Sammy's Quest To Save The West

Transcript

1 U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management JUNIOR RANGER SERIES s ’ y Q m u m e s a t S h t e e v W a e S s o t T Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—1

2 The Bureau of Land Management The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is a federal government agency that takes care of nearly 245 million acres of public lands containing over half of the sagebrush community of plants and animals in the United States. These lands, primarily in the western states, belong to you and all Americans. The BLM also manages a number of smaller public land sites in the eastern United States. These lands provide habitat for wildlife, food for livestock and timber. They provide many other natural resources, too, such as coal, oil, natural gas and minerals. The lands contain evidence of the past, such as dinosaur bones and plant fossils. Archaeological sites on s ’ y Q m u public lands help us learn about people who lived here long ago. Today, people like you m e enjoy exploring the vast open spaces on public lands. s a t S The Junior Ranger Program The Junior Ranger Program introduces young adventurers to public lands and the resources they contain. After you complete the activities in this book - let, clip out the Junior Ranger Certificate on the last page, recite the Junior Ranger pledge and sign your name. Then, keep the pledge as you continue to explore your public lands. This publication is part of the BLM Junior Ranger series of the BLM Division of Education, Interpretation, and Partnerships. Visit our website to learn more about the BLM Junior Ranger Program at www.blm.gov/learn/youth-and-educators/ junior-ranger-program. For answers to the activity pages or a copy of this Junior Ranger guide, visit M. Meier www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse.html. 2—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

3 U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management JUNIOR RANGER SERIES s ’ y Q m u m e s a t S h t e e v W a e S s o t T BLM Fire and Aviation Idaho State Office 1387 South Vinnell Way Boise, ID 83709 208-373-3963

4 Sandpoint The Quest in Idaho Coeur d’Alene The green areas on the map are Idaho’s sagebrush community where all of the sage-grouse live, along with 350 other types of plants and animals. The sagebrush community burns most frequently in wildfires, not only in Idaho but in all western states. Lewiston Is your town near sagebrush? Have you seen sagebrush, wildflowers and wild - life in your backyard or at the edge of Cottonwood Kooskia your town? Have you seen coyote, deer and elk in the sagebrush? 100 miles Grangeville Have you seen a wildfire? Join the Quest. 75 Riggins Salmon 50 New Meadows SCALE McCall 25 Ellis Council Leadore Challis 0 Island Dubois Park Weiser Stanley St. Anthony Payette Emmett Mackay Howe Mud Caldwell Ketchum Boise Lake Nampa Hailey Arco Faireld Idaho Swan Atomic Falls Falls City Marsing Carey Mountain Home Blackfoot Shoshone American Grand View Pocatello Bliss Falls Soda Minidoka Springs Jerome Twin Falls Montpelier Burley Malad Three Rogerson City Riddle Creek Preston Owyhee

5 Greater sage-grouse males have a white collar, black belly feathers and are less colorful during the summer, fall and winter. Tom Koerner, USFWS

6 Sammy, a Greater Sage-grouse male, is very colorful during the spring mating season. Tom Koerner, USFWS

7 Hello, Junior Ranger! My name is Sammy. Sage-grouse like me and over 350 plants and animals call sagebrush lands home. We need sagebrush and the insects and other plants found around it to survive. We live nowhere else on Earth but western North America—including Idaho— which gives us a chance to get to know each other. Our sagebrush home... • serves as a nursery that protects young elk, golden eagles, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, pygmy rabbits and sagebrush lizards so they can grow into strong adults. • is home to tribal nations, who hunt, fish and gather plants and minerals. provides beautiful open spaces where people find fun, recreation and renewal. • yields food for livestock and materials for roads, schools, homes and cars. • • contains energy resources to fuel the country’s economy. • is part of America’s western heritage. Why care about our sagebrush home? • Wildfire burns more of it every year than any other kind of place in the United States. It is only half the size it used to be, because of wildfires, invading plants and other factors. • • Many partners are working together to restore healthy plants to benefit wildlife and people. I can’t wait to show you around and intro- duce you to all the interesting places that you’ll find here. We’ll do some fun activities that explain how we sage-grouse meet various challenges to our survival and will help you find ways to protect the sage- brush lands and all of us who live here. Thanks for letting me share this unique world with you! Your friend, Sammy Greater Sage-grouse: • weigh about five pounds, about as much as a chicken • have white speckles on brown and black feathers • stay on the ground most of the time be- cause of their large size Volunteers watch a biologist from the Idaho Fish and Game demonstrate • can fly at speeds of up to 50 miles per how to plant a sagebrush seedling in an area burned by wildfire. hour, to escape predators or wildfire Photo BLM Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—7

8 At Home in the Sagebrush Steppe We sage-grouse rely completely on sage - Many wildflowers, grasses, shrubs and brush and other plants of the steppe for cactuses grow where I live. There are also our health and survival. Sagebrush is our trees like mountain mahogany and juniper. favorite food and just about the only thing This community of plants and the animals we eat in the winter. In other seasons, we they support is called an . The ecosystem eat native grasses, leaves, flowers, buds ecosystem shown below is called the and insects that also live on these plants. . “Steppe” is a word for sagebrush steppe a large, flat grassland. In Idaho, sagebrush steppe is the area between rivers and forests. It is usually hot and dry in the summer and cold and windy in winter. A. Hedrick, BLM 8—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

9 The sagebrush and taller grasses also hidden in chicks and hen Can you find my shelter us from weather and predators. the sagebrush stand below? This is especially important for female sage-grouse (hens) and our young (chicks). Their gray coloring helps them blend in with the plants. Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—9

10 Plants Growing in the Sagebrush Steppe DRAW AN ARROW TO MATCH EACH PLANT NAME TO THE CORRECT PHOTO. Bluebunch Wheatgrass grows in large grassy bunches and is named for its bluish-green coloring. Arrowleaf Balsamroot has yellow flowers that look like sunflowers with large, pointed leaves. Lupine has purple flower clusters and grows 10-15 leaves from a single center point. Indian Paintbrush has bright red leaves that grow taller on a stalk than the green leaves. Did You Know? There are about 200 kinds of plants in the sagebrush steppe. Matt Lavin, MSU 10—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

11 DRAW AN ARROW TO MATCH EACH PLANT NAME TO THE CORRECT PHOTO. Juniper is a bushy-looking tree that has very small blue berries. Wild Onion has white to pink flowers and small underground bulbs. Rabbitbrush is a shrub that grows in a mound with small yellow flower clusters. Mountain Mahogany is a tree that grows on steep slopes and provides an umbrella for shade. Western Yarrow has white flower clusters and leaves that look like ferns. Matt Lavin, MSU Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—11

12 What’s for Supper? Sagebrush—my favorite! Of the 21 different types of sagebrush, the low-growing kind feeds me during the winter. I also eat my favorite wildflower, sulfur buckwheat, western yarrow, leaves, buds and some insects. I cannot survive without sagebrush. This is true for other animals like pygmy rabbits. We are called sagebrush obligates. S u l f t u a r e B h u c w k Did You Know? There are 35 different types of insects that live in sagebrush, more than 55 types use rabbitbrush and 25 types that like sulfur buckwheat? How many types of insects is that in all? Yum! A. Hedrick, BLM | Matt Lavin, MSU 12—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

13 Jimmye Turner, USFS Watch My Steppe We sage-grouse can fly, but we prefer to Biocrusts can also be crushed or trampled walk to get around. Moist give us biocrusts in areas heavily traveled by people or other hiking paths and walkways. Biocrusts are animals. Then, weeds can fill in, grow very like multi-colored carpets made of algae, tall, take moisture out of the soil and make moss, lichens, fungi, bacteria and miner- it hard for me to move around. Weeds also als—the building blocks for soil. They hold burn very easily in wildfires, making fires moisture that can be scarce in sagebrush happen more often and allowing them to steppe. Without biocrusts, soil wears down move faster over more area. or erodes, and native plants die for lack of water or a place to take root. That leaves So, watch your step in the steppe, and stay us sage-grouse with nothing to eat and no on trails when you’re on wheels. walking paths. BLM Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—13

14 Sagebrush Protects Me Ravens, coyotes, hawks, eagles and other predators can’t see me because my colors blend in with the sagebrush. Sagebrush also shelters me in cold or stormy weather. A. Hedrick, BLM 14—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

15 Pronghorn antelope live in the sagebrush steppe. Tom Koerner, USFWS Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—15

16 Pushy Grasses Invade the Steppe After a wildfire, there is a good chance that plants like cheat - grass, medusahead and other noxious weeds will sprout. - plants that keep the sage native They can take the place of brush steppe healthy. These invaders grow quickly and steal water, sunlight and space from native plants. Soon, these invaders are the only thing growing, and the sage- . No more bluebunch monoculture brush steppe becomes a wheatgrass, lupine, wild onion, western yarrow, Indian paintbrush, rabbitbrush or sagebrush to feed and shelter me and other wildlife, or wild horses, cows or sheep, either! And once these invaders have taken over, the steppe burns over and over again, year after year, because these pushy plants burn and return more easily than native plants. Did You Know? Mono = one, only, or single Culture = group or species Cheatgrass Medusahead M . s e t d n u a l s p a h e . C e v e h a r ti e d fi a a d l t n f i g o t r w a r u s a m s r o t e a s f k s a e s r e o v a e k t h o i h c c k t m a h a t t 16—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

17 Bushy, Pushy Trees Juniper trees are a beautiful, natural part of sagebrush lands. But their seeds spread, sprout and grow downhill onto the flat steppe. These new trees push out sage - brush and other native plants that we sage-grouse and other animals need to survive. Too many junipers soak up all the water in the ground, block out the sunlight for wildflowers and grasses, and give predator birds high perches from which to hunt me and other small animals and birds. We like to push out all the other plants! Junipers are also very volatile meaning they burn very hot and fast during a wildfire. A. Hedrick, BLM Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—17

18 Animals in My Neighborhood Unscramble the words to find birds, reptiles, insects and mammals. Here are a few to look for: sage sparrow mule deer pronghorn coyote pygmy rabbit harvester ant sage-grouse golden eagle badger ground squirrel rattlesnake raven ootcey = ___________________________________________________________________ nrohrongp = _______________________________________________________________ lsetnatkear = _______________________________________________________________ gesa reogsu = _____________________________________________________________ gympy abirtb = _____________________________________________________________ druong reiulrqs = ___________________________________________________________ deglno aeegl = _____________________________________________________________ lume reed = ________________________________________________________________ vsetrerah tan = _____________________________________________________________ drbgae = ___________________________________________________________________ gase rwopsar = ____________________________________________________________ vrena = ____________________________________________________________________ 18—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

19 Walk Me Home Now that you know which plants and animals are good for me, guide me along the safest path to my family at the center of the maze. Keep to routes with good sagebrush, wild - flowers, insects and native grasses. Avoid predators and plants that I don’t like to eat. start here peep! Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—19

20 True or False You’ve learned a lot about plants and animals in the sagebrush steppe. Think about each statement below and write “t” next to the ones that are true and “f” next to the false statements. ____________ Sage-grouse, like Sammy, prefer walking to flying. ____________ Steppe is a name for a large, flat grassland. ____________ Coyotes, ravens, hawks and eagles hunt sage-grouse. ____________ Only 5 animals live in the sagebrush steppe. ____________ Sagebrush provides protection and shelter for Sammy. ____________ Arrowleaf balsamroot has purple flowers that look like sunflowers. ____________ Sammy loves to eat cheatgrass and medusahead grass. ____________ Sammy loves to eat wildlfowers, insects and sagebrush. ____________ Pygmy rabbits and ground squirrels live in the sagebrush steppe. ____________ Algae, moss, lichen and fungi are part of the soils that nurture plants. ____________ Algae, moss, lichen and fungi are some of the biocrusts. ____________ Biocrusts are moist carpets where Sammy walks between grasses and shrubs. ____________ Juniper trees are a natural part of Sammy’s home. ____________ Juniper trees can takeover other plants’ growing areas. ____________ More than 350 plants and animals live in the sagebrush steppe. ____________ Sage-grouse can fly. 20—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

21 Grouse Dance Did you know? This Shoshone-Paiute dancer is moving like a sage-grouse. The Shoshone, Paiute and Bannock people use over 100 kinds of plants from the sagebrush steppe for food, medicine, basket weaving, clothing, winnowing trays for pine nuts, and plantings after wildfire. Kit Julianto—Owyhee Combined School Art Teacher, Nevada Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—21

22 Smart Words As you explore the sagebrush-steppe, get to know these words. Match each word in the left column with its correct definition in the right column. Find clues in this book. plants and animals sharing the same place Biocrusts algae, moss, lichen, fungi and bacteria Community hunter Hen and Chick name of female and baby sage-grouse Predator wearing away Monoculture one group or species Erosion Sammy’s favorite wildflower to eat Native large, flat grassland Sulfur Buckwheat natural Steppe 22—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

23 You Can Help Us! Keep our young safe and sound We need... a roof of sagebrush overhead. • • moist biocrust carpets to use for escaping coyotes that find our nest. a nearby lunch line with wildflowers • and insects. So please... • stay on trails—don’t crush our carpets and sidewalks of biocrusts. • be very careful and safe with campfires and fireworks. • keep wildflowers, sagebrush, grasses, and other plants from burning. • learn how plants affect your life. • look for opportunities to volunteer planting sagebrush or other seedlings. A young student writes about his experiments planting sagebrush Thank you, Junior Ranger seedlings in native and commercial soils in Owyhee, Nevada. Drew Nash, Times-News Photo Gerrit Vyn, Cornell Lab Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—23

24 Wildfire is the Biggest Threat to the Sagebrush Steppe. Wildfires are a huge threat to me, my friends and the sagebrush steppe plants. Sagebrush grows very slowly. It can take 75 years for a single sagebrush to grow into a large, mature bush that supports wildlife. Many wildfires in Idaho are caused by lightning. Many wildfires are caused by careless people. NIFC 24—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

25 Be Very Careful With Fire and Fireworks Carelessness causes many wildfires every year. • Put out your campfire and fireworks completely, and use them only in places where they are permitted. • Keep your fire away from grass, brush and trees. • Use a fire pan and have water nearby. • Before you leave, drown your fire with water. • Stir the coals. Add more water, and stir again. • Feel the coals to be sure your fire is out cold. • Fireworks threaten the health of the sagebrush steppe, forests and the wildlife within. “I hope you’ll help prevent fires in the places where you and I live.” A. Hedrick, BLM Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—25

26 The red dots on this map show reported wildfires on public land in the Washington past 10 years. The green area shows Maine the sagebrush steppe North Dakota Montana Minnesota community of plants Ver mont and animals. Ne w Oregon e mpshir Ha Idaho Each fire consumed Wisc onsin Ne w Yor k South Dakota from 299 acres up Massachusetts Michigan to 653,000 acres. Connecticut Wyoming One megafire Pennsylvania Ne w burned from Iowa br as ka Ne Jer sey Nevada into Idaho. Nevada Its area was the Delaware Ohio Utah size of 500,000 West Indiana Illinois Ma ryland Vir ginia football fields of Colorado sagebrush-steppe Vir ginia Kansas plants! Missouri nt ucky Ke What states have the California North most wildfires on Carolina Tenness ee public land? Oklahoma Ariz ona Arkansas h Sout Draw an outline around Ne w Mexico Ca roli na your state. Mississippi Ge or gia Alabama Draw a simple picture of your home or where you live on a piece of paper. Louisiana Texas Florida A. Hedrick, BLM 26—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

27 Wildfire burns more in the sagebrush steppe Washington than any other area of the United States. Maine North Dakota Montana Minnesota Ver mont w Ne Oregon mpshir e Ha Idaho Wisc onsin w Yor k Ne South Dakota Massachusetts Michigan Connecticut Wyoming Pennsylvania Ne w Iowa Ne br as ka Jer sey Nevada Delaware Ohio Utah West Indiana Illinois ryland Ma Vir ginia Colorado Vir ginia Kansas Missouri nt ucky Ke California North Carolina Tenness ee Oklahoma ona Ariz Arkansas Sout h Ne w Mexico na roli Ca Mississippi or gia Ge Alabama Louisiana Texas Florida Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—27

28 What Feeds a Fire? Fires need heat, fuel, and oxygen. If any one of the three is eliminated, the fire will go out. Remember this fire triangle. Lightning, fireworks, campfires, wood stoves, your furnace at home or a burning cigarette provide heat that can easily start a wildfire. Heat ASK YOURSELF where the heat comes from: A person lighting fireworks? An untended campfire? A lightning strike? Oxygen Fuel ASK YOURSELF where the fire ASK YOURSELF what is burning: juniper or gets the oxygen it needs - mahogany trees, sagebrush, grasses, wild to burn? flowers or homes? 28—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

29 Test the Triangle Experiment 1 Supplies: 7-10 toothpicks, 7-10 gumdrops Step 1: Form a square using the toothpicks for the sides and the gumdrops to hold them together. Step 2: Push gently on the sides. Does the square shape hold? Step 3: Form a triangle using more tooth- picks and gumdrops. _______________________________________ Step 4: Push gently on the sides. _______________________________________ Does the triangle shape hold? _______________________________________ Step 5: Write down what you observed. Which shape is stronger? _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ Firefighters remove oxygen from the fire by covering the flames with dirt. A. Hedrick, BLM

30 Firefighter Word Search Letters may spell each word forward, backward or diagonally. Try to find each hidden word. pulaski shovel hose firefighter dozer fire engine retardant helicopter air tanker dispatch radio water smokejumper hand crew chainsaw f e s o h a w r e k n a t r i a a i a v b y v b w b d o z e r w o b r c c c c c c c c c x c w c w c x e h s p a t c h h c t a p s i d d e a e m e e e e e e e e e e e e e n i w f o r r e t h g i f e r i f g n a s g k e g g i h g q g y x g i s t h h h e t h w e r c d n a h n a e o i i l j p k a i a i q w i e w r v j m j e u o k t j k j f j k n k e k k n k v m c k z o k r k l l q l l i l p l o p i l r l a l m m m m w m m m m o h e l m m d m n n n i k s a l u p o x r e n i n r e t a r d a n t q p c b o h o o 30—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

31 Working Together to Fight Wildfires Wildland firefighters put out unwanted wildfires as quickly as possible to save the plants and animals in the sagebrush steppe. Firefighters remove heat, remove fuel (plants) or remove oxygen by smothering the fire. Firefighters have many tools. heat or oxygen from the To remove • HEAT wildfire, they spray water, foam, or retardant on the flames using engines, airplanes or helicopters. fuel from the wildfire, they use • To remove shovels, pulaskis, chainsaws, dozers, and mowers to remove vegetation or reduce vegetation height. This creates a line, known as a fire break, that stops large wildfires from spreading. FUEL OXYGEN A. Hedrick, BLM Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—31

32 Is Your Home Firewise? We sage-grouse can’t protect our home from wildfires, but you can protect yours. If you live near public land or a National Forest, your family should make your home Firewise . It’s easy! Clear brush, branches and fallen leaves away from your house. Make sure your grass stays green and moist. Trim tree limbs lower than six feet above the ground, and cover openings like vents and space under porches with a screen. These steps can help stop a wildfire from spreading to your home. ZONE 3 ZONE 1 ZONE 2 <30 feet from house 60-100 feet from house 30-60 feet from house low-growing fire-resis • - low-growing, fire-resistant plants • most existing plants • no tall trees or shrubs tant plants & shrubs • are acceptable keep well pruned and • • irrigate regularly, prune plants, • thin or remove trees, mow or weed-eat grasses, and remove excess plant remove weeds • litter & weeds, and use inimize overlapping use gravel or stone mulch m widely spaced plants gravel or stone mulch • branches between space trees & shrubs • plants 2x their height Fire travels faster uphill. If your house is on a steep slope, widen your zones. 32—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

33 Steps to a Healthy West for Everyone What happens A healthy West when wildfire has a mix of consumes sagebrush, healthy native land? grasses, wild- We have to flowers make a and plan! respectful people. 15-20 “Healthy native years plants mean If there is surviving vegetation at higher after healthy wildlife.” elevations, then no action is needed: na - fire. tive plants will return on Healthy their own. native plants have If no plants more survive the fire, moisture we have to reseed and are and plant new seedlings. resistant to wildfires. 5 years after fire. With time, native plants will grow taller and healthy. GOOD NEWS BAD NEWS When native seedlings grow, we keep 2 years Cheatgrass and checking on their progress during after medusahead will push the year. If they do not survive, fire. out all of the native plants we will replant new seedlings. if nothing is done. Then more wildfire will burn the same places every summer and we lose our home. SADLY This is happening all over the West and we need your help. Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—33

34 Care For This Unique Place I hope you continue to learn about, enjoy and protect the over 350 plants and animals in the sagebrush steppe. Visit a Firewise garden near you in Boise at the Idaho Botanical Garden, Pocatello at Zoo Idaho or Twin Falls at the Breckenridge Endowment Farm on the College of Southern Idaho campus. Because we are losing our home to wildfire and non-native invaders, we hope you will do your best to be careful with fire, obey fireworks restrictions and travel only on trails or roads when you are in the sagebrush steppe. You can volunteer to help re-plant areas burned by wildfire. You can work as a botanist, wildlife or fish biologist, firefighter, writer or teacher when you finish school. You can also be a wildlife artist or photographer, or learn to dance like a sage-grouse. High school students plant sagebrush, bitterbrush and other native plants a fer a wildfire, started by illegal fireworks, destoyed houses and over 2500 acres of native plants near Boise. Sagebrush seedlings were provided by high school students from Owyhee, Nevada. Deer, elk, pronghorn, birds and other wildlife have lost food and shelter for several years to come. Tetona Dunlap, Times-News Photo 34—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

35 True or False Two You’ve learned a lot about wildfire and the devastating effects of pushy, non-native plants in the sagebrush steppe. Read the statements below, do your best thinking about them, and write a “t” next to the ones that are true and an “f” next to those that are false. ____________ Lightning, fireworks, campfires, stoves and cigarettes are heat sources.. ____________The sagebrush steppe is the most frequently burned part of the U.S. ____________It is OK to light fireworks in the sagebrush steppe. ____________Planting seedlings in burned areas helps to restore the land after a wildfire. ____________Wildland firefighters use different tools to remove heat from a wildfire. ____________Chainsaws can be used to remove vegetation that fuels an oncoming wildfire. ____________All wildfires are started by careless people. ____________You can protect yourself by removing flammable plants near your house. ____________Fire needs four elements to burn. ____________Making your home Firewise makes firefighting easier. ____________Juniper trees do not burn very easily. ____________After a fire, native grasses and plants always come back quickly. ____________After a fire, it can take 75 years for a single sagebrush to grow back to full size. ____________It is good to use toothpicks after eating gumdrops. ____________It’s good to ride your motorcycle off the road on biocrusts and native plants. Sammy’s Quest to Save the West—35

36 Compare and Contrast Sometimes, wildfires can’t be prevented. Land managers work hard after a fire to keep the soil from eroding, washing or blowing away. The plants needed to rebuild the sagebrush steppe can’t regrow without the nutrients in the soil. Native seed and seedlings are planted so that one day, the sagebrush steppe can flourish again. What are some differences between the two photos on the opposite page? Write some of them down, then explain to a friend what you see. Which place looks healthier for you, me and 200 other types of animals? _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ Growing sagebrush to reestablish native vegetation for wildlife. BLM 36—www.idahofireinfo.com/p/sammy-sage-grouse

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38 Field Trip! Visit an area where you can observe the sagebrush steppe. Sketch a picture of the land, a plant or animal you saw. Remember to be part of nature by: • respecting native plants, animals and people as a living community • keeping campfires and fireworks away from Sammy’s home • leaving nature as you find it for the next person to enjoy not littering—take your trash home to throw away • 38—A Quest to Save the West

39 s u n r o s i e e n m t a e e r t o h D a y l s e u s o i l e l n i C u a o C c M o d O Oregon Fish and Wildlife NPS t n s Trading Cards: Steppe into the Sagebrush i A l a r t n e e s e l t o d t s i g e c e a a c v s o E r r y x a h e n c m H e r a l y d i n l u m r q o o e A n t G o s g o e P W Tear along perforated lines to assemble your collection of trading cards. Use, share and remember the sagebrush steppe. Joseph Berger FHA

40 Fun Fact: Fun Fact: day. Fire Prevention Tip: Firefighters use thermal nighttime imagery to find hot spots of fire. They cool them down with water and dirt. You can also put out your campfire with water and dirt. trash and yard waste. than humans, but not during the A coyote eats a wide range of food. If it cannot find mice or voles to eat, lizards, insects, or even garbage will do. Fire Prevention Tip: Composting is safer than burning outdoors. You can compost unwanted food, Mule deer can see better at night Jimmye Turner, USFS Jimmye Turner, USFS Fun Fact: Ants make their homes by digging nests in the ground. They remove all vegetation from an area in a circular pattern, so they are easy to spot. Fire Prevention Tip: When building a fire, remove anything that will burn in a 10-foot circle to keep your fire from spreading. Dry vegetation can easily ignite. Jimmye Turner, USFS Fun Fact: Golden Eagles have binocular vision that allows them to see depth and judge distances accurately. Fire Prevention Tip: If you see a wildfire, tell an adult, call 911 and leave the area. Jimm ye Turner, USFS

41 s i s t n i n s e o b u o n c b h l a a c a a i d i x F R e s u y e m i g o r a m l i c l y g a a h y r F c a P P r B FWS FWS | BLM e s Trading Cards: Steppe into the Sagebrush s u a n u a n i o a s r c a i n g r h r - e p o e o m r h a g u g a a s r n u p S c a o r r c r e o e c l P i t o t r n t a n A e e r C G Tear along perforated lines to assemble your collection of trading cards. Use, share and remember the sagebrush steppe. FS NPS

42 Jimmye Turner, USFS Jimmye Turner, USFS The pygmy rabbit is the smallest rabbit species in North America. It fits easily in the palm of your hand. In the winter, it gets 99% of its food from sagebrush. Fire Prevention Tip: A spark or fire smaller than your hand can easily lose control. Be a fire lookout - help watch for sparks on dry grass when adults are mowing. Fun Fact: Fun Fact: Prairie falcons hunt by chasing small prey close to the ground with fast, skillful flying. Fire Prevention Tip: Helicopter and airplane pilots fly close to wildfires to drop water or fire retardant. Keep your drones out of their way so they can do their job safely. They depend on sagebrush for food and per hour in grasslands. Leave early and safely if you are threatened by a wildfire. Jimmye Turner, USFS Fun Fact: a specialized stomach that digests tough sagebrush, their main food. A. Hedrick, BLM Fun Fact: Pronghorn can run up to 55 miles per hour. Sage-grouse have hiding places for their fawns. Fire Prevention Tip: Wildfires can move up to 14 miles Fire Prevention Tip: Protect sagebrush, their food source and home, by preventing wildfires.

43 t i b b r a e i R g i d d s k n u a c e x s a a B n t J w a n o e d t a d i e s c l x i u i a r p T a e e t L - m e t A i h W Oregon Fish and Wildlife Oregon Fish and Wildlife e Trading Cards: Steppe into the Sagebrush k a n s u s s g i r e d o u i l c r t i D u t v e s l e a i s u i l r R i a m t a n o o r r r n y C e P C t s e W Tear along perforated lines to assemble your collection of trading cards. Use, share and remember the sagebrush steppe. BLM FWS

44 but finding a new home is not so easy. Jimmye Turner, USFS Fun Fact: Badgers use their long, sharp front claws to dig for rodent prey. This sometimes attracts coyotes, which wait nearby for prey to make a break for it. Fire Prevention Tip: Dig, stir, and drown your campfire to make sure it is dead out. campfire is always completely out before you leave. Protect their home by making sure your Fun Fact: The jack rabbit can camoflauge with brown fur in the summer and white fur in the winter. Fire Prevention Tip: Jack rabbits can change their color, Jimmye Turner, USFS sleep, so it does Fun Fact: Prairie dogs have listening posts near the exits of their In hot weather, rattlesnakes hide during the day and wait of danger with a warning bark. Fire Prevention Tip: not cause a Listen to nature’s warning— hot, dry and windy days signal high fire danger. Please read and follow all fire warnings in the news or posted in campgrounds. wildfire. Jimm Fun Fact: until night when it is cooler to hunt. Fire Prevention Tip: Enjoy your campfire on cool evenings, but make sure it is completely out before you go to burrows, so they can alert others Jimmye Turner, USFS ye Turner, USFS

45 h s a u s r o a i s b r m t t e o t s r n c h i u a c r a b a c o j P n e o l a i l i n y t B C s a i a C d n I Matt Lavin BLM t o Trading Cards: Steppe into the Sagebrush o a r t s a i e t m s t i u n a g c e a s o s l s h e a a a z d F i i B h a r f o c o a h u m t e a a s l s e d l F I w a B o r r A Tear along perforated lines to assemble your collection of trading cards. Use, share and remember the sagebrush steppe. BLM BLM

46 and they come in many colors like red, pink, Jimmye Turner, USFS Watch where flames are and caution are necessary. is used to start a fire, safety Whenever an open flame Fun Fact: The colorful top of the paintbrush is actually leaves Fire Prevention Tip: yellow, white and fuchsia. at all times. out for me, too. Fun Fact: Your footrpint can smash me down for a very long time and is very harmful. Please watch Jimmye Turner, USFS doors. safety while enjoying the out- remember wildfire and hunter During hunting season, Fire Prevention Tip: Jimmye Turner, USFS I sprout very soon after a fire, ready to use the nutrients in the ashes. Fire Prevention Tip: Sparks may fly and ignite a wildfire if your chainsaw spark arrestor is not properly serviced or the tip of the bar strikes a rock. Jimm We are fairly tolerant of fire in autumn a wildfire. but require 2-3 years to fully recover Dragging chains may spark after burning in a wildfire. Fun Fact: your tow safety chain. your trailer, shorten When you hook up Fun Fact: Fire Prevention Tip: ye Turner, USFS

47 y d r n a s t a t u e u g n n b a o t s e n h t k o a a n m i w s M m a u u p H n c r i a a p a c s i i t o t p c n r e r r e u e C C o p a M T Matt Lavin Matt Lavin Trading Cards: Steppe into the Sagebrush a t a t h n s r e s d u u e i r r r e p t i b p i a i e n n s u g u e J J a m e S t r A Tear along perforated lines to assemble your collection of trading cards. Use, share and remember the sagebrush steppe. BLM Matt Lavin

48 fire rules and restrictions long time. weather conditions. Fun Fact: Native Americans ate raw stems. Fire Prevention Tip: live for a very Know before you go. bonsai tree and When you go out to play on public land, know what are in place for your area. Jimmye Turner, USFS Before building a camp fire, verify local fire restrictions and Fire Prevention Tip: Fun Fact: I resemble a Jimmye Turner, USFS Fire Prevention Tip: Fun Fact: Cowboys used sagebrush Idaho has at least three species of juniper. Notice how they spread into the flatter sagebrush area in the front photo. Fire Prevention Tip: When hiking, leave the area at the first sign of wildfire. Use established trails or Before your road trip, check your wheel roads. Think about bearings, brakes and muffler. wildfire safety. Jimmye Turner, USFS as a deodorant before Make sure no metal parts are dragging underneath your vehicle. Jimmye Turner, USFS heading to town. Fun Fact:

49 e a s u d d e m s a m u - s r t e o a u t h r p c a e g a t c t s s a m u u u e d r m e h o e r h t C B a M i n e a T BLM BLM s i l a t n e Trading Cards: Steppe into the Sagebrush d i c w c e o o s . n r r n r a o e i v a d . a n Y L v e O n m n r u d i e l l m t i o u f i s l e l l W e l A i m W a e l l i h c A Tear along perforated lines to assemble your collection of trading cards. Use, share and remember the sagebrush steppe. Matt Lavin Matt Lavin

50 at the edge of your town! it can easily ignite dry Medusahead has little value for wildlife. Most wildlife will not eat it because it has a high level of silica (glass). Seeds can cause injury to eyes, noses, and mouths of animals who eat it. than 1,200 degrees; over sites where the native plants have been destroyed by fire or eaten up. Fire Prevention Tip: Fireworks burn very fast and have destroyed homes. a temperature of more Please do not ignite fireworks on public land or A sparkler tip burns at Not-so-fun Fact: A sparkler tip burns at a temperature of more than or at the edge of your town! 1,200 degrees; it can easily ignite dry grass or debris. A ignite fireworks on public land have destroyed homes. Please do not Fireworks burn cheatgrass very fast and Fire Prevention Tip: We are sometimes eaten by grazing animals when we are green. We are an invasive, noxious weed not eaten by sage-grouse. grass or debris. Not-so-fun Fact: Jimmye Turner, USFS d g e l e P Medusahead typically takes . Hedrick, BLM Jimmye Turner, USFS Each time you use fire for warmth, Wildlife depends on these plants, so please cooking or just enjoyment indoors do not ignite fireworks on public land or and outdoors, be responsible and forests. Fun Fact: safe with and around it. Jimmye Turner, USFS your kitchen like when you’re cooking Fun Fact: We are found in many native plant spaghetti sauce. communities. We are a food source for bighorn sheep, pronghorn antelope and deer. Sage-grouse and other upland birds rely My entire plant smells like the onions in heavily on our foliage as food. Fire Prevention Tip: Accidental fires caused by fireworks Fire Prevention Tip: destroy valuable plants every year.

51 d g e l e P e Q h t u e n i s o t J As a BLM Junior Ranger, I promise to Do all I can to help protect and preserve natural and cultural resources on public lands. • • Be aware of how my actions can affect living things and evidence of our past. Keep learning about the importance of nature and our heritage. • • Share what I have learned with others. Congratulations! you sign here date here

52 Join the Quest! —Be a friend to wildlife in the west. —Volunteer to help gather and plant. Healthy native plants = healthy wildlife.

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