Request for Proposal

Transcript

1 Final Report Department of Defense Additive Manufacturing Roadmap Report Released 30 November 2016 Dr. Jennifer Fielding, Technical Advisor, Structures, Propulsion and Manufacturing Enterprise Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory Program Manager, Mr. Andy Davis, Manufacturing Technology, U.S. Army Mr. Ben Bouffard, Additive Manufacturing Lead, Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Department of the Navy Dr. Mary Kinsella, Additive Manufacturing IPT Lead, Air Force Research Laboratory Mr. Tony Delgado, R&D Additive Manufacturing Program Manager Defense Logistics Agency Mr. John Wilczynski, Director of Technology Development, America Makes Kelly Marchese, Principal, Deloitte Consulting, LLP Ian Wing, Manager, Deloitte Consulting, LLP - 5841 - 2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW

2 Table of Contents ... ... ... ... 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ... ... ... INTRODUCTION 4 ... APPROACH / M ... ... ... 5 ETHODOLOGY Background and Purpose ... ... ... 5 ... ... ... ... 6 Visioning Workshop Approach Functional Requirements Workshop Approach ... ... 7 ... ... ... 7 Joint Synthesis Workshop Approach 3.4.1 Service / Agency Vision ... ... ... 7 3.4.2 ... ... ... .. 8 Roadmap Integration 3 ... Mind Mapping Exercise 3.4. ... ... 9 Joint Synthesis Workshop Outputs ... ... ... 10 3.4.4 3.4.5 Joint Synthesis Workshop Participants ... ... ... 11 WITHIN DOD FOR ADDIT IVE MANUFACTURING ... 12 APPLICATIONS Maintenance and Sustainment ... ... ... 12 Deployed and Expeditionary ... ... ... 14 ... 15 ... ... quisition New Part/System Ac ... ... ... 17 DOD ROADMAP ENABLERS Cross - Cutting Enablers Summary and Takeaways ... ... 1 7 Cultural Change ... ... ... ... 17 5.1.1 5.1.2 Workforce Development ... ... ... 18 5.1.3 Data Management and use of the Digital Thread ... ... 19 DOD AM ROADMAP ... ... ... ... 20 DETAILED OBJECTIVES AND TECHNOLOGY ELEME NTS ... ... 26 Design Objectives and Technology Elements . 26 ... ... ... ... 27 Material Objectives and Technology Elements Process Objectives and Technology Elements ... ... 28 Value Chain Objectives and Technology Elements ... ... 30 ... KEY TAKEAWAYS ... ... ... 31 DATIONS ... ... ... 32 DOD ROADMAP RECOMMEN POINTS OF CONTACT ... ... ... ... 33 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ... ... ... ... 34 34 FOLD BROCHU - DMAP TRI ... RE APPENDIX: DOD AM ROA ... - 2016 - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 5841 2

3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AM offers considerable opportunity to create DoD supply chain efficiencies and en hance warfighter capabilities. In Spring 2016, America Makes and Deloitte facilitated the development of Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology roadmaps for the Department of Defense. T he US Army, Department of the Navy Defense Logistics Agency (DON), US Air Force (USAF) , and ( DLA ) jointly contracted with the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining to create a set of technology (NCDMM) through the America Makes cooperative agreement roadmaps for Additive Manufactu America Makes and Deloitte conducted a total of ring (AM). nine roadmapping workshops, facilitating tw o workshops with each Service/Agency and one joint workshop that brought stakeholders from all four organizations together. The results of these workshops were one i ndividual AM technology roadmap for each organization (total of four), and one integrated, joint roadmap, representing the combined interests of all stakeholders. The individual roadmaps focused on current state, future state, and the identification of the technology gaps ex The joint roadmap focuses on identifyin g isting between the two states. areas of commonality between the individual roadmaps. T he workshops aligned to the technical focus areas from the America Makes Technology Roadmap. Each technical focus area is defined below: hods and tools . rives technological advancements in new design met Design – D Material Builds the body of knowledge for benchmark AM property characterization data – and eliminating variability in “as built” material properties. - Process – Drives technological advancements that enable faster, more accurate, and higher detail resolution AM machines. – Encourages technological advancements that enable step change improvements Value Chain in end - to - end value chain cost and time to market for AM produced products. Although technology development and transition requ irement identification was the primary focus of the DoD Roadmapping workshops, enabling technology is critical to ensuring a robust AM Over the course of the workshop process, participants from Army, DL e cosystem. A, DON, and key technology factors/needs crucial to the eventual success - rs (non enable USAF identified three of DoD AM efforts). Cultural Change – Increasing knowledge of and comfort with AM, driving institutional acceptance. Readying the DoD workforce (acquisition, R&D, manu Workforce Development – facturing, etc.) with the skills to harness AM. – Data Management Developing the policies, architectures, and procedures to properly manage massive, multimodal AM data. foundation and T his integrated DoD Additive Manufacturing (AM) Roadmap provides a DoD’s on of the coordinati framework for focusing any desired collaboration and activities in AM Individuals ations. to systematically and efficiently mature the technology for multiple DoD applic and organizations may utilize this strategic document to identify areas of focus and address roadmap objectives and technology elements together, where appropriate and beneficial. - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 2016 - 5841 3

4 INTRODUCTION ” is a rapidly Additive manufacturing (AM), which includes the commonly used term “3D printing , growing and changing discipline. While the technology and associated processes have been used for several decades, AM is rapidly advancing in capability and expanding in applications, increasing the potential impact of this technology. Significant investments are being made, in both the private and public sector, in developing AM technologies for applications ranging from prototypes to mass ts. Each of the items, from tooling to custom medical implan - produced end - Department of Defense (DoD) components and agencies are investing in AM technologies, desiring to utilize and mature AM in order to affect the entire DoD 5000.02 defined acquisition lifecycle: from enabling new products to reducing logisti cs and sustainment costs. The commercial and defense industries are also investing in maturing AM for multiple applications and there is a significant international investment in the technology. According to the 2016 Wohler’s Report, the worldwide AM mar ket in 2015 was $5.17B. However, much of this investment is being dire cted at proprietary and specific applications, resulting in duplication of efforts, customized data sets and ultimately slower adoption of the technology across the industry. investment in AM It is ther efore imperative that DoD be broadly coordinated throughout its organizations and informed by broader government and industry initiatives in order to ensure rapid adoption. America Makes, The National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Ins titute, was established in - private partnerships under - established public August 2012 as the first of up to 45 presidentially the National Network of Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) ( branded as - recently re ). America Makes seeks to accele rate technology development and adoption Manufacturing USA nology challenges common to the AM associated with AM by addressing manufacturing tech community. To logically coordinate AM investments and efforts, America Makes has, with the input of its membership, developed a technology roadmap accounting for major swim lanes of activities and associated technology development efforts related to the maturation of AM. This roadmap has already paid dividends for the industrial partners within America Makes – for example, compani es such as Raytheon and Rolls Royce have restructured their internal R&D n with the roadmap. It has become a rallying point for the broader AM investments to alig community, effectively communicating the needs and opportunities for AM technology The greatest value has been the existence of a single, authoritative, AM maturation. community - developed product that is open for anyone in the industry to use. However, this roadmap does not fully capture the DoD’s input or requirements, as the America Makes roadm ap encompasses the broad needs of all industry stakeholders. As continues to be a major topic of interest, the need for a coordinated plan to collectively AM mature AM in support of DoD requirements is clear. In December 2014, representatives from the A rmy, Navy, Air Force, Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and the office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manufacturing & Industrial Base Policy (DASD(MIBP)) met with senior technolog y roadmap. Each leaders at America Makes to discuss collaboration on a DoD AM component sought to develop an AM technology roadmap specific to its needs and then integrate those roadmaps into a DoD - level AM technology roadmap. ffset A DoD AM technology roadmap is necessary for several reasons. In line with its “Third O Strategy”, the DoD is investing in AM technologies with the goal of establishing this “game changing” technology as a means to improve logistics, enable new and improved products and means of coordinating these increase materiel readiness. An integrated DoD roadmap provides a - 2016 - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 5841 4

5 investments, effectively communicating within and external to the Department the current needs and planned efforts related to AM technology development. This communication is critical to marshalling resources, sharing the DoD’s needs for AM technology maturation with the industrial base, and for systematically maturing the technology for DoD applications. It efficiently and effectively identifies common areas of interest across the DoD and facilitates the development of joint s trategies and plans to collaboratively address these, avoiding redundancy and duplication of efforts. By bringing together key subject matter experts, stakeholders and end users from across component organizations that the DoD, the effort focuses on facilitating discussions among DoD otherwise may not occur. Finally, the development and delivery of an AM technology roadmap provides starting points for the strategic application of AM throughout the DoD. By projecting technology maturation timelines, deliv erables and required resources, DoD program managers, logistics and production organizations, the testing and evaluation community and senior leaders are able to better manage expectations and plan for the implementation of AM. GY APPROACH / METHODOLO Background and Purpose In Spring 2016, America Makes and Deloitte facilitated the development of AM technology roadmaps for the Department of Defense. America Makes was contracted by the US Army, t of technology roadmaps for and DLA to create a se Department of the Navy, US Air Force, AM A , facilitating two were conducted in the DoD community . roadmapping workshops total of nine workshops with each Service/Agency and one joint workshop that brought stakeholders from all ts of these workshops were one individual AM technology The resul four organizations together. roadmap for each organization (total of four), and one integrated, joint roadmap, representing the interests of all stakeholders. combined The individual roadmaps focused on current state, future The joint stat e, and the identification of the technology gaps ex isting between the two states. roadmap focuses on identifying areas of commonality between the individual roadmaps. - phase workshop approach is shown in Figure 3.1.  The multi phase Workshop Approach - Figure 3.1: Multi - 2016 - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 5841 5

6 aligned to the AM swimlanes created by America Makes. Brief descriptions of workshop E ach these swimlanes follow below. Design The design swimlane is aimed at breaking the paradigm of designing additively manufactured parts cast or machined parts. Realization of this goal removes the constraints associated with like traditional CAD/CAM software and unlocks the potential of AM technology for a variety of applications. The DoD’s roadmaps focused on standardization of design tools, lowering barriers to entry for designers and pushing that capability forward (i.e. anyone, anywhere, can intelligently design a part for additive), with particular emphasis on reverse engineering and medical applications. Material The material swimlane se eks to advance understanding of materials science behind additive performance relationship and predictive - process manufacturing. Benchmark data on the material - d simulations of the complete AM process (i.e. multiscale, multi - physics simulation and Integrate ( are an essential component of this, as are Computational Materials Engineering ICME) ) standards. In particular, DoD emphasized standardization and management of data/models in a ification velopment of specific with advanced ICME, and de ification /cert central repository, qual types of materials. Process The process swimlane is aimed at enhancing the speed, maximiz ing size, accuracy and resolution the surface finish of final parts. The DoD roadmaps of the build process, and improving highlighted the need f or advancement in in - situ sensing and feedback control, the need to develop a suite of new process capabilities (including expeditionary), and a desire for more robust standards. Value Chain complete AM value chain, chain swimlane strives to enhance understanding of the The value including business case analysis, complete life cycle analysis, and inspection. Furthermore, this the IT - based backbone that digitally links various components – focus area includes digital thread of the value chain (design, model ling, build process, inspection, performance, etc.) together. The DoD’s roadmaps focused on digital thread, building the business/warfighting case for AM, and tightly integrating AM with the traditional supply network. Visioning Workshop Approach The majo r objectives of the visioning workshop were to: Understand the goals of DoD AM Roadmapping.   Validate the current state of AM in the Service. Develop a future state vision for AM for the Service.   Create a framework to reach the future state vision. DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 6

7 Fun ctional Requirements Workshop Approach The goal of these workshops was to have the content necessary to develop a provisional AM technology roadmap for each DoD service and DLA. The major objectives of the functional analysis workshops were to: . he outputs from the Visioning Workshop Validate t   Create the requirements needed to develop the technology elements. Prioritize and sequence the Service’s AM development plan.   Analyze the impact of each goal on the Service’s mission. Approach Joint Synthesis Workshop level roadmap which - The goal of the joint synthesis workshop was to develop a joint DoD integrated the previously developed technology roadmap for each DoD Service and DLA, and used a common structure and terminology. p conducted the following series of activities with additional details The Joint Synthesis Worksho included in Sections 3.4.1 3.4.5: - Service / Agency Vision   Individual Service Presentations  DoD - wide Roadmap Integration  Mind Mapping Joint Synthesis Workshop Outputs  Service / Agency Vi sion 3.4.1 At the beginning of the joint workshop, Service/Agency leads presented their vision for AM within their organization, priorities, and vision for the output of the project. Those remarks were captured in Figure 3.2, which also began to document commona lities across the organizations. A lead from each DoD service and DLA answered the following high - level questions:  What is the vision for AM in your Service/Agency? How do you hope to work with the other Services/Agency?  the roadmapping process? What do you hope to accomplish from  - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 2016 - 5841 7

8 Figure 3.2: Service / Agency Visioning Exercise 3.4.2 Roadmap Integration The Joint Synthesis Workshop challenged participants to build an integrated DoD roadmap by goals and technology elements, where appropriate, from the individual combining the organizational roadmaps. The integrated goals and technology elements indicate areas where stakeholders identified commonalities and perhaps could collaborate or coordinate. - lead presented their provisional roadmap to the et the workshop participants, each To level s workshop participants. Each of the leads reviewed the outputs from the previous workshop nal ensuring each participant had a common understanding of each Service/Agency provisio roadmap (objectives and tech elements) for each of the swimlanes . The review included the following: Review objectives at a high level for each swimlane   Explain relevant technology elements benefit from coordination  Explain any areas where the Service/Agency believes they can The next step in the process was to complete the Roadmap Integration exercise as illustrated in Figure 3.3. The objective of the exercise was to create a set of integrated objectives (and matching swimlane. The participants were divided into small swimlane technology elements) across each groups to accomplish this task. The participants worked with their swimlane groups to identify s/impacts and map appropriate te chnology elements to each of those overlapping objective , creating a draft DoD joint roadmap. objectives DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 8

9 The exercise was executed using the following workflow: y Groups were split by swimlane and brought together ideas from all Services/Agenc Swimlane: Participants developed integrated objectives by grouping and Goal: transferring objectives from level roadmaps Service - level - Participants developed integrated impact statements that refer back to Service Impact: roadmaps Service/Agency Alignment: Services/Agency indicated alignment with integrated objectives Technology E level - Participants transferred relevant technology elements from Service lements: roadmaps that aligned to the newly integrated objectives Figure 3.3: Roadmap Integration Exercise The output s of the exercise were integrated swimlane - level roadmaps and a ll Service/Agency objectives were merged or moved over to the integrated roadmap. The tech elements were also correctly mapped to the appropriate objectives and merged where appropriate. 3.4.3 Mind Mapping Exercise The second stage of the workshop focused on ide ntifying the remaining gaps/commonalities and identifying potential areas of collaboration or coordination. In the mind mapping portion of the workshop, participants worked within their swimlane groups to develop mind maps and structure their ideas on gap s, technology commonalities, and enabler commonalities based on the integrated roadmap. Figure 3.4 highlights an example of a mind mapping exercise. another Service/Agency’s provisional roadmaps that  Gaps: These are areas on one Service/Agency organization. Additionally, we would its own would like to consider for DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 9

10 like you to consider any areas that may not be mapped to any Service/Agency but may still . need to occur on a DoD level rvices/Agencies have Technology Commonality areas: These are areas where multiple Se  overlapping roadmap objectives and can potentially coordinate on R&D of technologies or program development. Enabler commonality areas: Identify cross  - cutting enablers. While they don’t directly are important focus areas to enable eventual correspond to technology elements, they success with each Service/Agency’s technology objective s. 4: Mind Map Exercise (example only) Figure 3. Joint Synthesis Workshop Outputs 3.4.4 America Makes and Deloitte compiled the workshop outputs into a final integrated roadmap, - wide package. bringing all integrated objectives and technology elements together into one DoD The two main outputs from the Joint Synthesis Workshop were a Joint DoD Technology Roadmap on guide. Those two documents are included for Additive Manufacturing and a narrative compani 7 and shown in Figure 3. within this report in Sections 6 and 5 . - Section 6 includes 21 Joint DoD Technology Roadmap for Additive Manufacturing The integrated objectives across four America Makes swimlanes (desig n, material, process, and value chain) and impact statements. – Section 7 The narrative companion guide accompanies the joint synthesis roadmap, to provide A s that participants across all Services/DL further clarity and detail where appropriate for objective integrated during the Joint Synthesis Workshop. - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 2016 - 5841 10

11 3.4.5 Joint Synthesis Workshop Participants Joint Synthesis Workshop Participants are identified in Figure 3. 5 . Service/ Participant Swiml ane Assignment Organization Design Joe Carignan – Tinker AFB – AFRL Material Mary Kinsella* Kristian Olivero – Tinker AFB Process Air Force Jamie Gilbert – Tinker AFB Value Chain Mark Benedict – AM Genome AFRL – Tobyhanna Army Depot Design Rick Foley CASCOM CAPT Jeremey Pinson – Material Process Andy Davis* – ManTech Army Vince Matrisciano – PEO Ammunition Value Chain Robert Carter ARL AM Genome – – Chief, Tech & Qual Design Edilia Correa Value Engineering Material Phillip Radliff – Chief, Logistics R&D – Kelly Morris* Process DLA Michael Ball – Chief, Technology Office Value Chain – Kyle Hedrick Exec Sponsor for AM AM Genome Design OPNAV N41 – James Pluta – Material Program Officer, ONR Jenn Wolk Ben Bouffard* Process AM Lead, DASN RDT&E – Department of the Navy Value Chain Chief Scientist, NAVAIR – William (Bill) Frazier – HQ, Installations & LtCol Howie Marotto AM Genome Logistics Floating facilitator Ed Morris Rob Gorham AM Genome – Facilitator Design – John Wilczynski Facilitator America Makes Material Kevin Creehan Facilitator – Observer Jennifer Fielding (AFRL, America Makes PM) Mark Cotteleer Workshop lead Mark Vitale Floating facilitator Deloitte – Jim Joyce Facilitator Value Chain – Ian Wing Facilitator Process , with asterisk (*) indicating lead Synthesis Workshop Participants : Joint 5 Figure 3. ith America Makes/Deloitte team Service/DLA interface w 2016 11 5841 - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW -

12 APPLICATIONS WITHIN DOD FOR ADDITIVE MAN UFACTURING our fighting The Department of Defense will rely on the ‘Third Offset’ strategy to ensure that forces maintain technological superiority in future conflict; this will result from the convergence of several advanced and emerging technologies (unmanned systems, big data, rapid prototyping, etc . ). AM will directly enable the employment of these technologies while also providing crucial new means for future sustainment. The convergence of AM with these concepts is essential for ensuring an offset that will outpace the future threats of our adversaries. The table below shows a categorization of application spaces in which AM may be beneficial to the DoD. Many of these exhibit strong commercial benefit to the U.S. industrial base with strong economic growth potential as well as DoD benefit. The ompasses locations such as logistics application space enc Maintenance and Sustainment centers, depots, and CONUS operating bases. The driver for adopting AM within the DoD maintenance and sustainment environment is primarily for producing acceptable parts on demand obtaining those items that have demand to ensure DoD platforms are functional and mission - ready ; and source long - but also have chronic supply issues with traditional manufacturing; and to hard - - application space encompasses time parts. The Deployed and Expeditionary production lead h as aircraft carriers, submarines, battlefields, OCONUS operating bases, and other locations suc unique environments. The application space refers to the adoption New Part/System Acquisition of AM into new acquisition platforms, where the part/system is designed for AM and manufactured using AM. Other applications of AM to this environment are manufacturing aides to support conventional manufacturing, and AM prototypes used for rapid design iteration and form/fit tests. Maintenance and Sustainment Manufacture of parts typically produced using conventional manufacturing  AM repair  of conventionally manufactured parts  Manufacturing aides for support to conventional manufacturing  Prototyping for rapid innovation and reverse engineering Deployed and Expeditionary  Manufacturing of parts typically produced using conventional manufacturing  of conventionally manufactured parts AM repair  Prototyping for rapid innovation and reverse engineering New Part/System Acquisition  New parts/systems designed for AM and manufacture d using AM  Manufacturing aides for support to conventional manufacturing  Prototyping for rapid part/system development Maintenance and Sustainment For the Maintenance and Sustainment application space, a significant application of AM is the The main that were typically produced using conventional manufacturing. anufacture of parts m for replacement parts is r drivers leading the interest in AM arely based on cost savings (and may , in some cases lead to a cost increase) and are more often based on part availability and capability DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 12

13 enhancements. Using the original part geometry, the drivers to shift to an AM process typically stem from attempting to mitigate part obsolescence or long lead time issues by turning to AM as a rapid manufacturing technique. Parts/systems traditionally produced using conventional manufacturing may have issues with long production lead times, part obsolescence and/or lectronic diminished manufacturing sources and material shortages (DMSMS). For support to e systems, AM may be an especially useful approach for hard source specialty components and - to - low - volume replacement electronic systems. With redesign of conventional parts to a new geometry enabled by AM, further benefits may include light - weigh ting, less material waste, production cost reductions, part consolidation and enhanced performance. Parts that have low production volumes are particularly desirable for AM may or may vs . conventional manufacturing due to lower tooling costs. These AM part candidates not be redesigned to take advantage of design freedom with AM. Part redesign may stem from a reverse engineering process or from a conversion of 2D drawing (if available) to 3D technical data. AM replacement may not be feasible, due to the u ailability of 3D data, or even 2D drawings nav As legacy parts were not designed and specifications, as well as unknown original design intent. n AM replacement part will not be the same as the original from a material property for AM, a ot provide the quality or properties over the lifetime required. standpoint and AM may n Understanding designer intent is critical for replacement parts using AM. These challenges are hen further complicated by the cost of qualification. Opportunities exist for pursuing an AM part w the original supplier is no longer available and requalification would be a requirement with either a traditional or AM process due to the need to qualify a new supplier. An AM replacement may cost more than the original part, due to not only the AM pr ocess and materials, but also the p re - processing (scan, 3D model, redesign for AM, optimize part build, supply/Q uality A ssurance incoming material), and post - processing (consolidate, machine, heat - treat, inspect, etc.) needed. In this case, the warfighter’ s readiness would be considered as the must be developed. While , including these aspects driving factor. Strong business cases , , this application area is maintenance and sustainment of systems is very important to all S ervices of special procurement intere st to the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA). AM Another general use for AM within the Maintenance and Sustainment environment is for of AM repair of conventionally manufactured parts due to wear or other damage. repair used with techniques such as directed energy deposition may be conventionally manufactured parts to refurbish worn parts. Issues include repair material compatibility and the interface/bond/weld with the parent material, and qualification of the repaired part. DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 13

14 for support of conventional manufacturing processes performed Manufacturing aides traditionally within maintenance and sustainment environments are also a viable and near - term application of AM. Cost and support of Manufacturing Aides for lead time savings may be achievable with the conventional manufacturing processes incorporation of AM manufa cturing aides to manufacturing support conventional  Masking activities. These include masking to support Tooling  painting, grit blasting and other surface Fixtures  treatment processes, tooling for sheet metal forming and composite manufacturing, rapid  Mounts s, patterns, and production of fixtures, mount  Patterns jigs, and many others. Pushing the limits of Jigs  AM tooling for higher pressure and temperature environments, such as for composite autoclave processing is also advantageous as well as for repairing forging/casting tools. ing AM within the Maintenance and Sustainment environment already Rapid us prototyping provides multiple advantages for the DoD. Rapid prototyping applications may be for form/fit checks, rapid development for parts or manufacturing aides, and for mock - ups for training purpose s. AM may be more intensively applied within acquisition programs to provide prototypes to accelerate defense system development. Deployed and Expeditionary rapid Drivers to utilize AM technology within a Deployed and Expeditionary environment are for ufacturing of parts typically produced using conventional manufacturing. With similar man motivations in the Maintenance and Sustainment application space, adoption of AM within Deployed and Expeditionary environments exhibit further unique challenges. Motivat ions for adoption of AM stem from further increased difficulty with obtaining parts critical to complete a mission. Opportunities for AM in this application space are for shortening the logistics tail and producing mission critical parts at the point of ne ed. Unique needs for this application space include ease of design for AM and reverse engineering procedures for less experienced users and remote operation for design and engineering support zation, resiliency, mobility, ease (reach back). Other unique challenges include equipment ruggedi of calibration and maintenance. Post processing is also a challenge. While simpler AM approaches and smaller footprints are preferred for Deployed and Expeditionary operations, post processing nt. It is desirable to reduce post processing requirements, though they requires additional equipme cannot be eliminated for most structural metal applications. Other needs are for enhanced control as dust and and containment of the build environment to protect from environmental factors such humidity. Unique environmental factors also need to be considered for the materials, such as storage and handling, thermal/humidity/salt, and dust/particulates. Deployed and Expeditionary AM also may benefit from the utilization of recycled or even indigenous material feedstocks. Finally, adopters of AM in a deployed or expeditionary scenario may be willing to adopt a higher risk situation, where a part may be approved for limited use until a “real” part is available from a certified supplier. - offs, risks and part life limitations need to be well - Balancing these trade - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 5841 - 2016 14

15 understood and based on mission criticality and known AM part properties including durability and damage tolerance. In a similar fashion as the Maintenance and Sustainment applica tion space, traditionally more , though this may be repaired using AM logistically challenging manufactured parts may be due to the nature of some AM equipment (larger machines, heavy energy requirements). nvironment may be also advantageous. AM Prototyping within the Deployed and Expeditionary e equipment employed in an expeditionary setting can provide the tools needed for those closest to potential problems to rapidly develop and iterate prospective solutions. These solutions may immediately support operat ions, or be digitally supplied to engineering activities for development of more robust components. AM may also be employed as a key element in a rapid reverse engineering process. New Part/System Acquisition s for adoption are the , new part/system acquisition expected benefits of AM over For the driver traditionally manufactured parts/systems. Army, Department of the Navy, and Air Force are all very interested in applying AM for enhanced capabilities within new part/system acquisition. drivers include an enhanced performance or capability not able to be affordably Typically, these produced using conventional manufacturing processes, such as enabling complex geometry, mass an acquisition customization, or rapid manufacturing solving a production lead time issue causing schedule slip. Applications for AM to impact new parts, systems, and designs are very diverse and encompass many aerospace, ground and marine vehicle subsystems and even personal protection, sensing, medical and pharmaceutical applications, power and communication, tailored food and shelter. AM is often considered for enhanced performance through producing complex geometries unable to be produced by other manufacturing methods. These include, for example, complex geometry structures for ligh t - weighting (fuel savings) and new designs for vehicle structures and propulsion components (such as heat exchangers, fuel components, etc.). Opportunities of interest are high of a system value, low production quantity parts with complex geometries, weight reduction through part consolidation or topology optimization, design customization, reduced development cycle time, rapid design iteration, and enhanced performance benefits. The complexity enabled by also to the chemistry and microstructure within AM extends not just to the geometry of the part but - the part, with location specific properties as a possibility. Other applications of interest include enabling advantages of additive within parts for extreme - environments such as corrosive, nuclear, radar/sonar/signature reduction, high temperature - (ceramics, metals), flame, smoke and toxicity ess ballistic, and energetic stringent, and high str environments. Multi - material and multifunctional AM is also of interest with the potential to use AM for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) applications with integrated electronics printed directly on or with in a structure, conformal antennas adapted into loadbearing structure, distributed electronics for flight control feedback and structural health monitoring. Electromagnetic Warfare applications for AM also include communication in contested areas with nabled solutions such as conformal apertures and reconfigurable electronics. Other e - AM applications for multifunctional AM include integrated power for applications such as energy harvesting, storage, and management to improve system endurance and range. DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 15

16 lso has the potential to create customized medical products that increase the effectiveness of AM a medical care for the warfighter. Examples include prosthetics, orthotics, casts, splints, and medical device implants. Some unique needs arise for these applicat ions. For example, medical implants need to exhibit biocompatibility, sterility, and must ensure AM - specific issues are overcome such as entrapped powder. Prosthetics must meet mechanical property requirements, and also be biocompatible and hypoallergenic . AM may impact pharmaceutical products through the creation of unique geometries and/or tailored and customized chemistry which are unable to be produced using conventional techniques, enabling advanced performance such as rapid drug delivery. - - counterfeit through the development tamper/anti provide functionality such as anti AM can also of micro/nano - structured “fingerprints” or “watermarks” on a part to verify part authenticity. A security and anti s designed and - - tamper for part general concern for AM is to ensure cyber where the designs are safeguarded throughout the production process to produced using AM, ensure tampering has not occurred within the supply chain to the design, build files or machine controls. New DoD production/acquisition systems may benefit from cost and lead time savings with the on of AM manufacturing aides in support of traditional manufacturing processes in a incorporati similar fashion as the Maintenance and Sustainment application space. Examples include tooling, fixtures, jigs, masks, and many others. New Parts/Systems with Potential for Dire ct Application of AM (designed for AM and manufactured using AM)  Aerospace, ground and marine vehicle structures and ancillary parts  Integrated electronics, antennas, structural health monitoring Conformal apertures and reconfigurable electronics   Energy harvesting/storage Power and  Personal protection such as ballistics and sensing  Energetics Medical implants and prosthetics   Pharmaceuticals  Food Shelter  In new acquisition, AM processes ma y be matured in order to provide advanced prototyping for rapid innovation and system/part design and form/fit testing. Benefits include faster design iterations and system engineering component checks earlier in the acquisition cycle for more rapid platfo rm development. As with any new technology, insertion risk is present with AM and must be managed in accordance to the application and requirements. Lower risk parts are generally pursued in the near term and in each Services ’ opportunities for new parts produced using AM include individual plans. Near term DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 16 5841 - 2016 -

17 components for remotely piloted aircraft, microsatellites, liquid rocket engines, munitions, and limited life platforms which may exhibit lower risk and less stringent safety requirements. As critical confidence is built for AM, longer term implementation opportunities are for full life, non - - structural applications, embedded electronics/sensors, and even farther term for fracture critical components. DOD ROADMAP ENABLERS While technology and transition requirement identification was the primary focus of the DoD Roadmapping workshops, enabling technology is critical to ensuring a robust Additive Manufacturing (AM) ecosystem. Figure 5.1 illustrates the six capability development needs with talent, governa nce, mission, and insights highlighted as AM enablers focus areas. Figure 5.1 : Capability Development Cutting Enablers Summary and Takeaways - Cross cutting - Each of the four AM roadmap swimlanes executed mind maps to identify cross - cutting enablers are: mary, these cross commonalities. In sum Cultural Change (Mission)  - Enabling cultural change will facilitate increased buy - in for and understanding of AM.  - Appropriately educating staff enables increased AM Workforce Development (Talent) understanding and production effectiveness.  Successful data management facilitates appropriate Data Management (Insights) - information exchange and secures sensitive data. 5.1.1 Cultural Change Definition ultural change is the adaptation of the organization to facilitate incr C : eased understanding and comfort (at both the individual and collective level) with AM . DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 17

18 Requirements : True cultural change requires strategic alignment, dedicated culture champions, and . continuous reinforcement through formal and informal methods Impact Organizations that fully incorporate AM into their culture will have staff that fully : understand the AM function and potential within the organization. Staff will then proactively work to actualize that potential in ways that are appropriate to their role . Key initiatives for cultural change include:  AM socialization : Socializing AM will ensure that staff across the organization have a deep understanding of AM, the benefits of AM, and how it can be used within the organization. Steps include: - o level staff tive Briefing execu Actively managing expectations at all levels o  AM community : Creating a forum for practitioners interested or involved with AM, alerting the community to new developments and providing resources. Steps include: o Setting up a Community of Practice (CoP) o Creating and facilitating access to makerspaces : Creating a more collaborative environment can ensure that the Collaborative environment  right staff connect with the right information and partners. Steps include: hange Facilitating information exc o Actively encouraging appropriate collaboration o 5.1.2 Workforce Development : Definition W orkforce development is a human resources strategy that focuses on increasing skill across the workforce in a given area, in this case AM . Requirements : W orkforce devel opment requires a HR led initiative, development of classes/materials on AM, incentive for staff to participate, and a feedback mechanism for continuous improvement . rganizations that succeed in workforce development will have a workforce that is Impact : O adequately prepared on all levels to interact with AM concepts and production. This enables the harnessing of existing AM capabilities and facilitates the development of new capabilities . Key initiatives for workforce development include: : Understanding AM technology developments and applicability in thesis  Best practice syn the organizational context. Steps include: o Synthesize existing organizational materials o Solicit best practices from industry and academia - ainings (classroom and hands on) that are  Trainings : Create an integrated curriculum of tr tailored to staff function and level. Steps include: Create standards for trainings/trainers o Understand key training content (AM fundamentals, decision tree, etc.) o - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 2016 - 5841 18

19 Develop training materials o Talent recruitment  tracting and retaining key personnel to strengthen existing : At capabilities and provide leadership to advance AM capabilities going forward. Steps include: Identify staffing needs o Create position requirements and profile candidates o o Collect candidate feedback to improve experience and retention Data Management and use of the Digital Thread 5.1.3 Definitions : Data management is the development and execution of architectures, policies, nterprise. practices, and procedures that properly manage the full data lifecycle needs of an e Note: Digital thread enables the use of all definition from the Data Management Association (DAMA). available information in analyses, uses physics to inform analyses, uses probabilistic methods to eginning to the end, and the back to the beginning of quantify risks, and closes the loop from the b the part/system’s lifecycle. D : Requirements ata management requires data policy, specs/standards, accessible and secure data . repositories, and active database upkeep rganizations with effecti ve data management are able to match the right information O : Impact with appropriate requestors in a minimal amount of time. This facilitates information exchange . and maximizing the effective use of past data on relevant present projects to inform key decisions Key initiatives for data management include: Database/platform  : Develop a platform that comprehensively compiles and stores data in a user - friendly manner. Steps include: Determining requirements for AM data storage o o ning integration points. Assessing existing databases and determi : Creating a uniform set of rules for data format, input, use, and  Data specs and standards storage. Steps include: o Assess current formats across enterprise o Create rules for data formatting, emphasizing interoperability for database structuring to correspond with data. Create rules o  Cybersecurity : Ensuring that all AM data is secure from design to production to storage. - end) from tampering and Understand needs to safeguard AM data (end - to o adversaries. . atabase Establish rules for access to d o DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 19

20 ROADMAP AM DOD Figure 6.1 shows the overall graphical representation of the DoD AM roadmap, showing major 2 6.5 Integrated Objectives by focus area/swimlane and Impact Statements for each. Figures 6. – show the graphical representation of the joint DoD AM roadmap with more detail by focus area/swimlane to show the Integrated Objectives and the corresponding detailed, Sequenced Element is found in Technology Elements. Further descriptions of each Sequenced Technology Section 7. - 2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 5841 20

21 Consolidated DoD AM Roadmap : Figure 6.1 21 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 5841 - 2016 -

22 rea of DoD AM Roadmap Figure 6.2: Design Focus A 5841 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 22

23 rea of DoD AM Roadmap Material Focus A Figure 6.3: 23 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 5841 - 2016 -

24 Process Focus Area of DoD AM Roadmap : Figure 6.4 24 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 5841 - 2016 -

25 Focus Area of DoD AM Roadmap Figure 6.5: Value Chain 5841 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 25

26 DETAILED OBJECTIVES AND TECHNOLOGY ELEME NTS Design Objectives and Technology Elements DoD.D.1. Enable Robust, Integrated, and Intelligent Design Tools - Enable the availability of a set of robust design tools that are capable o f being integrated and interoperable across the enterprise. DoD.D.1.1 Implement AM Design Tools and Software – Select, mature or develop the appropriate design tools and scale usage across the enterprise to fully enable the unique AM. design capabilities of DoD.D.1.2 Integrate Materials, Process, and Property data into Design Tools – Incorporate materials, process, and property data into design tools to improve design effectiveness. DoD.D.1.3 Ensure Intelligent Process Design Tools – Implement tools that determine optimal build parameters, orientations, and support structures. DoD.D.2 Enable Design for AM – Establish necessary process, and infrastructure to enable design for AM. This objective helps realize the design synergies that are enabled by AM d esign methods. – DoD.D.2.1 Establish AM Designs/Parts Libraries Create AM design repositories (part libraries) for AM parts and ensure availability to all stakeholders and at the point of need. DoD.D.2.2 Establish Digital Design Standards comprehensive rules and Build a set of – - focused design in a digital context. standards to guide AM - DoD.D.2.3 Ensure Cyber - Physical Security and Anti – tampering Develop techniques to ensure that designs are safeguarded throughout the production process and that adversarie s are unable to tamper with designs, build files, or machine controls. Develop tools, standards, and procedures DoD.D.3 Improve Reverse Engineering Capabilities – to mature reverse engineering capabilities for AM sustainment applications. DoD.D.3.1 Standa rdize Reverse Engineering Procedures Create and document a set – of uniform procedures for reverse engineering, including tools, software, and equipment. – DoD.D.3.2 Develop Design Tools for Reverse Engineering Develop the design tools material - engineer existing part designs, including complex and multi necessary to reverse parts. – Develop hardware and software DoD.D.3.3 Mature 3D Scanning Technologies capabilities for 3D scanning to enable an efficient and effective reverse engineering process. evelop Design for Function (Application – based Design) Guidelines DoD.D.4 D - Match design needs to AM benefits. Assess requirements and determine how to design components using AM. - 2016 - 5841 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 26

27 DoD.D.4.1 Establish AM Design Rules and Guidelines – Examine AM best practices and le ssons learned, leverage understanding to develop AM rules and guidelines. DoD.D.4.2 Establish AM Materials and Process Selection Guidelines – Create guidelines to govern which materials and processes could be selected to meet which requirements. Objectives and Technology Elements Material DoD.M.1 Define Standard AM Materials Requirements – Understand materials properties as they relate to AM processes and part performance. Determine key characteristics of feedstock materials, and establish standards. Determine the DoD. M.1.1 Establish acceptable AM feedstock material properties – key characteristics that AM materials must have to meet design requirements and for optimal processing. nce DoD.M.1.2 Characterize Impact of Material Properties and Process on Performa Understand and model the changes in materials performance as properties and process – parameters vary. Develop and – M.1.3 Develop Feedstock Materials Specifications and Standards DoD. t, storage, processing, document standards to govern feedstock materials, including transpor reuse, recycling, and disposal. DoD.M.2 Establish Vendor Qualification and Encourage Expansion of Material Sources – Define and apply requirements for the certification of material suppliers to ensure that materials meet all necess ary production requirements and encourage expansion of available feedstocks. DoD.M.2.1 Establish Vendor Qualification Procedure – Create a standard, transparent procedure for qualifying vendors of AM - specific feedstocks. – Potential AM Materials Sources DoD.M.2.2 Identify Identify capable vendors/sources of AM feedstock materials. Influence development of potential new sources to ensure availability and affordability. – Assess currently available AM materials a gainst DoD DoD.M.3 Develop AM Materials requirements and develop, as required, novel materials to meet gaps identified for DoD applications. – Assess existing DoD.M.3.1 Assess Current Materials Capabilities and Identify Gaps AM materials, data and process/property relationships agains t desired application areas and identify gaps. Develop materials, including – DoD.M.3.2 Develop AM Materials to Meet DoD Needs traditional materials, to meet identified gaps. - novel and non DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 27

28 emas – Create high DoD.M.4 Create Defined and Accessible Pedigreed Datasets and Sch quality, structured and accessible AM datasets. Develop schemas and repositories to collect, format, and house data for broad DoD use. DoD.M.4.1 Develop Comprehensive and Standardized Material and Process Data Schemas – Develop and docum ent standards and structures for AM data to be housed in repositories. – Develop Procedures for Pedigreed Datasets Determine procedures and DoD.M.4.2 protocols for verification/validation, access, and ownership of pedigreed datasets. DoD.M.4.3 Increase the Availability of Pedigreed Datasets – Ensure that data is easily available to relevant stakeholders for continuous enhancement of computer models. DoD.M.5 Establish a DoD - wide Materials and Process AM Data Repository – Create a livin g, secure (yet accessible), standardized data repository or repositories to house all material and process AM data. Build repositories that – DoD.M.5.1 Establish Secure, Standardized, Data Repository hable, accessible way across can accommodate AM technical data in a systematic, searc military services. DoD.M.5.2 Develop Procedures to Populate and Use Data Repository Create – governance processes for access to repositories and standardize data formats for usability. DoD.M.5.3 Populate Repository with Availab le Data – Compile available, current data into the database using standard formats/schemas for wide accessibility. DoD.M.6 Develop Model - based Approaches to Accelerate Materials Qualification and Certification – Develop advanced computational methods t o accelerate qualification and certification, for example, by minimizing design and process iterations and by reducing testing requirements. - Based Models Develop models to simulate – DoD.M.6.1 Develop Empirical and Physics AM materials and processes and pr edict performance. – Develop approaches DoD.M.6.2 Develop Approaches to Reduce Computation Time such as reduced order models to reduce computational intensity required for AM materials and processes. Process Objectives and Technology Elements Develop and validate process sensing and control DoD.P.1 Dev – elop NDE and Process Control technologies and NDE techniques to enable consistent processing and verification of quality. - Optimize – Situ Process Sensing/Monitoring Capabilities DoD.P.1.1 Improve In current capabilities and develop new sensors to enable continuous, comprehensive process management. - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 2016 - 5841 28

29 – DoD.P.1.2 Develop Closed - loop Process Control Improve sensor data collection and handling, develop computationally efficient control algorithms, and work with industry to - implement closed loop controls – Develop advanced data collection DoD.P.1.3 Advance Data Collection and Analysis and analysis techniques that can manage AM process data. for NDE, both DoD.P.1.4 Develop and Validate NDE Capabilities – Develop approaches post process and during the build. Validate NDE techniques for material quality and - process capabilities. DoD.P.2 Establish Stable and Robust AM Processes – Enable broader application of AM through process stability and equipment ruggediza tion. DoD.P.2.1 Reduce Process Variability – Understand critical process parameters and how to control them to reduce variability. – Collaborate DoD.P.2.2 Ensure Development of Process Standards and Specifications nd industry to publish process standards that with standards development organizations a meet DoD requirements. Develop – DoD.P.2.3 Establish Equipment Certification and Calibration Procedures hardware certification standards and calibration programs that contribute to process stability. Improve and Optimize Existing AM Processes – Develop incremental DoD.P.2.4 improvements to technologies involved in the production process. Address shortfalls in capability, such as for larger parts, smaller features, increased speed, dimensional accuracy, sion. and preci DoD.P.3 Develop Open Architecture Equipment – Advance hardware/software with open interfaces, allowing for monitoring and control of build processes. Develop open hardware and DoD.P.3.1 Develop Open - Architecture Platforms – software platforms to en able systems integration, such as process control, robotics, variability reduction, etc. DoD.P.3.2 Ensure Documentation of Open Architecture Standards – Develop and document standards for open architecture equipment. DoD.P.3.3 Develop Open Architecture Equ ipment Vendors – Share open architecture learnings with viable hardware and software vendors. Encourage development and availability of open architecture systems to enhance AM capabilities. DoD.P.4 Modify Existing or Develop New Process Capabilities – M odify existing or develop new AM process capabilities for broader application of AM throughout DoD. Modify existing or develop AM capabilities DoD.P.4.1 Develop AM Repair Processes – of AM parts. reparability AM parts). Assess and address - for repair applications (non - 2016 - 5841 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 29

30 – Develop hybrid DoD.P.4.2 Develop Hybrid AM/Traditional Manufacturing Systems processing approaches, i.e., those processes that combine additive and conventional techniques. DoD.P.4.3 Develop Capabilities for Larger Part Processing – Increas e capabilities for production of large parts, including continuous build and multi - laser equipment, engaging with industry where appropriate. – Understand issues Scale Processing - DoD.P.4.4 Develop Capabilities for Multi involved in AM processing at various scales. Develop multiscale approaches that integrate processing for a range of sizes, such as combining functional and structural components. Material Processing Increase capabilities – DoD.P.4.5 Develop Capabilities for Multi - material processin in multi - g, including multi - material feed, post - processing capabilities, and multi material modeling. - Value Chain Objectives and Technology Elements – Build cost models and decision tools to DoD.V.1 Build Cost Models and Decision Tools determine appropriate applications of AM. DoD.V.1.1 Identify and Capture AM Use Cases and Best Practices for Repair, Part Replacement, and New Part Manufacture – Compile and communicate use cases and lessons learned that provide data points for the feasibility of various AM app lications. DoD.V.1.2 Develop Adequate Cost Models for AM implementation – Develop appropriate cost models that take into account pre - and post - processing and can determine the financial implications of using AM in a given application. DoD.V.1.3 Develop and Implement AM Decision Tools to Establish the Value – Proposition cost factors - Develop appropriate decision tools that consider cost and non associated with the use of AM. Dev elop DoD.V.2 Develop Qualification and Certification Methods for Parts and Systems – methods to qualify and certify AM components, including new, replacement, and repaired/remanufactured parts. DoD.V.2.1 Understand Risk of AM Approaches Understand and quantify the risks – itical applications. associated with using AM for DoD parts, both critical and noncr Communicate relevant – DoD.V.2.2 Inform Decision Authorities re: AM Technology AM technology capabilities and risks to DoD decision authorities for qualification and certification. DoD.V.2.3 Ensure Qualification and Certification Metho ds Accommodate AM Technologies Determine how best to accomplish qualification and certification for AM – components and systems. Recommend any updates to existing policies and procedures. - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 2016 - 5841 30

31 DoD.V.3 Establish Cyber Infrastructure and Cyber Security – Develop secure information - end connectivity of the manufacturing process, i.e., from technology infrastructure for end - to design to production to service life to decommissioning (i.e. the digital thread). DoD.V.3.1 Establish Configuration Management for Da ta Collection and Monitoring – Determine appropriate methods to ensure consistent format and quality of data during data collection. - DoD.V.3.2 Integrate AM Practices into Enterprise Wide Product Lifecycle Understand integration points for AM w ithin existing product lifecycle – Management management processes and merge AM needs with existing infrastructure. DoD.V.3.3 Integrate AM with Efforts that are Developing the Model - Based Enterprise and the Digital Thread Infrastructure – Leverage model - based enterpri se and digital thread programs that enable the implementation of AM. Usage of 3D data DoD Replace standard 2D drawings – DoD.V.3.4 Drive toward included in today’s tech data packages with 3D models. Advocate requirements for tech ts to such data, as appropriate. data in 3D format and righ DoD.V.3 Ensure that data is protected both internally and – .5 Ensure Cyber Security across the supply chain, enabling a secure digital supply chain. DoD.V.4 Establish Physical AM Infrastructure – Plan for and begin impleme nting AM capability for R&D, production and sustainment across the defense community. DoD.V.4.1 Assess Current AM Capabilities and Gaps – Evaluate AM capabilities and determine gaps that must be addressed to establish adequate infrastructure. – ate DoD AM Enterprise Infrastructure Plan DoD.V.4.2 Cre Develop a plan to implement comprehensive AM infrastructure across the DoD. Carry out the AM – DoD.V.4.3 Implement DoD AM Enterprise Infrastructure Plan infrastructure plan developed for DoD. DoD V.5 Business Practices – Intellectual Property, Data Rights and Contracting Issues specific to AM DoD.V.5.1 Issue Guidance on Intellectual Property and Data Rights Considerations – Develop and issue guidance for the consideration of IP/data rights within the business ase for AM c . DoD.V.5.2 Create Streamlined Contracting Approaches for AM Parts – Determine how AM can be procured within the existing DoD contracting environment; customize . processes and procedures as necessary KEY TAKEAWAYS Opportunity of AM considerable opportunity to enha AM offers - nce warfighting capabilities and create supply chain efficiencies DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 3 1

32 Section 4 on Applications outlined the vast opportunity for AM within the DoD. Consensus from ave many unknowns and participants in the roadmapping workshop was that while AM may h to overcome, the opportunity expected from DoD - wide utilization of AM is great challenges game changing technology . ” enough to warrant the application of resources and a designation as a “ Synergistic Visions Shared visions provide a n opportunity for coordination on many – priorities The Services and DLA have very synergistic visions for AM development, which provide an opportunity for coordination on the majority of DoD AM objectives. There is also a strong desire to share information, data, and knowledge, and coordinate future investments. The technology “Enablers” identified in Section 5 are also strong opportunities for synergistic action from the services and DLA to enable implementation of AM technology. n DoD AM roadmap provides a major step towards focusing Structured Format for Actio – AM technical development strategy The structured format of the roadmap allows for a common language through which to take further action to include prioritization and allocation of resources while maximizing impact to all DoD stakeholders. The roadmap is the first key step towards fostering DoD - wide collaboration for prevention of duplication of effort and leveraging resources. DOD ROADMAP RECOMMEN DATIONS and his integrated DoD Additive Manufacturing (AM) Roadmap provides a f oundation T any desired in AM activities DoD’s the on of coordinati collaboration and f ramework for focusing ndividuals I to systematically and efficiently mature the technology for multiple DoD applications. and organizations may utilize this strategic document to identify areas of focus and address and beneficial together, where appropriate . roadmap objectives and technology elements and working shared objectives together, the national defense By “traveling the roadmap” dest ination is improved logistics, new and improved products, and increased materiel readiness from applying this “game changing” technology. Typical of any disruptive technology, AM can be used to our advantage, and our adversaries can use it against us. Spee d of travel to implement the AM roadmap becomes an important factor that can be best achieved by coordinating national defense resources to achieve the DoD’s shared objectives. wide pla STEP 1: Further Refinement and Development - n for Create a coordinated DoD – advancing AM capabilities , tactical DoD - wide AM coordination plan is The development of a detailed beneficial for speeding the advanc ement of AM capabilities. The plan should focus on concrete and coordinated actions to achieve the integrated objectives set forth within the DoD roadmap. To achieve this critical next step, a strong recommendation is for the development of a Lead Integrator and su pporting team to and resourced champion and lead this effort. Having this role assigned will help maintain R&D, engineering, momentum and focus. The supporting team must involve all stakeholders – aintenance and sustainment, and test, logistics, quality assurance, inventory management, m - wide and DoD - operating/end users. To enable this coordination, a DoD only information sharing - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 2016 - 5841 32

33 mechanism is recommended, such as a Community of Practice/Community of Interest. The sharing mechanism developed should build upon best practices developed within existing groups. – Begin the execution of the DoD - wide STEP 2: Initial Execution plan for coordination developing AM capabilities The S ervices and DLA are currently conducting many activities which are contributing to delivering specific objectives outlined within the joint DoD AM roadmap. This information should be captured and disseminated to other DoD stakeholders . Integrated for greater awareness objectives may be prioritized based on impact to the DoD and resources needed to achieve the objective. Prioritized initiatives may then be defined in more detail with appropriate partners and resources. Commitment is required to achieve the technology objectives as well as the “Enablers” identified in Section 5. STEP 3: Co – Sustain the development of AM capabilities across the ntinuous Improvement DoD and refine the DoD AM roadmap as AM technology matures It is recommended that the Lead Integrator periodically coordinate revisions to the DoD AM , maturing technology, priorities to reflect changing roadmap and most recent through gathering the input from all stakeholders. Progress towards achieving the key national defense objectives should eadiness be documented, including progress towards achieving the desired impact on capability/r and reduced cost using AM. One additional recommendation is respectfully offered. The Senate “National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 Report” dated May 18, 2016 includes “Additive manufacturing recommendations” under “Items of Sp ecial Interest.” The text includes a Senate request for a report from the Secretary of Defense on additive manufacturing and identifies specific details to be addressed. This Integrated DoD AM Roadmap is an important resource which may be utilized to addre ss some of the details requested. POINTS OF CONTACT DoD Points of Contact: Manager, Manufacturing Mr. Andy Davis , Program Technology, ARMY: [email protected] Ben Bouffard, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy, A NAVY: ead, Manufacturing L dditive [email protected] Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, , Dr. Jonathan Miller, AFRL/RX Additive Manufacturing Lead AIR FORCE: [email protected] Mr. Tony Delgado DLA: , R&D Additive Manufacturing Program Manager, [email protected] - 2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 5841 33

34 America Makes Program Points of Contact: , Government Program Manager, AFRL/RXMS, [email protected] Mr. Dennis Butcher , Government Chief Technology Advisor, AFRL/RXMS, Dr. Mark Benedict [email protected] mark.b Vice President, National Center for Defense Mr. Ed Morris , Director, America Makes and Manufacturing and Machining ( NCDMM ) : [email protected] Mr. Rob Gorham, Director of Operations, , Makes [email protected] America ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The participants gratefully acknowledge funding from the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy, the Department of the N avy, the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Army, and the Defense Logistics Agency. This effort was also possible through in kind cost share contributions from the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM) and Deloitte, Inc. Contracting and pro gram management was performed through the Air Force Research Laboratory through the public private partnership, America Makes, the #FA8650 National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute through cooperative agreement - 7230. - - 12 2 BROCHURE TRI FOLD APPENDIX: DOD AM ROA DMAP - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW - 2016 - 5841 34

35 - 2016 - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 35 5841

36 - 2016 - DISTRIBUTION A: Cleared for Public Release #88ABW 36 5841

Related documents

Final rule: Home Mortgage Disclosure (Regulation C)

Final rule: Home Mortgage Disclosure (Regulation C)

BILLING CODE: 4810- -P AM BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION 1003 12 CFR Part Docket No. CFPB -0019 -2014 RIN 3170- AA10 Home Mortgage Disclosure (Regulation C) AGENCY: Consumer Financial Protect...

More info »
IHE RAD TF Rev17 0 Vol1 FT 2018 07 27

IHE RAD TF Rev17 0 Vol1 FT 2018 07 27

Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise IHE Radiology (RAD) 5 Technical Framework Volume 1 10 IHE RAD TF -1 Integration Profiles 15 Revision 1 7.0 – Final Text 20 July 27, 2018 Please verify you have th...

More info »
What Works in Girls' Education: Evidence for the World's Best Investment

What Works in Girls' Education: Evidence for the World's Best Investment

Foreword by Malala Yousafzai With a foreword by Winthrop s Malala Yousafzai p E Student, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, and Cofounder of the Malala Fund rlin in What Works G Hard-headed evidence demonstr...

More info »
HESTEM FinalReport Email

HESTEM FinalReport Email

National HE STEM Programme - Final Report Written and compiled by Michael Grove

More info »
IHE ITI TF Rev15.0 Vol1 FT 2018 07 24

IHE ITI TF Rev15.0 Vol1 FT 2018 07 24

Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise IHE IT Infrastructure (ITI) 5 Technical Framework Volume 1 (ITI TF -1) 10 Integration Profiles 15 Revision 1 20 5.0 – Final Text July 24, 201 8 which is published...

More info »
The 9/11 Commission Report

The 9/11 Commission Report

Final FM.1pp 7/17/04 5:25 PM Page i THE 9/11 COMMISSION REPORT

More info »
Experimental and Theoretical Statics of Liquids Subject to Molecular Forces Only

Experimental and Theoretical Statics of Liquids Subject to Molecular Forces Only

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STATICS OF LIQUIDS SUBJECT TO MOLECULAR FORCES ONLY, BY J. PLATEAU Professor of the University of Ghent, Member of the Academy of Belgium, Correspondent of the Institute o...

More info »
Protecting Statutory Conscience Rights in Health Care; Delegations of Authority

Protecting Statutory Conscience Rights in Health Care; Delegations of Authority

This HHS‐approved document is b eing submitted to the Office of publication and has not the Federal Register (OFR) for y or published in the Federal R yet been placed on public displa egister. This do...

More info »
meinkampf

meinkampf

Mein Kampf Adolf Hitler Translated into English by James Murphy

More info »
2013 01073

2013 01073

Vol. 78 Friday, No. 17 January 25, 2013 Part II Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Parts 160 and 164 Modifications to the HIPAA Privacy, Security, Enforcement, and ...

More info »
aa39 final rule

aa39 final rule

4310- VH DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement 30 CFR Part 250 000 EEEE500000] [Docket ID: BSEE -2018- 0002; 190E1700D2 ET1SF0000.EAQ RIN 1014–AA39 Oil and Gas and ...

More info »
An Introduction to Computer Networks

An Introduction to Computer Networks

An Introduction to Computer Networks Release 1.9.18 Peter L Dordal Mar 31, 2019

More info »
Grant Lake Hydroelectric Project—FERC Project No. 13212 005

Grant Lake Hydroelectric Project—FERC Project No. 13212 005

Office of Energy Projects May 2019 –0283F FEIS FERC/ ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FINAL FOR HYDROPOWER LICENSES Hydroelectric Project —FERC Project No. 13212- 005 Grant Lake Alaska Federal Energy Re...

More info »
HANDBOOK of METAL ETCHANTS

HANDBOOK of METAL ETCHANTS

HANDBOOK of METAL ETCHANTS Editors Perrin Walker William H. Tarn CRC Press Boca Raton Boston London New York Washington, D.C. © 1991 by CRC Press LLC

More info »
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications

Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications

Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications Richard Szeliski September 3, 2010 draft c © 2010 Springer This electronic draft is for non-commercial personal use only, and may not be posted or re-distr...

More info »
JTVCC Independent Review Team FINAL Report 1

JTVCC Independent Review Team FINAL Report 1

Final Report: Independent Review of Security Issues at the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center by the Honorable John C. Carney, Jr., Requested Governor of the State of Delaware on February 14, 2017 Le...

More info »
Texas Commission on Public School Finance Report

Texas Commission on Public School Finance Report

Texas Commission on Public School Finance Funding for Impact: Equitable Funding for Students Who Need It the Most Final Report December 31, 2018

More info »
AndersBehringBreivikManifesto

AndersBehringBreivikManifesto

2011 , London – By Andrew Berwick

More info »
LawReferenceBook2018

LawReferenceBook2018

California Contractors License Law & Reference Book 2018 Edition With Rules and Regulations Contractors State License Board State of California Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor

More info »