FactoryTalk View Site Edition User's Guide

Transcript

1 User Manual FactoryTalk View Site Edition User's Guide

2 Important user information Re ad this document and the documents listed in the additional resources section about installation, configuration, and operation of this equipment before you install, configure, operate, or maintain this product. Users are required to familiarize themselves with installation and wiring instructions in addition to requirements of all applicable codes, laws, and standards. Activities including installation, adjustments, putting into service, use, assembly, disassembly, and maintenance are required to be carried out by suitably trained personnel in accordance with applicable code of practice. If this equipment is used in a manner not specified by the manufacturer, the protection provided by the equipment may be impaired. In no event will Rockwell Automation, Inc. be responsible or liable for indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use or application of this equipment. The examples and diagrams in this manual are included solely for illustrative purposes. Because of the many variables and requirements associated with any particular installation, Rockwell Automation, Inc. cannot assume responsibility or liability for actual use based on the examples and diagrams. No patent liability is assumed by Rockwell Automation, Inc. with respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software described in this manual. Reproduction of the contents of this manual, in whole or in part, without written permission of Rockwell Automation, Inc., is prohibited. Throughout this manual, when necessary, we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations. WARN ING: Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can cause an explosion in a hazardous environment, which may lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss. ATT Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic ENTION: loss. Attentions help you identify a hazard, avoid a hazard, and recognize the consequence Important: Id entifies information that is critical for successful application and understanding of the product. Labels may also be on or inside the equipment to provide specific precautions. SH OCK HAZARD: Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to alert people that dangerous voltage may be present. BU RN HAZARD: Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to alert people that surfaces may reach dangerous temperatures. ARC FLASH HAZARD: Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a motor control center, to alert people to potential Arc Flash. Arc Flash will cause severe injury or death. Wear proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Follow ALL Regulatory requirements for safe work practices and for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Allen-Bradley, Rockwell Software, Rockwell Automation, and TechConnect are trademarks of Rockwell Automation, Inc. Tra demarks not belonging to Rockwell Automation are property of their respective companies.

3 Table of contents Chapter 1 We lcome to FactoryTalk View SE... 29 Getting started with About FactoryTalk systems ... 29 FactoryTalk View SE FactoryTalk Services Platform ... 29 Finding more information about FactoryTalk services ... 30 FactoryTalk View Site Edition software ... 31 FactoryTalk View SE features ... 32 Quick start: setting up the software you need ... 33 Step 1: Plan the layout of the network ... 34 Step 2: Install FactoryTalk Services Platform ... 34 Step 3: Install FactoryTalk View SE ... 34 Step 4: Select the connectivity options ... 35 Step 5: Install the necessary activation keys ... 36 Step 6: Set up the FactoryTalk Directory ... 36 Exploring the InstantFizz application ... 37 Creating a FactoryTalk View SE application ... 39 Step 1: Create the application ... 40 Step 2: Create a graphic display ... 41 Step 3: Test run the application in FactoryTalk View SE Client ... 41 Chapter 2 About FactoryTalk View Studio ... 43 E xploring FactoryTalk View Start FactoryTalk View Studio using a command ... 43 Studio Command-line parameters and examples ... 44 About FactoryTalk Security permissions ... 44 Opening an application in FactoryTalk View Studio ... 45 Resolving access problems to the HMI Projects folder ... 45 Opening the InstantFizz application ... 46 Parts of the FactoryTalk View Studio main window ... 46 Workbook mode ... 50 Showing and hiding items in the main window ... 50 Working in the Explorer window ... 50 Moving the Explorer window ... 51 Opening and closing folders ... 52 Opening component editors ... 52 Creating and modifying components ... 53 Adding components to an application ... 54 Naming components ... 55 Using component names that contain spaces ... 55 Avoiding names that conflict with commands or macros ... 55 Deleting, removing, and renaming components ... 56 Ro 3 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

4 Table of contents Restoring a component after renaming the physical file ... 56 Techniques for working in editors ... 56 Gaining quick access to common operations ... 57 Browsing lists and components ... 57 Supplying tag names ... 57 Selecting and building commands... 57 Building expressions ... 58 Printing from FactoryTalk View SE ... 58 Selecting a printer ... 58 Printing at run time ... 59 Chapter 3 Understanding the process you are automating ... 61 Planning an application Planning the network layout ... 62 Choosing a Windows domain or workgroup ... 62 Windows workgroups ... 62 Determining computers needed ... 62 Planning communications ... 65 Determining how to access data ... 65 Collecting only the necessary data ... 65 Monitoring and controlling alarms ... 66 Planning an alarm monitoring and control system ... 66 Advantages of using FactoryTalk Alarms and Events services ... 66 Choosing device-based alarms ... 66 Choosing server tag-based alarms ... 67 Deciding when to use HMI tags... 67 Designing the HMI tag database ... 68 Organizing HMI tags ... 68 Designing a dependable control system ... 68 Planning how to secure the system ... 68 Planning to use built-in system availability features ... 69 About redundant application servers ... 69 Setting up the run-time application ... 70 Developing a hierarchy of graphic displays ... 70 Creating templates to ensure consistency ... 71 Planning the multi-monitor deployment ... 71 Applying visual design principles ... 72 Planning how to use trends ... 72 Planning run-time language switching ... 73 Designing a system that is easy to deploy and maintain ... 73 Designing the application for multiple users ... 74 Designing applications for multiple monitors ... 74 Integrating with other applications and customizing the system ... 76 4 R ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

5 Table of contents Chapter 4 About FactoryTalk Directory ... 79 Setting up the FactoryTalk FactoryTalk Directory in a networked system ... 80 Directory FactoryTalk Directory in a FactoryTalk View SE application ... 81 Local station applications ... 81 Running network applications ... 81 Specifying the FactoryTalk Directory server location ... 82 Setting up FactoryTalk Directory for local station applications... 84 What happens if the Network Directory server is unavailable ... 85 Monitoring the Network Directory status ... 85 Chapter 5 About FactoryTalk Security services ... 87 Setting up security About the FactoryTalk Directory ... 88 Finding more information about FactoryTalk Security ... 88 Gaining initial access to a FactoryTalk system ... 89 About the All Users account ... 89 Logging users on to and off from FactoryTalk View SE ... 90 Logging on to the FactoryTalk Directory ... 90 About single sign-on ... 91 Logging on to FactoryTalk View Studio ... 91 Logging on to a FactoryTalk View SE Client ... 92 Logging on when the client starts up ... 92 Changing the current user while the client is running ... 92 Logging on a different user ... 93 Logging off the current user at run time ... 93 Changing the current user’s password at run time ... 93 Deciding how to secure a FactoryTalk View SE application ... 94 Securing FactoryTalk View SE applications at run time ... 95 Securing FactoryTalk system resources ... 96 Setting up FactoryTalk accounts in FactoryTalk View SE ... 96 Setting up accounts in the Runtime Security editor ... 97 Example: Setting up run-time access to HMI components ... 99 Removing All Users from the Runtime Security list ... 100 Specifying login and logout macros ... 100 Removing Runtime Security accounts ... 101 Setting up run-time security for HMI project components ... 102 Assigning security codes to commands and macros ... 102 About the Unspecified_Command ... 103 Assigning security codes to graphic displays ... 103 Assigning security codes to OLE objects ... 103 Assigning security codes to HMI tags ... 104 Other ways to control run-time access to an application ... 105 Lock operators into the run-time environment ... 105 Ro ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019 5

6 Table of contents Use the signature button to control user actions ... 106 About FactoryTalk Security accounts ... 106 About the All Users account ... 106 Specifying which users can set up security ... 107 Choosing the types of accounts to use ... 107 Using accounts that originate at the FactoryTalk Directory ... 108 Using Windows-linked accounts ... 108 Using both types of user account ... 108 Creating group accounts ... 109 Setting up user and computer accounts ... 109 Creating computer accounts for network applications ... 110 Setting up system-wide policies ... 111 Product policies ... 112 Use HTTPS protocol ... 112 Add an HTTPS binding for your site ... 113 System policies ... 114 Setting up security for FactoryTalk system resources ... 115 Modifying FactoryTalk Security settings ... 116 Specifying which actions users can perform ... 117 About explicit and implicit permission ... 117 Organizing actions into groups ... 118 Understanding inherited permissions ... 118 Breaking the chain of inheritance ... 119 Using explicit permissions to override inheritance... 120 Performing secured tasks in FactoryTalk View SE ... 121 Example: Using the Common actions to set up security for user groups ... 122 Chapter 6 About network distributed applications ... 125 Working with network Parts of a network distributed application ... 126 distributed applications About FactoryTalk systems ... 127 Finding more information about FactoryTalk services ... 127 Key concepts ... 127 FactoryTalk Network Directory ... 127 FactoryTalk Security ... 128 About FactoryTalk Security permissions ... 128 HMI servers ... 128 HMI projects ... 129 HMI clients ... 129 Areas ... 129 Absolute and relative references ... 130 Absolute reference syntax ... 130 System availability ... 132 About HMI server redundancy ... 132 Language switching ... 132 R 6 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

7 Table of contents Creating network distributed applications ... 133 Adding areas and servers ... 133 Adding and deleting areas ... 133 Adding an HMI server ... 133 Adding a data server ... 134 Adding a Tag Alarm and Event Server ... 135 Deciding when to use multiple servers ... 135 Adding servers for redundant operation ... 135 Adding servers for load balancing ... 136 Running multiple HMI servers ... 136 Providing HMI server names ... 136 Monitoring disk space on HMI servers ... 136 Setting up HMI server properties ... 137 Changing the name of the host computer ... 137 Choosing how the server starts ... 138 Starting the HMI server when the first client connects to it ... 138 Starting the HMI server when the operating system initializes ... 138 Setting up HMI server redundancy ... 138 Selecting the secondary server ... 139 Replicating changes to the standby HMI server ... 139 Selecting startup and shutdown components ... 140 Starting and stopping HMI server components manually ... 141 Monitoring the status of an HMI server ... 142 Deleting HMI servers ... 142 Deleting HMI server project files... 143 Renaming and deleting network distributed applications ... 143 Backing up and restoring network distributed applications ... 144 Chapter 7 About network station applications ... 145 Working with network Parts of a network station application ... 146 station applications About FactoryTalk systems ... 147 Finding more information about FactoryTalk services ... 147 Key concepts ... 147 FactoryTalk Network Directory ... 147 FactoryTalk Security ... 147 About FactoryTalk Security permissions ... 148 HMI servers ... 148 HMI projects ... 148 HMI clients ... 148 Areas ... 149 Relative references ... 149 System availability ... 149 Language switching ... 150 Creating network station applications ... 150 Ro 7 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

8 Table of contents Adding areas and servers ... 150 Adding and deleting areas ... 150 Adding an HMI server ... 151 Adding a data server ... 151 Adding a Tag Alarm and Event Server ... 152 Providing HMI server names ... 152 Monitoring disk space on HMI servers ... 153 Setting up HMI server properties ... 153 Starting and stopping HMI server components manually ... 153 Monitoring the status of an HMI server ... 154 Deleting HMI servers ... 154 Deleting HMI server project files... 155 Renaming and deleting network station applications ... 155 Determining where the application is located ... 155 Chapter 8 About local station applications ... 157 Working with local station Parts of a local station application ... 158 applications About FactoryTalk systems ... 159 Finding more information about FactoryTalk services ... 159 Key concepts ... 159 FactoryTalk Local Directory ... 159 FactoryTalk Security ... 159 About FactoryTalk Security permissions ... 160 HMI servers ... 160 HMI projects ... 160 HMI clients ... 160 Relative references ... 160 Language switching ... 161 Creating local station applications... 161 Importing a project into a new application ... 161 Adding servers to a local station application ... 162 Adding a Tag Alarm and Event Server ... 162 Setting up HMI server properties ... 162 Selecting startup and shutdown components ... 163 Monitoring the status of an HMI server ... 163 Renaming, deleting, and copying local station applications ... 164 Chapter 9 About data servers ... 165 Setting up communications About FactoryTalk Live Data ... 166 Using multiple data servers in an application ... 166 Communicating with multiple controllers ... 167 Setting up communications in FactoryTalk View SE ... 167 8 R ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

9 Table of contents About FactoryTalk Security permissions ... 168 Adding FactoryTalk Linx data servers to an application ... 168 Setting up general properties ... 169 Setting up FactoryTalk Linx data server redundancy ... 169 Setting up support for FactoryTalk Alarms and Events ... 170 Deleting a FactoryTalk Linx data server ... 170 Setting up communications for FactoryTalk Linx ... 170 About the Primary and Secondary tabs... 170 Adding OPC data servers to an application... 171 Setting up general properties ... 171 Setting up OPC data server redundancy ... 172 Setting up advanced properties ... 173 Include extended information in the server cache file ... 173 Synchronizing a data server’s cache ... 173 Deleting an OPC data server ... 174 Chapter 10 About data server tags and HMI tags ... 175 Working with tags Using direct referencing to eliminate duplication ... 176 Using the extended capabilities of HMI tags ... 176 Securing tag or device values... 176 Scaling and offsetting values ... 177 Specifying minimum and maximum values... 177 Storing values in memory ... 177 Reusing HMI tag names ... 177 Using tag data in a FactoryTalk View SE application ... 178 Setting up data server tags ... 178 Setting up HMI tags ... 178 Specifying tag names where tag data is needed ... 179 Logging tag values ... 179 Observing tag-related limits ... 179 About tag references ... 180 Absolute references ... 180 Relative references ... 180 The home area ... 181 Parts of the Tag Browser ... 181 Viewing tags in folders ... 182 Showing server names ... 182 Finding tags in the home area ... 183 Searching for and selecting tags ... 183 Finding a tag or text string ... 183 Finding a list of all tags or text strings ... 184 Finding tags with Tag Browser ... 185 Selecting folders instead of individual tags ... 185 Showing a tag’s properties ... 186 Ro 9 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

10 Table of contents Filtering tags ... 186 Creating, modifying, and importing HMI tags ... 187 Browsing for offline tags ... 187 Browsing from FactoryTalk Linx ... 187 Browsing from RSLinx Classic ... 187 Browsing from other OPC servers ... 188 Working with HMI tags ... 188 HMI tag types ... 188 Data sources for HMI tags... 188 Organizing HMI tags ... 189 Naming HMI tags ... 189 Grouping HMI tags in folders ... 190 Viewing tag statistics ... 190 Parts of the Tags editor ... 190 Accept and Discard buttons ... 191 Form and spreadsheet ... 191 Query box... 191 Folder hierarchy ... 191 Creating, modifying, and deleting HMI tags ... 192 Selecting data source for HMI tags ... 193 Getting HMI tag data from a device ... 193 Getting HMI tag data from memory ... 194 Creating HMI tags without using the Tags editor ... 195 Creating tags in a third-party application ... 195 Creating tags in other FactoryTalk View editors ... 195 Importing and exporting tags ... 195 Importing tags from a PLC database ... 196 Opening the Import PLC Tags dialog box ... 196 Chapter 11 About FactoryTalk Alarms and Events ... 197 Setting up FactoryTalk Advantages in using FactoryTalk Alarms and Events services ... 198 alarms Choosing FactoryTalk device-based alarms ... 198 Choosing FactoryTalk server tag-based alarms ... 199 Finding more information ... 200 FactoryTalk Alarms and Events Help ... 200 FactoryTalk Alarms and Events System Configuration Guide ... 200 Key concepts ... 201 Alarms and events ... 201 Alarm servers ... 201 level alarm ... 202 Level alarm limits ... 202 Variable limits and alarm faults ... 203 Deadband ... 203 Deviation alarms ... 204 R 10 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

11 Table of contents Digital alarms ... 204 FactoryTalk alarm and event displays ... 205 Alarm and event summary ... 205 Alarm and event banner ... 205 Alarm status explorer ... 205 Alarm and event log viewer ... 205 Alarm priority and severity ... 206 Alarm class ... 206 Alarm states ... 207 Alarm tags ... 208 Alarm status tags ... 208 Alarm messages ... 208 Alarm audit, diagnostic, and history logs ... 209 Summary of basic steps for setting up FactoryTalk alarms ... 210 Setting up system-wide alarm and event policies ... 211 To modify system-wide alarm settings ... 211 To modify severity settings for system events ... 211 Securing access to FactoryTalk alarm information... 211 About FactoryTalk Security permissions ... 212 Working with Rockwell Automation Device Servers ... 212 Setting up support for FactoryTalk Alarms and Events ... 212 Specifying a device-based alarm source ... 213 Working with Tag Alarm and Event Servers... 214 Setting up alarm priorities and history logging ... 214 Setting up FactoryTalk tag-based alarms ... 215 Creating tag-based digital alarms ... 215 Creating tag-based level alarms ... 216 Creating tag-based deviation alarms ... 216 Creating server-based events ... 217 Viewing all tag-based alarms ... 217 Setting up status tags for tag-based alarms... 217 Setting up tag-based alarm messages ... 218 Opening the Alarm Message Editor ... 218 Modifying an existing alarm message... 218 Adding variables to alarm messages ... 219 Using tag placeholders in alarm messages ... 219 Specifying tag update rates ... 220 Setting up alarm and event history logging ... 220 Defining an alarm and event log database ... 220 Enabling alarm and event history logging ... 221 Setting up alarm and event displays ... 222 About the Alarm and Event graphic library ... 222 Setting up an alarm and event summary ... 222 Setting up the overall appearance of the summary display ... 223 Choosing the columns and toolbar buttons to show ... 223 Choosing the status bar contents ... 223 Setting up event subscriptions ... 223 Ro 11 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

12 Table of contents Setting up filter and sort criteria ... 224 Choosing colors and blink styles for the alarm states ... 224 Determining run-time behavior and appearance ... 224 Setting up an alarm and event banner ... 225 Setting up the appearance of the banner display ... 225 Choosing the columns and toolbar buttons to show ... 225 Choosing the status bar contents ... 225 Setting up event subscriptions ... 226 Choosing colors, sound, and blink styles for the alarm states ... 226 Determining run-time behavior and appearance ... 226 About the alarm and event banner at run time ... 226 Docking a banner display to the run-time client window ... 227 Using an alarm summary to monitor and respond to alarms ... 227 The parts of an alarm and event summary ... 228 Filtering and sorting information at run time ... 228 Acknowledging alarms ... 229 Acknowledging the selected alarm ... 229 Acknowledging all alarms ... 230 Resetting latched digital alarms ... 230 Suppressing and disabling alarms ... 230 Unsuppressing and enabling alarms ... 231 Shelve or unshelve an alarm ... 231 Working with alarm sources in the Alarm Status Explorer ... 232 The parts of an alarm status explorer ... 233 Browsing alarm sources ... 233 Refreshing the alarm list ... 233 Viewing alarm details ... 234 Unsuppressing and suppressing alarms ... 234 Disabling and enabling alarms ... 235 Viewing alarm and event history logs ... 235 The parts of an alarm and event log viewer ... 236 Refreshing the event list ... 236 Filtering information at run time ... 236 Using tags to interact with alarms or obtain their status ... 237 Using FactoryTalk alarm functions in expressions... 239 Retrieving information about the severity of alarms ... 239 Highest severity value of acknowledged alarms ... 239 Highest severity value of unacknowledged alarms ... 239 Retrieving information about the number of alarms ... 239 Number of disabled alarms ... 240 Number of shelved alarms ... 240 Number of shelved alarms returned to normal ... 240 Number of suppressed alarms ... 240 Number of suppressed alarms returned to normal ... 241 Number of acknowledged alarms ... 241 Number of unacknowledged alarms ... 241 Number of unacknowledged alarms returned to normal ... 242 R 12 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

13 Table of contents Specifying the FactoryTalk alarm source in an expression ... 242 Using absolute and relative references to alarms ... 242 Using wildcards to specify multiple alarms ... 243 Using tag placeholders to specify the alarm name ... 243 What happens if the alarm source becomes unavailable ... 244 About controller status system alarms... 244 Importing and exporting alarms ... 244 About import and export formats ... 245 Chapter 12 About language switching ... 247 Setting up language Text strings you can view in different languages at run time ... 248 switching Specifying time, date, and numeric formats ... 248 Text strings you cannot view in different languages ... 249 Exported text that does not support language switching ... 249 Text that cannot be exported ... 249 Text that is part of the FactoryTalk View software ... 249 Text shown in FactoryTalk View SE system tags ... 250 Text that is not visible at run time ... 250 Summary of steps for setting up language switching ... 251 About FactoryTalk Security permissions ... 251 Setting up font support for Windows languages ... 252 Selecting a language for a new FactoryTalk View application ... 252 About the current application language ... 252 Adding languages to an application ... 253 Setting up a default application language ... 253 Showing undefined text strings in the default language ... 254 Exporting application text strings ... 254 Troubleshooting export problems ... 256 Export file formats... 256 Excel spreadsheet file format ... 256 Unicode text file format ... 256 Working with text strings exported to an Excel spreadsheet ... 257 Maintaining the format of the spreadsheet ... 258 Modifying or translating text strings ... 259 Working with duplicate text strings ... 259 Working with strings exported to a Unicode text file ... 260 File name and format ... 260 Opening a Unicode text file in Microsoft Excel ... 260 Saving a Unicode text file in Microsoft Excel ... 261 Differences in format for Unicode files saved in Excel ... 261 Saving a Unicode text file in Notepad ... 262 File schema ... 262 Working with pairs of double quotes ... 263 Working with backslashes and new-line characters ... 263 Ro 13 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

14 Table of contents Importing translated or modified text strings ... 264 Troubleshooting import problems ... 265 Common errors when importing Unicode text files ... 266 Common errors when importing Excel spreadsheet files ... 266 Common errors when importing local messages ... 267 Switch application languages at design time ... 268 Setting up run-time language switching ... 268 Using the Language command to switch languages ... 268 Support for multiple languages in the graphic libraries ... 269 Language support in new graphic libraries ... 269 Using the graphic libraries in a multi-language application ... 270 Chapter 13 FactoryTalk features that maximize system availability ... 271 Setting up FactoryTalk Finding more information about system availability ... 272 system availability Monitoring the status of application servers ... 272 States for non-redundant and redundant servers ... 273 States for redundant servers only ... 274 What happens if a non-redundant HMI server fails ... 274 Monitoring the status of the Network Directory server ... 275 What happens if the Network Directory server is unavailable ... 276 Redundancy as part of a system availability strategy ... 276 Planning the layout of a redundant system ... 277 About FactoryTalk View SE system limits ... 278 FactoryTalk View SE redundant component limits ... 278 System sizing recommendations ... 279 Activating FactoryTalk View SE in a redundant system ... 280 Setting up redundant servers in FactoryTalk View SE ... 280 Setting up a redundant HMI server pair ... 281 Specify the Network Directory on the secondary computer ... 281 Set up HMI server redundancy options ... 281 Manually replicate changes to the standby HMI server ... 282 Determining the Active HMI server in a redundant pair ... 283 When an HMI server is ready to be active or standby ... 284 Specifying On Active and On Standby macros ... 284 What happens if both servers become active ... 285 Switching the Active and Standby servers manually ... 285 About FactoryTalk Security permissions ... 286 What happens when the primary HMI server fails ... 287 Failing over to the Standby secondary server ... 287 Switching back to primary, or staying with the Active server... 287 Continuing to use the secondary server ... 288 Switching back automatically to the primary server ... 288 Notifying clients when switching back to the primary ... 288 Modifying HMI tag properties at run time ... 289 R 14 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

15 Table of contents Modifying HMI tag properties ... 289 When HMI tag property changes take effect ... 289 Managing HMI data in an online redundant system ... 291 Centralize storage of diagnostic data ... 291 Determine which server will run events ... 291 Synchronize derived tags and data log files ... 292 Monitoring network client and server connections ... 292 About network glitches ... 293 Chapter 14 About FactoryTalk Diagnostics ... 295 Logging system activity Summary of steps for setting up Diagnostics ... 295 Finding more information ... 296 Key concepts ... 296 Destinations ... 296 Message routing ... 296 Message categories ... 297 Message severity ... 297 Message audience ... 297 How tag writes are categorized ... 298 Setting up FactoryTalk Diagnostics in FactoryTalk View ... 298 Setting up message routing ... 298 Logging to a central database ... 299 Setting up message buffering ... 299 Tracking system events in the Diagnostics List ... 299 Working with the Diagnostics List... 300 Viewing messages in the Diagnostics List ... 300 Viewing FactoryTalk Diagnostics logs ... 301 Chapter 15 About graphic displays ... 303 Creating graphic displays Importing and exporting graphic display XML files ... 304 About global object displays ... 304 Working with global objects ... 304 Parts of the Graphics editor ... 305 Viewing display contents in the Object Explorer ... 306 Viewing object properties in the Property Panel ... 307 Techniques for working in graphic displays... 308 Zooming in and out ... 308 Setting up a display grid ... 308 Using the toolbars ... 308 Selecting objects ... 309 Using shortcut menus to perform actions quickly... 309 Techniques for working with graphic objects ... 310 Ro 15 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

16 Table of contents Copying objects ... 310 Copying objects with multiple languages ... 310 Copying and pasting objects... 311 Duplicating objects ... 311 Resizing and reshaping objects ... 312 Arranging objects... 313 Stacking objects ... 314 Aligning objects ... 314 Aligning objects top, middle, and bottom ... 315 Aligning objects left, right, and center ... 315 Spacing objects ... 316 Spacing objects vertically and horizontally ... 316 Flipping objects ... 316 Rotating objects ... 317 Grouping objects ... 317 Ungrouping objects... 318 Modifying grouped objects ... 319 Applying colors ... 320 Applying pattern styles and colors ... 320 Changing line properties ... 321 Naming graphic objects ... 322 Assigning tags and expressions to objects ... 322 Adding tooltips to graphic objects ... 323 Using tag substitution to replace text strings ... 323 Creating a background for a display ... 324 Testing graphic displays ... 324 Testing the appearance of objects in different states ... 325 Creating and working with global object displays ... 326 Creating global object displays... 326 Adding standard displays that contain reference objects ... 327 About global object displays at run time ... 327 Adding controller instruction faceplates to an application ... 328 Working with faceplates in the Graphics editor ... 329 Using objects from the graphic libraries ... 329 Location of library files ... 329 Importing graphic files from third-party applications ... 329 Using bitmaps in a FactoryTalk View application ... 330 When to use a bitmap ... 331 Using the Image Browser to import images ... 331 Using placeholders to specify tag values ... 333 Creating a tag placeholder ... 333 Replacing tag placeholders using parameter files ... 334 Loading a parameter file with the initial client display ... 334 Replacing tag placeholders using parameter lists ... 334 Setting up tag placeholders for global objects ... 335 Defining tag placeholders for use in reference objects ... 335 Modifying global objects that use tag placeholders... 337 R 16 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

17 Table of contents Setting up the appearance and behavior ... 338 Setting up the properties of a graphic display ... 338 Specifying the display type ... 339 Allowing multiple running copies ... 340 Caching displays ... 340 Setting up the title bar and other display attributes ... 341 Scaling the graphic display ... 341 Showing the last known values of HMI tags ... 341 Setting the update rate for tags ... 342 Viewing screen statistics of a display ... 342 Specifying the size of the graphic display ... 343 Preventing scroll bars on the main window ... 343 Specifying the display’s position ... 343 Securing the graphic display ... 343 Selecting the background color ... 344 Using gradient style ... 344 Tracking screens for navigation ... 344 Setting up the run-time behavior of a graphic display ... 344 Specifying startup and shutdown commands ... 345 Specifying colors for input objects ... 346 Specifying the behavior of interactive objects ... 346 Specifying the behavior of objects with input focus ... 346 Using both types of highlight in the same display... 346 Showing the on-screen keyboard ... 347 Setting up displays to open more quickly ... 347 Removing displays from the cache ... 348 Changing the default display settings ... 348 Docking displays to the FactoryTalk View SE Client window ... 349 Display command parameters for docking displays ... 349 About the appearance and behavior of docked displays ... 350 Docking multiple displays in the same position ... 350 Running other displays in the available client area ... 350 Closing docked displays ... 351 Printing displays at run time ... 352 Chapter 16 Types of graphic objects ... 353 Creating graphic objects About global objects ... 354 Setting up the properties of graphic objects ... 354 Setting up properties common to all objects ... 355 Creating different types of drawing objects ... 355 Drawing a rectangle or square ... 356 Drawing a rounded rectangle ... 356 Drawing a polyline or polygon ... 356 Drawing an ellipse or circle... 357 Ro ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019 17

18 Table of contents Drawing an arc or wedge ... 357 Changing the properties of drawing objects ... 358 Creating text objects ... 358 Choosing text fonts ... 358 Creating a panel ... 359 Adding images into graphic displays... 359 Placing images in graphic displays ... 359 Adding images to an application ... 360 Importing images into graphic displays ... 360 Pasting images into graphic displays ... 360 Techniques for working with objects that use data ... 360 Specifying tag names ... 361 Determining which objects have input focus ... 361 Using the keyboard to select objects that can take focus ... 361 Removing objects from the tab sequence... 362 Creating different types of push buttons ... 363 Creating button push buttons ... 364 Setting up button properties ... 364 Creating momentary push buttons ... 365 Setting up momentary push button properties ... 365 Creating maintained push buttons ... 366 Setting up maintained push button properties ... 366 Creating latched push buttons ... 367 Setting up latched push button properties ... 367 Creating multistate push buttons ... 368 Setting up multistate push button properties ... 368 About the run-time error state ... 369 Creating interlocked push buttons ... 369 Setting up interlocked push button properties ... 369 Creating ramp push buttons ... 370 Setting up ramp push button properties ... 370 Creating navigation push buttons... 371 Setting up navigation push button properties ... 371 Creating different types of data display and input objects ... 372 Using input objects to retrieve and send data ... 372 Tag-related limits ... 373 Updating tag values continuously ... 374 Validating operator input ... 375 Shortcut keys for retrieving and sending data... 375 FactoryTalk View commands for retrieving and sending data ... 376 Parts of the on-screen keyboard ... 376 Creating numeric and string display objects ... 377 Creating numeric and string input objects... 377 Creating different types of indicators ... 377 Setting up states for indicators ... 378 Using the Least Significant bit to trigger states ... 378 Setting up connections for indicators ... 378 R 18 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

19 Table of contents Creating multistate indicators ... 378 Creating symbols ... 379 Creating list indicators ... 379 Creating different types of gauges and graphs ... 379 Using gauges to show limits... 379 Changing a gauge’s fill color at different thresholds ... 379 Using graphs to compare values... 380 Changing a bar graph’s fill color at different thresholds ... 380 Showing limits using scales with bar graphs ... 381 Creating gauges ... 381 Creating bar graphs ... 381 Creating scales ... 381 Using key objects to simulate keyboard functions ... 381 Creating different types of key objects ... 382 Setting up the auto-repeat function for selected keys ... 383 Using the same set of keys with different graphic objects ... 383 Creating different types of advanced objects ... 383 Creating arrows... 384 Creating tag labels ... 384 Creating time and date displays ... 384 Creating display list selectors ... 385 Setting up states for a display list selector ... 385 Creating Web Browser objects ... 385 Providing operator instructions in local message displays... 385 Setting up local messages ... 385 Trigger values cannot be zero ... 386 What is shown at run time ... 386 Creating local message displays ... 386 Creating and restoring recipes ... 388 Creating a recipe object ... 388 Restoring and saving recipe values at run time ... 388 Creating control list selectors ... 390 Selecting states in a control list selector ... 391 Using keys to scroll the list ... 391 Setting the Value tag ... 391 Creating control list selectors ... 392 Creating piloted control list selectors ... 392 Selecting states in a piloted control list selector ... 392 Using keys to scroll the list ... 393 Controlling the list view ... 393 Selecting items directly or remotely ... 393 Setting the Value tag ... 394 Using Enter key handshaking to ensure the current value is read ... 394 How the handshaking tags and settings interact ... 394 How the Handshake reset type option works ... 395 Creating piloted control selectors ... 395 Specifying the text and value for each state ... 395 Ro 19 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

20 Table of contents Setting up connections for a piloted control list selector ... 396 Creating the Alarm and Event objects ... 396 Creating global objects ... 397 Creating reference objects ... 397 Using placeholders to specify values for global objects ... 398 Adding global objects into the graphic libraries ... 399 Setting up the link properties of reference objects ... 399 LinkAnimation ... 399 LinkConnections ... 400 LinkSize ... 400 LinkToolTipText... 400 LinkBaseObject ... 401 Link properties of grouped reference objects ... 401 Breaking links between reference and base objects ... 401 Working with OLE objects ... 402 Creating OLE objects ... 402 Converting OLE objects ... 402 Working with ActiveX objects ... 403 Attributes of ActiveX objects ... 403 Creating ActiveX objects ... 404 Setting up ActiveX objects to interact with FactoryTalk View ... 404 Setting up tools in the ActiveX toolbox ... 404 Deploying ActiveX components automatically at run time ... 405 Working with Symbol Factory ... 405 Using electronic signatures to authorize run-time changes ... 406 Securing tag writes, commands, and downloads ... 407 Creating signature buttons ... 408 Securing objects in graphic displays ... 408 Tracking changes using FactoryTalk Diagnostics... 408 Chapter 17 About animation in FactoryTalk View ... 409 Animating graphic objects Setting up animation for FactoryTalk View graphic objects ... 410 Linking animation to tag values ... 410 Using tag placeholders ... 410 Linking animation to expressions ... 411 Linking animation to actions ... 411 Determining start and end points for a range of motion ... 411 Defining the range of motion ... 412 Applying animation to object groups ... 413 Testing animation ... 413 Viewing the animation applied to objects ... 414 Copying or duplicating objects with animation ... 414 About global objects and animation ... 414 Creating effects using the different types of animation ... 415 20 R ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

21 Table of contents Showing and hiding objects ... 415 Changing an object’s color ... 415 Example 1: Creating text that blinks ... 416 Example 2: Creating an object that changes color ... 417 Changing the level of fill in an object ... 419 Moving an object horizontally in a display ... 419 Moving an object vertically in a display ... 419 Rotating objects ... 419 Setting up rotation animation ... 420 Changing the width of an object ... 421 Changing the height of an object ... 421 Setting up touch zones ... 421 Creating a horizontal slider ... 421 Creating a vertical slider ... 421 Creating a hyperlink for an object ... 422 Animating OLE verbs ... 422 Using index numbers to navigate to objects in a display ... 422 Checking an object’s index number ... 423 How tab index numbers work ... 423 Creating a tab sequence ... 424 Changing index numbers ... 424 Associating objects and displays with keys ... 424 Setting up object keys ... 425 Setting up display keys ... 426 Viewing the key list at run time ... 427 Setting up object-specific commands using keys ... 427 Animating ActiveX objects ... 429 Connecting tags to an ActiveX object’s properties ... 429 About ActiveX object names ... 430 Viewing an object’s methods ... 430 Connecting tags to an object’s methods ... 431 Using the Invoke command to call a method ... 431 Connecting tags to an ActiveX object’s events... 431 Chapter 18 Designing a display hierarchy for an application ... 433 Setting up navigation Setting up ways to move among displays ... 434 Using commands to open, close, and switch displays... 434 Choosing display types with navigation in mind ... 437 Reducing display call-up time ... 438 Setting up keys to run FactoryTalk View commands ... 438 General rules governing precedence ... 438 Precedence and the F1 key ... 439 Precedence and embedded ActiveX objects ... 439 Precedence and embedded OLE objects ... 439 Ro ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019 21

22 Table of contents Keyboard shortcuts ... 440 About navigation buttons... 441 How navigation buttons work ... 442 Creating a navigation button ... 442 Viewing and clearing the navigation history ... 443 Chapter 19 About expressions ... 445 Creating expressions Where you can use expressions in FactoryTalk View SE ... 445 Working in the Expression editor ... 446 Expression components ... 446 Checking the syntax of an expression ... 447 Cutting, copying, and pasting expressions ... 447 Formatting expressions ... 448 Using tag names and tag placeholders in expressions ... 448 Specifying the area with a tag name ... 448 Using tag placeholders to specify tag values ... 448 Using constants in expressions ... 449 Using operators in expressions ... 449 Arithmetic operators ... 449 Relational operators ... 449 Logical operators ... 450 Bitwise operators ... 450 Evaluation order of operators ... 451 Using built-in functions in expressions ... 453 Math functions ... 453 File functions ... 453 Time functions... 454 Tag functions ... 456 Security functions ... 456 Language function ... 457 Redundancy functions ... 457 FactoryTalk alarm functions ... 457 About using FactoryTalk alarm names in expressions ... 459 Using if-then-else logic in expressions ... 459 Nested if - then - else ... 460 Chapter 20 About embedded variables ... 463 Creating embedded variables Inserting embedded variables ... 464 Creating numeric embedded variables ... 465 Syntax for numeric embedded variables that use a tag value... 466 Syntax for numeric embedded variables that use a literal number ... 467 Creating string embedded variables ... 467 22 R ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

23 Table of contents Syntax for string embedded variables that use a tag value ... 468 Syntax for string embedded variables that use a literal string ... 468 Creating time and date embedded variables ... 469 Syntax for time and date embedded variables ... 469 How embedded variables are shown at run time ... 470 Numeric embedded variables ... 470 String embedded variables ... 471 Time and date embedded variables ... 471 How embedded variables are updated at run time ... 471 Chapter 21 About data logging ... 473 Setting up data logging Gathering tag data in data log models ... 473 Using multiple data log models ... 473 Data log storage formats ... 474 How log file sets are named ... 474 ODBC database storage format and schemas ... 475 How ODBC tables are named ... 475 Format for ODBC float and string tables ... 475 Format for ODBC tag table ... 476 Creating data log models ... 476 Specifying the storage format ... 477 Selecting the ODBC database format ... 477 Setting up log paths ... 478 Setting up and managing data log files ... 478 Creating new file sets ... 478 Deleting file sets and ODBC database records ... 479 Specifying when to log data ... 479 Choosing the data to be logged ... 479 Logging data to ODBC data sources ... 479 Logging data to an existing ODBC data source ... 479 Creating a new ODBC data source ... 480 Setting up security to log data to a remote computer... 480 Creating new files at run time ... 480 Using the DataLogNewFile command ... 481 Switching log paths at run time ... 481 Setting up switching options ... 482 Switching back manually to the primary path ... 482 Using the DataLogSwitchBack command ... 483 Moving data from the secondary path ... 483 Using the DataLogMergeToPrimary command ... 483 Logging on demand ... 484 Using the DataLogSnapshot command ... 484 Combining logging ... 485 Modifying existing data log models ... 485 Ro 23 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

24 Table of contents Changing log paths ... 485 Making run-time changes without modifying the model ... 485 Starting and stopping data logging ... 486 Ways to start data logging ... 486 Ways to stop data logging ... 487 Chapter 22 About trends ... 489 Setting up trends Charting current versus historical data ... 490 Creating TrendPro objects ... 490 Setting up Trend Pro properties ... 491 Creating Trend objects ... 492 Setting up trend properties ... 493 Providing a name for the trend ... 494 Testing a trend ... 494 The parts of a trend ... 495 Trend chart styles ... 499 The Standard chart style ... 499 The XY Plot chart style ... 499 Isolated graphing ... 500 Plotting a value across the full width of the chart ... 501 Choosing trend colors, fonts, lines, and legends ... 502 Changing the trend highlight color ... 502 Changing the trend object background ... 502 Showing a current value legend ... 502 Showing a line legend ... 503 Using templates for trend objects ... 503 About the Trend graphic library ... 504 Working with trends at run time ... 504 Collecting data in the background at run time ... 505 Modifying trend properties at run time ... 505 Displaying the difference in pen values for two points ... 506 Zooming the trend chart... 507 Panning the trend chart ... 508 Printing the trend chart ... 508 Fixing run-time errors ... 508 Chapter 23 About logic and control ... 509 Adding logic and control Creating and using derived tags ... 509 Parts of the Derived Tags editor ... 509 Accept and Discard buttons ... 510 Form and spreadsheet ... 510 Checking the syntax of an expression ... 510 24 R ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

25 Table of contents How to use derived tags ... 510 Creating a derived tags component ... 511 About the maximum update rate ... 512 Using multiple derived tag components ... 512 Modifying existing derived tag components ... 512 Starting and stopping derived tags processing ... 512 Starting derived tags in network and local station applications ... 512 Starting derived tags in local station applications only ... 513 Stopping derived tags in network and local station applications ... 513 Stopping derived tags in local station applications only ... 514 Setting up FactoryTalk View SE events ... 514 Parts of the Events editor ... 514 Accept and Discard buttons ... 515 Form and spreadsheet ... 515 Checking the syntax of an expression ... 515 Creating an events component ... 515 About the maximum update rate ... 516 Using multiple events components ... 516 Modifying existing event components ... 517 Starting and stopping events processing ... 517 Ways to start events processing ... 517 Ways to stop events processing ... 518 Creating and using macros ... 518 Macro syntax ... 519 Specifying parameters in a macro ... 520 Typing macro names that contain spaces ... 520 Nesting macros ... 521 Running macros ... 521 Specifying user login and logout macros ... 522 Creating client keys ... 522 Running client key components ... 523 Chapter 24 About recipes ... 525 Managing recipes About the RecipePro+ editor ... 525 The parts of RecipePro+ editor ... 526 Recipe edit table ... 527 Toolbar commands ... 527 Create, modify, or delete recipes ... 528 Refresh recipes ... 529 Import or export recipes ... 529 Required security permissions ... 529 Ro ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019 25

26 Table of contents Appendix A Using commands ... 531 FactoryTalk View commands How to use commands ... 531 Using tag placeholders in commands ... 532 Where commands run ... 533 Using absolute and relative references ... 535 How relative references are resolved ... 536 Commands that take tags as parameters ... 536 Commands that take HMI project components as parameters ... 536 Creating symbols ... 536 Important guidelines ... 537 Running and building commands ... 538 Appendix B Overview of DDE communications ... 539 Setting up DDE Setting up an HMI server as a DDE client ... 540 communications for HMI tags Creating an HMI tag that uses DDE ... 540 Specifying Device as the data source ... 540 Syntax for DDE addresses... 541 Scanning for new tag values ... 541 Appendix C Customizing applications using VBA with FactoryTalk View ... 543 Using th e SE Client object Summary of basic steps ... 544 model and display code About procedures ... 545 How VBA code runs ... 545 Parts of the VBA IDE ... 545 FactoryTalk View SE Client object model ... 546 Finding information about FactoryTalk View SE Client objects ... 546 Finding information about VBA ... 547 Appendix D About XML ... 549 Importing and exporting XML Exporting graphics data to an XML file ... 549 files Modifying exported XML files ... 550 Saving XML files in Notepad... 550 Testing XML files ... 551 Importing XML files ... 551 Error log file ... 551 Importing graphic display XML files ... 551 Graphic display XML file structure ... 552 26 R ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

27 Table of contents Legal Notices ... 553 Legal Notices Index Ro ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019 27

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29 Chapter 1 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Th is chapter describes: • What FactoryTalk View Site Edition is. What a FactoryTalk system is. • • FactoryTalk View Site Edition software. • FactoryTalk View tools and utilities. • How to set up the software you need. Running FactoryTalk View SE without activation. • Exploring the InstantFizz application. • How to start creating a new network distributed application. • Welcome to FactoryTalk FactoryTalk View Site Edition (SE) is an integrated software package for developing and running human-machine interface (HMI) applications that can View SE involve multiple users and servers, distributed over a network. As a member of the FactoryTalk View family of products, FactoryTalk View SE provides all the tools you need to create powerful, dependable process monitoring and supervisory control applications. In FactoryTalk View Studio, you can create network distributed, network station, or local station applications that mirror your plant or process. Use the editors in FactoryTalk View Studio to create and test the application components you need. Then set up the FactoryTalk View SE clients to let operators interact with the application after it is deployed. The steps or illustrations in this manual may vary depending on your operating Tip: systems. FactoryTalk View Site Edition provides all the tools you need to create powerful, About FactoryTalk systems dependable process monitoring and supervisory control applications. FactoryTalk Services Platform provides a set of common services (such as FactoryTalk Services Platform diagnostic messages, health monitoring services, and access to real-time data) for Ro 29 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

30 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 all the FactoryTalk products and applications used in a control system. Using the FactoryTalk Services Platform, FactoryTalk products can share and gain simultaneous access to resources such as tags and graphic displays that you only need to define once in the system. The FactoryTalk Services Platform installs behind the scenes during FactoryTalk View SE installation. Following are the services the platform provides: FactoryTalk Directory centralizes access to system resources and names for • all FactoryTalk products and components participating in an automated control system. The FactoryTalk Network Directory manages resources for FactoryTalk View SE network applications, and the FactoryTalk Local Directory manages resources for FactoryTalk View SE local applications. on page 79 For more information, see Setting up the FactoryTalk Directory . • FactoryTalk Security centralizes user authentication and authorization at t he FactoryTalk Directory. For information about securing FactoryTalk Setting up security . on page 87 View SE applications, see FactoryTalk Live Data manages connections between data servers in an • a pplication and FactoryTalk Live Data clients such as FactoryTalk View SE clients. For information about data communications in FactoryTalk View SE applications, see Setting up communications on page 165 . • FactoryTalk Diagnostics collects and provides access to activity, status, w arning, and error messages generated throughout a FactoryTalk system. For information about diagnostics in FactoryTalk View SE, see Logging system activity o n page 295 . • FactoryTalk Administration Console is a stand-alone tool for developing, m anaging, and securing multiple FactoryTalk View applications. You must use the FactoryTalk Administration Console to restore FactoryTalk View SE Note: network applications and to set up computer accounts, if necessary, after upgrading the FactoryTalk Services Platform. Otherwise, FactoryTalk View Studio is the configuration software for developing and testing FactoryTalk View applications. FactoryTalk services installed with FactoryTalk View SE The FactoryTalk Services Platform also supports FactoryTalk Alarms and Events services, and software-based product activation. These services are installed separately, during FactoryTalk View SE installation, rather than with the FactoryTalk Services Platform. For more information about FactoryTalk Alarms and Events and FactoryTalk Activation, see the list of FactoryTalk View SE software below. This manual contains information about developing FactoryTalk View SE Finding more information applications, including information about how FactoryTalk View uses about FactoryTalk services R 30 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

31 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 FactoryTalk services. For additional, detailed information about FactoryTalk systems, services, concepts, and components, see the FactoryTalk Help. FactoryTalk View SE consists of several pieces of software you can use to build FactoryTalk View Site network or local HMI applications, customized to your needs. Edition software Depending on the software packages you purchased, you will have installed one or more of the following software components, from the FactoryTalk View installation package. FactoryTalk Services Platform provides a set of common services (such as diagnostic messages, health monitoring services, and access to real-time data) for all the FactoryTalk products and applications used in a control system. For an FactoryTalk Services Platform overview of FactoryTalk Services Platform, see on . page 29 FactoryTalk View Studio is the design-time environment for FactoryTalk View th at provides the editors and tools you need to develop and test network distributed, network station, and local station human-machine interface (HMI) applications. It contains editors for creating complete applications, and contains client and server software for testing the applications you create. For information Exploring FactoryTalk View Studio about FactoryTalk View Studio features, see on page 43 . You can also use FactoryTalk View Studio to set up FactoryTalk Security services fo Setting up security on r the applications you develop. For more information, see page 87 . Fa ctoryTalk View Studio is also the configuration software for developing FactoryTalk View Note: Machine Edition (ME) applications. For information about FactoryTalk View ME, see FactoryTalk View Machine Edition User’s Guide and the ME Help. FactoryTalk View SE Client is software for viewing and interacting with FactoryTalk View SE local station, network station, and network distributed applications at run time. Use the FactoryTalk View SE Client Wizard to create client configuration files that can be deployed to client host computers. FactoryTalk View SE Server, also called the HMI server, stores HMI project components (for example, graphic displays) and supplies them to clients. The server also contains a database of tags, and performs historical data logging. FactoryTalk View SE Server has no user interface. Once installed, it runs as a set of headless Windows services that supply information to clients as they request it. FactoryTalk Alarms and Events installs behind the scenes during FactoryTalk View SE installation, and provides system-wide alarm monitoring and control centralized at the FactoryTalk Directory. For run-time clients to receive Ro ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019 31

32 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 FactoryTalk device-based and tag-based alarm information, you need to set up application servers to support FactoryTalk Alarms and Events services. For details, . on page 197 see Setting up FactoryTalk alarms FactoryTalk Activation services provide a secure, software-based system for ac tivating Rockwell Software products and managing software activation files. For FactoryTalk information about activating FactoryTalk View SE software, see the View Site Edition Installation Guide . FactoryTalk tools and utilities that support the operation of your FactoryTalk FactoryTalk View Site View SE software. For an overview, see Chapter 1 of the . Edition Installation Guide FactoryTalk View SE provides the flexibility and features you need to create FactoryTalk View SE features powerful automation systems for your plant or process. For example, you can: • Create local station applications for parts of the plant or process that are self-contained, and are not related to other parts of the process. • Create complex applications that mirror the layout of a plant or process. A FactoryTalk View SE network distributed application can contain several servers running on multiple computers, connected over a network. Multiple client users can connect simultaneously to a network distributed application. • Open and modify network applications remotely using FactoryTalk View Studio. • Use the health monitoring and redundancy features built into FactoryTalk and FactoryTalk View SE to support system availability at run time. Use FactoryTalk Security services to centralize the authentication and • authorization of system users at the FactoryTalk Directory. • Create multi-language applications that support switching between up to 40 different languages at run time. In a network distributed application, multiple clients can run in different languages simultaneously. Modify HMI tags at run time, and have changes take effect at connected • clients, without restarting the clients. In a redundant network distributed application, changes made at the active HMI server can be replicated to the standby server. • Create a complete alarm monitoring system with FactoryTalk Alarms and Events. Using FactoryTalk Alarms and Events services, FactoryTalk View SE applications can subscribe to and display device-based alarms, programmed directly into Logix 5000™ controllers. R 32 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

33 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 Customize alarm summaries and banners to provide specific alarm data, • rather than displaying alarms for the entire system. Create global objects in global object displays, and use copies of these objects • throughout an application. When you modify the original object, all linked copies are also updated. • Dock selected displays to an edge of the FactoryTalk View SE Client window so they can be viewed in a fixed position, at all times. • Use the FactoryTalk View SE Client Object Model and VBA to extend the capabilities of FactoryTalk View SE, and to share and interoperate with Windows programs such as Microsoft SQL Server and Microsoft Excel. Create trends that show process variables plotted against time. FactoryTalk • View SE trends can display real-time or historical data, with up to 100 pens (tags) in each trend. • Log data simultaneously to the FactoryTalk Diagnostics log and to remote ODBC (Open Database Connectivity) databases to provide various records of production data. Quick start: setting up the The design of the automation and control system you plan to deploy will determine which FactoryTalk View SE software components to install and set up software you need on network computers. Where you install the software also depends on the type of application. FactoryTalk View Studio Enterprise is the configuration software for developing and testing FactoryTalk View SE network distributed, network station, local station, and FactoryTalk View ME applications. • To develop or run a Network Distributed application, you can install different combinations of software on each computer, depending on needs. • To develop or run a Network Station application, you must install all the necessary software components on one computer (except for data servers). Network station applications can connect to data servers that are located on different machines. • To develop or run a Local Station application, you must install all the necessary software components on one computer (except for OPC data servers). Local station applications can connect to OPC data servers that are located on different machines. • To develop or run a View Machine Edition application, see FactoryTalk View Machine Edition User’s Guide and ME Help. Steps in this section describe the basic tasks involved in setting up the software needed to develop and run local and network applications. Ro 33 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

34 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 For detailed installation instructions, and for information about deploying Site Edition network distributed, network station, and local station applications for FactoryTalk View Site Edition Installation Guide. production, see The layout of the network is particularly important to the design of a network Step 1: Plan the layout of the distributed application. network The type and structure of the network can determine which roles participating host computers will play, including whether any of the servers will run as redundant pairs. If you are planning a network application that uses more than 10 computers, you must use a network domain controller. For network distributed applications consisting of 10 computers or fewer, you can use a Windows workgroup. Do not install FactoryTalk Directory, FactoryTalk View SE Server, or any other application Note: software on the same computer as the Windows domain controller. This configuration is not supported. FactoryTalk View applications depend on FactoryTalk software, such as Step 2: Install FactoryTalk FactoryTalk Directory, to run. During the FactoryTalk Services Platform Services Platform installation, the FactoryTalk Network Directory and Local Directory are set up automatically on the computer. If you plan to run only the FactoryTalk Directory server on a computer without any Tip: dependent software, install only the FactoryTalk Services Platform on the computer. When you install the FactoryTalk View SE software, you can choose to install all Step 3: Install FactoryTalk View the components on one computer, or to install individual components on separate SE computers on the network. To develop or run a local station application, you must install the FactoryTalk Services Platform and all the FactoryTalk View SE software on one computer. In a local application, only OPC data servers can be run on a separate computer. Tip: To develop or run a network distributed or network station application, you can install all the FactoryTalk View SE software, or just selected components, on participating computers. For example, you might install only the FactoryTalk View SE Client software on computers run by operators. Similarly, to distribute server loads across the R 34 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

35 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 application, you might install only the FactoryTalk View SE Server software on server computers. During the installation, you are prompted to select the connectivity options. tep 4: Select the connectivity S options When to use FactoryTalk Linx FactoryTalk Linx is a communication server built around FactoryTalk technology to assist in developing and running your FactoryTalk View SE applications. For communications with Allen-Bradley local and remote devices, particularly with Logix 5000™ controllers, FactoryTalk Linx is the recommended data communications software for FactoryTalk View applications. FactoryTalk Linx now allows you to create redundant controller shortcuts and to perform online tasks such as uploading and downloading Logix 5000 files. When to use RSLinx Classic RSLinx Classic is a complete 32-bit product family that links Allen-Bradley networks and devices to Microsoft Windows applications. These range from device programming and configuration applications to HMI applications, to your own data acquisition applications using Microsoft Office, Web pages, or Visual Basic. RSLinx Classic also incorporates advanced data optimization techniques and contains a set of diagnostics. RSLinx Classic is an OPC DA (Data Access) Compliant Server and a DDE server. For example, install and use RSLinx Classic to serve data through DH+ (Data Highway +) networks, to support complex bridging and routing, and to support unsolicited messaging from a controller to RSLinx. RSLinx Classic also allows you to create alias topic shortcuts, and to perform online tasks such as uploading and downloading RSLogix 5000 files. Communicating with third-party local and remote devices For communications with non-Allen-Bradley local and remote devices, FactoryTalk View SE supports OPC, a protocol used to connect to communication devices via vendor-specific OPC servers. OPC enables FactoryTalk View to act as a client to other OPC servers. This means that FactoryTalk View can use third-party OPC servers to retrieve tag values from third-party controller devices, such as Siemens or Modicon. Ro 35 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

36 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 FactoryTalk View SE supports the OPC DA 2.05a, UA 1.02 and 1.03 specifications for exchanging data among automation or control applications, field systems or devices, and business or office applications. The types of product licenses you require depend on the software you have S tep 5: Install the necessary installed, and how you intend to use it. activation keys For information about the types of activation you might need, and how to install FactoryTalk View Site Edition Installation Guide activation keys, see the . Running FactoryTalk View SE without activation The FactoryTalk View SE software you install must be licensed for full use. If for some reason activation is unavailable, the software can run unlicensed for a grace period of up to seven days. This provides time to correct any problems, without disrupting critical applications. If activation is restored within the seven days, normal operations will resume. If activation remains unavailable when the grace period expires, the FactoryTalk View SE software will run in demo mode. When running in demo mode, there are some limitations. You can run a local station FactoryTalk View application for up to two • hours. Remote clients cannot connect to a FactoryTalk View server. • Starting from FactoryTalk View version 10.00, some limitations are eliminated. You can create or load over five graphic displays per HMI server now. You can also fully use the Symbol Factory library without restriction. The FactoryTalk Directory centralizes access to resources and components, such tep 6: Set up the FactoryTalk S as graphic displays and tags, for all FactoryTalk products participating in a control Directory system. FactoryTalk Directory centralizes access to application resources and components, such as graphic displays and tags, for all FactoryTalk products participating in a control system. FactoryTalk Local Directory (also called the Local Directory) manages applications that are confined to a single computer, for example, FactoryTalk View SE local station applications. The Local Directory must reside on the same computer as the local station application. FactoryTalk Network Directory (also called the Network Directory) manages FactoryTalk View SE network distributed applications, and network station applications. All of the client and server computers participating in a given 36 R ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

37 Getting started with FactoryTalk Vi ew SE Chapter 1 network distributed application, or network station application must point at the same Network Directory. Both directories are configured on the computer, when you install the FactoryTalk Services Platform. To use the Local Directory as part of a local application, no further setup is required. To use the Network Directory as part of a network application, you must set up all participating computers to point at the same Network Directory computer. For Setting up the FactoryTalk Directory more information, see . on page 79 The InstantFizz application shipped with FactoryTalk View SE is a fully Exploring the InstantFizz fu nctional example of a network distributed application. application To explore the FactoryTalk View SE development and run-time environments, open the InstantFizz application in FactoryTalk View Studio and launch the SE client. Before running the client, you need to download the control logix project Tip: IF2_DEMO.ACD to a programmable controller or a SoftLogix controller. The project is located at: C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Documents\RSView Enterprise\SE\HMI Projects\InstantFizz_HMI To open the InstantFizz application: 1. From Windows Start menu, select All Programs > Rockwell Software > > FactoryTalk View Studio . FactoryTalk View In the Application Type Selection dialog box, select View Site Edition 2. and click (Network Distributed) Continue . . 3. In the Existing tab, select InstantFizz and click Open Ro 37 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

38 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 In the following illustration, the graphic display named Packaging and the undocked Objects toolbar are open in the Graphics editor. For information about Exploring FactoryTalk working with FactoryTalk View Studio and the editors, see on p View Studio . age 43 To test a display in FactoryTalk View Studio: 1. In FactoryTalk View Studio, in the Explorer window, right-click the display you want to test, and then click Open . . To stop testing, on the View menu, 2. On the View menu, click Test Display . Edit Display click R 38 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

39 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 To run the InstantFizz client: Open C:\Users\Public\Documents\RSView Enterprise\SE\Client and double-click the IF_Client_1920x1080.cli file to run the application. Yo u can use the buttons and touch zones provided to navigate through the application, view alarm summaries and so on. There is a that Learning Mode highlights features in blue boxes as you navigate throughout the application. To Learning Mode enable these feature highlights, on the menu, select More... > . To Demo Mode hide, select > . More... Creating a FactoryTalk View Yo u can also create a simple, new application to exercise some of the development and run-time features of FactoryTalk View SE. Following are some steps to get SE application you started. Ro 39 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

40 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 First, create the application itself, and then add at least one HMI server. Step 1: Create the application FactoryTalk View SE Server, also called the HMI server, stores HMI project components (for example, graphic displays) and supplies them to clients. The server also contains a database of tags, and performs historical data logging. FactoryTalk View SE Server has no user interface. Once installed, it runs as a set of headless Windows services that supply information to clients as they request it. To create a network distributed application: From Windows Start menu, select All Programs > Rockwell Software > 1. > FactoryTalk View Studio . FactoryTalk View In the Application Type Selection 2. dialog box, select the application type and click . Continue 3. In the New/Open Site Edition Application dialog box, click the New tab. 4. Type the name and description, select a default language, and click Create . The default language shown in the New tab is the operating system language. You can accept the default or, in the Language list, select any language that Windows supports. For more information, see Setting up language switching o . n page 247 To add an area to the application: 1. I n FactoryTalk View Studio, in the Explorer window, right-click the application and select New Area . 2. In the New Area dialog box, specify a name and description and click OK . To add an HMI server: 1. In FactoryTalk View Studio, in the Explorer window, right-click the application or an area name, select Add New Server , and then select HMI Server . window, click 2. Add HMI Server Wizard , in the Select Operation In the Create a new HMI server and then click Next . 3. Type a name and description for the HMI server, specify the host computer if applicable, and click Finish . For information about other options in the Select Operation window, see Adding an HMI server o n page 151 . R 40 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

41 Getting started with FactoryTalk View SE Chapter 1 If it’s set to display when you create a new HMI server, the Add Controller Tip: Instruction Faceplates dialog box opens. If you don’t want to add faceplates, click Cancel to close the dialog box, without affecting HMI server creation. For more information about adding faceplates, see Adding controller instruction faceplates to an application o n page 328 . Ad ding an HMI server to an application also creates the HMI project, which Step 2: Create a graphic display contains all of the editors and productivity tools you need to create and modify application components. Opening component editors For a list of editors and their functions, see on page H 52 . For instructions about using the editors, click p in the editor dialog boxes. el For this example, use the Graphics editor to create a graphic display, and then add a graphic object to that display. To create a display: In FactoryTalk View Studio, in the Explorer window, open the Graphics folder, right-click the Displays icon, and then click New . To add a graphic object to the display: , and then click Drawing 1. In the Graphics editor, on the Objects menu, click Rectangle . You can also click the button on the Objects toolbar that represents the object you want to add. For information about using the Graphics editor, see Creating graphic displays on p age 303 and Creating graphic objects on page 353 . 2. Position the pointer where you want to draw the rectangle, click and hold t he left mouse button, and then drag the mouse down and to the right. Release the mouse button to place the rectangle on the display. 3. To save the display: Save 1. In FactoryTalk View Studio, in the Graphics editor, select File > or Save As . . 2. Enter a name for the display and click OK In FactoryTalk View Studio, you can only test one graphic display at a time. To Step 3: Test run the application test navigating among displays, run the application in a FactoryTalk View in FactoryTalk View SE Client Ro 41 ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

42 started with FactoryTalk View SE Getting Chapter 1 SE Client. To run the new application you just created, create a FactoryTalk View SE Client configuration file that specifies: The type and name of the application the client will connect to. • • The display to run initially, when the client starts. This can be the new display you just created. While you are developing an application, it is recommended that you test run the Tip: application in a FactoryTalk View SE Client at various stages. That way, you can resolve issues that might occur only at run time. To create and run an SE Client configuration file: > Rockwell Software > All Programs 1. From Windows Start menu, select FactoryTalk View > FactoryTalk View Site Edition Client . Create a FactoryTalk 2. In the FactoryTalk View SE Client Wizard, click View SE Client configuration file , and follow the on-screen instructions. . For details about options in the wizard, click Help . The graphic display you specified to run Run When complete, click 3. initially will open in the FactoryTalk View SE Client window. When you are finished testing, use the close button on the client’s title bar to close the client window. R 42 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

43 Chapter 2 Exploring FactoryTalk View Studio Th is chapter describes: • What FactoryTalk View Studio is. • How to open an application in FactoryTalk View Studio. Parts of the FactoryTalk View Studio main window. • Working in the Explorer window. • • Techniques for working in editors. Printing from FactoryTalk View SE. • About FactoryTalk View FactoryTalk View Studio is the design-time environment for FactoryTalk View that provides the editors and tools you need to develop and test network Studio distributed, network station, and local station human-machine interface (HMI) applications. It contains editors for creating complete applications, and contains client and server software for testing the applications you create. You can also use FactoryTalk View Studio to set up FactoryTalk Security services Setting up security on for the applications you develop. For more information, see . page 87 Op tionally, you can use the FactoryTalk Administration Console to develop, Tip: manage, and secure multiple applications. However, you cannot use the FactoryTalk Administration Console to create or modify HMI servers and HMI project components. To start FactoryTalk View Studio, do one of the following: • From Windows Start menu, select Start > All Programs > Rockwell Software . The steps may FactoryTalk View Studio > FactoryTalk View > vary depending on your Windows operating systems. Start FactoryTalk View Studio using • Use the command-line. For details, see a command on p age 43 . FactoryTalk View Studio Start You can start FactoryTalk View Studio using a command. using a command start FactoryTalk View Studio using a command To 1. In Windows Run command, enter a command with the following syntax: Ro ckwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019 43

44 Exploring FactoryTalk View Studio Chapter 2 (32-bit OS) "C:\Program Files\Rockwell Software\RSView • Enterprise\VStudio.exe" /o /type:application_type /app:application_name [/lang:startup_language] • (64-bit OS) "C:\Program Files (x86)\Rockwell Software\RSView Enterprise\VStudio.exe" /o /type:application_type /app:application_name [/lang:startup_language] where C: is the drive to which FactoryTalk View is installed. . Enter 2. Press The following table shows the parameters used in the command to start line parameters and - Command FactoryTalk View Studio. Command-line parameters are case-insensitive. examples However, if a specified value includes a space, be sure to enclose the value in quotation marks (for example, "value with spaces"). Descriptions Parameters /O St arts FactoryTalk View Studio. value /Type: Specifies the application type. The value is one of: • sed – SE Network Distributed • sen – SE Network Station • – SE Local Station sel – Machine Edition • med /App: value Specifies the application to be opened. value /Lang: Specifies the startup language. The value is a Locale ID in Decimal. The following examples show how to use the commands. • To start FactoryTalk View Studio for SE and open the InstantFizz application in default language, type the following command: "C:\Program Files\Rockwell Software\RSView Enterprise\VStudio.exe" /o /type:sed /app:InstantFizz To start FactoryTalk View Studio for SE and open the FTViewDemo • application in French (France), type the following command: "C:\Program Files\Rockwell Software\RSView Enterprise\VStudio.exe" /o /type:sed /app:FTViewDemo /Lang:1036 bout FactoryTalk Security A If FactoryTalk Security services are used to secure parts of an application, to perform certain tasks, users must have the necessary security permissions. permissions For example, to create or modify the properties of an application, you must at least be allowed the Common actions Read, List Children, Write, and Create Children, at the FactoryTalk Directory that manages the application. R 44 ockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006N-EN-E - February 2019

45 Exploring FactoryTalk View Studio Chapter 2 If you receive a FactoryTalk Security message while trying to perform such a task, contact your system administrator about permissions you might require. For an overview of FactoryTalk Security services, see Setting up security on page 87 . When you start FactoryTalk View Studio, the Application Type Selection dialog Opening an application in bo x opens. You can select: FactoryTalk View Studio • View Site Edition (Network Distributed) to create or open a FactoryTalk View SE network application (also called a network distributed application). • to create or open a FactoryTalk View Site Edition (Network Station) View SE network station application. • View Site Edition (Local Station) to create or open a FactoryTalk View SE local application (also called local station application). • to create or open a FactoryTalk View Machine View Machine Edition Edition application. For information about developing machine-level applications, see FactoryTalk View Machine Edition User’s Guide . To open an existing application: > All Programs > 1. From Windows Start menu, select Rockwell Software FactoryTalk View Studio . > FactoryTalk View In the 2. Application Type Selection dialog box, select the application type and click Continue . Existing 3. In the . tab, select the application and click Open If the existing application is not set up to support multiple languages and the Tip: