Nada Te Turbe),” Words: St. Teresa de Jesús, Taizé Community; Music: Jacques Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Berthier © 1986, 1991 Les Presses de Taizé (France), admin. by GIA Reprinted under One License #A-709087. “Woke Up This Morning,” by J. Jefferson Cleveland and Verolga Nix. Arr. © 1981 Abingdon Press. Used under CCLI license, song #1760719. “My Hope Is Built,” Words by Edward Mote, 1834. Music (Solid Rock) by William B. Bradbury, 1863. Public domain. “His Eye Is on the Sparrow,” Words: Civilla D. Martin, 1905; Music: Charles H. Gabriel, 1905. Public domain. “What Does the Lord Require of You?” Words & Music: Jim Strathdee © 1986 Desert Flower Music. All rights reserved. Reprinted under One License #A-709087. “Together We Serve” Words & Music: Daniel Charles Damon © 1998 Hope Publishing Company, Carol Stream, IL 60188, www.hopepublishing.com. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Reprinted under One License #A-709087. After the Event Through the easy access that cell phones, e-mail, conference calls, and other technologies of communication facilitate, the participants in this study group can continue to be connected, expanding their relationships, sense of community, and effectiveness in their personal and local group action plans over time. Provide a list of the participants’contact information to everyone in the group. (Check in advance for anyone who may not wish to be included on such a list.) Encourage the participants to follow up with one another. Ask them to keep you in the communication loop so that you can encourage and resource any action groups that might emerge. Endnotes 1. Credit: “Bridge Over Troubled Waters,” by Simon & Garfunkel/BMI. Video by Nicole/YouTube user. 12

13 GODʼS KIN-DOM (INTRODUCTION AND CHAPTER 1) 1 Goals: ‹ To explore the biblical basis for the study on money. To build community among the participants. ‹ Notes Presentation/Process Time As people arrive, greet them and mark each of their Set up the room with hands with a colored dot, using washable markers in chairs for small groups four different colors. Direct participants to fill out a and a table with nametags nametag and then form groups based on their dot color. and markers. Encourage participants to get acquainted within their If anyone objects to small groups. having marker ink on their skin, simply indicate a col- or verbally and ask them to remember it. 5 minutes Worship together: Arrange in advance for • Invite the group to sing “Gather Us In” music leadership for both ( The Faith We Sing , no. 2236, verses 1 and 2). worship times. Read Matthew 22:37–40. Affirm for the group that • Invite someone who ar- these words of Jesus are central to who we are and rives early to class to read all that we do. the scripture. • Pray with gratitude for this place where “new light is streaming,” for scripture to guide our path, and for companions for the journey ahead. Ask God for hearts open and eager to learn and for courage to live faithfully in grace. • W elcome the group. Take care of any housekeeping. 10 minutes Divide into small groups. Instruct the small groups to continue with introductions. Ask each person to share a favorite scripture or Bible story. They do not need to have exact words or even the specific reference. If there is time, individuals may wish to elaborate on why they chose a particular passage. 13

14 Time Presentation/Process Notes Ask how many of the favor- Discuss as a large group. 10 minutes To minimize transition ite scriptures named had to do with money. ( Show of time, simply ask partici- hands. ) Introduce the study by pointing out that, even pants to stay in their small though money is the second most common theme in groups, but turn to face the Bible, it is not a favorite! Talking about money makes you for this segment. us uncomfortable, and talking about money in light of faith makes us really uncomfortable! Acknowledge that fact and assure the participants Post the Study Goal and that, although we are tackling a tough topic, we will Ground Rules for Our do so with lovingkindness for all. Refer the group Community. to the ground rules and to the goal for the study. ( See the information in Have them written out, posted, and read aloud. “To Post” at the end of ) this session. Alternative : Invite the community to create their own list of ground rules. You may want to use two or three of those given as examples or starting points for the group. Introduce the term “kin-dom.” Point out that we are accustomed to hearing about God’s “kingdom,” but that language is male-dominated and hierarchical, and it does not reflect what we understand about God’ s vision, which is the Beloved Community. “Kin-dom” is the word we will use throughout the study. Small Group Assignments: 35 minutes Divide into small groups. Assign each group one of 1. God Provides What W e the four topics and give them the instruction sheet for Need/All Is God’s their task. 2. Cultivating a Sense of Move from group to group to clarify and encourage them Enough as they work. 3. Money Can Easily Get It may be wise to remind the groups when it is time to the Better of Us move to the next task in the process. Approximate times 4. Jubilee: Biblical Calls . are listed on the handouts for Justice ( See handouts at the end of this session. ) 14

15 Time Presentation/Process Notes Take a break. 5 minutes Each of the four groups will 35 minutes Share with the large group. do their creative presentation in turn and report the high- lights, if appropriate. After each presentation, the whole group may ask ques- Have one (or two people, tions for clarification, which the presenting group should writing alternately) list on answer. Individuals may also ask questions for discussion. large sheets any questions List those immediately and then cover them after all the for discussion. presentations have been given. Debrief and discuss. Use the questions the group has listed as well as ones such as: What parallels did you see between these examples from scripture and society today? Discuss as a large group. Invite the group to identify Have one (or two people, 10 minutes any new insights from the study so far. writing alternately) list these insights on large Give everyone a copy of the Resources handout. Encourage sheets of paper. Post them participants to use them, especially the websites, which they for the next session. can easily access with their smartphones or computers. The more participants who are familiar with the material covered Provide the Resources there, the richer the group experiences will be for all. handout to participants. Challenge participants to create a money autobiography ( See handout at the end of (refer them to the Resources section in this session), .) this session before the group gathers for Session 3. They may either do the one from the website or simply work with the questions listed in the Introduction of the study book. Worship together: 10 minutes The Faith We • Invite the group to sing “Gather Us In” ( Sing , no. 2236, verses 1 and 2). • Speak a few words of gratitude for the group’ s par - ticipation, for their growing awareness, and the new community forming as a result of this session. • Make the connection for the group to today’ s discus- “Give us this day our daily sion of manna, and the assurance that God provides bread, and forgive us our what we need, with the line in the Lord’s Prayer, “Give debts, as we forgive our us this day our daily bread.” debtors.” - • Refer also to the contrast between the debt-and-confis cation human economy and God’s economy of enough for all. Point out that when we pray the Lord’s Prayer, using “forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors,” it is a reminder of our role in realizing God’s vision. • Pray the Lord’ s Prayer together. • Sing verse 4 of “Gather Us In.” • Close with the benediction: May the “ fire of our love” reflect God’s love and light the way to God’s kin-dom, God’s gracious economy of enough for all. Go in peace. 15

16 TO POST Note to leader: Copy the following ground rules and the study goal onto large sheets of paper and post these in your meeting space. Feel free to add or tweak what is here to better fit your group needs, leadership style, or to engage participants in coming up with their own ground rules. You may also wish to post the specific session goals at the beginning of each meeting. Ground Rules for Our Community ‹ We recognize each person as a beloved child of God. ‹ We value each person’s contributions. We will listen with respect. ‹ We agree that judging another’s ideas or responses, or attempting any “fixing,” is out of bounds. ‹ We may disagree, but we will not be disagreeable in our manner of speaking or in our behavior. ‹ We understand that what is shared here is not to be repeated to others. ‹ We will work as a community to make this group a safe place. Study Goal To connect our faith with our money in relationship to how we live personally and how we address injustice as we journey further into God’s kin-dom. Session Goals Session 1: God’s Kin-dom ‹ To explore the biblical basis for the study on money. ‹ To build community among the participants. Session 2: The Water We Swim In To identify the often-invisible systems of inequality that operate in our culture. ‹ ‹ To contrast God’s economy of enough for all (sufficiency) with the culture’s relentless message of scarcity. Session 3: Our Well-Being ‹ To clarify ways in which our relationship with money has an impact on our well-being. ‹ To experience hope through the awareness that we are not alone and that we have concrete steps we can take to move toward the well-being God desires for us. Session 4: Where Is God Calling Our Money? ‹ To learn about ways our financial decisions can contribute to not only our own well-being but also to the well-being of God’s people and creation. ‹ To discover tools and strategies for working toward God’s call. 16

17 RESOURCES: WHAT ABOUT OUR MONEY? What did John Wesley say about money? “Gain all you can. Save all you can. Give all you can.” That’s short— the and often misunderstood—version! For a fuller and accurate understanding, read “Wesley on Money,” by Sondra . Also, read “Giving, Wesley Style” in Chapter 5 of the study book. www.ministrymatters.org Wheeler, on What does The United Methodist Church say about money? The answers are in our Social Principles. Go to The Book of Resolutions . Also, www.umc.org/what-we-believe/economic-community of The United Methodist Church, 2016 includes important statements under the topics of “Privatization” and “Greed.” United Methodist Women has taken the lead in confronting issues related to women and economic justice. The - slides from the workshop “Overworked and Undervalued: Women, Race, and the Economy” are available on line. These were developed in partnership with United for a Fair Economy. The slides give a very readable overview of the issues related to this study. We encourage you to lead this workshop as a follow-up to the study. They can be found online here: www.unitedmethodistwomen.org/what-we-do/service-and-advocacy/ mission-focus-issues/economic-inequality/gendereconomycharts.pdf . Also, see the Economic Inequality pages on the United Methodist Women website for resources and specific www.unitedmethodistwomen.org/economic-inequality action opportunities: . Being familiar with these additional online resources will be especially helpful for this study: ‹ Sessions 2–4: To gain perspective on where you stand financially in the global picture, search “online income calculator global” for several websites. ‹ For insights about your personal relationship to money, complete the Session 3: money autobiography found at www.faithandmoneynetwork.org . ‹ Session 4 and beyond: Continue the conversation and keep learning at www.unitedmethodistwomen.org . - The following books and those referenced in the study book provide a more in-depth look at how our relation ship to money has an impact on our own well-being and on our ability to respond to God’s call to establish all: for God’s kin-dom, where there is enough ‹ More Than Enough: Living Abundantly in a Culture of Excess , by Lee Hull Moses (available from www.cokesbury.com ). ‹ Loaded: Money and the Spirituality of Enough , by Heather King (available from www.cokesbury.com ). ‹ Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think , by Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler (available from www.amazon.com ). ‹ Mind over Money: Overcoming the Money Disorders That Threaten Our Financial Health , by Ted Klontz and Brad Klontz (available from www.amazon.com ). 17

18 SESSION 1: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT Group 1: God Provides What We Need/All Is God’s Task: To delve into two sections in Chapter 1 of the study book titled “God Provides What We Need” and “All Is God’s,” pulling out and presenting key insights in a way that helps the whole group to have a richer under - standing of this foundational material from the author and from scripture. Process: Work individually in silence. Take the opportunity to read “God Provides What We Need” and “All Is 1. God’s,” to reflect, and to respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas, key phrases, and images that speak to you. Look for both the positive and the negative. Identify both descriptors and consequences (10 minutes). Talk about what you feel to be important from these sections. Look for confirmation as others in your 2. group affirm those findings (10 minutes). 3. Select what you may want to include in your presentation to the other groups. List those possibilities on a worksheet (5 minutes). Use your collective, God-given creativity to prepare what you will present to the large group (10 minutes). 4. Product and Presentation: Do not worry about how “artistic” the product Create a collage* (an artistic assembly of a collection of things). The point is to make visual references to your important findings. Here are some techniques and considerations is! your group may want to incorporate: ‹ Stick figures and other simple drawings Color choices ‹ ‹ Size of the images or words ‹ Location and proximity of the elements ‹ Expressions of emphasis: arrows, starbursts, underlines Choose one or two spokespersons to highlight the group’s main insights for the presentation (5 minutes). Any of your group members may respond to questions generated by the presentation. *An alternative format is acceptable. 18

19 SESSION 1: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT Group 2: Cultivating a Sense of Enough Task: To delve into the section in Chapter 1 of the study book titled “Cultivating a Sense of Enough,” pulling out and presenting key insights in a way that helps the whole group to have a richer understanding of this foundational material from the author and from scripture. Process: Work individually in silence. Take the opportunity to read “Cultivating a Sense of Enough,” to reflect, 1. and to respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas, key phrases, and images that speak to you. Look especially for consequences both positive and negative. Focus also on the contrasts the author identifies, including contrasts between biblical times and today (10 minutes). Talk about what you feel to be important from this section. Look for confirmation as others in your group 2. affirm those findings (10 minutes). Select what you may want to include in your presentation to the other groups. List those possibilities on a 3. worksheet (5 minutes). 4. Use your collective, God-given creativity to prepare what you will present to the large group (10 minutes). Product and Presentation: - Prepare a series of posters.* Do not worry about how “artistic” the product is! The point is to make visual refer ences to your important findings, including contrasts, consequences, and any other connections you see. Here are some techniques and considerations your group may want to incorporate: ‹ Stick figures and other simple drawings Color choices ‹ ‹ Size of the images or words ‹ Location and proximity of the elements ‹ Expressions of emphasis: arrows, starbursts, underlines The spokesperson(s) will highlight the group’s main insight reflected in each poster for the presentation (5 minutes). Any of your group members may respond to questions generated by the presentation. *An alternative format is acceptable. 19

20 SESSION 1: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT Group 3: Money Can Easily Get the Better of Us Task: - To delve into the section in Chapter 1 of the study book titled “Money Can Easily Get the Better of Us,” pull ing out and presenting key insights in a way that helps the whole group to have a richer understanding of this foundational material from the author and from scripture. Process: Work individually in silence. Take the opportunity to read “Money Can Easily Get the Better of Us,” to 1. reflect, and to respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas, key phrases, and images that speak to you. Look especially for the causes and symptoms of “mammon illness,” the outcomes if left untreated, and the prescribed treatments (10 minutes). 2. Talk about what you feel to be important from this section in your group. Look for confirmation as others in your group affirm those findings (10 minutes). Select what you may want to include in your presentation to the other groups. List those possibilities on a 3. worksheet (5 minutes). Use your collective, God-given creativity to prepare what you will present to the large group (10 minutes). 4. Product and Presentation: Prepare a medical skit about “mammon illness.”* Include a checklist for diagnosis and a prescription for treatment. Develop visual aids that help communicate the message; these can be posted for reference once the skit is over. Invite volunteers from the large group to participate in the skit. Have fun! Any of your group members may respond to questions generated by the presentation (5 minutes). *An alternative format is acceptable. 20

21 SESSION 1: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT Group 4: Jubilee: Biblical Calls for Justice Task: To delve into the section in Chapter 1 of the study book titled “Jubilee: Biblical Calls for Justice,” pulling out - and presenting key insights in a way that helps the whole group to have a richer understanding of this founda tional material from the author and from scripture. Process: Work individually in silence. Take the opportunity to read “Jubilee: Biblical Calls for Justice,” to reflect, 1. and to respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas, key phrases, and images that speak to you. Look especially for the comparisons between biblical - times and today. What does God or a particular prophet of God say? How are people today still experi encing the evil of an unfair distribution of resources? (10 minutes) Talk about what you feel to be important in your group. Look for confirmation as others also affirm those 2. findings (10 minutes). Select what you may want to include in your presentation to the other groups. List those possibilities on a 3. worksheet (5 minutes). 4. Use your collective, God-given creativity to prepare what you will present to the large group (10 minutes). Product and Presentation: Show the comparison between God’s instruction and what we experience today. For example, one way to do this is to have someone act as a prophet from biblical times and speak or read their words of instruction or condemnation. Then someone else can identify and briefly explain the comparison to today.* . Make a series of signs to help the larger group connect then and now. Post these after the presentation Your group will have about 5 minutes for the presentation. Any of your members may respond to questions gen- erated by the comparison. *An alternative format is acceptable. 21

22 THE WATER WE SWIM IN (CHAPTERS 2 AND 3) 2 Goals: To identify the often-invisible systems of inequality that operate in our culture. ‹ To contrast God’s economy of enough for all (sufficiency) with the culture’s relentless message of scarcity. ‹ Notes Presentation/Process Time greet them and mark their hand As people arrive, The goal is to divide the with a colored dot, using washable markers of four groups up differently than in different colors. Direct participants to their nametags. orking in the first session. W Encourage them to mingle with others and introduce small, varied groups builds themselves. community. Worship together: 10 minutes • Sing “Give Thanks” ( The Faith We Sing , no. 2036) twice. Arrange in advance for music • Express your gratitude for the sense of community leadership for both worship you see growing and for the great work the group times. already accomplished in Session 1.* • Invite volunteers to share their own expressions of grati - *You may wish to refer also tude: “I am grateful for . . . ” After each, lead the commu- to key insights from the nity in response: “Thank you, God, for your love.” previous session. s • Pray with gratitude for all these reminders of God’ love and care for each of us. Ask God for our hearts and minds to grow in awareness of that love and You may want to have a also of what distracts or hinders us from receiving it. simple illustration of the fish Introduce this session with the story of the fi sh from drawn in advance to present the end of the Introduction in the study book. Tell as a visual aid. After speak- the group that seeing what we take for granted is a ing, post it or add it to the challenge for us today. worship center. 30 minutes Divide into small groups. Instruct each small group “Map the System” Small Group Assignments: to map the system you assign to them. Instructions for 1. Educational System each group are provided in the handouts that follow. Be 2. Financial System sure to state the amount of time the groups will have, 3. Lottery and Law- and also indicate when they only have 10 minutes, and Enforcement/Justice Systems then 3 minutes, remaining. 4. Economic System Check in with the groups as they work to encourage ( See handouts following this and assist them. chart. ) 22

23 Time Presentation/Process Notes Work individually. 10 minutes Post these sentence stems Give everyone 7–10 sticky notes and for easy reference by the a fine-tip marker. Invite participants to work individually group: and in silence to write some hopeful responses related to the elements mapped out under the various systems. “Someday . . .” After they complete a phrase they can place it under the “I hope . . .” appropriate system description. “We could . . .” “I will . . . ” Allow time for reflection and for reading the dreams of You may also post additional others, as well. sentence stems that would be helpful. Gather as a large group. Debrief the exercise with 10 minutes To save time, do the debrief- ing standing up. Encourage questions such as: people to move to their • Where were your eyes opened? response notes when they • What surprised you? speak to make it easier Invite participants to speak about their statements. for the group to make the Then ask: . connection • What kinds of actions would be needed to make our hopes a reality or to invoke a change in these systems? • What are some collective first steps to take as a member of United Methodist Women or as part of The United Methodist Church? 10 minutes Take a break. Instruct the large group to Divide into small groups. create small groups of people with mixed dots when they return from break. Encourage them to take a few minutes to make sure everyone in their new group is acquainted. Point out that the previous exercise was about raising 20 minutes awareness of the “waters of injustice” we swim in, as well as our knowledge that many people are in danger of drowning in them. That recognition can be distress- ing, but God provides an alternative direction! Hand out the Contrast Exercise instruction sheet: All Contrast Exercise: The World the groups are to create two contrasting lists. According to Our Culture vs. God’s Kin-dom When time is called, ask the groups to post their ( See handout at the end of sheets together, for example, all the Culture sheets on this session. ) one wall, God’s Kin-dom sheets on another. Invite participants to walk around and read the vari- ous sheets. 23

24 Time Presentation/Process Notes Discuss in the large group. Use the suggested ques- 20 minutes tions below and/or your own to stimulate discussion: • What did you notice? What surprised you? • Do you disagree with or have a different take on anything? • What connections do you see with the biblical If available, refer to the list of insights from Session 1? insights from Session 1. • What consequences do you see for individuals? Churches? Society? • What new questions does this exercise and discus- sion raise for you? The 1–4 scale, moving from Ask for a few volunteers to indicate on a scale of lesser to greater, can simply 1–4 how aware they were before this exercise of the be volunteers indicating a scarcity mindset and then after. Ask the same two number choice or standing questions of before-and-after awareness related to on a physical continuum God’s sufficiency. mapped out on the floor. The first option is less time-con - suming; the second may have more impact. Label one sheet “Our Cul- Follow up with questions to the volunteers and to the ture: Scarcity” and another whole group to elicit ideas that could help people be- sheet “God’s Kin-dom: Suf- come more aware and be able to move toward living ficiency.” Have two writers more fully with a sense of God’s sufficiency. (Be sure alternately list the ideas the to include the author’s counsel, if no one else does.) group generates. Post them What can we do to move towards God’s kin-dom: in the meeting space. • In community (discernment of wants vs. needs)? Remind the group that • For creation (sustainability vs. growth models)? within the national and local • In heart and purpose (simplicity vs. fragmentation)? United Methodist Women • As a discipline (gratitude)? organizations we have com- Remind the group that Session 3 will cover Chapters munity and other resources 3, 4, and 6. Encourage them to read the material in that support us in these advance. efforts. Remind participants also to be sure to complete the money autobiographies for Session 3. 24

25 Time Presentation/Process Notes Worship together: 10 minutes rouble” • Lead the group in singing “Nothing Can T ( The Faith We Sing, no. 2054 ). Sing it three or four times through. • Point out that in the face of our rising awareness Refer again to your visual of “the waters of injustice” in which we all swim, it aid of the fish and water, if is easy to become overwhelmed, discouraged, and available. fearful. But as Christians, we have a powerful God, whose love is greater than all else. In advance invite three read- • Read Psalm 91:1–4, 14–16. ers to work out a dramatic • ( Optional ) Show a modern “psalm,” “Bridge Over - reading of Psalm 91. (Per Troubled Waters.”* Encourage the group to sing haps, one reading verses 1–4, along. The words are on screen. and the other two splitting the lines of 14–16.) • Direct the group to stand and hold hands in a *Play or project the circle. Remind participants that even though the YouTube sing-along: “waters” in our lives are rough, we have affirmed www.youtube.com/ two very important gifts today: God’s ever-present watch?v=jjNgn4r6SOA and sustaining love and vision for sufficiency, as (search: Bridge Over Trou- well as the joy and support we have as people of bled Waters—with lyrics); faith—together. or bring a recording you can 1 play. • Sing “Give Thanks” one time through. Have the words to “Give Thanks” projected or in • Close with the benediction: advance cue one or more May we face our troubled waters together with strong singers to be ready to courage and the assurance that we worship Jesus lead the group. ( This is not a Christ, who we know can calm the sea! Go in time to pull out hymnals! ) peace. Endnotes 1. Credit: “Bridge Over Troubled Waters,” by Simon & Garfunkel/BMI. Video by Nicole/YouTube user. 25

26 SESSION 2: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT Group 1: Map the Educational System Task: To carefully scrutinize this system, becoming more aware of its potential for good and also of its practices that harm individuals and create systemic injustice. Resources: Collectively, your small group has a great deal of experience with the educational system. Draw from your various experiences to complete this map. You may also wish to review the section in Chapter 2 of the study book titled “Familiar and Visible.” Use your smartphones, if you choose, to search for additional information. Keep in mind the need to be alert for bias in the sources. Process: 1. Take at least five full minutes to work individually in silence. Recall what you already know about schools—public and private, preschool to higher education (including universities, community colleges, and technical schools). How are they funded? What is the quality of the learning? What’s the environ- - ment in terms of their culture, including discipline? What pressures are on the schools? Teachers? Stu dents? What support systems are available? Ask for a volunteer from your group to take notes in preparation for making your map. 2. - Talk about your discoveries. As you do, indicate good and bad, causes and effects, intended and unin 3. , race, financial tended consequences, who benefits and who suffers or is left out because of their gender situation, inmigration status, or other factors. Tell your own stories: What have been your experiences, observations, hopes, and decisions within the educational system? Product: Map the system. Show relationships and connections, how one thing led to another, and so forth. Use the imagery of a map where it is helpful: routes, bypasses, intersections, detours, toll roads, freeways, dead ends, alternate routes, bridges, obstructions, barricades, construction, proposed routes, unpaved/rocky roads, vehi- cles, and so on. Make one large map, creating “pull-out” enlargements within the overall map, or make a series of maps— whatever is most helpful. Add labels. Post your map(s) for others to see. You will not need to do a verbal presentation. 26

27 SESSION 2: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT Group 2: Map the Financial System Task: To carefully scrutinize this system, becoming more aware of its potential for good and also of its practices that harm individuals and create systemic injustice. Resources: Review the section in Chapter 2 of the study book titled “Familiar and Visible Only to Some” (ending with the paragraph that begins with “As private businesses have cashed in . . .” then scan the rest) and the income charts in the Introduction. Use your smartphones, if you choose, to search for additional information. Keep in mind the need to be alert for bias in the sources. Process: Work individually in silence. Review the assigned section, reflect, and respond. Underline, highlight, or 1. make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas, key phrases, and images that speak to you. Look for both the positive and the negative. Identify both descriptors and consequences. Note who benefits and who suffers or is left out. Ask for a volunteer from your group to take notes in preparation for making your map. 2. 3. - Talk about your discoveries. As you do, indicate good and bad, causes and effects, intended and unin , race, neigh - tended consequences, who benefits and who suffers or is left out because of their gender borhood, economic resources, or other factors. Tell your own stories: What have been your experiences, observations, hopes, and decisions within the financial system? Product: Map the system. Show relationships and connections, how one thing led to another, and so forth. Use the imagery of a map where it is helpful: routes, bypasses, intersections, detours, toll roads, freeways, dead ends, alternate routes, bridges, obstructions, barricades, construction, proposed routes, unpaved/rocky roads, vehi- cles, and so on. Make one large map, creating “pull-out” enlargements within the overall map, or make a series of maps— whatever is most helpful. Add labels. Post your map(s) for others to see. You will not need to do a verbal presentation. 27

28 SESSION 2: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT Group 3: Map the Lottery and Law-Enforcement/Justice Systems Task: - To carefully scrutinize these systems, becoming more aware of their potential for good and also of their prac tices that harm individuals and create systemic injustice. Resources: Review the section in Chapter 2 of the study book titled “Familiar and Visible Only to Some,” beginning with the sentence “As private businesses have cashed in on people who are financially struggling. . . ” Use your smartphones, if you choose, to search for additional information. Keep in mind the need to be alert for bias in the sources. Look also at the income charts in the Introduction. Process: 1. Work individually in silence. Review the assigned section, reflect, and respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas, key phrases, and images that speak to you. Look for both the positive and the negative. Identify both descriptors and consequences. Note who benefits and who suffers or is left out. In your group ask for a volunteer to take notes in preparation for making your map. 2. - 3. Talk about your discoveries. As you do, indicate good and bad, causes and effects, intended and unin , race, financial tended consequences, who benefits and who suffers or is left out because of their gender prospects, or other factors. Tell your own stories: What have been your experiences, observations, hopes, and decisions within the lottery and law-enforcement/justice systems? Product: Map the two systems. Within each map, show relationships and connections, how one thing led to another, and - so forth. Use the imagery of a map where it is helpful: routes, bypasses, intersections, detours, toll roads, free ways, dead ends, alternate routes, bridges, obstructions, barricades, construction, proposed routes, unpaved/ rocky roads, vehicles, and so on. Make a series of maps or one large map of each system, creating “pull-out” enlargements within the overall maps—or whatever is most helpful. Add labels. Post your map(s) for others to see. You will not need to do a verbal presentation. 28

29 SESSION 2: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT Group 4: Map the Economic System Task: To carefully scrutinize the resulting inequality of the economic system, examining how the consequences harm individuals and create systemic injustice. Resources: Refer to the section in Chapter 2 of the study book titled “Natural Force or Unjust System?” beginning with the text, “What has resulted from all these changes? Extreme inequality.” Look also at the income charts in the Introduction and the wordle in Chapter 3 in the section titled “Which Is Our Text?” Use your smartphones, if you choose, to search for additional information. Keep in mind the need to be alert for bias in the sources. Process: 1. Work individually in silence. Review the assigned section, reflect, and respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas, key phrases, and images that speak to you. Look for both the positive and the negative. Identify both descriptors and consequences. Note who benefits and who suffers or is left out. Ask for a volunteer from your group to take notes in preparation for making your map. 2. Talk about your discoveries. As you do, indicate good and bad, causes and effects, intended and unintended 3. or consequences, who benefits and who suffers or is left out because of their gender, race, educational level, other factors. Tell your own stories: What have been your experiences, observations, hopes, and decisions within the economic system? Product: Map the system. Show relationships and connections, how one thing led to another, and so forth. Use the imagery of a map where it is helpful: routes, bypasses, intersections, detours, toll roads, freeways, dead ends, alternate routes, bridges, obstructions, barricades, construction, proposed routes, unpaved/rocky roads, vehicles, and so on. You may want to begin with two roads going in different directions. Make one large map, creating “pull-out” enlargements within the overall map, or make a series of maps— whatever is most helpful. Add labels. Post your map(s) for others to see. You will not need to do a verbal presentation. 29

30 SESSION 2: CONTRAST EXERCISE The World According to Our Culture vs. God’s Kin-dom Definitions: Words have power. The author has pointed out that the biblical word “abundance” has taken on commercial overtones in our culture, suggesting that we deserve materially , a connotation avoided in this study by more . the term “sufficiency,” which implies enough Similarly, the biblical word “kingdom” carries baggage by being male-centered, which is exclusionary. This study uses instead the term “kin-dom” as a reminder that the vision to be realized is God’s Beloved Commu- nity, where we are all “kin” held together by love—love of God and love of one another, regardless of gender - or race or economic resources. The vertical and horizontal parts of the cross of Christ form a symbol, incor porating both loves. Task: To clarify distinctions that arise based on a mindset of scarcity versus a sense of God’s sufficiency. Process: 1. Work individually in silence. Take the opportunity to review Chapter 3, to reflect, and to respond. Un - derline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas, key phrases, and images that speak to you. 2. In your group create two lists on separate sheets titled, “Our Culture: Scarcity” (black marker) and “God’s Kin-dom: Sufficiency” (green marker). Together, examine such areas as media, advertising, polit - ical rhetoric, and social “isms,” as well as indications of God’s economy of enough for all. 3. When time is called, post your sheets with the others by category (Culture lists together , Kin-dom lists together). 4. With a partner or two, walk around and look over the various sheets. Talk briefly about what you notice. 30

31 OUR WELL-BEING (CHAPTERS 3, 4, AND 6) 3 Goals: ‹ To clarify ways in which our relationship with money has an impact on our well-being. To experience hope through the awareness that we are not alone and that we have concrete steps we ‹ can take to move toward the well-being God desires for us. Time Presentation/Process Notes greet them and mark their hands As people arrive, Your goal is to continue to with a colored dot (in a different color from the previ- mix group members. ous session), using washable markers of four different colors. Direct participants to their nametags. Encour- age them to mingle and become further acquainted with each other. Worship together: 5 minutes • Sing “W oke Up This Morning” ( The Faith We Sing , Arrange for music leadership no. 2082), verses 1 and 5. And “My Hope Is Built” for both worship times. ( , no. 368), verse 1. The United Methodist Hymnal Repeat the chorus. • Acknowledge that we live in a complicated world, which often challenges us with hard times and difficult decisions. What a blessing it is to wake up each morning with a “mind stayed on Jesus!” What a blessing it is to know that Jesus Christ is our solid rock when we are surrounded by “sinking sand” of all sorts. • Read Jeremiah 29:11 as words of assurance. In advance invite one of the participants to read Jeremi- • Pray with gratitude for Jesus Christ in our lives, for ah 29:11. The reader may his example and his teachings that help us to live in simply stand where she hope of the coming of God’s kin-dom in our lives and or he is to read, unless a our world. Ask God to help us become more aware of microphone is needed. the true source of our security and of the well-being God desires for us. 31

32 Time Presentation/Process Notes Divide into small groups. Direct everyone to find their Small Group Assignments: 15 minutes 1. W-M-S-M Cycle small groups, based on the dot on their hand, and 2. Squeeze Freeze make sure everyone is acquainted. 3. Stuffed! Hand out a skit assignment to each group. 4. Losing Time Move from group to group, checking with them to address any questions and to encourage them as they See handout at the end ( prepare. of this session .) Gather in the large group to watch the skits. 15 minutes Be sure to thank each group. Point out that laughter in this case is both a recognition of the “talent” displayed and an acknowledgement that we’ve “been there,” too. Invite participants to form Divide into groups of three. 20 minutes Remind the group of the triads, spacing their chairs close together but apart ground rules and that what from the other groups. is shared here is not to be judged or repeated to others. Once they are settled, give these instructions for the deep listening exercise: Give each group one copy of the Deep Listening Exercise Round 1: handout. Remind the partic- • Each person is to have uninterrupted time to talk ipants that these are starting for three minutes, based on the topics listed in the points—not requirements; speaking prompts. When time is called, the oppor- they may speak as they tunity to speak will shift to the next person. choose. • The other two are to listen, not speaking but show- ing with their body language that they are listening ( See handout at the end of deeply. this session.) • The three minutes may seem long. Most of us are The intention of this time is not used to being listened to uninterrupted for that for participants to talk freely length of time. So, if need be, allow silence as the about how they experience speakers gather their thoughts. the pressures highlighted in Round 2: the skits in their own lives. • The pattern repeats, but this time with only one to Be vigilant about keeping the two minutes for each speaker (depending upon time. Sound a bell or simply time). call, “Time to switch speak- • Speakers may acknowledge when what they heard ers.” Make yourself heard. from one of the others stimulated another thought, Explain Round 1, and then at however the focus is not to be on responding to the appropriate time explain what that person said, only to allow it to generate Round 2. more introspection. 32

33 Time Presentation/Process Notes Take a break. This break may need to be a 10 minutes bit longer since the sharing may have been intense. Gather in the large group. Point out that the previous 5 minutes hour was like confession in our liturgy. Confession is a good thing—it indicates the awareness that allows us to change. We can move ahead because we have the assurance of God’s forgiveness and love. Give some words of assurance: God’s vision is sufficiency. With God’s help we can let go of our worries about scarcity that are pressed upon us by our culture. With God’s help, we can move further into God’s kin-dom, where all have enough. Invite the group now to shift to action, to take steps This session’s focus is on liv- forward on their faith journey, especially as it relates to ing into God’s well-being for money. Point out that the author has lifted up financial us personally. Session 4 will planning as a key tool for helping us gain well-being cover how we can help bring and use our money in ways that are in line with our about well-being for God’s values as people of faith. Remind the group that we people and for creation. also have another tool: the wisdom of one another. Form wisdom circles for sharing. Assess the number 30 minutes Give each circle a “talking stick,”* an item of your of people and establish one or more circles of no more choice that the person talking than 12–14 people. Ask participants to self-select a holds until finished and then circle with an eye toward having all the circles be a mix passes to the next person, of several generations. who then may speak. The The goal of these wisdom circles is to give participants rest of the group should the opportunity to share and to learn from the wisdom simply listen until their turn. each person has gained from their life experience and Suggested questions: faith journey. • What practices related to money do you find helpful? The nature of the wisdom can be practical (a way of (Possible answers: bud- doing things) or philosophical (a way of thinking), a geting, having a financial big idea or an informative tip. Encourage speakers to planner, automatic with- elaborate. Adding specifics often helps listeners under - drawal from your paycheck stand better. for savings.) • In what ways has your Do two or more rounds (depending upon time), each faith helped you with with a different question. Choose from the list, at right, managing money? or add your own. Each round should focus on only one • What do you now know question. Participants may choose to pass. about managing money that you wish you had known and implemented sooner? • What dreams do you have for using money to help bring in God’s kin-dom? 33

34 Time Presentation/Process Notes Participants work individually to create an action plan 10 minutes for themselves. Based on their insights from the skits, the study book, and the deep listening exercise, and also drawing upon the ideas and information from the wisdom circles, participants should note several steps they want to take toward their well-being. Encourage them to list both things they will do and things they want to investigate further. Participants may want to talk with family members, gather more information, or look for a financial planner or budget template, for example. They may want to become more active in United Methodist Women advocacy efforts or consider strategies discussed in the study book. Remind the group that Session 4 will cover Chapters 5–7 of the study book. Worship together: 10 minutes • Lead the group in singing “His Eye Is on the Sparrow” ( The Faith We Sing , no. 2146). Sing all three verses. Ask two to three readers in • Read Luke 12:6–7, 15, 24, 29–34. • Assure ever yone that God does not measure our advance to present the vari- worth by our wealth! The pressures of systems and ous sections of the scripture. circumstances beyond our control are real and may not change. Yet, in the midst of outside stressors we have control of our insides—our hearts—and can choose where our treasure is even as we work together to change the larger systems. • Remind the group that in God’ s economy there is enough for all. We have the assurance that as we take steps individually and as a community toward God’s kin-dom, God, who watches over even a small sparrow, is watching over us on that journey. • Sing the chorus of “His Eye Is on the Sparrow” ( The Faith We Sing , no. 2146). • Close with the benediction: As you navigate life’s uncertainties, may you find your certainty in God’s love. Go in peace. * The talking stick is used in many Native American traditions when a council is called. Passing the stick from person to person allows each individual present to be heard and to give their sacred point of view. 34

35 SESSION 3: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENTS Print out only one copy of the skit assignments and cut the assignments into strips. Give one Note to leader: . assignment to each group Group 1: W-M-S-M Cycle Using the material in the first three paragraphs of Chapter 4, create a skit that gives the whole group an image of the exhausting cycle of the “work-more-spend-more” trap. Some options to consider are telling a single story in the skit or doing a series of vignettes and possibly playing off the medical connotations of the words “consumption” or “affluenza.” The topic is serious, but the skit can be a fun learning experience! Group 2: Squeeze Freeze Using the material in paragraphs four and five near the beginning of Chapter 4, create a visual depiction of the squeeze many people experience from outside pressures that they have very little control over. Do not include the “work-more-spend-more” trap, which is assigned to another group. Some options to consider are putting on a skit; or b) creating one or more tableaus or freeze frames that capture the action and/or the a) feelings. The topic is serious, but the presentation can be a fun learning experience! Group 3: Stuffed! Using the material in paragraphs two and six in the section “Admitting the Problem Is the First Step” in Chapter 4, create a skit or tableau that gives the whole group an image of how our stuff is taking over our lives. The topic is serious, but the skit or tableau can be a fun learning experience! Group 4: Losing Time Using the material in paragraphs eight and nine in the section “Admitting the Problem Is the First Step” in Chapter 4, create a skit that gives the whole group an image of the ramifications of believing that “time is money.” The topic is serious, but the skit can be a fun learning experience! 35

36 SESSION 3: DEEP LISTENING EXERCISE Speaking Prompts Print only enough copies to be able to give one to each group of three in the class. Cut the list Note to leader: of prompts into strips to hand out. Instruct the triads to pass the list to the person speaking for their reference. Remind participants that these prompts are starting points—not requirements; they may speak as they choose . ‹ Which images presented in the skits did you connect with? ‹ What have you learned about yourself and your relationship to money through completing your money autobiography? ‹ What consequences or questions are you struggling with? Which images presented in the skits did you connect with? ‹ What have you learned about yourself and your relationship to money through completing your ‹ money autobiography? ‹ What consequences or questions are you struggling with? ‹ Which images presented in the skits did you connect with? ‹ What have you learned about yourself and your relationship to money through completing your money autobiography? ‹ What consequences or questions are you struggling with? ‹ Which images presented in the skits did you connect with? ‹ What have you learned about yourself and your relationship to money through completing your money autobiography? ‹ What consequences or questions are you struggling with? 36

37 WHERE IS GOD CALLING OUR MONEY? (CHAPTERS 5–7) 4 Goals: ‹ To learn about ways our financial decisions can contribute to not only our own well-being but also to the well-being of God’s people and creation. ‹ To discover tools and strategies for working toward God’s call. Presentation/Process Notes Time greet them and mark their hands As people arrive, with a colored dot. Direct participants to their nametags. Encourage them to mingle and share short conversations. 10 minutes Worship together: ou?” ( • Sing “What Does the Lord Require of Y The Arrange for music leadership Faith We Sing , no. 2174). Repeat or sing through for both worship times. as a round. • Read Matthew 25:34–40. ( Optional: Narrator reads Invite three readers in verses 31–33.) advance to present the Affirm that God’ s kin-dom is characterized by • scripture: well-being, shown to us through God’s never-ending 1. Narrator to set the scene grace and through the caring of God’s people for and make the transitions those who are suffering, who do not have enough, 2. Jesus and who are shut out from the well-being God 3. The representative of intends. the righteous • Remind the group that as we have experienced the grace of Christ, we are also called to reflect that love in our actions toward others. • Pray with gratitude for this time to grow in our under - standing and our faith. Offer thanks for the glimpse of God’s kin-dom. Ask for a continued blessing upon this session and for discernment of next steps along the way where God would have us go. 37

38 Time Presentation/Process Notes Introduce United Methodist Women’s focus on 5 minutes Have Living Wages for All handouts available for Living Wages for All. participants. Using the handout following these charts and referenc- ing the United Methodist Women website, briefly intro - If you have Internet access, duce United Methodist Women’s quadrennial campaign you may want to pull up the for state and local legislation that advances living wages website. for all. Divide into small groups. Direct everyone to find their 20 minutes Needs and Opportunities small groups, based on their dot, and make sure every- small group assignments are one is acquainted. as follows. Group 1: Give the Needs and Opportunities handout to several Taxes and Their Community- people in each group. Each group has the same task, Building Role— but different content. Instruct the groups to: Savings and Banking 1. review and discuss the areas suggested by the Group 2: author or group members of ways to be involved Investing for Personal and in helping create well-being for all of God’s people Community Needs— and creation; Wills and Legacies 2. be prepared to share two or three highlights from Group 3: the discussion with the whole group. Giving: Stewardship of What Is Ultimately God’s— Move from group to group, checking in with them to The Spirit of Service and address any questions and encourage them as they Advocacy prepare. Group 4: Giving, Wesley Style— United Methodist Women Engage in Service and Advocacy See handouts at the end ( of this session. ) Encourage each group to consider how their issue connects with the United Methodist Women goal of a living wage for all through their conversations and planning. 38

39 Time Presentation/Process Notes Be sure to thank each group. Listen and discuss in the large group. Hear the 20 minutes reports of each group’s highlights. Have two note takers writ- ing on large sheets of pa- Invite further discussion: per as participants express Given United Methodist Women’s focus on ideas for ways to achive economic inequality and living wages, how might a wider impact through we challenge and enable our local members to United Methodist Women. recognize and respond to any of these needs In wrapping up, lift up and opportunities? how personal choices are Remind participants that they have their study books also reflected in collective to refer to after the sessions are over. Also, the action by United Methodist United Methodist Women website has an economic Women units. What can inequality page with additional resources and United study participants bring Methodist Women unit action opportunities: Visit back to their units to plan www.unitedmethodistwomen.org/economic-inequality . for ongoing local action, particularly around the issue of Living Wages for All, throughout the qua- drennium? Compile and send these ideas to participants and United Methodist Women national staff after the event. 5 minutes Take a break. Gather as a large group. Explain the two options for For example, a creed might 5 minutes this time period: use these sentence stems: 1. One or more small groups may work together to 1. We believe . . . We trust. write a creed or litany. The creed should have at 2. We choose . . . We work. least two parts: Our belief and our action. A litany usually has a repeating response. Give each “artist” an instruction sheet. 2. Participants may work individually or with a partner to create an artistic word-art poster (or other expression) based on what they have learned or experienced. Point out designated spaces in the room for individuals to meet to work on a creed/litany or the art opportunity. Allow participants to self-select the activity they prefer. 39

40 Time Presentation/Process Notes Work on the projects in small groups Provide art supplies, includ- 25 minutes or individually. ing masking tape or tacks Move from area to area to encourage participants as to display art. they work and address any questions or needs they *Set up one or more lap- have. tops and designate guides to lead the tour of the site. Optional: Offer the opportunity for participants who Be sure to check Internet are not familiar with the United Methodist Women availability in advance or website to have a guided introduction to this tool for have the site downloaded connecting and working together on issues like Living onto a computer. Wages for All and Economic Inequality.* See handout at the end ( of this session for more information. ) Gather as a large group. As part of this study, be sure 10 minutes View the art. Encourage everyone to take photos with their smartphones, to supply each person with a contact list of the participants if they have one, so they can keep and share these as well as contact informa- visible reminders of their time together and what they have learned. tion for United Methodist Women national staff work- ing on economic inequality. 20 minutes Worship together: • Remind the group that when we look at the “water Invite one person in ad- we swim in” and recognize that we as Christians are vance to read the scripture. swimming against the current of our culture, it is easy to become overwhelmed and to feel we are not enough to make a difference. But we have a helpmate for the task in the Holy Spirit and companions for the journey as we work together as United Methodists and United Methodist Women members. We are enough! • Have each writing group read aloud their creed Reassure the writers that or litany. whatever they have done • Read 1 Corinthians 3:5–9. Remind the group that in will be enough. faith, like Paul and Apollos, we plant and we water, knowing that God gives the growth. • Sing “Together We Serve” ( The Faith We Sing , no. 2175), all verses. • Ask the participants to form a circle. • Invite each person to speak one or two words about the study and how they are feeling. • Thank the group for the gifts they have so lovingly shared with one another in these sessions. • Close with the benediction: As you go your separate ways, carry with you the love we have experienced here and the assurance that you are never alone. Go in peace. 40

41 SESSION 4: LIVING WAGES FOR ALL Every person has the right to a job at a living wage. , ¶163.C Book of Resolutions, 2016 —United Methodist Social Principles, Consider supporting a family of four on the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. (Or maybe you already know from experience how challenging this is.) That is only $15,080 per year before taxes—a rate that has not been raised since 2009. It costs a family at least $15.84 per hour to meet the basic needs of housing, food, transportation, health care, child care, taxes, and other items such as clothing and personal care items ($28,829 per year for a family of four). That’s called the living wage. Those costs are even higher in large urban centers. The gap between minimum wage and living wage is a women’s issue, an economic justice issue, a racial justice issue, and an immigrant rights issue, because women, people of color, and immigrants make up the majority of low-wage workers. Women are 46 percent of the total workforce, but make up 75 percent of low-wage workers. 1 Women of color are only 16 percent of the total workforce, but make up 37 percent of low-wage workers. Most people who cannot make ends meet are working forty hours a week, or even two jobs, but their wages 2 Employers are too low (or employers may be stealing wages by not paying overtime, altering time slips, etc.) are not required to pay the minimum wage to tipped workers, some disabled workers, youth, and some farm- workers. This affects the next generation as no wealth can be created to pass on. Take Action Together: United Methodist Women is mobilizing with allies at state and municipal levels to pass legislation that advances a living wage for all. We invite you to get involved through your United Methodist Women unit and local church. Get prepared, find allies, and then, working together, take action to make change! ‹ ‹ Find out the minimum wage and living wage in your county. Check the MIT Living Wage . http://livingwage.mit.edu Calculator: ‹ What About Our Money? A Faith Gather a group of interested members from your unit. Use this - study as an introduction to the biblical and theological call for Christian social engage Response ment around the economy (see particularly Chapter 1). ‹ Contact district and conference United Methodist Women presidents and/or social action coordi- nators to see how they are involved. Consider organizing a conference United Methodist Women legislative event on living wages. ‹ Lead the United Methodist Women/United for a Fair Economy workshop in your unit/congregation as a follow-up to this study: “Overworked and Undervalued: Women, Race, and the Economy,” www.unitedmethodistwomen.org/what-we-do/service-and-advocacy/mission-focus-issues/ economic-inequality/gendereconomycharts.pdf . 41

42 ‹ Learn which groups in your county and state are working to advance a living wage for all. Invite them to meet with you. Organize a forum to learn about their work. Explore alliances to support their campaigns. ‹ Women website Explore the Economic Inequality pages of the United Methodist ( www.unitedmethodistwomen.org/economic-inequality ) and contact United Methodist Women national office staff (Carol Barton, [email protected]) for resources and orga- nizing ideas. Endnotes 1. “Overworked and Undervalued: Women, Race, and Economy,” United for a Fair Economy workshop on United Methodist Women website, www.unitedmethodistwomen.org/what-we-do/service-and-advocacy/ mission-focus-issues/economic-inequality/gendereconomycharts.pdf . 2. For more information, see www.iwj.org/issues . 42

43 SESSION 4: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT: NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES Group 1: Taxes and Their Community-Building Role—Savings and Banking Tasks: Review and discuss ways the author or group members suggest to become involved in helping to create 1. well-being for all of God’s people and creation. 2. Prepare to share two or three highlights from the discussion with the whole group. Process: Work individually in silence. Take the opportunity to review the sections from Chapter 6 listed below, 1. to reflect, and to respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas that you’d like to explore individually or with the group. The Community-Building Role of Taxes ‹ Savings and Banking ‹ 2. In your group use questions such as the following to start a discussion about the text: ‹ Which of these ideas excited you? Why? What questions or concerns do these sections raise? ‹ ‹ What experiences have you had with these suggestions? ‹ Where do you see possibilities? ‹ How might our United Methodist Women organization (local or national) work together on any of these issues? 3. Select two or three ideas that generated excitement to present to the other groups. Designate your spokes - person(s). Groups will only have 3–4 minutes for their report. 43

44 SESSION 4: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT: NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES Group 2: Investing for Personal and Community Needs—Wills and Legacies Tasks: Review and discuss ways the author or group members suggest to become involved in helping to create 1. well-being for all of God’s people and creation. 2. Prepare to share two or three highlights from the discussion with the whole group. Process: 1. Work individually in silence. Take the opportunity to review the sections from Chapter 6 listed below, to reflect, and to respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas that you’d like to explore individually or with the group. ‹ Intentional Investing and Community Investing Wills and Legacies ‹ 2. In your group use questions such as the following to start a discussion about the text: ‹ Which of these ideas excited you? Why? What questions or concerns do these sections raise? ‹ ‹ What experiences have you had with these suggestions? ‹ Where do you see possibilities? ‹ How might our United Methodist Women organization (local or national) work together on any of these issues? 3. Select two or three ideas that generated excitement to present to the other groups. Designate your spokes - person(s). Groups will only have 3–4 minutes for their report. 44

45 SESSION 4: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT: NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES Group 3: Giving: Stewardship of What Is Ultimately God’s— The Spirit of Service and Advocacy Tasks: Review and discuss ways the author or group members suggest to become involved in helping to create 1. well-being for all of God’s people and creation. Prepare to share two or three highlights from the discussion with the whole group. 2. Process: 1. Work individually in silence. Take the opportunity to review the sections from Chapter 5 listed below, to reflect, and to respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas that you’d like to explore individually or with the group. ‹ Giving: Stewardship of What Is Ultimately God’s (the opening section of Chapter 5 up to the first subtitle) ‹ The Spirit of Service and Advocacy United Methodist Women Engages in Service and Advocacy (including the paragraph about ‹ contributing to the United Methodist Women Legacy Fund at www.unitedmethodistwomen.org/ ) legacy 2. In your group use questions such as the following to start a discussion about the text: Which of these ideas excited you? Why? ‹ ‹ What questions or concerns do these sections raise? ‹ What experiences have you had with these suggestions? ‹ Where do you see possibilities? ‹ How might our United Methodist Women organization (local or national) work together on any of these issues? 3. Select two or three ideas that generated excitement to present to the other groups. Designate your spokesperson(s). Groups will only have 3–4 minutes for their report. 45

46 SESSION 4: SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT: NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES Group 4: Giving, Wesley Style—United Methodist Women Engages in Service and Advocacy Tasks: Review and discuss ways the author or group members suggested to become involved in helping to 1. create well-being for all of God’s people and creation. 2. Prepare to share two or three highlights from the discussion with the whole group. Process: Work individually in silence. Take the opportunity to review the sections from Chapter 5 listed below, 1. to reflect, and to respond. Underline, highlight, or make notes in your study book or on your worksheets about ideas that you’d like to explore individually or with the group. Giving, Wesley-Style ‹ United Methodist Women Engages in Service and Advocacy ‹ 2. In your group use questions such as the following to start a discussion about the text: ‹ Which of these ideas excited you? Why? What questions or concerns do these sections raise? ‹ ‹ What experiences have you had with these suggestions? ‹ Where do you see possibilities? ‹ How might our United Methodist Women organization (local or national) work together on any of these issues? 3. Select two or three ideas that generated excitement to present to the other groups. Designate your spokesperson(s). Groups will only have 3–4 minutes for their report. 46

47 SESSION 4: ART POSSIBILITIES Goal: To create an artistic poster using words and/or phrases from the study that are meaningful to you. (Or use your smartphone to create a wordle inspired by the one that appears in the section titled “Which Is Our Text” in Chapter 3 of the study book.) Possibilities: Focus on one word or phrase (see the list of suggestions below) . Write the word in large letters ‹ (perhaps even “bubble letters”) and decorate around it and/or in it. Choose several or many words and phrases and fill the poster wit h them, using artistic techniques ‹ of your choice, such as: ‹ Providing emphasis with color or size ‹ Varying your lettering styles (script and block) ‹ Write the words using “bubble letters” to create a coloring page for later Turning the poster to write sideways or upside-down ‹ ‹ Including negative words (perhaps in a dark color or visibly “overcome” by positive words) References: Look to the worship center items, to the various posted images or statements, and to your notes for words and phrases. You may also draw from this list for starters: Money, Faith, God Provides, Manna, Daily Bread, Enough, Mammon, Kin-dom, God’s Beloved Community, God’s Economy, Sabbath, Jubilee, Justice, Inequality, Systems, Systemic Injustice, The Water We Live In, Scarcity, Sufficiency, Security, Simplicity, Sustainability, Need or Want, Consumption, Affluenza, Well-Being, Stewardship, Giving, 10 percent, 90 percent, Generosity, “Gain all you can. Save all you can. Give all you can,” You can!, You are enough!, Service, Advocacy, Together, Intentional, Community Investing, Planning, Legacy, Connecting Money and Faith, United Methodist Women 47

48 ABOUT THE AUTHOR Crys Zinkiewicz A lifelong United Methodist, worked for more than thirty years at The United Methodist Publishing House as an editor and product developer. After retiring, Crys served for four years on the editorial board of United Methodist Women, helping choose and shape the mission study resources of United Methodist Women. Crys has continued her editorial work doing various projects for the General Board of Discipleship, United Methodist Communications, the YMCA, Chalice Press’s InsideOut Camping Curriculum, and Vanderbilt Law School. Crys’s most fun project has been collaborating with a horse, Hershey, to write his stories about Saddle Up!, a therapeutic riding center for children with disabilities. As an eight-year volunteer for the organization, Crys (with Hershey’s help) created the book Hershey, Here! at Saddle Up! to raise awareness of programs that use horses like Hershey to help people (children with disabilities, at-risk teens, wounded warriors, older adults) and also to raise funds for Saddle Up! (Check out www.hersheyhere.org .) And yes, Hershey is a real horse—and he loves peppermints! Crys and her husband of fifty-one years live in Nashville, Tennessee, near their daughter, son-in-law, and grandson. 48

Related documents

Returning from the War Zone  A Guide for Military Personnel

Returning from the War Zone A Guide for Military Personnel

Returning from U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs the War Zone A Guide for Military Personnel September 2010 Welcome home! Thank you for your service Reunion can also be a time of considerable stress...

More info »
Greater Expectations: A New Vision for Learning as a Nation Goes to College

Greater Expectations: A New Vision for Learning as a Nation Goes to College

GREA TER expect a tions AN ew Vision for Learning as a Nation Goes to College N a tional Panel Report

More info »