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1 CHANCELLOR'S UNIVERSITY REPORT DECEMBER 10, 2018

2 THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK DECEMBER CHANCELLOR'S UNIVERSITY REPORT – 10, 2018 ACADEMIC MATTERS PART A: Special Actions Section I: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements Section II: Section III: Changes in Degree Programs Section IV: New Courses ion V: Sect Changes in Existing Courses Section VI: Courses Withdrawn Section VII: Affiliation Agreements PART B: PERSONNEL MATTERS [PART C: FISCAL MATTERS All Trusts, Gifts, and Grants Section III Section IV Fees Section V Other Financial Matters NOTES Fiscal Matters As the University requires all sponsored program support to be administered by the Research Foundation, Part C - Section III does not differentiate between grants that are or are not administered by the Research Foundation and shall include all grants received on behalf of a college or University entity regardless of dollar amount. PART AA: PERSONNEL ACTIONS REQUIRING WAIVER OF THE BYLAWS ADDENDUM ERRATA

3 Chancellor ’s University Report Errata Report November 2018 NYC College of Technology Instructional Correction Faculty Humanities Comments Title Name Type Instructor Hagood,Martha N. Substitute Corrected step entry date to >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben 1/1/2019. Total Action Correction: 1 Total Actions Reported: Instructional Correction Faculty: 1 Total Instructional: 1 1 Page of 2

4 Chancellor ’s University Report Errata Report November 2018 End of Report Page 2 of 2

5 Baruch College – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report art A: Academic Matters P ection AI: Special Actions S AI .1.1 Dual Executive MS in Finance and Entrepreneurship Degree Programs between Baruch College and the Brazilian Internationa l Business School (BRAIN), São Paulo, Brazil: Proposed exception to the Zicklin School of Business’s guidelines for transfer credit. ESOLVED, that Baruch College agrees to accept fifteen transfer credits for students from the Brazilian International Busi ness R School enrolling in the Dual Executive MS in Finance and Entrepreneurship Degree Programs at Baruch College. S ection AIV: New Courses .1 V.1 AI CUNYfirst Course ID Paul H. Chook Department of Information Systems and Statistics Department(s) eer Car [ ] Undergraduate [X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area IS Course Prefix CIS 9551 Course Number Course Title Blockchain Technologies and Applications Catalogue This course will trace the history of cryptocurrencies and explicate the relationship between iption Descr cryptocurrencies and blockchain. It will focus on not only explaining the components of blockchain technologies but also surveying the competing platforms available as well as trade- offs among them. It will then examine potential applications of blockchain technologies and various societal, legal, and monetary implications of these technologies. Blockchain has the potential to be a successful technology platform to overcome trust barriers among different parties over the Internet. This is a significant value proposition – one that this course will seek to unpack that has attracted significant flow of capital and talent into the blockchain space. – Requisites None Pre/ Co

6 Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 [ ] Yes [ X Liberal Arts ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability ____ Major ___ _ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - Flexible ____ Gen Ed - College Option ___ _ English Composition ____ World Cultures _ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ___ C ollege Option Detail __________________________________ _ Science ___ _ Creative Expression ___ ____ Individual and Society ___ _ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2019 R atio nale: Blockchain has the potential to be a successful technology platform to overcome trust barriers among different parties over the Internet. IBM argues that blockchains can do for business what the Internet did for communication. This course is targe ted at graduate students in business to help them understand the unique value proposition of blockchains that has attracted significant interest from venture capital.

7 AIV. 2.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Stan Ross Department of Accountancy Department(s) er [X ] Graduate Care [ ] Undergraduate [ X] Regular [ ] Compensatory Academic Level [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area ACC Course Prefix ACC Course Number 9886 Course Title Data Analytics in Accounting Catalogue Description - requisite: ACC 9112 (or 9110) – Financial Accounting Pre/ Co Requisites Pre -requisites: ACC 9811--Managerial Accounting Theory and Practice; and ACC 9818 Co – Auditing and Accounting Information Systems Credits 4 (Note: Credit may not be earned for both ACC 9886 and ACC 9993: Special Topics in Accounting - - Data Analytics for Accounting Professionals) Contact Hours 4 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.)

8 Course Applicability ____ Major _ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - College Option ___ Flexible ____ Gen Ed - ___ _ English Composition ____ World Cultures ___ _ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity C ollege Option Detail __________________________________ ___ _ Science ___ _ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ___ _ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2019 R ationale: Data has proliferated in business. Accounting professionals need to understand the implications of its availability in decision- making and be able to utilize data effectively to provide insights into a firm/client/customer/supplier. This course is intended to provide students with an understanding of data analytic thinking and hands -on experience with data analytics tools and techniques. This graduate elective course will help satisfy new AACSB Accountancy standards, issued in April 2018, on student use of emerging technologies in accounting courses. It is offered for 4 credits and hours to maximize course content until additional ACC graduate courses in data analytics can be developed and staffed. Additional ACC graduate courses in data analytics will be offered for 3 credits and hours and will necessitate a reduction from 4 credits and hours to 3 credits and hours of the current proposed course.

9 AIV. 2.2 rse ID CUNYfirst Cou Stan Ross Department of Accountancy Department(s) [ ] Undergraduate Career [ X ] Graduate [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory Academic Level [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Taxation Course Prefix TAX Course Number 9871 Course Title Financial Planning for Individuals The goal of this course is to e xpose students to the four basic core personal financial planning Catalogue Description areas: (i) tax planning (mainly income, estate, and gift tax) as it relates to personal financial planning; (ii) risk management; (iii) investments; and (iv) financial independence. It will explore the general principals of personal financial planning: statement of financial position, spending plans, and personal financial ratios. This course will focus on two disciplines: technical skills and subject matters associated with implementing a financial plan. Pre or Co - requisite None Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.)

10 Course Applicability ____ Major Flexible ____ Gen Ed - ____ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - College Option ___ _ English Composition ____ World Cultures ___ _ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity ollege Option Detail __________________________________ C _ Science ___ ___ _ ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ___ _ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2019 R ationale: The industry trend is that clients of tax specialists expect or prefer that their tax professional also assist them in some way with matters dealing with personal financial planning services. The ability to offer financial planning services has become a trademark of a successful and growing tax practice and an increasing number of tax businesses are losing clients due to their inability to offer financial planning services. In this course, students will gain exposure to the financial subject matters at the core of preparing a typical financial plan for an individual. Additionally, students will connect the individual financial subject matters of the financial plan to the tax issues that inevitably arise from such subject matters. Over the course of the semester, students will create their own comprehensive personal financial plan. The successful creation of a personal f inancial plan will require students to demonstrate an understanding of the financial vehicles employed in a typical individual financial plan, a competency in the tax issues inextricably related to such vehicles, and an awareness of the basic methodologies in the creation of a personal financial plan.

11 AIV. 2.3 CUNYfirst Course ID Stan Ross Department of Accountancy Department(s) [ ] Undergraduate Career [ X ] Graduate [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental Academic Level [ ] Remedial Subject Area Taxation Course Prefix TAX 9876 Course Number Course Title Special Topics in Taxation Catalogue This course focuses on timely and relevant topics in taxation and/or in topics that are related to Description taxation that are not covered in the regular curriculum. The areas of study are determined each semester by the instructor offering the course. The course topics and pre- requisites (if any) will be announced during the preceding semester. Students may take this more than once provided . that different topics are covered - requisite There are no fixed co - or pre - Pre or Co requisites for this special topics course; these will depend on the topics covered in the course and will be announced during the preceding semester. dits 3 Cre Contact Hours 3 hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) N/A (TAX)____ Major Course Applicability Flexible ____ Gen Ed - ____ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - Colle ge Option ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures

12 ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity C ollege Option Detail __________________________________ ___ _ Science ___ _ ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ___ _ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2019 Rationale Trends in the Tax industry can change quickly, as can the laws that either directly or indirectly affect the tax : industry. Accordingly, a previously esoteric law can suddenly become paramount in the tax discussion, the application of a law may change suddenly, or a newly enacted law may set a new industry norm. Consequently, many important issues facing the tax practitioner may not fit into the core courses for the MS Taxation curriculum. The MS Taxation program would benefit from the ability to be nimble in terms of adding and subtracting the discussion of certain topics to keep pace with industry standards. In this course students will gain exposure to the most relevant subject matter. Additionally, students will connect the current subject matters focused on in the class to the tax issues that inevitably arise from such subject matters. Special Topics could be taken multiple times for the same MS or MBA program provided the topics discussed have changed.

13 AIV. 3.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance Departme nt(s) [X ] Graduate Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory Academic Level [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Economics Course Prefix ECO Course Number 9793 Course Title Special Topics in Economics This course focuses on timely and relevant topics in Economics that are not covered in the Catalogue Description regular curriculum. The areas of study are determined each semester by the instructor offering course. The course topics and any additional pre- or co -requisites will be announced during the the preceding semester. Students may take this more than once provided that different topics are covered. Prerequisites ECO 9730 and ECO 9740 Credits 2 Contac 2 t Hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.)

14 Course Applicability ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - Flexible ____ Gen Ed - College Option ition ____ World Cultures ____ English Compos ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail __________________________________ ____ Science ___ _ ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2019 This course will provide flexibility in offering contemporary topics that draw on the special expertise of the Rationale: instructor but that do not otherwise fit within the regular curriculum. Ability to offer special topics in 2 credits provides flexibility in selecting topics that may be timely and relevant but might not warrant a 3- credit course. This course will also allow transfer credit to be granted to students who have taken 2 credit courses in their prior institutions. This course is expected to enroll approximately 40 students each semester.

15 AIV. 3.2 CUNYfirst Course ID Bert W. Wasserman Department of Economics and Finance Department(s) [X ] Graduate Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ Academic Level ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subje Finance ct Area Course Prefix FIN Course Number 9890 Course Title Special Topics in Finance Catalogue This course focuses on timely and relevant topics in Finance that are not covered in the regular Description curriculum. The areas of study are determined each semester by the instructor offering the or co course. The course topics and any additional pre- -requisites will be announced during the preceding semester. Students may take this more than once provided that different topics are covered. equisite FIN 9770 Prer Credits 2 Contact Hours 2 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Course Applicability ____ Major ___ _ Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed - Flexible ____ Gen Ed - College Option ___ _ English Composition ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity

16 College Option Detail __________________________________ ____ Sc ience ____ ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2019 Rationale: This course will provide flexibility in offering contemporary topics that draw on the special expertise of the instructor but that do not otherwise fit the regular curriculum. Ability to offer special topics in 2 credits provides flexibility in selecting topics that may be timely and relevant, but might not warrant a 3- credit course. This course will also allow transfer credit to be granted to students who have taken 2 credit courses in their prior institutions. This course is expected to enroll approximately 40 students each semester.

17 Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses .1 AV:1 Changes in title and description to be offered in the Aaronson Dept of Marketing and International Business. CUNYFirst Course ID FROM TO Aaronson De pt of Marketing and Departments Aaronson Dept of Marketing and Departments International Business International Business International Business Course IBS 9769: Strategic Management of the IBS 9769: Course Strategy Global Company PreReq: IBS 9600 Pre or corequisite Pre or corequisite PreReq: IBS 9600 Hours Hours 3 3 3 Credits 3 Credits Description Analysis of strategy in international Description Companies are increasingly expanding business in terms of resources to be their horizons from local to global markets and resources, and the playing transmitted abroad, adaptation to foreign cultures, acquisition of field in a growing number of industries . The purpose of this is becoming global legitimacy in host c ountries, and the integration of the international firm's course is to introduce students to the challenges and opportunities that these various parts. changes open up and to help them develop the mindset that is needed to create value via global activity. A series of case studies, supplemented by some sel ected readings, provides students with diagnostic tools to analyze the competitive (dis)advantages of global companies and their variations in

18 different countries and competitive settings, and operational frameworks to analyze major strategic decisions in a global context, beginning with the decision to invest overseas, means to identify opportunities in the global market, and ways to take advantage of them. Through these discussions students will learn the language of global business strategy and develop their ability to deal with cultural issues in international business . Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course A ttribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Writing Intensive, Honors, etc.) Honors, etc.) Course Applicability Course Applicability ____ Major ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ____Gen Ed Required ____ English Compos ____ English Composition ition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science

19 ____Gen Ed Flexible ____ Gen Ed Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity _ ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ _ Creative Expression _ Creative Expression ___ ___ ___ _ Individual and Society _ Individual and Society _ Scientific World ___ ___ _ Scientific World ___ _Gen Ed – College Option C ollege Option Detail Eff ective Term Fall 2019 R ationale: Based on feedback received from students, the old title and description were perceived as too close to IBS 9600, the introductory IB course. They were too generic and insufficiently informative of the contents of the course and had become increasingly removed from the actual content of the course. The new title and description remedy these problems.

20 AV:2 .1 Change(s) prerequisite, title to be offered in the Paul H. Chook Department of Information Systems and Statistics. CUNYFirst Course ID TO FROM Departments Paul H. Chook Department of Departments Paul H. Chook Department of Information Systems and Statistics Information Systems and Statistics Course CIS 9555: Information Technologies In Principles of FinTech Course C IS 9555: Financial Markets Pre or corequisite CIS 9000 OR CIS 9001 & FIN Pre or corequisite Prereq: Prereq: None 9770 Hours 3 Hours 3 Credits 3 Credits 3 Description Exploration of the application of The course is designed to give Description students a general understanding of information technology (IT) in the y (FinTech) in the Financial Technolog financial s ervices industry. The student will learn how IT affects the financial context of the capital markets and services industry, survey the various financial services industry. The forms of financial information systems, students will learn how IT affects the financial services industry and how to assess the potential for strategic advantage based on information assess the potential for strategic technology, and measure value added advantage based on information The course w technology. by IT in the financial services industry. ill survey Topics will be covered through a emerging issues in the FinTech arena combination of lectures, case studies, such as cryptocurrencies, blockchains, team projects, and software cybersecurity and machine learning development projects. and assess their application to an array of financial services. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation

21 Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ x ] No [ ] Yes [ x ] No Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Intensive, Honors, Honors, etc.) etc.) Course Course Applicability ____ Major Applicability ____ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ____Gen Ed Required on ____ English Compositi ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ____ Gen Ed Flexible ____Gen Ed Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity in its Diversity ____ US Experience ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World ____Gen E d – College Option College Option Detail

22 Fall 2019 Effective Term Rationale: The course has been redesigned to take into account the impact of emerging technology trends such as cry ptocurrencies and blockchains. We are removing all prerequisites due to the changing nature of the course, which is now designed to appeal to a wider range of students who are pursuing an MBA degree in order to pursue careers in the Financial Services industry. Last Modified: Aug 23, 2018

23 PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS The following recommendations of the Curriculum Committee were approved at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs Faculty Meetings on September 20, 2018 and May 10, 2018. They will be effective for the Fall 2019 semester, pending approval of the Board of Trustees. AIII: Changes in Degree Programs AIII.1:1. The following revisions are proposed for the Master of International Affairs program in the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs. Program Code: 37904 2212.00 HEGIS Code: From To Course Description Course Description Crs Crs Requirements for the International Non - Governmental Requirements for the International Non - Governmental Organizations concentration in the Master of International Organizations concentration in the Master of International Affairs program Affairs progr am - 30 credits) Required Courses (27 - 30 credits) Required Courses (27 3 3 Budgeting and Financial Analysis I Budgeting and Financial Analysis I PAF 9140 PAF 9140 3 Research and Analysis I PAF 9170 PAF 9170 Research and Analysis I 3 PAF 9172 3 PAF 9172 Research and Analysis II 3 Research and Analysis II 3 Policy Analysis PAF 9180 Policy Analysis PAF 9180 3 Comparative Public Policy and PAF 9181 PAF 9181 Comparative Public Policy and 3 3 Administration Administration PAF 9184 3 PAF 9184 nternational Institutions and Global 3 International Institutions and Global I Governance Governance PAF 9415 3 International Economics PAF 9415 International Economics 3

24 Global Communication PAF 9420 Global Communication 3 3 PAF 9420 PAF 9190 Public Affairs Capstone Seminar 3 PAF 9190 Public Affairs Capstone Seminar 3 *PAF 9195 Public Affairs Internship 3 3 Public Affairs Internship *PAF 9195 INGO Concentration Required Courses (3 credits) INGO Concentration Required Courses (3 credits) PAF 9183 PAF 3 International Nonprofit Organizations 9183 3 International Nonprofit Organizations INGO Concentration Elective Courses ( 12 credits) INGO Concentration Elective Courses (12 credits) credits either from list below 6 credits from list below plus 6 credits either from list below 6 credits from list below plus 6 or from another graduate program with advisor approval or from another graduate program with advisor approval 3 Government Contracting PAF 9109 3 PAF 9109 Government Contracting PAF 3 Public and Nonprofit Management I 9120 PAF 9120 Public and Nonprofit Management I 3 PAF 9150 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector PAF 9150 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector 3 3 PAF 9151 PAF 9151 3 Administration of t he Nonprofit Sector 3 Administration of the Nonprofit Sector and Voluntary Agencies and Voluntary Agencies PAF 9152 PAF 9152 3 Fundraising and Grants Administration 3 Fundraising and Grants Administration in Nonprofit and Voluntary in Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations Organizations Budgeting and Finance for Nonprofits PAF 9153 Budgeting and Finance for Nonprofits PAF 9153 3 3 3 3 Emergency Preparation, Response, Emergency Preparation, Response, PAF 9156 PAF 9156 and Recovery and Recovery 3 I 3 Introduction to Philanthropy PAF 9157 PAF 9157 ntroduction to Philanthropy PAF 9158 PAF 9158 3 Religion, Nonprofits, Politics, Policy Religion, Nonprofits, Politics, Policy 3 PAF 9182 PAF 9182 3 Development Administration 3 Development Administration 3 Selected Topics in Public Affairs ted Topics in Public Affairs Selec PAF 9199 PAF 9199 3 Selected Topics in Nonprofit PAF 9299 Selected Topics in Nonprofit 3 3 PAF 9299 Management Management PAF 9410 3 3 : Pacts, Global Economic Governance Global Economic Governance: Pacts, PAF 9410 Actors, and Regimes Actors, and Regimes PAF 9425 3 Western Hemisphere Affairs: Past, PAF 9425 Western Hemisphere Affairs: Past, 3

25 Present and Future Present and Future Illicit Trade PAF 9426 3 3 aspora, Migration and Transnational Di Diaspora, Migration and Transnational PAF 9430 3 PAF 9430 Life in the Western Hemisphere and Life in the Western Hemisphere and Beyond Beyond 3 Selected Topics in Public Policy PAF 9699 PAF 9699 Selected Topics in Public Policy 3 IBS 9761 g Markets and the 3 Emerging Markets and the IBS 9761 3 Emergin International Business Environment International Business Environment Global Firms, Cultures, and 3 IBS 9767 3 IBS 9767 Global Firms, Cultures, and Governments Governments 3 Globalization and Technology CIS 9230 CIS 9 Globalization and Technology 230 3 * The internship is required of candidates who have less * The internship is required of candidates who have less - than 1 year relevant international work experience. year relevant international work experience than 1- Total credits required for the INGO Concentration in Total credits required for the INGO Concentration in the 42 the Masters of International Affairs program 42 Masters of International Affairs program - - 45 45 Rationale: Though it is not a requirement for the MIA degree, adding PAF 9426 Illicit Trade to the list of approved electives will provide students with understanding of a key policy challenge for governments, international organizations and non- profits seeking to promote security, stability and economic growth. From To Course Description Course Description Crs Crs Requirements for the Trade Policy and Global Economic Requirements for the Trade Policy and Global Economic Governance concentration in the Master of International Governance concentration in the Master of International Affairs program Affairs program

26 Required Courses (27 Required Courses (27 30 credits) 30 credits) - - PAF 9140 3 3 Budgeting and Financial Analysis I PAF 9140 Budgeting and Financial Analysis I PAF 917 PAF 9170 3 and Analysis I Research 0 Research and Analysis I 3 3 3 Research and Analysis II PAF 9172 PAF 9172 Research and Analysis II PAF 9180 PAF 9180 3 Policy Analysis Policy Analysis 3 PAF 9181 PAF 9181 3 3 Comparative Public Policy and Comparative Public Policy and Administration Administration PAF 9184 3 3 International Institutions and Global PAF 9184 International Institutions and Global Governance Governance PAF 9415 3 3 International Economics PAF 9415 International Economics PAF 9420 3 Global Communication 3 Communication Global 9420 PAF PAF 9190 Public Affairs Capstone Seminar 3 PAF 9190 Public Affairs Capstone Seminar 3 Public Affairs Internship *PAF 9195 3 *PAF 9195 Public Affairs Internship 3 TPGEG Concentration Required Courses (6 credits) TPGEG Concentration Required Courses (6 credits) Trade Policy 3 Trade Policy PAF 9440 PAF 9440 3 PAF 9450 3 3 International Development International Development PAF 9450 TPGEG Concentration Elective Courses (9 credits) TPGEG Concentration Elective Courses (9 credits) from the list below or 3 from another graduate program 6 6 from the list below or 3 from another graduate program with advisor approval with advisor approval 3 PAF 9104 Media, Politics and Public Culture PAF 9104 Media, Politics and Public Culture 3 3 3 Organization Theory PAF 9119 Organization Theory PAF 9119 PAF 9182 PAF 9182 3 Development Administration Development Administration 3 PAF 9199 3 ffairs Selected Topics in Public A PAF 9199 3 Selected Topics in Public Affairs Selected Topics in Nonprofit AF 9299 P Selected Topics in Nonprofit 3 3 PAF 9299 Management Management PAF 9410 3 3 Global Economic Governance: Pacts, Global Economic Governance: Pacts, PAF 9410 Actors, and Regimes Actors, and Regimes PAF 9425 Western Hemisphere Affairs: Past, 3 PAF 9425 Western Hemisphere Affairs: Past, 3

27 Present and Future Present and Future 3 Illicit Trade PAF 9426 al 3 3 Diaspora, Migration and Transnation PAF 9430 PAF 9430 Diaspora, Migration and Transnational Life in the Western Hemisphere and the Western Hemisphere and Life in Beyond Beyond International Political Economy PAF 9445 3 International Political Economy 3 PAF 9445 3 International Regulatory Policy 3 PAF 9455 International Regulatory Policy PAF 9455 3 PAF 9699 PAF 9699 Selected Topics in Public Policy 3 Selected Topics in Public Policy IBS 9761 Emerging Markets and the 3 IBS 9761 Emerging Markets and the 3 International Business Environment International Business Environment Global Firms, Cultures, and 3 IBS 9767 lobal Firms, Cultures, and IBS 9767 3 G Governments Governments Globalization and Technology Globalization and Technology 3 CIS 9230 CIS 9230 3 LAW 9740 3 LAW 9740 International Trade and Investment 3 International Trade and Investment Law Law MKT 9739 3 Global Advertising and Marketing MKT 9739 Global Advertising and Marketing 3 Communication Communication MKT 9764 3 Internet Marketing and Global MKT 9764 3 Internet Marketing and Global Business Business *The internship is required of candidates who have less than *The in ternship is required of candidates who have less than year relevant international work experience - - 1 1 year relevant international work experience Total credits required for the Trade Policy and Total credits required for the Trade Policy and Global Economic Governance Concentration Global Economic Governance Concentration - 45 program 42 in the Masters of International Affairs in the Masters of Internatio nal Affairs program 42 - 45 Rationale: Though it is not a requirement for the MIA degree, adding PAF 9426 Illicit Trade to the list of approved electives will provide students with understanding of a key policy challenge for governments, international organizations and non- profits seeking to promote security, stability and economic growth.

28 From To Course Descr iption Course Description Crs Crs equirements for the Western Hemisphere Affairs R Requirements for the Western Hemisphere Affairs concentration in the Master of International Affairs concentration in the Master of International Affairs program program 30 credits) 30 credits) - Required Courses (27 - Required Courses (27 PAF 9140 3 Budgeting and Financial Analysis I 3 Budgeting and Financial Analysis I PAF 9140 P Research and Analysis I 3 PAF 9170 AF 9170 Research and Analysis I 3 3 3 II Research and Analysis PAF 9172 Research and Analysis II PAF 9172 PAF 9180 PAF 9180 3 Policy Analysis 3 Policy Analysis PAF 9181 Comparative Public Policy and 3 PAF 9181 Comparative Public Policy and 3 Administration Administration 3 PAF 9184 PAF 9184 3 International Institutions and Global International Institutions and Global Governance Governance PAF 9415 International Economics International Economics 3 3 PAF 9415 Global Communication PAF 9420 3 3 Global Communication PAF 9420 e Seminar Public Affairs Capston PAF 9190 PAF 9190 Public Affairs Capstone Seminar 3 3 *PAF 9195 *PAF 9195 3 3 Public Affairs Internship Public Affairs Internship WHA Concentration Required Courses (3 credits) WHA Concentration Required Courses (3 credits) PAF 9425 3 Western Hemisphere Affairs: Past, 3 Western Hemisphere Affairs: Past, PAF 9425 Present and Future Present and Future WHA Concentration Elective Courses (9 credits) WHA Concentration Elect ive Courses (9 credits) from list below or from 6 from list below, plus 3 credits either 6 from list below, plus 3 credits either from list below or from another graduate program with advisor approval another graduate program with advisor approval 3 PAF 9104 Media, Politics and Public Culture PAF 9104 Media, Politics and Public Culture 3 3 PAF 9119 PAF 9119 Organization Theory 3 Organization Theory

29 Selected Topics in Public Affairs PAF 9199 Selected Topics in Public Aff airs 3 3 PAF 9199 Selected Topics in Nonprofit 3 PAF 9299 PAF 9299 Selected Topics in Nonprofit 3 Management Management Global Economic Governance: Pacts, 410 3 PAF 9 PAF 9410 3 Global Economic Governance: Pacts, Actors, and Regimes Actors, and Regimes Illicit Trade PAF 9426 3 PAF 9430 PAF 9430 3 Diaspora, Migration and Transnational Diaspora, Migration and Transnational 3 Life in the Western Hemisphere and Life in the Western Hemisphere and Beyond Beyond 3 3 Trade Policy PAF 9440 Trade Policy PAF 9440 PAF 3 PAF 9445 International Political Economy 9445 International Political Economy 3 9450 PAF 3 International Development PAF 9450 International Development 3 PAF 9699 3 Selected Topics in Public Policy Selected Topics in Public Policy 3 PAF 9699 IBS 9761 3 Emerging Markets and the IBS 9761 Emerging Markets and the 3 International Business Environment International Business Environment IBS 9767 Global Firms, Cultures, and 3 IBS 9767 Global Firms, Cultures, and 3 Governments Governments Globalization and Technology 3 CIS 9230 Globalization and Technology 30 CIS 92 3 LAW 9740 International Trade and Investment 3 LAW 9740 International Trade and Investment 3 Law Law MKT 9739 3 3 Global Advertising and Marketing MKT 9739 Global Advertising and Marketing Communication Communication 3 MKT 9764 3 Internet Marketing and Global MKT 9764 Internet Marketing and Global Business Business than *The internship is required of candidates who have less *The internship is required of candidates who have less than - - perience year relevant international work ex 1 1 year relevant international work experience Total credits required for the Western Hemisphere Total credits required for the Western Hemisphere Affairs Concentration in the Masters of International Affairs Concentration in the Masters of International

30 Affairs program 42 45 Affairs program 42 - 45 - Though it is not a requirement for the MIA degree, adding PAF 9426 Illicit Trade to the list of approved Rationale: electives will provide students with understanding of a key policy challenge for governments, international organizations and non- profits seeking to promote security, stability and economic growth.

31 Section AIV: New Courses Program Code: 37904 2210.00 HEGIS Code: AIV: 1.1 The following new course is proposed for the Master of International Affairs program in the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs. first Course CUNY PAF 9426 ID ) Marxe School of Public and International Affairs Department(s [ Career ] Undergraduate [X] Graduate Academic Level [ X] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Public Affairs ourse Prefix PAF C Course Number 9426 Course Title Illicit Trade Catalogue This course examines the role of illicit trade in the international system with a focus on its integration with other social, political, and economic processes. This class begins with an overview Description of the policy challenges associated with illicit trade and then examines a broad array of illicit trade activities. These activities include the drug trade, the arms trade, various forms of human ural resources, and cyber -crime. Students should gain a knowledge of trafficking, the trade in nat illicit trade broadly and its implications for international policymaking. Students will be expected to write policy related papers related to various illicit trade activities. Open to A ustin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs students; others with Marxe School permission. Pre/ Co Requisites None Credits 3

32 Contact Hours 3 [X ] No [ ] Yes Liberal Arts None Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) urse Applicability Co _X_ Major ____ Gen Ed Required ___ Gen Ed - Flexible ___ Gen Ed - College Option ____ English Composition _ ___ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its Diversity College Option Detail ______________________________ ____ Science ____ Creative Expression ____Individual and Society ____Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2019 R : This c ourse is an elective in the Masters of International Affairs (MIA degree). It is designed to deepen student ationale knowledge of key issue in international affairs today broadly intersecting with the three existing tracks in the program. The class requires that students give consideration to some of the more complex policy issues facing the international community today providing a foundation for understanding some of the cutting edge challenges in global policy asking. T his course is an elective for the Master of Public Administration and Master of International Affairs programs, to be offered once per year with a projected enrollment of 15 students.

33 Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses Program Code: 20526 2102.00 HEGIS Code: te and Description in the BSPA program in the Marxe School of Public and AV: 2 .1 Changes in Prerequisi International Affair s CUNYFirst Course ID PAF 3401 FROM TO Departments Quantitative Methods for Policy and Course Course Quantitative Methods for Policy and Practice Practice Pre or co requisite STA 2100 and ENG 2150 Prerequisite ENG 2150 and either STA 2000 or PSY 2100 (equivalent to STA 2100) 3 Hours 3 Hours Credits Credits 3 3 This course focuses on the use of Description This course focuses on the use of Description quantitative information and analysis quantitative information and analysis to to under stand, interpret, promote, understand, interpret, promote, critique, critique, and inform the and inform the implementation of programs and policies. Real world cases implementation of programs and A statistical policies. Real world cases are are examined throughout. software package will be employed to Students use examined throughout. various Excel to analyze data with analyze selec ted data using various methods, such as simple regression. methods, such as simple regression.

34 Requirement Requirement Designation Designation [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute e Course Attribut (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Intensive, etc) Honors, etc) Course Course X _ Major Applicability Applicability _ X __ Major __ ____ Gen Ed Required ____Gen Ed Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ience ____ Science ____ Sc ___ Gen Ed Flexible ___Gen Ed Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World _____Gen Ed – College Option College Option Detail

35 Effective Term Fall 2019 One of the pre Rationale: -requisite courses for PAF 3401 (our required undergraduate statistics course) has been transferred from the Statistics Department to the Psychology Department, and this proposal updates the bulletin the bulletin description does not list STA 2000 (Business Statistics) description with the new course number. In addition, requisite course, even though this has been an option for some time and is currently coded in CUNY as a possible pre- First as an option. Finally, the language of the bulletin descriptio n has been updated to delete an outdated reference to Excel as the statistical package used in the course. Program Code: 01966 HEGIS Code: 2102.00 AV: 3 .1 Changes in Title and Description in the MPA program in the Marxe School of Public and Internatio nal s Affair CUNYFirst Course ID PAF 9145 FROM TO Departments Course Social Welfare Policy Course Poverty and Social Policy Pre or co requisite Prerequisite None None Hours Hours 3 3 Credits 3 Credits 3 Description This is a course about the poor and - This is a course about the poor and anti Description poverty programs in the United States. It -poverty programs in the United anti States. It focuses on measurement, focuses on measurement, extent, and distribution of poverty; causes of poverty; extent, and distribution of poverty; causes of poverty; tradeoffs faced by -makers in tradeoffs faced by policy policy -makers in reducing poverty and reducing poverty and economic issues economic insecurity; and insecur ity; and the spatial concentration

36 relating to the American underc lass. of poverty. It covers major social policies intended to reduce poverty and inequality, and the evidence on policy effectiveness. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation [ ] Yes [ X ] No Lib eral Arts [ ] Yes [X ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Writing Intensive, Intensive, Honors, Honors, etc) etc) Course Course X Applicability Applicability _ X __ Major __ _ Major ____Gen Ed Required ____ Gen Ed Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Science ___ Gen Ed Flexible ___Gen Ed Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its ___ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression ession ___ Creative Expr ___ Individual and Society ___ Individual and Society ___ Scientific World ___ Scientific World _____Gen Ed – College Option

37 College Option Detail Effective Term Fall 2019 Rationale: PAF 9145 has been taught several times. This proposal changes only the title of the course and the bulletin description to reflect better the current focus of the course on poverty -related issues and to capture the range of topics discussed in the course.

38 Borough of Manhattan Community College Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor's Report - N ovember 2018 P art A: Academic Matters S ection AI: SPECIAL ACTIONS: S ection AI.1.1: Online Certificate Program in Spanish Translation for the Health, Legal, and Busi ness Professions Resolved, that the undergraduate online certificate program in Spanish Translation for the Health, Legal, and Business Professions to be offered at Borough of Manhattan Community College be approved, effective S eptember 1, 2019. E xplanation: There is a growing need for translators in the fields of Health, Legal and Business. The higher demand for interpreters and translators results from the broadening of international ties and large increases in the number of non english speaking people in the U.S. In addition, the U.S. Department of Labor/Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that this is a rapidly growing need for translators and will increase 22% in this decade. Demand will be especially strong in Healthcare , Law and Business. T he proposed Certificate Program consists of 15 credits of which 9 of the credits are required and 6 additional credits must be chosen in a special area to complete the certificate. full proposal is on file in the Office of Academi c Affairs. A

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51 Table 3: Current Faculty, Part-Time information field or graduate members who are part-time at the institution and who will be teaching each course in the major Provide on faculty program. Faculty Member Name and Title/Rank Program Courses which may be Taught Highest and Other Applicable Additional Qualifications: (include and identify at Institution Earned and Disciplines Degrees list related Program Director) (include College/University) certifications/licenses; experience in professional field, scholarly contributions, other academic affiliations. 12

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61 Section II Changes in Generic Degree Requirements None Section III: Changes in Degree Programs AIII.1 NONE Section IV: NEW COURSES AIV.1 Modern Languages Department: se Number: SPN 471 Cour Title: Literature and Civilization of Spain SPN 211 or departmental approval or any 400 leve l Spanish course except SPN 476 Prerequisites: 3 hours Hours: Credits : 3 Course Description: This course offers a diachronic approach to the evolution of Spain through the examination of its social, political and cultural manifestations. By paying particular attention to its linguistic, regional, economic, and ethnical diversity as well as to the complex relationships held throughout the centurie s between Spain and the rest of the world, this course also promotes a richer understanding of some of the current situations faced by this country . This is an approved Pathways course. Rationale: AIV.2 Department: Music and Art ART 126 Course Number: Introduction to African Art Title: Prerequisites: None Hours: 3 hours Credits : 3 Course Description: This survey examines African artifacts, arts, and architecture from Prehistory to the present by introducing several cultures and regions and the producti on of art objects in each. Both Pre -Colonial Africa - and Post , as well as the influence of African art forms on will be considered to understand influences on indigenous African art tions and forms of art Objects produced by "Western" art. Emphasis is placed on distinguishing and analyzing the func diverse African cultures created in relation to socio -political frameworks. Attention will also be g iven to "traditional concepts" o f art history and so- called “primitive” art. This will promote a basic understand ing of the development of African visual traditions. Rationale: This is equivalent to courses offered at senior institutions such as Queens College.

62 AIV.3 Music and Art Department: Course Number: ART 295 -American Art Title: African ART102 ) or ART104 and ENG101 Prerequisites: ( Hours: 3 hours Credits : 3 Course Description: This course examines the role of Afr ican -American artists from the A ntebellum period to Contemporary Art. I , and will promote a general t focuses on historical, social, and political contexts, meanings understanding of the development of art forms and styles from different periods. Although emphasis is placed on visual traditions of sculpture, painting, performance art, photography, video, and media technologies, focus will also be placed on "folk art" traditions. A visit to a museum is required. This is equivalent to courses offered at senior institutions such as Queens College. Rationale: AIV.4 Department: Music and Art Course Number: ART 12 5 Introduction to Latin Ame Title: rican Art Prerequisites: None Hours: 3 hours : 3 Credits This survey examines the art and architecture of Latin America from the pre- Columbian era to the Course Description: present. The course begins with an analysis of pre -Hispanic iconography, styles, t raditions, and techniques in Meso, Central, South America, and the Caribbean. The art of colonial Latin America will be explored to understand the cultural complexity that characterized Spanish colonialism. The development of Modern art in Latin America, f ollowing independence and nation building in the 19th century, will be discussed as a series of responses to the influence of international movements and ideas. The course culminates in the exploration of Contemporary Latin American and Latina/o art, inclu ding Chicana/o art. Museum visit required. Rationale: This is equivalent to courses offered at senior institutions such as Queens College.

63 : C HANGES IN EXISTING COURSES Section V AV.1 NONE AV.2 Section VI: Courses Withdrawn NONE Section VII: Affiliation Agreements NONE

64 City College – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report AI. 1 CHEM 24300 Course Number Quantitative Analysis Course Title Rationale We erroneously filed a Course Withdrawn item for this course in the February 2017 Report. This course is being reinstated. AIII. 1 Change in Course requirements in the Master of Landscape Architecture II Program: MLA II Department: Architecture Program Code: 29276 HEGIS Code: Effective: Fall 2019 From To Course Number Course Number Name Crs Name Crs

65 Semester 1 Semester 1 LAAR 64150: Design Research...3 LAAR 64150: Design Research...3 LAAR 00000: History Elective...3 LAAR 00000: History Elective...3 LAAR 00000: Natural Systems Elective...3 Natural Systems Elective...3 LAAR 00000: LAAR 00000: Planning Elective...3 LAAR 00000: Planning Elective...3 LAAR 00000: Planning Elective...3 LAAR 00000: Planning Elective...3 LAAR 00000: History/Planning Elective...3 LAAR 00000: History/Planning Elective...3 Semester 2 Semester 2 LAAR 72100: Landscap 6 e Architecture Thesis Project... Landscape Architecture Thesis Project... LAAR 72100: 9 LAAR 00000: Urbanism Elective...3 LAAR 00000: Urbanism Elective...3 LAAR 00000: Professional Elective...3 LAAR 00000: Professional Elective...3 LAAR 00000: Professional Elective...3 LAAR 00000: Professional Elective...3 Elective...3 LAAR 00000: History Total Credits 36 Total Credits 36 Rationale: The curriculum change published in the January 2017 CUR lowered the thesis credit count from nine to six to more accurately reflect the current course content as described and assessed in the 2015 LAAB accreditation review and to reflect actual studio hours. This gives students the opportunity to focus -credit history course concurrent with the thesis project. (The previous change was not intended to on history research with an independently selected, 3 reduce the overall credit requirement of the program.) AIII. 2.1 Program: B.A. in Music – Popular Music Studies Concentration Music Department: Code: 02196, 60123 Program HEGIS Code: 1005.00 Effective: Fall 2019 From Requirements for the degree To Requirements for the degree Course # Course # Name Crs. Name Crs.

66 MUS 13200 - Leading I 3 MUS 21600 Music Production 3 Tonal Harmony and Voice Tonal Harmony and Voice Leading II 3 MUS 23100 Harmony I 3 MUS 23100 - Leading III 3 MUS 23200 - Harmony II 3 MUS 23200 Tonal Harmony and Voice Tonal Harmony and Voice - Leading IV 3 MUS 43100 Pop Composition 3 MUS 33100 3 MUS 26100 MUS 26100 Ear Training I 3 Aural Skills II Ear Training II 3 MUS 26200 3 MUS 26200 Aural Skills III History I: Antiquity through Renaissance 3 MUS 24100 MUS 24100 Minstrelsy to Rock ‘n’ Roll 3 MUS 24200 History II: Baroque through Classical Era 3 The 1960s to Today 3 MUS 24200 MUS 34100 History III: The Classic - Romantic Era 3 MUS 43300 Case Studies in Popular Music 3 MUS 16400 2 MUS 16400 Keyboard Skills I 2 Keyboard Skills I 2 MUS 26800 MUS 26400 Fretboard Skills 2 Keyboard Skills II MUS XXXXX 2 MUS 16500 Ensemble elective [160XX or 260XX] Voice Class I 2 MUS 34200 History IV: Late Romanticism - Present 3 MUS XXXXX Music electives (200 - level or higher) 9 MUS 16200 3 Aural Skills I MUS 36100 Aural Skills IV 3 Music subtotal 42 Music subtotal 42 120 B.A. degree Total credits for the B.A. degree 120 Total credits for the Rationale: The proposed changes will maintain the same number of credits and hours as in the existing BA curriculum. There are no changes to the required liberal arts and sciences courses. The proposed music curriculum represents an improved balance between conceptual and practical musical studies. It also modernizes the content to enable students to develop the skill set necessar y to succeed st in the 21 century. The number of alterations are results of minor changes to course titles or descriptions.

67 AIII. 2.2 Program: B.M. in Sonic Arts Music Department: 39313, 39314 Program Code: HEGIS Code: 1004.00 Effective: Fall 2019 degree To Requirements for the degree From Requirements for the Name Crs. Course # Name Crs. Course # 3 MUS 21800 The Recording Studio Environment 3 MUS 21800 The Recording Studio Environment Fundamental MIDI & Audio 3 MUS 21900 Production 3 MUS 21900 Fundamental MIDI & Audio Production Synthesis & Sound Design I 3 MUS 32100 MUS 32100 Synthesis & Sound Design I 3 MUS 32200 Synthesis & Sound Design II 3 MUS 32200 Synthesis & Sound Design II 3 Audio Production Techniques I 3 MUS 32500 Audio Production Techniques I 3 MUS 32500 Audio Production Techniques II 3 MUS 32600 3 MUS 32600 Audio Production Techniques II Microphone Applications I 3 MUS 32700 MUS 32700 Microphone Applications I 3 MUS 32701 Song Production Techniques 3 MUS 32701 Song Production Techniques 3 3 MUS 32800 Microphone Applications II Microphone Applications II 3 MUS 32800 MUS 32801 Music & Post Production Mixing 3 MUS 32801 Music & Post Production Mixing 3 MUS 36201 Instrumentation & Arranging for Commercial 3 MUS 36201 Instrumentation & Arranging for Commercial 3 Music Music Audio for Moving Images Audio for Moving Images 3 3 MUS 43500 MUS 43500 Advanced Recording 3 MUS 43600 Advanced Recording 3 MUS 43600 MUS 16400 Keyboard Skills I 2 MUS 16400 Keyboard Skills I 2 MUS 43400 MUS 43400 Internship 2 Audio & Music Industry Audio & Music Industry Internship 2 MUS 13200 Tonal Harmony and Voice - Leading I 3 MUS XXXXX Sonic Arts Music Electives (200 or higher) 4 MUS 23100 Leading II 3 MUS 23100 - Harmony I 3 Tonal Harmony and Voice Tonal Harmony and Voice - Leading III 3 MUS 23200 Harmony II 3 MUS 23200 MUS XXXXX MUS XXXXX 3 Music History Course Music History Course 3 ( unspecified (MUS 23700, 24100, 24200, or 43300) ) MUS 16200 3 MUS 26800 Aural Skills I Fretboard Skills I 2 Aural Skills II 3 MUS 26100 Ear Training I 3 MUS 26100

68 MUS 26200 3 MUS 26200 Ear Training II 3 Aural Skills III Music subtotal 64 Music subtotal 64 Total credits for the B.M. degree 120 Total credits for the B.M. degree 120 The proposed changes will maintain the same number of credits and hours as in the existing curriculum. There are no Rationale: changes to the liberal arts and sciences courses. The previous Sonic Arts audio technology requirements remain the same, the changes reflect approved changes to music courses they share with our B.A. curriculum (Popular Music Studies). (B.A. Rationale: The proposed music curriculum represents an improved balance between conceptual and practical musical studies. It also modernizes the st century.) content t o enable students to develop the skill set necessary to succeed in the 21

69 AIII. 3 BS in Psychology Program: Psychology Department: Program Code: 02268/60131 HEGIS Code: 2001.00 See Rationale below. Effective: From To Course Number Name Crs Course Number Name Crs Same Psychology, Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Same Requirements for Same Majors Same Same The majority of Psychology majors choose the BA program; however the BS program may offer advantages for those intend to go on to graduate/professional school students who in such fields as neuroscience, medicine, allied health professions, or other sciences. The BS is also a good choice for those students who have already completed the math and w, and those who are generally science requirements listed belo successful in math and science courses. To determine whether the BA or the BS is the better option for you, we recommend that you meet a Psychology Faculty Advisor. Same Required Courses for the BS in Psychology

70 Same Math and Science Courses: Same Any two of the following Calculus courses: (8 credits) Title Credits Course Number 4 Same 4 MATH 20100 Calculus I Calculus II 4 MATH 21200 4 MATH 20200 Calculus II Calculus III MATH 20300 4 MATH 21300 Calculus III 4 MATH 20500 Elements of Calculus 4 Same 4 Same 4 4 Elements of Calculus and Statistics MATH 20900 Same from the following (16 credits) Four courses Title Course Number Same Credits BIO 10100 Biological Foundations I 4 Same 4 BIO 10200 4 Same 4 Biological Foundations II Same 4 4 CHEM 10301 General Chemistry I General Chemistry II 4 Same 4 CHEM 10401 EAS 10600 4 Same 4 Earth Systems Science EAS 22700 4 Structural Geology Same 4 PHYS 20400 General Physics II 4 Same 4 4 PHYS 20700 Same 4 University Physics I 4 PHYS 20800 Same University Physics II 4 Same Take the following course (3 credits) Course Number Title Credits Same ENGL 21003 Writing for the Sciences 3 Same 3

71 Same (3 credits) One of the following three: Title Credits Course Number Same Applications of Psychology in the 3 3 PSY 10200 Modern World Psychology for Freshman Honors Same 3 3 PSY 10101 Students Same the Applications of Psychology in 3 3 PSY 10299 Modern World Same Take the following courses (6 credits) Course Number Credits Title PSY 21500 Applied Statistics 4 Same 4 PSY 32100 4 Same 4 Experimental Psychology courses (1 course Three "Gateway" Psychology from 3 of the 4 major areas of Psychology) (9 credits) Same Developmental Area Title Course Number Credits PSY 22600 Introduction to Life - Span Development 3 Same 3 Same OR Introduction to Human Development: Same PSY 24600 3 3 Infancy and Childhood

72 Social/Personality Area Same Title Credits Course Number 3 Same 3 PSY 24700 Social Psychology OR Psychology of Personality 3 Same 3 PSY 24900 Same Cognitive Area Title Credits Course Number Same Cognitive Psychology: Thinking, 3 3 PSY 25300 Knowing and Remembering Biological Area Title Credits Course Number 3 PSY 25400 3 Same Brain, Mind and Experience Same - Four Psychology Courses at the 30000 level or above (12 credits) Majors must place into calculus (Math 20100 or Math 20500 or Same higher) or may be required to complete the prerequisite through Math 19500. sequence Total Credit Hours: 59 Grade Point Average Requirements Same

73 A 2.0 GPA in the major is required for graduation. The GPA in Same the major is calculated from courses in the major based in the major department only, and that have been taken at City College or through ePermit, including all courses in excess of required for the degree. the minimum General Education Requirements ("Pathways") Same In general, students are required to complete 42 credits of Same General Education coursework, with some adjustments for transfer students. See the General Education Requirements ("Pathways") section of the Bulletin for more information. Rationale: This curriculum change is updating the curriculum to accommodate the course numbers changes to Math 20200 and Math 20300. MATH 20200 is renumbered to MATH 21200. This change is going into effect Spring 2019. MATH 20300 is renumbered to MATH 21300. This change is going into effect Fall 2019 .

74 AIII. 4 BS, BA in Geology Program: Earth and Atmospheric Science Department: BS: 02260/60114, BA: 60113 Program Code: 1914.00 HEGIS Code: Effective: SAME Geology, Bachelor of Science or Arts (B.S. or B.A.) Requirements for Majors SAME A GPA of 2.0 or higher in the major is required for SAME graduation. The GPA in the major is calculated from courses in the major based in the major department only, and that have been taken at City College or through the minimum ePermit, including all courses in excess of required for the degree. SAME The EAS Curriculum comprises a basic set of courses EAS Science and Math Courses and Basic Courses (Non- for EAS Majors) complemented by 33 credits of elective courses (Electives for Standard EAS Option). The E AS elective set is extensive and is supplemented by special topics courses offered on subjects of interest to students and faculty. Recent special topics courses have included Environmental Site Assessments, Geothermal Resources, nmental applications of the and a course on the enviro Matlab computer program. Under certain circumstances, selected courses from other departments may also be counted toward the major. This option is limited, however, and is approved on a case- by-case basis. Selections from the set of EAS electives are chosen in consultation with either Dr. Lampousis or Professor Kenyon, to ensure a coherent program.

75 It is recommended that EAS majors complete PHYS PHYS It is recommended that EAS majors complete PHYS 20300- 20700- 20400 sequence 20400 sequence PHYS 20300- 20800, though the 20700- 20800, though the MATH 20100- may b 20300 students. may be preferred for some MATH 20100 - e preferred for some students. MATH 20500- is recommended, but 21300 20900 is an 20900 is an MATH 20500- is recommended, but acceptable option for some students. Recommendations acceptable option for some students. Recommendations are on a case case basis. - by - - by - case basis. are on a case SAME Foundational courses for the EAS major must be completed before embarking upon related courses in the major. Students with appropriate background as demonstrated by the College’s Placement Exam may be exempted from some or all Foundational Courses. The foundational course for Earth Systems Science (EAS 500); this course must be 10600) is Pre -Calculus (Math 19 passed with a grade of C or higher (or students must place into a higher math course) in order to proceed to the next level. SAME STANDARD EAS OPTION, LEADING TO A B.S. DEGREE All EAS majors in the standard option must complete the SAME Basic Courses for EAS Majors with a grade of at least C in each course and pass 33 credits of courses from the elective list with a C average. Required Courses (for both Standard EAS and Secondary SAME Education options): SAME - EAS Science and Math Required Non Courses Normal Sequence (For Most Students): (28 Credits) Normal Sequence (For Most Students): (26 Credits) Title Credits Title Course Number Credits Calculus I 3 4 MATH 20100 Calculus II 4 3 Calculus II MATH 21200 MATH 20200 4 Calculus III 4 Calculus III MATH 20300 MATH 21300 4 General Chemistry I 4 SAME CHEM 10301

76 4 SAME 4 General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 4 SAME 4 University Physics I PHYS 20700 University Physics II 4 SAME 4 PHYS 20800 SAME Alternative Sequence (For Geobiology): (24 Credits) 4 SAME 4 Elements of Calculus MATH 20500 SAME Elements of Calculus and Statistics 4 4 MATH 20900 General Chemistry I 4 SAME 4 CHEM 10301 4 SAME 4 General Chemistry II CHEM 10401 SAME General Physics I 4 4 PHYS 20300 4 General Physics II 4 SAME PHYS 20400 SAME Basic EAS Courses: (22 credits) 4 Earth Systems Science 4 SAME EAS 10600 4 Systems Analysis of the Earth SAME 4 EAS 21700 4 Structural Geology 4 SAME EAS 22700 ESS Modeling/Databases SAME 3 3 EAS 30800 Environmental Geochemistry 3 SAME 3 EAS 41300 Environmental Project 4 - 6 6 SAME 4 - EAS 472** also accepted EAS 10600 ENGR 10610 : SAME SAME EAS Electives for Standard EAS Option SAME Choose 33 Credits From The Elective List Below Course Title Cr Credi SAME Number edits ts 1 SAME 1 Earth and Environmental Science EAS 30000 Seminar Honors I - IV Varia Variable SAME - EAS 301** ble cr. 304** . cr 3 Fundamentals of Atmospheric Science SAME 3 EAS 30900 4 Independent Study 1 - 4 SAME 1 - EAS 310**

77 - Selected Topics in Earth Systems 4 3 - 4 SAME 3 EAS 311** - Science 315** Global Environmental Hazards 3 SAME 3 EAS 32800 SAME Geographic Information Systems 3 3 EAS 33000 Phase I Environmental Site 3 SAME 3 EAS 33300 Assessments Phase II Environmental Site 3 SAME 3 EAS 33400 Assessments Hydrology 3 3 SAME EAS 34500 Coast and Ocean Processes 3 3 SAME EAS 36500 SAME Satellite Meteorology 3 3 EAS 41700 Environmental Remote Sensing and 3 3 SAME EAS 42600 Image Analysis Remote Sensing of the Ocean 3 3 SAME EAS 42700 3 Sedimentology 3 SAME EAS 43000 4 Mineral/Energy Resources SAME 4 EAS 43900 3 Groundwater Hydrology 3 SAME EAS 44600 Terrestrial, Aquatic and Atmospheric 4 SAME 4 EAS 44800 Systems Environmental Field Methods 3 3 SAME EAS 45000 SAME Climate Change 3 3 EAS 48800 Plate Tectonics/Geodynamics 3 3 SAME EAS 52800 SAME Geophysics 3 3 EAS 56100 Environmental Geophysics 3 3 SAME EAS 56500 Solid Earth Geochemistry SAME 3 3 EAS 56600 SAME Up To 9 Credits Of The 33 Credits Of Electives May Com - EAS Courses Below: e From The Non 4 Biological Foundations I SAME 4 BIO 10100 4 Biological Foundations II 4 SAME BIO 10200 3 Organic Chemistry I 3 SAME CHEM 26100 2 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I SAME 2 CHEM 26200

78 3 SAME 3 Organic Chemistry II CHEM 26300 Introduction for Computing 3 SAME 3 CSC 10200 Introduction to Satellite Remote 3 SAME 3 ENGR 30100 Sensing and Imaging Introduction to GIS 3 SAME 3 ENGR 59910 3 Methods of Differential Equations SAME 3 MATH 39100 Linear Algebra and Vector Analysis for 3 SAME 3 MATH 39200 Engineers Elements of Probability Theory 4 SAME 4 MATH 37500 Mathematical Statistics 4 4 SAME MATH 37600 3 Applied Statistics and Probability SAME 3 MATH 37700 SAME REQUIREMENTS FOR A B.A. IN EAS Cr Title Credi Course SAME Number ts edits B.A. Science Core 9 SAME 9 Required EAS 22 SAME 22 Courses 33 SAME 33 EAS Electives Total Credit Hours: 55 Total Credit Hours: 55 SAME ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS General Education Requirements ("Pathways") SAME SAME In general, students are required to complete 42 credits of General Education coursework, with some adjustments for transfer students. See the General Education section of the Bulletin for more Requirements (Pathways) information. Earth and Atmospheric Science students will satisfy their "Pathways" requirements most efficiently by following these recommendations: SAME Fixed Core SAME English Composition I: Number

79 Freshman Inquiry Writing Seminar 6 SAME 6 FIQWS SAME English Composition II: Writing for the Sciences 3 SAME 3 ENGL 21003 SAME Mathematical And Quantitative Reasoning: Course Cr Credi Title SAME edits ts Number Calculus I 4 4 SAME MATH 20100 SAME Life And Physical Sciences: Number SAME I 4 General Chemistry SAME 4 CHEM 10301 SAME Flexible Core SAME World Cultures And Global Issues: SAME any CLAS offerings in this category SAME Individual And Society: SAME any CLAS offerings in this category SAME U.S. Experience In Its Diversity: any CLAS SAME offerings in this category SAME Creative Expression: SAME any CLAS offerings in this category SAME Scientific World: SAME PHYS 20700 SAME Additional Course In Scientific World: General Chemistry II 4 4 SAME CHEM 10401 SAME College Option SAME Speech 3 Foundations of Speech SAME 3 SPCH 11100 Communication OR SAME SAME SPCH 00380 or exemption on the basis of demonstrated proficiency SAME SAME Foreign Language

80 Two semesters of college - SAME level study, or exemption on the school level study, or basis of two years of high- demonstrated proficiency. Rationale: This curriculum change is updating the curriculum to accommodate the course numbers changes to Math 20200 and Math 20300. MATH 20200 is renumbered to MATH 21200. This change is going into effect . Spring 2019 MATH 20300 is renumbered to MATH 21300. This change is going into effect Fall 2019 .

81 AIII. 5.1 Program: B.S. in Physics (Applied Physics Concentration) Physics Department: 02245, 60126 Program Code: HEGIS Code: 1902.00 See Rationale Below Effective: From To Name Course Number Crs Course Number Name Crs Basic Courses for all Physics Majors PHYS 20700 University Physics I Same 4 4 PHYS 20800 Same 4 University Physics II 4 Same PHYS 20900 University Physics III 4 4 Same PHYS 35300 3 3 Electricity & Magnetism I PHYS 36100 Same 4 Math. Methods in Phys. 4 PHYS 37100 Same Advanced Lab I 2 2 PHYS 45100 Same Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 3 3 Same Mathematics MATH 20100 4 Same Calculus I 4 MATH 21200 4 MATH 20200 Calculus II Calculus II 4 MATH 21300 4 Calculus III Calculus III 4 MATH 20300 MATH 39100 Same 3 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. 3 Same MATH 39200 3 Lin. Alg. & Vect. Analysis 3 Same General Science BIO 10100 Same 4 Biological Foundations 4

82 CHEM 10301 Same 4 General Chemistry I 4 Same CHEM 10401 General Chemistry II 4 4 Same Applied Physics Concentration Same PHYS 35100 4 4 Mechanics Same PHYS 35400 3 3 Electricity & Magnetism II PHYS 45200 Same 3 3 Optics Same PHYS 47100 2 Advanced Physics Lab II 2 Same PHYS 55100 4 4 Quantum Mechanics Same PHYS 55400 3 3 Solid State Physics 1 elective from the following (3 cr) Same Same PHYS 31000 3 Ind. Study 3 PHYS 31500 Same Medical Physics 3 3 PHYS 42200 Same 3 Biophysics 3 PHYS 42300 Same Biophysics Applications 3 3 PHYS 55200 Same Quantum Physics II 3 3 PHYS 45300 Same 3 3 Phys. Phot. I / Lasr. Opt. PHYS 45400 Same 3 3 Descriptive Astronomy PHYS 52200 Same 3 Biomedical Physics 3 PHYS 55500 Same Phys. & Chem. of Matrls 3 3 PHYS V0100 Same 4 Math. Meth. in Physics 4 Same PHYS V1100 4 4 Analytical Dynamics PHYS V1500 Same Electromag. Theory I 4 4 Same PHYS V1600 4 4 Electromag Theory II PHYS V2500 Same Quantum Mechanics I 4 4 PHYS V2600 Same Quantum Mechanics II 4 4 Same 76 78 Total credits 76 - 78 -

83 Rationale: This curriculum change is updating the curriculum to accommodate the course numbers to Math 20200 and Math 20300. MATH 20200 is renumbered to MATH 21200 . This change is going into effect Spring 2019 . MATH 20300 is renumbered to 21300 . This change is going into effect MATH Fall 2019 .

84 AIII. 5.2 Program: B.S. in Physics (Biomedical Physics Concentration) Physics Department: Program Code: 02245, 60126 1902.00 HEGIS Code: Effective: See rationale below From To Name Crs Course Number Name Crs Course Number Basic Courses for all Physics Majors Same PHYS 20700 4 University Physics I Same 4 Same PHYS 20800 4 4 University Physics II Same PHYS 20900 4 University Physics III 4 PHYS 35300 Same Electricity & Magnetism I 3 3 Same PHYS 36100 4 4 Math. Methods in Phys. PHYS 37100 Same Advanced Lab I 2 2 PHYS 45100 Same 3 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 3 Same Mathematics MATH 20100 4 Calculus I Same 4 Calculus II MATH 21200 MATH 20200 Calculus II 4 4 MATH 21300 Calculus III 4 Calculus III 4 MATH 20300 MATH 39100 Same Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. 3 3 Same MATH 39200 3 3 Lin. Alg. & Vect. Analysis General Science Same BIO 10100 Same Biological Foundations 4 4 CHEM 10301 Same 4 Chemistry I General 4

85 CHEM 10401 Same 4 General Chemistry II 4 Same Comp. Science (1 from the following) MATH 32800 Same Meth. of Num. Analysis 3 3 Same MATH 36600 Intro. Appl. Math. Comp. 3 3 Same CSC 10200 3 3 Intro. to Computing Same CSC 10400 4 Discrete Math. Structures 4 Same Biomedical Physics Concentration Same PHYS 42200 3 3 Biophysics CHEM 26300 Same 3 Organic Chemistry II 3 CHEM 32002 Same Biochemistry I 3 3 PHYS 55100 Same 4 Physics I Quantum 4 PHYS 55600 Same 1 Current Topics 1 Same and Same PHYS 52200 3 3 Biomedical Physics, or Same with permission of major advisor: Same PHYS 42300 3 Biophysics Applications 3 Same BIO 22900 4 4 Cell and Molecular Bio BIO 35400 Same 3 3 Intro. to Neurobio. Same CHEM 42500 3 Inorganic Chemistry 3 Same CHEM 43400 3 3 P.Ch & Chem Ins Lab II CHEM 48005 Same Biochemistry II 3 3 1 elective from the following (3 cr) Same

86 PHYS 31000 Same Ind. Study PHYS 31100 - 3 3 Same Sel. Topics 32000 PHYS 31500 Same Medical Physics 3 3 Same PHYS 35100 3 3 Mechanics Same PHYS 35400 4 4 Electricity & Magnetism II PHYS 45200 Same 3 3 Optics Same PHYS 45300 3 Op 3 Phys. Phot. & Las. PHYS 45400 Same 3 3 Descriptive Astronomy PHYS 52200 Same 3 Biomedical Physics 3 Same PHYS 55400 3 3 Solid State Physics PHYS 55500 Same 3 Phys. & Chem. of Matrls. 3 Same PHYS V0100 3 3 Math. Meth. in Physics Same PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics 4 4 PHYS V1500 Same 4 4 ElectroMag Theory I PHYS V1600 Same 4 ElectroMag Theory II 4 PHYS V2500 Same 4 Quantum Mechanics I 4 PHYS V2600 Same 4 4 Quantum Mechanics II Total credits 77 - 79 77 - 79 Rationale: This curriculum change is updating the curriculum to accommodate the course numbers to Math 20200 and Math 20300. MATH 20200 is renumbered to MATH 21200 . This change is going into effect Spring 2019 . Fall 2019 MATH 20300 is renumbered to . This change is going into effect MATH 21300 .

87 AIII. 5.3 Program: B.S. in Physics (Secondary Education Concentration) Physics Department: Program Code: 02245, 60126 1902.00 HEGIS Code: Effective: See rationale below. From To Name Crs Course Number Name Crs Course Number Same Basic Courses for all Physics Majors University Physics I 4 Same 4 PHYS 20700 PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 Same 4 University Physics III 4 Same 4 PHYS 20900 Same 3 3 PHYS 35300 Electricity & Magnetism I Math. Methods in Phys.* 4 PHYS 36100 Same 4 PHYS 37100 Advanced Lab I 2 Same 2 3 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. Same 3 PHYS 45100 Mathematics Same Same 4 4 Calculus I MATH 20100 4 Calculus II MATH 21200 Calculus II MATH 20200 4 4 Calculus III MATH 21300 III Calculus MATH 20300 4 MATH 39100 3 Meth. Of Diff. Eqs. Same 3 MATH 39200 Lin. Alg. & Vect. Analysis 3 Same 3 Same General Science BIO 10100 Biological Foundations 4 Same 4 CHEM 10301 4 General Chemistry I Same 4 General Chemistry II 4 Same 4 CHEM 10401

88 EAS 10600 4 Same 4 Earth Systems Science* Same Secondary Education Concentration Mechanics 4 Same 4 PHYS 35100 3 Same 3 Electricity & Magnetism II PHYS 35400 Electives to be chosen in consultation Same 6 6 with the advisor 67 67 Total credits Same *Physics majors in this concentration will Same have a choice between PHYS 36100 or EAS 10600. Rationale: This curriculum change is updating the curriculum to accommodate the course numbers to Math 20200 and Math 20300. MATH 20200 is renumbered to MATH 21200. This change is going into effect Spring 2019 . MATH 20300 is renumbered to MATH 21300. This change is going into effect Fall 2019 .

89 AIII. 5.4 Program: B.S. in Physics (Standard Concentration) Physics Department: HEGIS Code: 1902.00 Program Code: 02245, 60126 Effective: See rationale below To From Name Crs Course Number Course Number Name Crs Core Requirements Basic Courses for all Physics Same Majors University Physics I 4 PHYS 20700 Same 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II 4 Same 4 Same 4 4 PHYS 20900 University Physics III Electricity & Magnetism I 3 Same 3 PHYS 35300 PHYS 36100 4 Same 4 Math. Methods in Phys. PHYS 37100 2 Advanced Lab I Same 2 PHYS 45100 Thermo. & Stat. Phys. 3 Same 3 Mathematics Same MATH 20100 4 Same 4 Calculus I MATH 21200 Calculus II MATH 20200 4 Calculus II 4 MATH 21300 Calculus III 4 4 MATH 20300 Calculus III MATH 39100 3 Same 3 Meth. Of Diff. Eq. MATH 39200 3 Lin. Alg. & Vect. Analysis Same 3 General Science Same BIO 10100 Biological Foundations 4 Same 4

90 CHEM 10301 4 Same 4 General Chemistry I General Chemistry II 4 Same 4 CHEM 10401 Comp. Science (1 from the Same following) 3 Same 3 MATH 32800 Meth. of Num. Analysis Same Intro. Appl. Math. Comp. 3 3 MATH 36600 Intro. to Computing 3 Same 3 CSC 10200 Discrete Math. Structures 4 Same 4 CSC 10400 Same Standard Physics Concentration Mechanics 4 Same 4 PHYS 35100 3 PHYS 35400 Same 3 Electricity & Magnetism II PHYS 47100 2 Advanced Physics Lab II Same 2 PHYS 55100 Quantum Mechanics 4 Same 4 PHYS 55200 3 Same 3 Quantum Physics II Current Topics 1 Same 1 PHYS 55600 1 Elective from the following Same Same 3 PHYS 31000 3 Independent Study PHYS 31500 3 Medical Physics Same 3 PHYS 42200 Biophysics 3 Same 3 PHYS 42300 3 Same 3 Biophysics Applications 3 PHYS 45400 Same 3 Descriptive Astronomy PHYS 52200 3 Biomedical Physics Same 3 PHYS 55400 Solid State Physics 3 Same 3 PHYS 55500 3 Phys. & Chem. of Matrls. Same 3 PHYS V0100 Math. Meth. in Physics 4 Same 4 PHYS V1100 Analytical Dynamics 4 Same 4

91 PHYS V1500 4 Same 4 Electromag. Theory I 4 PHYS V1600 Same 4 Electromag. Theory II PHYS V2500 4 Quantum Mechanics I Same 4 PHYS V2600 Quantum Mechanics II 4 Same 4 Total credits 77 - 79 79 77 - Same Rationale: This curriculum change is updating the curriculum to accommodate the course numbers to Math 20200 and Math 20300. MATH 20200 is renumbered to MATH 21200. This change is going into effect Spring 2019 . MATH 20300 is renumbered to MATH 21300. This change is going into effect Fall 2019 .

92 AIII. 6.1 BS in Chemistry Program: Chemistry Department: Program Code: 02257, 60102 1905.00 HEGIS Code: See Rationale below. Effective: Same Chemistry, Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Same FOR MAJORS REQUIREMENTS A GPA of 2.0 or higher in the major is required for graduation. Same The GPA in the major is calculated from courses in the major based in the major department only, and that have been taken at City College or through ePermit, including all courses in excess of the minimum required for the degree. Same Foundational Courses Foundational courses for all undergraduate programs for Same Chemistry must be completed before embarking upon related courses in the major. Students with appropriate background as demonstrated by the College’s Placement Exam may be exempted from some or all Foundational Courses. The foundational course for Calculus I ( MATH 20100) is Pre - Calculus ( MATH 19500), and this course must be passed or higher in order to proceed to the next with a grade of C level. The foundational course for General Chemistry I MATH 19500), and this (CHEM 10301) is Pre -Calculus ( course must be passed with a grade of C or higher in order to proceed to the next level. Same Non - Chemistry Core Requirements s 4 Biological Foundations I 4 Same BIO 10100

93 Calculus I 4 4 MATH 20100 Same Calculus II 4 Calculus II 3 MATH 20200 MATH 21200 Calculus III 4 MATH 20300 University Physics I 4 4 PHYS 20700 Same 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II Same One Of The Following Two: Earth Systems Science 4 4 EAS 10600 Same Biological Foundations II 4 4 Same BIO 10200 All Chemistry majors must complete "Chemistry Core s" and either the "Standard Chemistry Concentration" Course or one of the alternative concentrations. Students may also elect to satisfy the American Chemical Society Certification requirements. CHEMISTRY CORE COURSES Same Required Courses 4 General Chemistry I 4 CHEM 10301 Same General Chemistry II 4 4 CHEM 10401 Same Quantitative Analysis 4 4 CHEM 24300 Same 2 Physical Introduction to CHEM 25000 Chemistry 3 Organic Chemistry I 3 CHEM 26100 Same Organic Chemistry II 3 3 Same CHEM 26300 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 3 3 Same CHEM 27200 3 3 Physical Chemistry I Same CHEM 33000 Total Credit Hours: 26 Total Credit Hours: 24 Same STANDARD CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION Same Required Courses 3 Biochemistry I 3 Same CHEM 32002

94 2 2 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I CHEM 33100 Same Physical Chemistry II 3 3 Same CHEM 33200 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 3 3 CHEM 37400 Same Inorganic Chemistry 3 3 CHEM 42500 Same Physical Chemistry and Chemical 3 3 CHEM 43400 Same Instrumentation Laboratory II CHEM 33100: Spring semester only Same CHEM 43400: Fall semester only Same Same Total Credit Hours: 17 Same ENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATION Same Required Courses 3 Biochemistry I 3 Same CHEM 32002 2 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 2 Same CHEM 33100 3 3 Physical Chemistry II CHEM 33200 Same 3 3 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II CHEM 37400 Same 3 Environmental Chemistry 3 CHEM 40600 Same Environmental Chemistry 2 2 Same CHEM 40601 Laboratory 3 Environmental Organic Chemistry 3 Same CHEM 40700 3 3 Inorganic Chemistry Same CHEM 42500 3 3 Physical Chemistry and Chemical CHEM 43400 Same Instrumentation Laboratory II CHEM 33100: Spring semester only Same Same CHEM 43400: Fall semester only Same Total Credit Hours: 25 Same SECONDARY EDUCATION CONCENTRATION

95 Major requirements are listed below. Pedagogical Same Department of requirements are listed in the Education section in this Bulletin. Same Required Courses Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 2 2 CHEM 33100 Same Physical Chemistry II 3 3 CHEM 33200 Same Physical Chemistry and Chemical 3 3 CHEM 43400 Same Instrumentation Laboratory II Total Credit Hours: 8 Same Same ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS All Chemistry majors must maintain a C average in Chemistry Same courses. No courses beyond General Chemistry may be taken unless a C is obtained in all prerequisite courses (or permission is received from the Chair). General Education Requirements ("Pathways") Same Same In general, students are required to complete 42 credits of General Education cours ework, with some adjustments for General Education Requirements transfer students. See the (Pathways) section of the Bulletin for more information. Chemistry students will satisfy their "Pathways" requirements most efficiently by following these recommenda tions: Same Fixed Core Same English Composition I: Freshman Inquiry Writing Seminar 6 6 Same FIQWS Same Composition II: English 3 Writing for the Sciences 3 ENGL 21003 Same Same Mathematical And Quantitative Reasoning: Calculus I 4 4 Same MATH 20100 Same Life And Physical Sciences: 4 4 General Chemistry I Same CHEM 10301

96 Same Flexible Core Same World Cultures And Global Issues: any CLAS offerings in this category Same Same Individual And Society: any CLAS offerings in this category Same Same U.S. Experience In Its Diversity: any CLAS offerings in this category Same Same Creative Expression: any CLAS offerings in this category Same Same Scientific World: Biological Foundations I 4 Same 4 BIO 10100 Same Additional Course In Scientific World: General Chemistry II 4 Same 4 CHEM 10401 OR Same University Physics I 4 PHYS 20700 Same Same College Option Same Speech Foundations of Speech 3 3 Same SPCH 11100 Communication OR Same SPCH 00380 Same or exemption on the basis of demonstrated proficiency in a Same foreign language Same Foreign Language two semesters of college - level study, or exemption on the Same school level study basis of two years of - high Same Philosophy any CLAS offerings in this category Same

97 Rationale: This curriculum change is updating the curriculum to accommodate the course numbers changes to Math Spring 2019 . 20200. MATH 20200 is renumbered to MATH 21200. This change is going into effect This curriculum change adds CHEM 25000, which was approved to replace MATH 21300. PHYS 20800 and CHEM 24300 were omitted in error.

98 AIII. 6.2 BS/MS in Chemistry Program: Department: Biochemistry 34757 Program Code: 1905.00 HEGIS Code: Effective: See Rationale below. Chemistry, Bachelor of Science/Master of Science (B.S./M.S.) The Combined BS/MS Degree The primary purpose of the B.S./M.S. degree The primary purpose of the B.S./M.S. degree program is program is to prepare chemistry majors for to prepare chemistry majors for positions in industry. In positions in industry and to enable students addition, students who want to strengthen their ration for who want to strengthen their prepa preparation for graduate and professional schools would graduate and professional school education. also benefit from this program. The combined B.S./M.S. The combined B.S./M.S. degree program is degree program is designed to be completed in five designed to be completed in five years, and is years, and is research intensive. Students will complete research intensive. Students will complete three three semesters of undergraduate research plus another semesters of undergraduate research plus two semesters of research at the graduate level which f research at the another two semesters o culminates in a master’s thesis. graduate level which culminates in a master’s thesis. Prospective students are expected to have a strong Same undergraduate background in the sciences and a desire to perform research. Students will be considered for admission generally during their junior year after they meet the requirements for admission to the Chemistry major and have three of the five required core Chemistry courses for this program. A total of 75 credits must be fulfilled before an application will be considered. St udents

99 must have a 3.0 minimum GPA in chemistry courses and a 3.0 overall GPA. Furthermore, students must be working on a research project with a mentor. A recommendation letter from the research mentor on the ch will be student’s ability to conduct scientific resear required. A total of 145 credit hours is required to complete the combined B.S./M.S. degree program, and students will benefit from early faculty advisement and mentoring. Same REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS A GPA of 3.0 or higher in the major is required for A GPA of 2.0 or higher in the major is required for graduation. The GPA in the major is calculated from graduation. The GPA in the major is calculated from courses in the major based in the major department courses in the major based in the major department only, and that have been taken at City College or through only, and that have been taken at City College or the minimum ePermit, including all courses in excess of through ePermit, including all courses in excess of the required for the degree. minimum required for the degree. Same Foundational Courses Foundational courses for all undergraduate programs for Same Chemistry must be completed before embarking upon related courses in the major. Students with appropriate background as demonstrated by the College’s Placement Exam may be exempted from some or all Foundational Courses. The foundational course for Calculus I ( MATH MATH 19500), and this course -Calculus ( 20100) is Pre of C or higher in order to must be passed with a grade proceed to the next level. The foundational course for CHEM 10301) is Pre -Calculus General Chemistry I ( (MATH 19500), and this course must be passed with a grade of C or higher in order to proceed to the next level. - Non Chemistry Core Requirements Biological Foundations I 4 4 Same BIO 10100 4 Calculus I 4 MATH 20100 Same 4 Calculus II 4 Calculus II MATH 21200 MATH 20200 Calculus III 4 MATH 20300

100 4 4 University Physics I PHYS 20700 Same 4 PHYS 20800 University Physics II One Of The Following Two: Earth Systems Science 4 4 Same EAS 10600 Biological Foundations II 4 4 BIO 10200 Same CHEMISTRY CORE COURSES Core All Chemistry majors must complete "Chemistry Courses" and either the "Standard Chemistry Concentration" or one of the alternative concentrations. Students may also elect to satisfy the American Chemical Society Certification requirements. Required Courses General Chemistry I 4 4 Same CHEM 10301 General Chemistry II 4 4 Same CHEM 10401 4 Quantitative Analysis 4 CHEM 24300 S ame 2 Introduction to Physical CHEM 25000 Chemistry Organic Chemistry I 3 3 CHEM 26100 Same Organic Chemistry II 3 3 CHEM 26300 Same Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 3 3 Same CHEM 27200 Physical Chemistry I 3 3 Same CHEM 33000 26 Total Credit Hours: 24 Total Credit Hours Same REQUIREMENTS FOR BS/MS DEGREE Same General Requirements General Education Requirements: 28 General Education Requirements 21 Same Additional BS Degree Requirements 3 Biochemistry I 3 CHEM 32002 Same 2 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 2 Same CHEM 33100

101 3 3 Physical Chemistry II CHEM 33200 Same Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 3 3 CHEM 37400 Same Physical Chemistry and Chemical 3 3 Same CHEM 43400 Instrumentation Laboratory II Methods of Differential Equations 3 MATH 39100 Electives Chemistry Electives 9 9 CHEM Same Total Credit Hours: 9 9 Same Honors Research Honors Research I 3 3 Same 3 Honors Research II 3 Same Honors Research III 3 3 Same 9 Total Credit Hours: 9 Same Total BS Degree Credits 113 Total BS Degree Credits 107 MS Degree Requirements Inorganic Chemistry 5 5 Same CHEM B1000 Organic Mechanisms 5 5 Same CHEM B5000 Thesis Research 10 10 Same CHEM B9901 - B9905 Chemistry - Physics - Engineering 1 CHEM A8200 Seminar I 1 - Physics - Engineering Chemistry CHEM A8300 Seminar II Same Electives: (10 Credits) MS Chem Any combination of Chemistry MS courses that totals 10 Same credits. Total MS Degree Credits 30 Total MS Degree Credits 32 TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 143 TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 145 Rationale: This curriculum change is updating the curriculum to accommodate the course numbers changes to Math 20200. MATH 20200 is renumbered to MATH 21200. This change is going into effect Spring 2019 .

102 Rationale: This curriculum change adds CHEM 25000, which was approved to replace MATH 213 00. Rationale: PHYS 20800 and CHEM 24300 were omitted in error. MATH 39100 was included in error. Rationale: Two seminar courses have been absorbed into the 10 credits of electives; this change and the drop in total MS credits to 30 have been vetted with the Division of Science (Liz Rudolph).

103 AIV. 1 Studio Art Program: Spring 2019 Effective: Career [x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental Academic Level ] Remedial [ Course Number Art 23200 Course Title Introduction to Bookbinding Prerequisite Art 10200 None Corequisite Hours 3 Credits 3 Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) This introductory course will familiarize students with the basic materials (paper, cloth, board, Catalog Description and adhesives), and techniques (folding, sewing, gluing), used in bookbinding. Students will make several structures, including a pamphlet, an accordion, a stab bind, a glue bind, and a bound multi -section book. General Education [ x ] Not Applicable Component [ ] ] Required [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World

104 Rationale There is high demand for this course, Introduction to Bookbinding has run previously as a special topics class ( Art 31569) and fills within the first few hours of registration. This course is a logical extension within printmaking area but will serve the entire art department and whole student body.

105 AIV. 2 BA in English Program: English Department: Program Code: 02220 Effective: Fall 2019 X Undergraduate Graduate Career Ph.D. Course Subject & Number ENGL 21200 Introduction to Language Studies Course Title Prerequisite(s) English 110 or FIQWS WHUM 10100 or 10200 or 10300 Corequisite (s) Credits 3 3 Hours Liberal Arts & Sciences Yes X No (As defined by NYSED) Former Special Topics Course Number (if applicable ) Catalog Description This course examines intersections of language and society, introducing important theories about how language is used, perceived, taught, and treated in the US and beyond. The course provides opportunities to investigate societal structures and attitudes s urrounding language that create and uphold hierarchies, empowering some groups and disadvantaging others. Hybrid Online/Hybrid Fully Online Web Enhanced Online Partially Online X Not Applicable Experiential Learning Not Applicable X Opportunities (ELO) COPED CVEG RFS IALO (if applicable) Attributes CPP CWL INTERN SLCS Does this course fulfill a Not Applicable X Flexible Core General Education World Cultures & Global Issues College Option Requirement? US Experience in its Diversity Required Core English Composition Creative Expression

106 Individual and Society Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Scientific World This course invites beginning students to analyze and interrogate a variety of language practices and ideologies. Rationale Such inquiry is especially important for understanding implications of standard language ideology and its applications to educational practice s, the media and popular culture, and opportunities in the workforce.

107 AIV. 3 Psychology Department: Fall 2019 Effective: Career [x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ Academic Level ] Remedial Course Number PSY 37900 Course Title Neurobiology and Mental Health Prerequisite PSY 10101 or 10200; PSY 24900 or PSY 25400; PSY 32100 None Corequisite 3 Hours 3 Credits [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description This course introduces research and theory on the biological bases of human behavior. We will explore the relation between mental health, psychopathology, and the nervous system. Students will learn how neurobiological sciences inform our understanding and treatment of mental illness by viewing videos, and reading chapters, case studies, and articles the neurobiology of mental health. [ x ] General Education Not Applicable [ ] Required Component [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Mathematics Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World

108 Rationale Psychology majors are required to take four courses (12 cr) at the 300 - level or above, and this course helps fulfill that requirement. The course brings together neuroscience with clinical/counseling psychology and therefor e has relevance to students pursuing both directions within psychology. For students pursuing clinical or counseling psychology, it is increasingly necessary to have a foundation in the underlying neurobiology. For students pursing neuroscience, this cours e will introduce them to real world application in the field of mental health.

109 AIV. 4 Department: Chemistry & Biochemistry Effective: Fall 2019 [X] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Career [X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number CHEM 25000 Mathematics for Physical Chemistry Course Title Grade of C or better in MATH 20100, MATH 21200 Prerequisite Corequisite 3 Hours 2 Credits [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Catalog Description This course emphasizes computational chemistry mathematical methods. Topics include multidimensional integration, differential equations and elementary linear algebra. General Education [ ] Not Applicable [ ] Required Component [ ] Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] [ ] Creative Expression Science [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Rationale Department Approval March 1, 2018. The CCNY Mathematics Department announced the restructure of its Calculus I, Calculus II, and Calculus III courses, which will affect the requirements for Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. MATH 20300 [now renumbered as 21300] will be eliminated as a requirement for all Chemistry & Biochemistry majors. CHEM 25000 will replace MATH 20300 as a

110 prer equisite for CHEM 33200 and CHEM 43500, and maintain the required 10 credits of Math. The goal of the new course will be to train Chemistry and Biochemistry students in complex analysis topics and prepare them for Physical Chemistry courses. AV. 1.1 Fall 2019 Effective: To From MUS 23100 Course # Same Course Number Tonal Harmony and Voice - Leading II Course Name Harmony I Course Name Prerequisite MUS 13200 Prerequisite Permission of the department: only students who pass the music theory placement exam (offered at the beginning of each term) may enroll in 23100. None Corequisite Same Corequisite Hours 3 Hours Same Credits 3 Credits Same Same Liberal Arts [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes Description A continuation of harmony and voice - leading study of A study of contemporary tonal harmony, melody, Description and voice leading. Concepts include pentatonic and the common -practice diatonic vocabulary: predominant chords, predominant seventh chords -based tonalities, diatonic modes, and an blues and their inversions, cadential embellishment, introduction to functional harmony. Work includes tone seventh chords, VI, embellishing tones, leading- song analysis and compos ition. quences, and 6/4 chords. III and VII, se Rationale The revision makes better use of students’ musical experience and knowledge to introduce them to the abstract concepts explor ed in the music theory sequence. It also accelerates the possibility of creative compositional work in the sequence. Shifting the entry- level course from the 100 -level to the 200 -level better reflects the expectation of some prior musical training and performing experience upon entry to the major. Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Gen Ed Desig. Same

111 AV. 1.2 Effective: Fall 2019 To From Course Number Course # Same MUS 23200 Tonal Harmony and Voice - Course Name Course Name Harmony II Leading III Prerequisite MUS 23100 Prerequisite Same None Corequisite Same Corequisite Hours 3 Hours Same Credits Credits Same 3 [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Same Liberal Arts The study of form in common - practice tonal music Description Continuing study of contemporary tonal harmony, Description and detailed analytic techniques. Topics include: melody, and voice leading. Concepts include sentences, periods, binary and rounded binary form, diatonic modes, functional harmony, and mode ternary form, rondo mixture. Work includes analysis and composition. form, and sonata theory. Rationale The revision makes bet ter use of students’ musical experience and knowledge to introduce them to the abstract concepts explored in the music theory sequence. It also increases the possibility of creative compositional work in the sequence. Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Gen Ed Desig. Same

112 AV. 1.3 Fall 2019 Effective: To From Course Number Course # Same MUS 43100 Pop Music Composition Course Name Course Name Same Prerequisite MUS 23100 or 35700, 21600, or permission of the 23200, or permission of the Prerequisite MUS 21600 and department. department. None Corequisite Corequisite Same Hours 3 Hours Same Credits Credits Same 3 Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes Previously unspecified? [ ] No Description Intensive work in the compositional practices of Same Description contemporary popular music genres. Through modeled compositions students engage the distinct practices of varied popular music styles. Rationale The prerequisite revision reflects the change in course numbers in the required music theory sequence leading up to this course. Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Gen Ed Desig. Same

113 AV. 1.4 Fall 2019 Effective: To From Course Number Course # Same MUS 24100 History I: Antiquity through the Renaissance Course Name Minstrelsy to Rock ‘n’ Roll Course Name Prerequisite MUS 13200 Prerequisite MUS 23100 MUS 21000 and Corequisite Corequisite Same None Hours 3 Hours Same Credits 3 Credits Same Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] No [ X ] Yes Same Description Musical thought of the Middle Ages. Evolution of from 1880 to the 1950s. History of popular music Description plainchant; origins and organization of polyphony, Ars Music ranging from late minstrelsy and Tin Pan Alley Nova. Modes, musica ficta, trends toward to the beginnings of Rock ‘n’ Roll and modern homophony. Mass, motet, chanson, and madrigal in Country explored in terms of cultural developments, technology, economics, and politics. 15th and 16th centuries. Rationale The examination of popular music styles builds on students' existing musical experience and knowledge, allowing them to pursue historical issues (such as race, gender, sexuality, politics, etc.) to a greater depth than is possible when dealing with entirel y unfamiliar repertoire. The styles and developments covered are more closely related to the contemporary musical landscape in which our students hope to participate after graduation. Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Gen Ed Desig. Same

114 AV. 1.5 Fall 2019 Effective: To From Course Number Course # Same MUS 24200 History I: Baroque through the Classical Era Course Name The 1960s to Today Course Name Prerequisite MUS 23100 and MUS 24100 Prerequisite MUS 23100 Corequisite Corequisite Same None Hours 3 Hours Same Credits 3 Credits Same Liberal Arts [ ] No Liberal Arts Same [ X ] Yes Monody and basso continuo. Emergence of opera, Description History of popular music from the 1960s to the Description oratorio, cantata and Passion. The suite, concerto current music scene. Music ranging from the grosso and baroque sonata. Learned, galant and emergence of Rock and Motown to Punk and bourgeois styles. Beginnings of classical sonata, Reggae to Gangsta Rap and Alternative Rock symphony, concerto, chamber music. explored in terms of cultural developments, technology, economics, and politics. Rationale The examination of popular music styles builds on students' existing musical experience and knowledge, allowing them to pursue historical issues (such as race, gender, sexuality, politics, etc.) to a greater depth than is possible when dealing with entirely unfamiliar repertoire. The styles and developments covered are more closely related to the contemporary musical landscape in which our s tudents hope to participate after graduation. Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Gen Ed Desig. Same

115 AV. 1.6 Fall 2019 Effective: To From Course Number Course # Same MUS 43300 Advanced Analysis Course Name Case Studies in Popular Music Course Name Prerequisite MUS 33100 Prerequisite MUS 24100 or MUS 34100 Corequisite Corequisite Same None Hours 3 Hours Same Credits 3 Credits Same Liberal Arts [ ] No Liberal Arts Same [ X ] Yes Studies of complete works of the 18th and 19th Description A course in the analysis and interpretation of Description selected moments in popular music history. The - and centuries, with consideration of both micro macrocosmic relationships. Readings from the works music will be examined through specific analytical of influential theorists. and philosophical lenses. There will be six units: two on pre -WWII music, one rock, one hip -hop, one on a less prominent genre, and one on pop of the 2000s. Rationale The examination of popular music styles builds on students' existing musical experience and knowledge, allowing them to pursue historical issues (such as race, gender, sexuality, politics, etc.) to a greater depth than is possible when dealing with entirel y unfamiliar repertoire. The styles and developments covered are more closely related to the contemporary musical landscape in which our students hope to participate after graduation. Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Gen Ed Desig. Same

116 AV. 1.7 Effective: Fall 2019 To From Course Number Course # Same MUS 26100 Aural Skills II Course Name Ear Training I Course Name Prerequisite Prerequisite Permission of the department: only students who MUS 16200 pass the music theory placement exam (offered at the beginning of each term) may enroll in 26100. MUS 23100 Corequisite None Corequisite Hours 3 Hours Same Credits 3 Credits Same Same Liberal Arts [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes Description Rhythm, singing, sight - singing, and dictation skills. singing, and dictation skills - Rhythm, sight ion Descript -singing melodies corresponding to the concepts covered in Harmony The course involves singing/sight -practice Western tonal and melodies from common I. Pentatonic and diatonic melodies, melodic and -voice, two literature, and dictation of one -voice, and harmonic dictation. Work includes song analysis and harmonic exercises. The content covers the full range simple improvisation. of diatonic practice. Rationale The revision makes bette r use of students’ musical experience to introduce them to the practical concepts explored in the ear - training sequence. Shifting the entry- level to the 200 -level better reflects the expectation of some prior level course from the 100- musical training and performing experience upon entry to the major. Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Gen Ed Desig. Same

117 AV. 1.8 Fall 2019 Effective: To From MUS 26200 Course # Course Number Same Aural Skills III Course Name Ear Training II Course Name MUS 26100 Prerequisite Prerequisite Same Corequisite MUS 23200 Corequisite None Hours Hours Same 3 Credits 3 Credits Same Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Same Description singing, and dictation skills - singing, and dictation skills. - Rhythm, sight Description Rhythm, singing, sight corresponding to the concepts covered in Harmony -singing melodies The course involves singing/sight -practice Western tonal and melodies from common II. Diatonic and chromatic melodies, melodic and -voice, and literature, and dictation of one -voice, two harmonic dictation. Work includes song analysi s and harmonic exercises. The content covers melodic improvisation. chromaticism, mode mixture, and applied dominants to V. Rationale The revision makes better use of students’ musical experience and knowledge to introduce them to the practical concepts explo red in the ear - training sequence. It also increases the possibility of creative improvisational wor k in the sequence. Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Gen Ed Desig. Same

118 AV. 1.9 Fall 2019 Effective: To From Course Number Course # Same MUS 26800 Class Instruction in Guitar Course Name Fretboard Skills Course Name Prerequisite Prerequisite Permission of the department: only students who None. pass the music theory placement exam (offered at the beginning of each term) may enroll in 26800. None. Corequisite Same Corequisite Hours 2 Hours Same Credits 1 Credits 2 Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Previously unspecified? Description Previously unspecified? Description Introduction to guitar basics corresponding to the concepts covered in Harmony I. Common chords, scales, and progressions. Work includes simple co mposition and improvisation. Rationale The increased credits correspond to the class contact hours and brings it in line with other two - hour courses in the department. The change in pre - /co - requisites reflects its status and location as a required course in the revised BA curriculum. Gen Ed Desig. [ X ] Not applicable Gen Ed Desig. Same

119 AV. 2.1 Program: Mathematics Effective: Spring 2019 From To X Undergraduate Graduate Career Career X Undergraduate Graduate Math 20200 Course Number Math 21200 Course Number Calculus II Course Name same Course Name Prerequisite A grade of C or higher in MATH 20100 or A grade of C or higher in MATH 20100, or Prerequisite (Part of placement by the Department. placement by the Department. After 200, MATH sequence MATH 20100, MATH 21 completion of MATH 20900, only 3 credits (Part of will be given for MATH 20200. 21300.) 200, 0 sequence MATH 20100, MATH 2 0 MATH 2 300.) Corequisite Corequisite Hours Hours same 4 Credits 4 Credits same Required for Major? Required for Major? Yes Yes X No No X X Liberal Arts? Yes No Liberal Arts? X Yes No Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Web Enhanced Online Online Web Enhanced Fully Online Fully Online Description Techniques of integration, improper same Description integrals, infinite sequences and series, parametric equations, vectors and the geometry of space, functions of several variables and partial differentiation.

120 Rationale significant changes were made to the content of the STEM calculus sequence at CCNY. In order to Last year, proposing new course numbers the revised courses. MATH 21200 will be the avoid confusion, we are for two of course in the sequence a for the new second nd MATH 21300 will be the number for the new third number We course. MATH 20200 and Math 20300 will be eliminated as MATH 21200 and Math 21300 are phased in. need to be able to distinguish between the former Math 20200, which is no longer a sufficient prerequisite for the new Math 20300 (requested to be renumbered to Math 21300 for similar reasons), when the new version takes effect in spring 2019. Not Applicable X Not Applicable General General Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required X Required English Composition English Composition X Mathematics Mathematics Science Science Flexible Flexible World Cultures World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

121 AV. 2.2 Program: Mathematics Effective: Spring 2019 From To X Undergraduate Graduate Career Career Undergraduate Graduate X 0 300 Math 2 Math 21300 Course Number Course Number Calculus III Course Name same Course Name Prerequisite A grade of C or higher in MATH 2 0 200 or 200, or Prerequisite A grade of C or higher in MATH 2 1 placement by the Department. successful completion of Math 21201 and grade of C or higher in Math 20200, or placement by the Department. Corequisite Corequisite Hours Hours same 4 Credits 4 Credits same Required for Major? Required for Major? Yes No X X Yes No X Yes No Liberal Arts? Liberal Arts? Yes No X Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Fully Online Fully Online Applications of partial differentiation, same Description Description -valued functions, multiple integrals, vector vector fields, line integrals, and theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. Rationale Last year, significant changes were made to the content of the STEM calculus sequence at CCNY. In order to avoid confusion, we are course numbers for two of the revised courses. MATH 21200 will be the proposing new sequence and MATH 21300 will be the number for the new third for the new second course in the number

122 course. We need to be able MATH 20200 and 20300 will be eliminated as MATH 21200 and 21300 are phased in. te for Math 39100, to distinguish between the former Math 20300, which is no longer a sufficient prerequisi when the new version of Math 20300 takes effect in fall 2019. We must also change the prerequisites, as indicated above, because of the insufficiency of the old Math 20200 as a prerequisite for the new Calculus III. For students who fail ed the old Math 20200 and/or 20300 courses, or who need to complete the sequence for other reasons after MATH 20200 or 20300 have been removed, zero -credit workshops, numbered MATH 21201 and Math 21301, respectively, will be offered as part of temporary al ternative prerequisites to Math 21300 and Math 39100, respectively. Math 21201 will be on introductory multivariable calculus. It is necessary for the study of the material in Math 21300. This material is in the new Math 21200 syllabus but was not covered in the old Math 20200. Not Applicable X Not Applicable General General Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation X Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics X Mathematics Science Science Flexible Flexible World Cultures World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

123 AV. 2.3 Program: Mathematics Effective: Spring 2019 From To X Undergraduate Graduate Career Career X Undergraduate Graduate Math 34600 Course Number same Course Number Elements of Linear Algebra Course Name Course Name same Prerequisite MATH 20300; coreq Math 20300 and MATH 21200, or Math 20300, or departmental Prerequisite (After permission. departmental permission. completion of Math 39200 only 2 credits will be given for Math 34600.) Corequisite Corequisite 3 Hours same Hours Credits 3 Credits same Required for Major? Required for Major? Yes No X X Yes No Liberal Arts? Yes No Liberal Arts? X Yes No X Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Fully Online Fully Online Description same Vector spaces, basis and dimension, Description matrices, linear transformations, determinants, solution of systems of linear equations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Rationale The needed prerequisite material about vectors and three dimensional Euclidean space that was in Math 20300 is now in Math 21200, so either course suffices. X Not Applicable X Not Applicable College Option College Option

124 General Required General Required Education Education English Composition English Composition Designation Designation Mathematics Mathematics Science Science Flexible Flexible World Cultures World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

125 AV. 2.4 Program: Mathematics Effective: Fall 2019 From To X Undergraduate Graduate Career X Undergraduate Graduate Career Math 39100 Course Number same Course Number Methods of Differential Equations Course Name same Course Name Prerequisite Prerequisite MATH 2 1 200 and Math 21300, or Math 20200 MATH 20300. and Math 21301 and Math 21300, or Math 20200 and Math 20300, or departmental permission. Corequisite Corequisite 3 Hours same Hours Credits same 3 Credits Required for Major? Required for Major? Yes, appl math X No, pure or No, pure or math ed X X Yes, appl math X math ed Yes No Liberal Arts? X X Yes No Liberal Arts? Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Web Enhanced Online Online Web Enhanced Fully Online Fully Online First order equations; higher order Description same Description linear equations with constant coefficients, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, applications; Euler's equation, series solutions, special functions; linear systems; elementary partial differential equations

126 and separation of variables; Fourier series. Last year, significant changes were made to the content of the STEM calculus sequence at CCNY. In order to Rationale course numbers the revised courses. MATH 21200 will be the proposing new avoid confusion, we are for two of course in the sequence and MATH 21300 will be the number for the new third number for the new second We need to be able MATH 20200 and 20300 will be eliminated as MATH 21200 and 21300 are phased in. course. te in conjunction with to distinguish between the former Math 20200, which is no longer a sufficient prerequisi the new Math 21300 for Math 39100, and Math 21200. For students who failed the old courses, or who need to -credit complete the sequence for other reasons after MATH 20200 or 20300 have been removed, zero workshops, numbered MATH 2120 1 and 21301, respectively, will be offered as part of temporary alternative prerequisites to Math 21300 and 39100, respectively. Math 21301 will be a workshop on sequences and series, topics necessary for the study of the material in Math 39100. These used to be in the old Math 20300 but have been moved to the new Math 21200 syllabus. Material from Calculus III, in either the old or new sequence, is also needed. General X Not Applicable General Not Applicable X Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics Mathematics Science Science Flexible Flexible World Cultures World Cultures US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

127 AV. 3 BA Political Science Program: Fall 2019 Effective: From To Course Number Course Number Same PSC 21304 Course Name Reinventing Freedom Course Name Modern Freedom This course explores how the Analyzes the major writings of the Description Description European Enlightenment Enlightenment, the century that has redefined the idea of human done more than any other to shape the Unlike the classical freedom. current sense of modernity and Enlightenment the world, freedom, particularly in the American insisted on equality, thus paving people. In dealing with questions the way for both the articulation regarding belief and the place of - of human rights and broader in a politically just society; religion based participation in the regarding the justification for political political process. We read works obedience and the legitimation of the ranging from political tracts to political order; regarding economic -poems to short novels and prose justice and how it can be achieved; and deas still explore how these i regarding the place and possibilities for shape our political world. women in the political world, students realize that this era marks the reinvention of freedom that has catapulted us into the modern age. None Prerequisite None Prerequisite Corequisite None Corequisite Same Hours 3 Hours Same 3 Credits Same Credits

128 Rationale The new description offers a more accurate understanding of the thematic and analytic changes introduced into this course and the different readings now included. AV. 4.1 Program: M Arch I Architecture Department: 26614 Program Code: Fall 2019 Effective: From To Career Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate [ ] Undergraduate [X] Graduate Course Number ARCH 74100 Course Number same Course Name Architecture Studio 1.4 Course Name same Prerequisite Prerequisite ARCH 71301 none Corequisite Corequisite same None Hours 12 Hours same Credits 9 Credits same Liberal Arts?? [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc)

129 Description Description - semester Same The fourth and final studio in the four focuses on building systems core sequence integration, structural systems, and technical documentation. In this integrative design studio students develop a building from schematic design through design development, and finally through the construction documents phase. With an emphasis on energy efficiency, this studio provides students with an opportunity to synthesize the knowledge they have acquired in their core studies with respect to program preparation, sustainable design and building technology. Rationale The formal addition of a digital prerequisite reinforces the sequential nature of the M Arch curriculum and ensures that students are fully prepared for the studio, focusing on building systems integration.

130 AV. 4.2 M Arch I Program: Architecture Department: Program Code: 26614 Fall 2019 Effective: To From [ ] Undergraduate [X] Graduate Career Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Course Number ARCH 85101 Course Number same Course Name Course Name same Advanced Studio Prerequisite none Prerequisite ARCH 85201 and ARCH 74501 and ARCH 74401 Corequisite None Corequisite same Hours Hours same 8 Credits same Credits 6 [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts?? Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Students will be placed in one of an array of same Description Description diverse advanced studio offerings, developed to provide students opportunity to deeply engage topics within the expansive discipline of architecture, and reflective of the expertise and interests of the full design faculty. Studio project sizes, types and sites will vary, along with pedagogical methods. Course is taken two times in sequence to meet third year M Arch program requirements. R ationale The formal addition of prerequisites reinforces the sequential nature of the M Arch curriculum and ensures that students have the necessary foundation for advanced coursework.

131 AV. 4.3 Program: M Arch I Architecture Department: Program Code: 26614 Fall 2019 Effective: To From [ ] Undergraduate [X] Graduate Career Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Course Number ARCH 85200 Course Number same Course Name Course Name same Design Seminar Prerequisite none Prerequisite ARCH 85201 Corequisite None Corequisite same Hours Hours same 3 Credits 3 Credits same Liberal Arts?? [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Description This required seminar course focuses on special same Description topics of study that support and broaden the 3rd year M Arch design curriculum. Rationale The formal addition of a prerequisite reinforces the sequential nature of the M Arch curriculum and ensures that students have the necessary foundation for advanced coursework.

132 AV. 4.4 M Arch I Program: Architecture Department: Program Code: 26614 Fall 2019 Effective: From To [ ] Undergraduate [X] Graduate Career Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Course Number ARCH 85300 Course Number same Course Name Course Name same Advanced Computing Prerequisite none Prerequisite ARCH 62001 and ARCH 71301 Corequisite None Corequisite same Hours Hours same 3 Credits 3 Credits same Liberal Arts?? [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) This new required fifth semester course builds Description same Description upon the digital skills students have acquired over the 4 semesters of the core and introduces them to advanced topics in computing. Emphasis is on scripting, parametric modeling, and data visualization and covers such software as Revit, Grasshopper, Solid Works, and Ecotect. Rationale The formal addition of digital prerequisites reinforces the sequential nature of the M Arch curriculum and ensures that students have the necessary foundation for advanced coursework.

133 AV. 5.1 Effective: Fall 2019 To From Undergraduate Graduate Career Career Undergraduate Graduate X Course Subject & Course Subject & EAS 30900 Same Number Number Fundamentals of Atmospheric Science Name Same Course Course Name 20300 or MATH 20900 (or equivalent) or MATH 20900 (or Prerequisite MATH Prerequisite MATH 21300 equivalent) and PHYSICS 20700 or PHYSICS and PHYSICS 20700 or PHYSICS 20400 (or 20400 (or equivalent), or permission of equivalent), or permission of instructor. instructor. Corequisite Corequisite 3 Credits Same Credits Hours Same Hours 3 Liberal Arts & Sciences Sciences Liberal Arts & No Yes Yes No (As defined by NYSED) (As defined by NYSED) Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Online Not Applicable Fully Online Not Applicable Fully Online Description Description Rationale Update of prerequisites to match Math 21300 course number change. Not Applicable General Not Applicable General Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics and Quantitative Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences

134 Flexible Flexible World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

135 AV. 5.2 Effective: Fall 2019 To From X Graduate Undergraduate Graduate Career Undergraduate Career Course Subject & Course Subject & Same EAS 34500 Number Number Hydrology Same Course Name Course Name MATH 20300 or MATH 20900, PHYSICS 208 or MATH 20900, PHYSICS 208 or Prerequisite Prerequisite MATH 21300 PHYSICS 204, and EAS10600 or ENGR10610, or or PHYSICS 204, and EAS10600 or ENGR10610, or permission of instructor. permission of instructor. Corequisite Corequisite ts Credits Same Credi 3 3 Hours Same Hours Liberal Arts & Sciences Liberal Arts & Sciences Yes Yes No No (As defined by NYSED) (As defined by NYSED) Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Online Fully Online Not Applicable Fully Online Not Applicable Description Description Rationale Update of prerequisites to match Math 21300 course number change. General Not Applicable Not Applicable General Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics and Quantitative Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences Flexible Flexible

136 World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

137 AV. 5.3 Effective: Fall 2019 To From Undergraduate Graduate Career Undergraduate Graduate Career X Course Subject & Course Subject & EAS 41700 Same Number Number Same Satellite Meteorology Course Name Course Name MATH 20300 , and PHYS 20800, or Prerequisite , and PHYS 20800, or permission Prerequisite MATH 21300 permission of instructor. of instructor. Corequisite Corequisite 3 Credits Credits Hours Hours 3 Liberal Arts & Sciences Liberal Arts & Sciences No Yes No Yes (As defined by NYSED) (As defined by NYSED) Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Online Fully Online Not Applicable Fully Online Not Applicable Description Description Rationale Update of prerequisites to match Math 21300 course number change. General Not Applicable Not Applicable General Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics and Quantitative Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences Flexible Flexible

138 World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

139 AV. 5.4 Change in Existing Course Form Effective: Fall 2019 To From Undergraduate Graduate Career Career Undergraduate Graduate X Course Subject & Course Subject & EAS 44600 Same Number Number Groundwater Hydrology Same Course Name Course Name 20300 or MATH 20900, and Prerequisite Prerequisite: MATH Prerequisite Prerequisite: MATH 21300 or MATH 20900, and PHYS 20800 or PHYS 20400, and EAS PHYS 20800 or PHYS 20400, and EAS 10600 or 10600 or ENGR 10610, or permission of ENGR 10610, or permission of instructor instructor Corequisite Corequisite Credits Same Credits 3 3 Hours Same Hours Liberal Arts & Sciences Liberal Arts & Sciences Yes No Yes No (As defined by NYSED) (As defined by NYSED) Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Online Not Applicable Fully Online Not Applicable Fully Online Description Description Rationale Update of prerequisites to match Math 21300 course number change. Not Applicable General Not Applicable General Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics and Quantitative Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences

140 Flexible Flexible World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

141 AV. 6.1 Department: Physics Effective: Spring 2019 From To x Undergraduate Career Graduate Career x Undergraduate Graduate Course Subject & Course Subject & PHYS 20700 Same Number Number Course Name Same Course Name University Physics I Math 20200 Prerequisite Math 21200 Prerequisite - Co Math 20200 Co - requisite Math 21200 requisite Credits 4 Credits Same Hours 4 Hours Same Liberal Arts & Sciences Liberal Arts & Sciences No No X Yes X Yes (As defined by NYSED) (As defined by NYSED) Hybrid Online/Hybrid Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Partially Online Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Fully Online Fully Online Description Calculus based introductory physics course Same Description covering: vectors, kinematics, Newton's laws, equilibrium, gravitation, motion in a plane, work and energy, impulse and momentum, rotation and angular momentum, simple harmonic motion, fluids, heat, and thermodyna mics. (Required for all students in the Physical Sciences, Engineering and Computer Science.) Rationale MATH 20200 has been renumbered to MATH 21200

142 General Not Applicable General Not Applicable Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics and Mathematics and Quantitative Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences Flexible Flexible World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

143 AV. 6.2 Department: Physics Spring 2019 Effective: From To X Undergraduate Graduate Career X Undergraduate Graduate Career Course Subject & PHYS 20800 Course Subject Same & Number Number Course Name University Physics II Course Name Same MATH 21300 20700 , MATH 20300 Prerequisite PHYS 20700 , Prerequisite PHYS MATH 20300 Corequisite MATH 21300 Corequisite Credits 4 Credits Same Hours 3 lect., 2 rec. hr./wk., 2 lab/wrkshp. hrs. Hours Same Liberal Arts & No X Yes No Liberal Arts & Yes X Sciences Sciences (As defined by (As defined by NYSED) NYSED) Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Web Enhanced Online Online Web Enhanced Fully Online Not Applicable Fully Online Not Applicable Description Calculus based introductory physics course Same. Description covering: waves and acoustics, electrostatics, magnetism and electromagnetism, direct and alternating current, geometrical and physical optics. (Required for all students in the Physical Sciences, Engineering and Computer Science.)

144 Rationale MATH 20300 has been renumbered to MATH 21300 Not Applicable Not Applicable General General Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics and Mathematics and Quantitative Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences Flexible Flexible World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

145 AV. 6.3 Department: Physics Effective: Spring 2019 From To X Undergraduate Career Graduate Career X Undergraduate Graduate Course Subject & Course Subject & PHYS 20900 Same Number Number University Physics III Course Name Same Course Name 20700, Physics 20800 and Math 20300 Physics 20700, Physics 20800 and Math 21300 Physics Prerequisite Prerequisite Co - Co - requisite requisite 4 Credits Same Credits Hours 4 hr./ wk. Hours Same Liberal Arts & Sciences Sciences Liberal Arts & X X Yes No No Yes (As defined by NYSED) (As defined by NYSED) Hybrid Online/Hybrid Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Partially Online Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Not Applicable Fully Online Not Applicable Fully Online Calculus - based study of the basic concepts Description Same Description of wave motion, physical optics, and modern physics. Topics include: Wave equation, Electromagnetic Waves, Dispersion; Interference, Diffraction, Polarization; Special Theory of Relativity; Particle properties of Waves, Photoelectric Effect, Compton Effect; Wave Properties of -particle duality; The Particles, Wave Nuclear Atom, Bohr Model, Franck -Hertz Experiment; The Schrodinger Equation,

146 Harmonic Oscillator, Hydrogen Atom; Atomic Physics; Molecular Structure and Atomic Spectra; Structure of Solids, Conduction; Nuclear Physics, Nuclear Structure, Nuclear Force, Radioactivity. Rationale MATH 20300 has been renumbered to MATH 21300 Not Applicable General General Not Applicable Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics and Mathematics and Quantitative Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences Flexible Flexible World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

147 AV. 6.4 Department: Physics Effective: Spring 2019 From To X Undergraduate Career Graduate Career X Undergraduate Graduate Same Course Subject PHYS 32100 Course Subject & Number & Number Course Name Same Modern Physics for Engineers Course Name PHYS 20800 or equivalent, MATH 20300 or MATH 21300 or Prerequisite PHYS 20800 or equivalent, Prerequisite MATH 20900 MATH 20900 - Co - requisite Co requisite 3 Credits Same Credits Hours 3 lect. hr./wk. Hours Same Liberal Arts & Liberal No X Yes No Yes X Arts & Sciences Sciences (As defined by (As defined by NYSED) NYSED) Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Web Enhanced Online Online Web Enhanced Fully Online Not Applicable Fully Online Not Applicable Description Introductory historical background, Same Description elementary quantum theory, application to -electron atoms, atomic shell structure one and periodic table; nuclear physics, relativity and statistical mechanics. Concepts, quantitative work and problem sets are emphasized.

148 Rationale MATH 20300 has been renumbered to MATH 21300 Not Applicable Not Applicable General General Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition Mathematics and Mathematics and Quantitative Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences Flexible Flexible World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

149 AV. 7.1 Effective: From To X Undergraduate Graduate Career X Undergraduate Graduate Career Course Subject & Course Subject & Bio 22800 Same Number Number Ecology and Evolution Course Name Same Course Name Prerequisite Prerequisite Corequisite Bio 20600; Math 20900 OR Math 17300, Bio 20600; Math 20900 OR Math 17300, OR Corequisite Prereq Math 20200 OR Math 21200 OR Prereq Math 20200 4 Same Credits Credits 2 lect, 4 lab Hours Same Hours Liberal Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Liberal X X Yes No Yes No (As defined by NYSED) (As defined by NYSED) Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Online Fully Online Not Applicable Fully Online Not Applicable Description Same Description Introduction to the basic principles of ecology and evolutionary biology emphasizing quantitative approaches and hypothesis testing. Computer literacy is attained using spreadsheets and the Internet. Rationale Math 20200 is being phased out to be replaced by Math 21200 so we are adding Math 21200 as an acceptable prereq. Eventually we will remove Math 20200 as a prereq. General Not Applicable General X Not Applicable X Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition

150 Mathematics and Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning Quantitative Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences Flexible Flexible World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

151 AV. 7.2 To From Undergraduate Graduate Career X Undergraduate Graduate Career X Course Subject & Course Subject & Bio 45500 Same Number Number Advanced Ecology Course Name Same Course Name Bio 22800; Math 20900 OR Math 17300 or Prerequisite Prerequisite Bio 22800; Math 20900 OR Math 17300 OR Math 20200 OR Math 21200 Math 20200 Corequisite Corequisite 3 Credits Same Credits Hours Same Hours 3 Liberal Arts & Sciences Liberal Arts & Sciences Yes No No Yes (As defined by NYSED) (As defined by NYSED) Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online/Hybrid Hybrid Partially Online Online Web Enhanced Online Web Enhanced Fully Online Not Applicable Fully Online Not Applicable Description Same Description Introduction to the analytical techniques necessary to quantify modern ecological theory. Emphasis on application of mathematical tools and computers to population growth, interspecific models of interactions and ecosystem function. Rationale Math 20200 is being phased out to be replaced by Math 21200 so we are adding Math 21200 as an acceptable prereq. Eventually we will remove Math 20200 as a prereq. General Not Applicable General Not Applicable Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition

152 Mathematics and Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning Quantitative Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences Flexible Flexible World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

153 AV. 8 To From x Undergraduate Graduate Career x Career Undergraduate Graduate Course Subject & Course Subject & CHEM 33000 Same Number Number Physical Chemistry 1 Course Name Same Course Name Prerequisite Prerequisite C or higher in CHEM 10401; CHEM 25000 C or higher in CHEM 10401; MATH 203 PHYS 20800 (recommend as prereq.) Corequisite Same Corequisite 3 Credits Same Credits Hours Same 3 Hours Liberal Arts & Sciences Liberal Arts & Sciences Yes X No No X Yes (As defined by NYSED) (As defined by NYSED) Online/Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid Online/Hybrid Online Online Fully Online Fully Online Description Ideal and real gases, kinetic molecular Same Description theory, thermodynamics and phase equilibria, solutions. Rationale We have replaced the Math 203 (now 213) prerequisite with CHEM 250, a mathematical introduction to Physical Chemistry. General Not Applicable X Not Applicable General X Education Education College Option College Option Designation Designation Required Required English Composition English Composition

154 Mathematics and Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning Quantitative Reasoning Life and Physical Sciences Life and Physical Sciences Flexible Flexible World Cultures & Global World Cultures & Global Issues Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World

155 INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE AGREEMENT RESOLUTION , the City College of New York (“CCNY”) and the Munich University of Applied Sciences in Munich, Germany (“Munich UAS”) WHEREAS recognize the mutual benefits of scholastic interaction between their respective institutions; and , CCNY and Munich UAS have developed a program of study denominated the City College -Munich UAS Exchange Program to be WHEREAS offered to their respective students during the academic year (the “Program”); and WHER EAS , the term of this agreement is for a three- year period beginning March 1, 2019 and including two 2- year options to renew; and WHEREAS , it is anticipated that up to two (2) exchange students from each institution will be enrolled in the program during t he 2018- 19 academic year; NOW, THEREFORE , be it : That the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York authorize the President of City College of New York to execu te an RESOLVED international student exchange agreement for study abroad on behalf of City College of New York with Munich University of Applied Sciences (“Munich UAS ”), located in Munich, Germany. The agreement is for a three -year period beginning March 1, 2019 and shall include up to two two - year options for the College to renew in i ts best interest. The agreement shall be subject to approval as to form by the University Office of General Counsel.

156 EXPLANATION This agreement will enable students enrolled in the College’s CCNY -Munich UAS Exchange Program to study at Munich : University of Applied Sciences and Munich University of Applied Sciences students to study at the City College of New York, with enrollment available during the fall and spring semesters. Undergraduate and graduate students in architecture at CCNY and Munich UAS are eligible Neither party to this agreement is obliged to pay any monetary consideration to the other. The equivalent of two (2) exchange students to apply. per institution per academic year are expected to participate.

157 New York City College of Technology Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters Section AI: Special Actions Articulation Agreement for the NYCCT BFA in Communication Design Al.1 AS in Graphic Design and with BCC A Illustration ode: 21403 Program C Effective Date: Fall 2018 A. SENDING AND RECEIVING INSTITUTIONS Sending Institution: Bronx Community College Department: Art and Music Graphic Design and Illustration Program: Degree: Associate in Applied Science Degree (AAS) Receiving Institution: New York City College of Technology Department: Department of Communication Design Program: Communication Design Degree: Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) B. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SENIOR COLLEGE PROGRAM Admission • The A.S. degree and a minimum GPA of 2.00 • Grade of C or better in a credit -bearing mathematics course worth three or more credits* • Grade of C or better in freshman composition, its equivalent, or a higher -level English course* *(Effective 10/1/08, per Univers ity policy)

158 Students who wish to transfer but do not meet all of the above requirements or are unable to enroll within two years after gr aduation will receive admission consideration under our standard transfer credit policies. Total transfer credits gr anted toward the baccalaureate degree: 60/61 Total additional credits required at the senior college to complete baccalaureate degree: 60 Total credits required for the BFA in Communication Design: 120 C. TRANSFER CREDIT AWARDED (60 credits) Common Core Credits Required ENG 110 Fundamentals of Composition and Rhetoric OR ENG 111 Compositions & 12/13 - Rhetoric I ENG 112 Composition & Rhetoric II OR ENG 113 Writing About Literature OR ENG - 114 Written Composition & Prose Flexible Common Core Credits A. World Cultures and Global Issues 18 f the Modern World OR HIS 111ntroduction To the Modern World (3 HIS 10 History o cr) C. Creative Expression ART 11 Introduction to Art History OR ART 12 introduction to Art History Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Middle East (3 cr) D.Individual and Society Select one from COMM 11 Fund amentals of Interpersonal Communication (3 cr) A -D - Flexible Core A, B, C, or D. Select one from ANT, COMM, ECO, ENG,GEO, HIS, MOD LAN, MUS 11,PHI, POL, PSY,OR SOC (3 cr) Others GEN ED courses taken as part of the discipline ART 55 Mod ern Art (3 Credits) ART 56 Graphic and Digital Design History (3 Credit) Courses in the Discipline Credits

159 30 ART 15 Design Basics (2cr) ART 21Drawing (2cr) ART 22 Painting (2cr) n (2cr) ART 72 Digital Photography & Motion Graphics (2cr) ART 79 Typographic Desig ART 81Typography and Layout (2 cr) ART 82 Illustration (2cr ) ART 84 Digital Imaging (2cr) ART 86 Digital Illustration (2cr) ART 87 User Interface Design (2cr) Design ( 2cr ) ART 89 Publication or ART 88 Web Animation (2cr) ART 90 Graphic Desi gn Project ( 2 cr ) or ART 93 Web Design Project (2cr) ART 91Design Portfolio OR ART 32 ART 97 Web Portfolio OR ART 32 or OR ART 41 Printmaking Printmaking OR ART 41 i OR ART 9S I t d ti t C i OR ART 9S I t d ti t 3D C - • Free Elective (0 2 Credits) • FYS 11 First Year Seminar (1Credit) • PEA Physical Education activity course OR HLT 91CriticalIssues in Health (1-2 Credits) D. SENIOR COLLEGE UPPER DIVISION COURSES REMAINING FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREE (60 credits) GENERAL EDUCATION: College Option Requirement Credits

160 6 • One Speech class (COM 1330 or higher) if not already taken (if already taken then nced liberal arts course an adva • One interdisciplinary Liberal Arts and Sciences course Writing Intensive Requirement Students at New York City College of Technology must complete two courses designated Writing Intensive (WI) for the associate eneral Education and one from the major; and two additional level, one from G courses designated WI for the baccalaureate degree, one from General Education and one from the major. Program Specific Coursework COMD 2320 introduction to Video (must complete first semes ter at City Tech) /3 cr 45 COMD 2400 Communication Design II (must complete first semester at City Tech) /3 cr COMD 3504 Design Theory /3 cr ANY four SK ILL courses (from list) {12 credits) ANY three STRATEGY courses (from list) (9 credits) MD 3701 Design Studio /3 cr CO COMD 4701 Design Team 3 cr COMD 4801 Portfolio /3 cr COMD 4830 Senior Project /3 cr COMD 4900 (WI) Internship/ 3 cr COMD additional elective credits to reach 120 credits 9 E. Articulation Agreement Follow -Up Procedu res

161 1. Procedures for reviewing, updating, modifying or terminating agreement: • Bronx Community College and New York City College of Technology will review implementation of the agreement every four years, or as soon as a program has undergone revisions, to ensure that students are adequately informed of the program and to identify issues requiring attention. When either of the degree programs involved in this agreement undergoes a change, the agreement will be reviewed and revised accordingly by faculty f rom each institution's respective departments or programs, selected by their Chairpersons and program directors. 2. Procedures for evaluating agreement, e.g., tracking the number of students who transfer under the articulation agreement and their success: • Each year New York City College of Technology (City Tech} will provide Bronx Community College (BCC) the following information: a) the number of BCC students who enrolled; d) the aggregate GPA of these enrolled students at City Tech. 3. Sending and recei ving college procedures for publicizing agreement, e.g.college catalogs, transfer advisers, Websites, etc.: • Technology This articulation agreement will be publicized on the Bronx Community College's and New York City College of websites. Transfer advisors at BCC will promote this agreement with eligible students. Al.2 Articulation Agreement for the NYCCT BTech in Electrical Technology with BCC AAS in Electronic Engineering Technology 36279 Program Code: Fall 2018 Effective Date: A. S ENDING AND R ECEIVING I NSTITUTIONS : Bronx Community College of the City University of New York Sending College Department: Engineering, Physics and Technology Program: Electronic Engineering Technology Degree: Associate in Applied Science

162 : New York City College of Technology of the City University of New York Receiving College Department: Electrical & Telecommunications Engineering Technology Program: Electrical Technology Degree: Bachelor of Technology B. OLLEGE DMISSION S ENIOR C EQUIREMENTS FOR P ROGRAM A R AAS in Electronic Engineering Technology from Bronx Community College with a minimum GPA of 2.5 Bronx Community College graduates with the AAS in Electronic Engineering Technology will receive 64 credi ts toward the Bachelor of Technology in Electrical Technology at New York City College of Technology. Total transfer credits granted toward the baccalaureate degree: 64 Total additional credits required at the senior college to complete baccalaureate degree: 68 66- E C. C OURSE TO C OURSE QUIVALENCIES AND WARDED RANSFER C REDIT A T CUNY Pathways General Education Requirements Required Common Core Credits A. English Composition (2 courses) ENG 110 Fundamentals of Composition and Rhetoric OR 14 ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric I AND ENG 112 Composition and Rhetoric II B. Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning (1 course) (4 cr) MTH 30 Pre- Calculus Mathematics Life and Physical Sciences (1 course) C.

163 PHY 11 College Physics I (4 cr) Flexible Common Core edits Cr A. World Cultures and Global Issues (1 course) HIS 10 History of the Modern World OR HIS 11 Introduction to the Modern World Individual and Society (1 course) D. COMM 11 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication 10 E. Scientific World (1 course) PHY 12 Colleg e Physics II (4 cr) Subtotal 24 Transfer Major Requirements Credit Credit Credit Granted Bronx Community College New York City College of Technology transfe Towards Course & Title Course & Title rred degree EET 1 102 Techniques of Electrical ELC 15 Computer Application 2 2 2 Technology ELC 11 DC Circuit Analysis 4 EET 1122 Circuit Analysis I 4 4 ELC 51 Electronic Controls EET 2220 Electronic Controls 3 3 3 s 1 4+ 8 EET 2162 Digital Electronic ELC 96 Digital Electronics 3 + 5 4 EET 1222 Circuit Analysis II ELC 21 Ac Circuit Analysis 5 4 + ELC 25 Electronics I EET 1240 Electronics + 1 4+ EET 1241 Electronics Laboratory 1 ART 10 Art Survey OR MUS 10 Music Survey EET 2122 Advanced Circuit Analysis + 3+ ELC 35 Electronics 2 4 4 EET 1202 Electric al Drafting 1 ELC 81 Electronic Communications 4 EET 2140 Communications Electronics 3+ + 1 4 EET 2141 Communications Electronics

164 Laboratory 1+ 6 EET 2171 Projects Laboratory + ELC 94 Laser & Fiber Optics EET 2251 Elect 1+ ELC 18 Computer Programming ric Machines Laboratory 4+ 3+ + 2 1 EET 2262 Digital Electronics II + EET 2271 Circuit Analysis Laboratory FYS 11 First Year Seminar 1 Elective Credit 1 0 MTH 31 Calculus and Analytical 4 MAT 1475 Calculus I 4 4 Geometry I PEA Physical Education Ac tivity 1 Elective Credit 1 0 Course SUBTOTAL 40 42 TOTAL 64

165 A SSOCIATE L EVEL AND S ENIOR C OLL EGE U PPER D IVISION C OURSES R EMAINING F OR B ACCALAUREATE D EGREE C OMPLETION D. Credits Pathways FLEXIBLE CORE US Experience in its Diversity ECON 1101 Macroeconomics (3 cr)  Creative Expression Any Approved Course (3 cr)  Individual and Society PHIL 2106 Philo sophy of Technology (3 cr)  16 COLLEGE OPTION REQUI REMENTS BCC’s COMM 11 will fulfill the speech requirement. Interdisciplinary Liberal Arts and Sciences Any approved course (3 cr) • Additional Liberal Arts MAT 1575 Calculus II (4 cr)  SUBTOTAL 16 Writing Intensive Requirement Students at New York City College of Technology must complete two courses designated Writing Intensive (WI) for the baccalaureate level, one from General Education (liberal arts) and one from the major. Credits Electrical Technolog y Major Associate Level Courses - EET 2150 Electric Machines Theory (3 cr) Baccalaureate - Level Courses 36 EET 3102 Signals and Systems (4 cr) EET 3112 Advanced Microcontroller and Embedded System Design (3 cr) EET 3122 Sensors and Instrumentation (3 cr) EET 3202 Principles of Communications Systems (4 cr)

166 EET 3212 Control Systems (4 cr) EET 3222 Power Electronics (3 cr) EET 4102 Electrical Power Systems (3 cr) EET 4112 Applied Mechatronics (3 cr) EET 4202 Digital Signal Processing (3 cr) apstone Project (3 cr) EET 4212 C MAT 1372 Statistics with Probability 3 OR 4 OR MAT 2572 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I ENG 2570 Writing in the Workplace (3 cr) 6 ENG 2575 Technical Writing (3 cr) Technical Electives hnical electives from the following list in consultation Students should select two tec with a faculty advisor: EET 3132 Remote Sensing (3 cr) EET 4120 Engineering Technology Management (2 cr) 5-6 TCET 3222 Satellite Transmission (3 cr) -Optic Communications (3 cr) TCET 4102 Fiber Wireless Communications (3 cr) TCET 4132 TCET 4140 Telecommunications Network Management (3 cr) TOTAL 66 - 68 E. Articulation Agreement Follow -Up Procedures

167 dating, modifying or terminating agreement: 1. Procedures for reviewing, up - f the degree programs involved in this agreement undergoes a change, the When either o agreement will be reviewed and revised accordingly by faculty from each institution’s respective departments or programs, selected by their Chairpersons and program directors. 2. Procedures for evaluating agreement, e.g., tracking the number of students who transfer under the articulation agreement and their success: The CUNY Institutional Research Database will be used to track performance (in terms of credit accumulation and GP A) and persistence (in terms of retention and graduation) of Bronx Community College students who transfer to New York City College of Technology under this agreement 3. Sending and receiving college procedures for publicizing agreement, e.g., colle ge catalogs, transfer advisers, Websites, etc.: Notice of articulation will be placed in the respective catalogues, recruiting brochures, and websites. Respective transfer and academic advisers will be informed and provided with copies of this agreement. The New York City College of Technology Electrical and Telecommunications Engineering Technology will coordinate efforts with their respective Admissions Office to make certain that Day event or STEM materials are sent with recruitment officers for BCC’s annual Transfer Fair.

168 Section AIII: Changes in Degree Programs AIII.1 echanical Engineering Technology department The following revision is proposed in the M Technology in Mechanical Engineering Technology Bachelor of Program: Program Code: 33565 Effective Date: Spring 2019 : From To: - SPECIFIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS PROGRAM SPECIFIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS - PROGRAM Baccalaureate-Level Courses (36-41 credits) Baccalaureate-Level Courses (36-41 credits) MECH 350 1 Quality Contr ol MECH 3500 3 Computer Programming and Applications 3 MECH 35 MECH 35 3 10 Advanced Solid Modeling II 10 Advanced Solid Modeling II 3 Mechanical Measurements and 3 MECH 3600 MECH 3600 Mechanical Measurements and 3 Instrumentation Instrumentation 3 Advanced Strength of Materials MECH 3650 MECH 3650 3 Advanced Strength of Materials MECH 4700 Fluid Mechanics 3 MECH 4700 3 Fluid Mechanics MECH 3 Finite Element Methods 4730 Finite Element Methods 4730 MECH 3 3 MECH 4760 Vibration and Advanced Dynamics 3 Vibration and Advan MECH 4760 ced Dynamics H 4850 MEC 3 H 4850 3 MEC Senior Design Project Senior Design Project 4 4 3 3 Project Management MECH 4860 Project Management MECH 4860 4 MAT 1575 4 MAT 1575 Calculus II or higher Calculus II or higher 5 5 3 3 MAT 2680 Differential Equations Differential Equations MAT 2680 In addition to the above, students must complete 12 credits from one of the In addition to the above, students must complete 12 credits from one of the three three concentrations below. Students can substitute a course from a different concentrations below. Students can substitute a course from a different concentration with t he permission of a faculty advisor. concentration with the permission of a faculty advisor. Industrial Design Concentration Industrial Design Concentration MECH 3520 3 3 MECH 3520 Rapid Prototyping Rapid Prototyping 3 Simulation and Visualization 0 MECH 355 MECH 355 0 Simulation and Visualization 3 3 3 gn I Product Desi MECH 3610 MECH 3610 Product Design I 3 Product Design II Product Design II MECH 4710 3 MECH 4710 3 vanced 3-Dimensional Animation Ad MECH 4800 MECH 4800 Ad vanced 3-Dimensional Animatio n 3 Manufacturing Systems Concentration Manufacturing Systems Concentration Advanced Engineering MECH 3530 3 Materials MECH 3530 Advanced Engineering Materials 3

169 ME CH 3540 Manufacturing Systems 3 3 Manufacturing Systems CH 3540 ME MECH 3620 3 vanced Manufacturing Processes Ad 3 MECH 3620 Ad vanced Manufacturing Processes Plastics Product Manufacturing MECH 4720 3 3 MECH 4720 Plastics Product Manufacturing -Integrated Manufacturing Com 3 3 puter Com MECH 4820 ing puter MECH 4820 -Integrated Manufactur Robotics Concentration Robotics Concentration MECH 3572 Embedded Systems and Applications in Embedded Systems and Applications in MECH 3572 3 3 otics Rob otics Rob Actuators and S 3 ensors Application in Robotics MECH 3672 MECH 3672 Actuators and S ensors Application in Robotics 3 trol Systems in Robotics Con MECH 4772 3 Control Systems in Robotics MECH 4772 3 stems Design and Applications MECH 4872 stems Design and Applications Robotic Sy Robotic Sy MECH 4872 -SPECIFIC REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE COURSES TOTAL PROGRAM 77 -SPECIFIC REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE COURSES PROGRAM TOTAL 77 TOTAL NYSED LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCE CREDITS TOTAL NYSED LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCE CREDITS 44-46 44-46 TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE 121- 121-123 TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE 123 Rationale: Stren gthens the curriculum by adding a focus on concepts related to the management of quality assurance systems and quality improvement programs, techniques currently used in the industry . Currently, MECH 3500 covers topics in computer programming (MATLAB) and quality control. Topics in computer programming (MATLAB) are adequately covered in MECH 1240 Computer Applications in Mechanical Engineering Tech.

170 Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses The following change is proposed for the Architectural Technology AV.1 department ARCH 1231 Building Technology I CUNYFirst Course ID 115605 TO: FROM: Department(s) Department(s) Course Number Course Number Course Title Course Title Prerequisite Prerequisite Corequisite Corequisite Pre - or core quisite Pre - or corequisite Hours Hours Credits Credits Description Description Requirement Designation Requirement Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Honors, Honors, etc Intensive, etc [ X ] Major [ ] Major [ X ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required Course Applicability Course Applicability [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ X ] Science [ ] Science

171 Flexible Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures iversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its D [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Speech [ ] Speech [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Inter disciplinary [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: Listed in the June 2018 report in error as a Scientific World course. AV. Engineering Technology department 2 The following change is proposed for the Computer C/C++ Programming for Embedded Systems T 2410 EM CUNYFirst Course ID 136230 FROM: TO: Department(s) Department(s) Course Number Course Title Course Title EMT 2370, or EET 2262, or TCET 2242, or Prerequisite Prerequisite ENT 2280, or MTEC 2280, or MECH 1240 Corequisite Corequisite

172 EMT 2370, or EET 2262, or TCET 2242, or Pre Pre - or corequisite - or corequisite ENT 2280, or MTEC 2280, or MECH 1240 Hours Hours Credits Credits Description Description Requir Requirement Designation ement Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Honors, Intensive, Honors, etc etc [ ] Major [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Course Applicability Course Applicability [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World College Option [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - College Option eech [ ] Sp [ ] Speech [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: As in the original curriculum proposal .

173 is proposed for the English 3 The following change AV. department ENG 3402 Topics in Literature CUNYFirst Course ID 038767 TO: FROM: Department(s) Department(s) Course Number Course Number Course Title Course Title Prerequisite Prere quisite Corequisite Corequisite Pre - or corequisite Pre - or corequisite Hours Hours Credits Credits Description Description Requirement Designation Requirement Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Honors, Intensive, Honors, etc etc [ ] Major [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition Course Applicability Course Applicability [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science Flexible [ X ] Gen Ed - [ X ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures

174 [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ X ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World College Option [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Speech [ ] Speech [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts Effective Term Spring 2019 Approved by the Pathways Common Cor e Course Review Committee as a Creative Expression course. Rationale: AV. The following change is proposed for the Hospitality Management department 4 HMGT 4902 Hospitality Revenue Management CUNYFirst Course ID 146459 FROM: TO: Department(s) Department(s) Course Number Course Number Course Title Course Title MAT 1 272 or higher statistics, HMGT 3501, MAT 1272 or higher statistics, HMGT 3501, Prerequisite Prerequisite 3502, 3601, 3602 3502, 3601, 3602 Corequisite Corequisite - or corequisite Pre Pre - or corequisite HMGT 4702 Hours Hours Credits Credits De scription Description

175 Requirement Designation Requirement Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Honors, Intensive, Honors, etc etc [ ] Major [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures res [ ] World Cultu [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Course Appl icability Course Applicability [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society orld [ ] Scientific W [ ] Scientific World College Option [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Speech [ ] Speech [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts Effective Term Spring 2019 e: Rational with this additional pre- or corequisite. This course was originally proposed AV. 5 The following change is proposed for the Mechanical Engineering Technology department MECH 4860 Project Management CUNYFirst Course ID 121625

176 TO: FROM: Department(s) rtment(s) Depa Course Number Course Number Course Title Course Title Prerequisite Prerequisite MECH 3500 MECH 2333 Corequisite Corequisite - or corequisite or corequisite Pre - Pre Hours Hours Credits Credits Description Description Requirement Designation Requirement Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Honors, Intensive, Honors, etc etc [ ] Major [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science ability Course Applic Course Applicability Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures s [ ] World Culture [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society ld [ ] Scientific Wor [ ] Scientific World

177 College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Speech [ ] Speech [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts Effective Term Spring 2019 Rationale: MECH 4860 does not rely on the new materials in MECH 3501. Instead, students learn some teamworking and . management skills in MECH 2333, and MECH 4860 is built upon these skills AV. are proposed for the Social Sciences department 6 The following changes AV. 6.1 GOV 2402 Public Policy CUNYFirst Course ID 130080 TO: FROM: Department(s) Department(s) Course Number Course Title Course Title Public Policy US Public Policy Prerequisite Prerequisite Corequisite Corequisite Pre quisite Pre - or corequisite - or core Hours Hours Credits Credits Description Description Requirement Designation Requirement Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No

178 Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Honors, Honors, etc Intensive, etc [ ] Major [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures [ ] US Experience in its Div ersity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Course Applicability Course Applicability [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Speech [ ] Speech [ ] Interdisciplinary ciplinary [ ] Interdis [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts Effective Term Fall 2019 Provides clarity by specifying that this course focuses exclusively on public policy -making in the United States. Rationale: AV. 6.2 SOC 3301 The Emerging Global Society CUNYFirst Course ID 040882 FROM: TO: Department(s) Department(s) Course Number

179 Course Title Course Title ENG 1101 and one of the following: ENG 1101 and one of the following: any any Prerequisite Prerequisite Sociology course (SOC), ECON 1101 or HIS Sociology course (SOC), ECON 1101, HIS 1102 1102 or HIS 1103 Corequisite Corequisite - or corequisite Pre Pre - or corequisite Hours Hours Credits Credits Description Description Requirement Designation Requirement Designation Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Honors, Intensive, Honors, etc etc

180 [ ] Major [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Course Applicability Course Applicability [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society dividual and Society [ ] In [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Speech [ ] Speech [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Interdisciplinary [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts [ ] Advanced Liberal Arts Effective Term Fall 2019 Rationale: Because HIS 1103 Modern World History discusses globalization as a core theme, it is an appropriate choice of pre- requisite for SOC 3301 The Emerging Global Society .

181 Graduate School & University Center – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report November/December 2018 PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS AIII.1 The following revisions are proposed for the Program: Psychology Program Code: 36654, 36653, 39748,39749, 80248,33095, 80252, 92069, 80253, 92070, 86420, 92068, 92073, 92072, 92071, 80254, 92067, 80251, 92065,80247, 30539, 28268, 28267, 90261, 30538, 38607 Effective: Fall 2018 FROM TO Program Description Program Description The Ph.D. Program in Psychology prepares students for research, The Ph.D. Program in Psychology prepares students for research, The Program teaching, and practice in the vari teaching, and practice in the various fields of psychology. ous fields of psychology, and is provides specialized study in four broad areas: Brain, Cognition, and organized into ten different training areas. Three Training Areas Behavior; Basic and Applied Social Systems; Clinical Psychology; and (Clinical Forensic Psychology (Clinical Psychology at John Jay); Health Psychology and Clinical Science (HPCS); Health Psychology and Critical Psychology. Within those areas, students select a specialized Clinical Science (HPCS) area for their training, For detailed information about the Ph.D. Program ; Neuropsychology Clinical (Clinical y and the specific training areas, please visit our website at Psychology at Queens College) lead to NYS licensing, whereas the in Psycholog remaining seven (Basic and Applied Social Psychology (BASP); . http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Psychology/ Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience (BCN); Cognitive and Comparative Psychology (CCP); Crit ical Social/Personality and Environmental Psychology (CS/PEP); Developmental Psychology; Industrial -Organizational Psychology; and Psychology and Law) are academically -oriented. For detailed information about the Ph.D. c training areas, please visit our Program in Psychology and the specifi http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Psychology/ . website at Rationale: In its 2013 reorganization, the Psychology Program moved from eleven (11) sub- programs to four broad clusters that in turn had specialized areas of training. These areas quickly increased to 14 Training Areas. With subsequent cuts in admissions slots ( 90 down to 50), the

182 remaining 13 Training Areas could not sustain their programs, and respective mergers of six Training Areas into three combined training Areas reduced the resultant number of ten. The Clusters that failed to work in practicality were eliminated. AIII.2 The following revisions are proposed for the Program: Renaissance Studies Certificate Program Program Code: 91424 Effective: from date of approval FROM TO Course Description Crs Course Description Crs Certificat e Program Renaissance Studies Certificate in Global Early Modern Studies Rationale: Change in Program Title The Renaissance Studies Certificate Program will become the Certificate in Global Early Modern Studies. Course titles offered through the certificate will likewise change, for which separate proposals are concurrently filed. This change reflects the intellectual direction of the program, and our discomfort with the Eurocentric charge of the current title. For several years now, course offerings by faculty affiliated with the program have become increasingly international in scope and comparatist in spirit. “Renaissance Studies” evokes a traditional view of the period, in which a humanist rediscovery of the classics vaults European culture into modernity, with al -polar in approach, and considers modernity in broader l others lagging behind. “Global Early Modern Studies” is much more multi context. There was no empire in the seventeenth century more powerful than the Ottomans, who posed an enormous obstacle to Europ ean commercial aspirations in the Eastern Mediterranean. If we identify modernity with scientific method, then we must notice that European and Indian advances in observational astronomy run somewhat in parallel in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Our program’s scholarly and teaching practices acknowledge these dynamics of the period; we wish to have the program name do so, as well. “Global Early Modern Studies” also distinguishes us from certificates at peer institutions. We are furthermore in the process of introducing a MALS track in Global Early Modern Studies; the new program name makes clear that Master’s and Doctoral students are members of the same community of scholars engaged in interdisciplinary and international study of the period. The substance and structure of the certificate will not change. If approved, all related documents will be updated to include th e new title.

183 Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.1 CUNYfirst Course ID Cognitive Neuroscience Department(s) Career ] Undergradu ate [ X ] Graduate [ [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental Academic Level [ ] Remedial Subject Area Course Prefix CNS Course Number 70001 Neuroscience I Course Title sequence designed to provide a uniform foundation for students engaged - course This course is the first in a two in graduate work in the Neurosciences. Its focus is on the molecular, cellular, and developmental aspects of neural function. The course is often team -taught, and in addition to a standard textbook, utilizes a variety of Catalogue Description readings, problem sets and research presentations designed to introduce students to the methods and data of contemporary neuroscience research. Some background in genetics and molecular biology is highly desirable. An emphasis on interdisciplinary work, which is characteristic of contemporary neuroscience, is an important feature of the course. Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 4 Contact Hours [ ] Yes [ Liberal Arts ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing nors, etc) Intensive, Ho [ X ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required College Option [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ [ ] English Composition Course Applicability [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018

184 Course Description: course sequence designed to provide a uniform foundation for s tudents engaged in graduate work in the This course is the first in a two- Neurosciences. Its focus is on the molecular, cellular, and developmental aspects of neural function. The course is often te am -taught, and in addition to a standard textbook, utilizes a variety of readings, problem sets and research presentations designed to introduce students to the methods and data of contemporary neuroscience research. Some background in genetics and molecular biology is highly desirable. An emphasis tic of contemporary neuroscience, is an important feature of the course. on interdisciplinary work, which is characteris Rationale: tate the This course has already been approved as BIOL 72301 and PSYC 70810. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facili as well as advising and tracking student progress. listing of courses for registration Learning Goals/Outcomes: Acquire a knowledge of the fundamentals of molecular, cellular, and developmental neuroscience Acquire an understanding of the various research methods in current use in these areas. Be able to generate critical analyses of current research papers in these areas Assessment: These may include oral presentations, problem sets, research critiques and formal examinations. Syllabus: A representative syllabus is provided below . -4: Basic neurobiology, neurochemistry and molecular genetics of the nervous system. Weeks 1 -6: Neural development Weeks 5 Weeks 7 -9: The neurons: neurochemistry and electrophysiology Weeks 10 -12: Synaptic mechanisms: Electrophysiology and neuroc hemistry of transmitters Weeks 13 -14: Molecular and cellular mechanisms of neuronal plasticity Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.2 CUNYfirst Course ID

185 Department(s) Cognitive Neuroscience ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Career [ [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area CNS Course Prefix 70002 Course Number Neuroscience II Course Title - This course is the second in a two m foundation for students course sequence designed to provide a unifor engaged in graduate work in the Neurosciences. Its focus is on systems, behavioral, and cognitive neuroscience. The course is often team -taught, and in addition to a standard textbook, utilizes a variety of readings, oral Catalogue Description ations and research critiques designed to introduce students to the methods and data of these disciplines. present Completion of Neuroscience I would be highly desirable. An emphasis on interdisciplinary work, which is characteristic of contemporary neuroscience, is an important feature of the course. Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 4 Contact Hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexi ble [ ] Gen Ed - College Option __________________ College Option Detail__ [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures Course Applicability [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Mathematics [ ] Creative Expression [ X ] Science [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scie ntific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Course Description: This course is the second in a two- course sequence designed to provide a uniform foundation for students engaged in graduate work in the Neurosciences. Its focus is on systems, behavioral, and cognitive neuroscience. The course is often team -taught, and in addition to a standard

186 textbook, utilizes a variety of readings, oral presentations and research critiques designed to introduce students to the met hods and data of these pletion of Neuroscience I would be highly desirable. An emphasis on interdisciplinary work, which is characteristic of disciplines. Com contemporary neuroscience, is an important feature of the course. Rationale: This course has already been approved as BIOL 72302 and P SYC 70811. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facilitate the listing of courses for registration as well as advising and tracking student progress. Learning Goals/Outcomes: Acquire a knowledge of the fundamentals of system, behavioral, and cognitive neuroscience Acquire an understanding of the various research methods in current use in these areas. Be able to generate critical analyses of current research papers in these areas Assessment: These may include readings, oral presentations, r esearch critiques and formal examinations. Syllabus: A representative syllabus is provided below. Weeks 1 -2: Neural systems and behavior: common principles; Weeks 3 -6: Sensory and motor systems; Sensorimotor integration. Weeks 7 -10: Behavioral Neuroscience: Learning and Motivation -14: Cognitive Neuroscience: Perception, Attention, Memory, Decision Making, Consciousness Weeks 11 Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.3 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Cognitive Neuroscience Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Develop mental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Course Prefix CNS Course Number 70003 Course Title Cognitive Neuroscience Catalogue Description This course will provide students wit h an overview of cognitive neuroscience. Topics to be covered in this course

187 include the neural bases for higher aspects of perception, object recognition, attention, reward and motivation, memory, language, executive control, decision making, social cogni tion, and consciousness. - Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3 Contact Hours [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major [ ] Gen [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - - College Option Flexible Ed [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ Course Applicability [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific Wo rld Effective Term Fall 2018 Course Description: This course will provide students with an overview of cognitive neuroscience. Topics to be covered in this course include the neural bases for ion, reward and motivation, memory, language, executive control, decision- making, social higher aspects of perception, object recognition, attent cognition, and consciousness. Rationale: This course has already been approved as PSYC 73003. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facilitate the list ing of courses for registration as well as advising and tracking student progress. Learning Goals/Outcomes: Each week, the students will read recent review and primary research articles and will critically discuss and evaluate them. By the end of the course, students will have a strong foundational understanding of the key topics in cognitive neuroscience and will be able to critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of empirical studies and theories in these areas of neuroscience. Assessment:

188 Stud ents will be assessed on the quality of weekly questions about each of the assigned articles, with more critical and insightf ul questions about en or assigned topic. These oral the readings graded more favorably. Additionally, each student will be required to lead the discussion on a chos presentations will be assessed primarily on clarity of presentation, depth of understanding of the approach, and attempts at synthesis in the l examination, which will be composed of questions that the general discussion. Students will also be assessed on their performance on a fina students will be required to answer in an essay format. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.4 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Cognitive Neuroscience [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Career [ X Academic Level ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Course Prefix CNS 70100 Course Number Course Title Statistics tics, including correlation, regression, comparing This course will cover descriptive and inferential univariate statis Catalogue Description - parametric tests, and analysis of categorical data. means, non Pre/ Co Requisites 3 Credits Contact Hours ] No [ [ ] Yes Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - College Option Flexible [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity Course Applicability [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term

189 Fall 2018 Course Description parametric tests, This course will cover descriptive and inferential univariate statistics, including correlation, regression, comparing means, non- and analysis of categorical data. Rationale: This course has already been approved as PSYC 70500. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facilitate the listin g of courses for registration as well as advi sing and tracking student progress. Learning Goals/Outcomes: e data analyses using Students will learn how to: (1) match specific univariate methods to particular types of research data; (2) compute univariat the R programming language; (3) test assumptions and interpret results of statistical analyses; and (4) write up and present statistical findings. Assessment: Students will be assessed on their performance on homework assignments and in- class and final examinations. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1 .5 CUNYfirst Course ID Cognitive Neuroscience Department(s) [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Course Prefix CNS 70200 Course Number e Title Research Methods in Cognitive Neuroscience Cours This course will provide an opportunity for graduate students to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of commonly used methods that cognitive neuroscientists use to measure central and peripheral nervous system Catalogue Description activity. These methods include single- unit recordings, the lesion method, electroencephalography (EEG) and event -related potentials (ERPs), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation ( tDCS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and optical imaging. Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3

190 Contact Hours [ ] No [ ] Yes Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option Detail______________________ [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures Course Applicability [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Fall 2018 Effective Term Course Description This course will provide an opportunity for graduate students to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of commonly used methods that cognitive ntists use to measure central and peripheral nervous system activity. These methods include single -unit recordings, the lesion method, neuroscie electroencephalography (EEG) and event -related potentials (ERPs), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and optical imaging. Rationale: A firm understanding of the methods used in cognitive neuroscience is essential for critically evaluating any empirical study that uses an y of these he listing of methods. This course has already been approved as PSYC 88400. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facilitate t courses for registration as well as advising and tracking student progress. Learning Goals/Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe what these methods measure, how these measurements are ideally acquired (including potential artifacts that could decrease the quality of data), and options for how to analyze the acquired data. 2. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of each method for answering a given psychological question. 3. Critically evaluate the use of the methods in empirical papers, thereby increasing their depth of understanding of these s tudies.

191 4. Design a research study that demonstrates the appropriate use of one or more methods covered in class and present that study in an appropriate grant proposal format. Assessment: Students will be assessed on the quality of weekly questions about each of the assigned articles, with more critical and insightful questions about class written assignment/quiz designed to examine their ability to synthesize the the readings graded more favorably. There will also be an in- readings and information presented in cl ass and apply it in an experimental context. Responses that show greater understanding of the material, attention to detail and creativity in methodological application to experimental design will receive higher grades. Students will also be required to complete an 8- will 10- page research proposal using one or more of the methods covered in the course. It is expected that the topic of the proposal tudent demonstrated appropriate use reflect the students own research focus. The quality of this proposal will be judged primarily on whether the s of the method to their research area, attention to methodological detail, and awareness of potential caveats in use of that m ethod. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.6 CUNYfirst Course ID Cognitive Neuro science Department(s) [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Course Prefix CNS Course Number 70300 Neuroanatomy Course Title This cours e will provide students with an overview of the structure and function of the nervous system and its subdivisions. It will introduce students to the organizational structure of the human brain, including slide material of gross neuroanatomy, cerebral vascu lature, spinal organization, and internal structure from medulla to cortex. Catalogue Description Functional system mini -lectures are also provided for the sensory and motor systems, the thalamus, hypothalamus, basal ganglia, limbic system, cerebellum and cortex. Neuroanatomical mapping of major neurochemical systems and their receptors is also provided. Course expectations include both visuo- spatial and written fluency of the material. Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3 Contact Hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No

192 Course Att ribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible College Option [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ Course Applicability ematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Math [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Course Description This course will provide students with an overview of the struct ure and function of the nervous system and its subdivisions. It will introduce students to the organizational structure of the human brain, including slide material of gross neuroanatomy, cerebral vasculature, spinal organization, and internal structure fr om medulla to cortex. Functional system mini -lectures are also provided for the sensory and motor systems, al systems and the thalamus, hypothalamus, basal ganglia, limbic system, cerebellum and cortex. Neuroanatomical mapping of major neurochemic their rec spatial and written fluency of the material. eptors is also provided. Course expectations include both visuo- Rationale: This course is designed to provide a detailed overview of basic neural function and has already been approved as PSYC 70801. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facilitate the listing of courses for registration as well as advising and tracking student progress. Learning Goals/Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Describe the structure and function of a neuron 2. Differentiate the cranial nerves and their functions 3. Explain the role of the spinal cord and its relationship to peripheral nerves 4. Describe the structures of the brain and their functions Assessment: Weekl y tests and quizzes as well as midterm and final exams will be used for assessment. A sample grading scheme is as follows: Midterm (visuospatial identification of slide material, and essay questions) 30% Final (visuospatial identification of slide materia l, and essay questions) 60%

193 Term paper (3- 5 pages, double space, 11pt Ariel font, 1” margins) 10% Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.7 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Cognitive Neuroscience Career ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate [ [ X ] Regular [ Academic Level ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Course Prefix CNS 70601 Course Number Course Title Attention al systems can handle. One We are typically confronted with much more information than our cognitive and neur mechanism to deal with this information overload is to selectively orient attention to the most relevant location or Catalogue Description piece of information. This seminar course will survey the psychological as well as the neurobiological evidence on attention, focusing primarily on visual attention, which is by far the most widely studied and best understood form of attention. Pre/ Co Requisites 3 Credits Contact Hours ] No Liberal Arts [ [ ] Yes Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ Course Applicability [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018

194 Course Description: We are typically confronted with much more information than our cognitive and neural systems can handle. One mechanism to deal with this information overload is to selectively orient attention to the most relevant location or piece of information. This seminar c ourse will survey the psychological as well as the neurobiological evidence on attenti on, focusing primarily on visual attention, which is by far the most widely studied and best understood form of attention. Rationale: Along with memory and language, attention is one of the core topics in the fields of cognitive psychology and systems and cognitive neuroscience. This course will survey the classic as well as the contemporary literature on attention. This course has already been approved as PSYC 87103. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facilitate the listing of courses for registration as well as advising and tracking student progress. Learning Goals/Outcomes: Each week, the students will read recent review and primary research articles and will critically discuss and evaluate them. By the end of the course, students wi ll have a strong foundational understanding of the key topics in attention research and will be able to critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of empirical studies and theories of attention. Assessment: Students will be assessed on the quality of weekly questions about each of the assigned articles, with more critical and insightful questions about the readings graded more favorably. Additionally, each student will be required to lead the discussion on a chosen or assigne d topic. These oral presentations will be assessed primarily on clarity of presentation, depth of understanding of the approach, and attempts at synthesis in the 15 page paper on any chosen topic covered in the course, the quality of which general discussion. Students will also be required to complete a 10- ations and criticisms will be based on demonstrated depth of understanding, command of the literature, and the quality of any alternative interpret of articles. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.8 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Cognitive Neuroscience [ Career [ X ] Graduate ] Undergraduate Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area

195 Course Prefix CNS 70602 Course Number Cognitive Neuroscience of Con Course Title sciousness This seminar examines the psychological and neural mechanisms for conscious and unconscious information processing. The role of consciousness and evidence for unconscious processing in perception, priming, pain, Catalogue Description emotion, actions, motor control, intentions, problem solving and decision making will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on neuropsychological evidence of unconscious processing from patients with neglect, blindsight, anosognosia, split - brains, individuals under anesthesia, and persistent vegetative states. Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3 Contact Hours [ ] Yes [ Liberal Arts ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major College Option [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ Course Applicability [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Course Description: This seminar examines the psychological and neural mechanisms for conscious and unconscious information processing. The role of consciousness and evidence for unconscious processi ng in perception, priming, pain, emotion, actions, motor control, intentions, problem solving and decision making will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on neuropsychological evidence of unconscious processing from patients with neglect, blindsight, an osognosia, split -brains, individuals under anesthesia, and persistent vegetative states. Rationale:

196 Consciousness is arguably one of the most complex, unique human traits that relies upon highly specialized cognitive and neur al modules. Much earch in cognitive neuroscience has been focusing on the neural bases of consciousness. This course will provide students wit h an current res overview of this literature on consciousness and will cover various theoretical stances and models of consciousness. This cour se has already been approved as PSYC 87203. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facilitate the listing of courses for registr ation as well as advising and tracking student progress. Learning Goals/Outcomes: Each week, the students will re ad recent review and primary research articles and will critically discuss and evaluate them. By the end of the the o critically assess course, students will have a strong foundational understanding of the key topics in consciousness research and will be able t strengths and weaknesses of empirical studies and theories of consciousness. Assessment: ghtful questions about Students will be assessed on the quality of weekly questions about each of the assigned articles, with more critical and insi graded more favorably. Additionally, each student will be required to lead the discussion on a chosen or assigned topic. Thes the readings e oral presentations will be assessed primarily on clarity of presentation, depth of understanding of the approach, and attempts at synthesis in the general discussion. Students will also be required to complete a 10- 15 page paper on any chosen topic covered in the course, the quality of which will be based on demonstrated depth of understanding, command of the literature, and the quality of any alternative interpretations and criticisms of articles. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.9 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Cognitive Neuroscience Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate Academic Level ] Regular [ ] Compensato ry [ X [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Course Prefix CNS Course Number 70603 Cognitive Neuroscience of Human Memory Systems Course Title This course will provide an opportunity for graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) to critically examine research into what is arguably the most “human” of memory systems — long- term declarative memory — and its Catalogue Description instantiation in the brain. The course will start with the basics and then move to “hot” topics of current cont roversy that nonetheless have their basis in the central tenets of the field.

197 Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3 Contact Hours Liberal Arts ] No [ ] Yes [ Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail______________________ Course Applicability [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Course Description: This course will provide an opportunity for graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) to critically examine research into what is arguably the most “human” of memory systems — long- term declarative memory — and its instantiation in the brain. The course will start with the basics and then move to “hot” topics of current controversy that nonetheless have their basis in the central tenets of the field. Rationale: A seminar course on the cognitive neuroscience of human memory systems will provide students with the opportunity to learn about current research in this field in more detail than is covered in any of the core required courses. This course has already been approved as PSYC 81403. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facilitate the listing of courses for registration as well as advising and tracking student progress. Learning Goals/Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Discuss key issues and theories in the cognitive neuroscience of episodic memory; knowledge will be obtained through weekl y reading, lecture and discussion of review and empirical articles aimed at presenting mult iple points of view

198 2. Engage in scholarly debate about the validity of different theories concerning the nature of episodic memory and its neural underpinnings, using both inductive and deductive logical reasoning, as demonstrated through weekly “quickfir e” challenges) 3. Formulate critical questions and generate new hypotheses, as demonstrated through weekly submission of written discussion questions and participation in class discussion 4. Design a research study examining episodic memory using cognitive neuroscience research methods, and present this study in an appropriate grant proposal format Assessment: Students’ ability to synthesize and expand upon the material in weekly assignments will be assessed on the quality of weekly emailed questions -class “quickfire challenges” that require students to answer abou t the assigned articles, participation in class discussions, and responses to in open- ended questions about the material. More critical and insightful questions/responses about the readings will be graded more favorably. Each week, one student will be required to give a short presentation on a paper that complements the assigned readings, but was not read by the other students in the class. This presentation will be judged based on the appropriateness of the chosen paper, the ability to communicate the paper’s vely with the assigned findings accurately and clearly, and the extent to which the student is able to integrate the findings from that paper cohesi complete a 10- readings. Students will also be required to 15 page research proposal on any chosen topic covered in the course, the quality of which will be based on soundness of the research question and methods, command of the background literature and its motivation for the proposed study, and cl arity of writing. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.10 CUNYfirst Course ID Department(s) Cognitive Neuroscience Career [ ] Undergraduate [ X ] Graduate [ Academic Level ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ X ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject A rea Course Prefix CNS Course Number 70610 Course Title Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience This course focuses on research representing the relatively recent merger of cognitive neuroscience with social and affective psyc hology. Students of social and cognitive psychology will have an opportunity to learn more about the information- processing components and neural mechanisms underlying a selection of core social Catalogue Description experiences and individual differences, and students of cogni tive neuroscience will be able to expand appreciation of how social context and individual differences influence basic cognitive and emotional processes and their associated neural systems. Pre/ Co Requisites

199 Credits 3 Contact Hours [ ] Yes [ Liberal Arts ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major [ ] Gen Ed - College Option Flexible [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures College Option Detail_____ _________________ Course Applicability [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Course Description: This course focuses on research repr esenting the relatively recent merger of cognitive neuroscience with social and affective psychology. Students of social and cognitive psychology will have an opportunity to learn more about the information- processing components and neural mechanisms under lying a selection of core social experiences and individual differences, and students of cognitive neuroscience will be able to expand appreciation of how social context and individual differences influence basic cognitive and emotional processes and their associated neural systems. Rationale: g of courses for This course has already been approved as PSYC 84603. Having a Cognitive Neuroscience course number will facilitate the listin registration as well as advising and tracking student progress. Learning Goals/Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Discuss key findings in social cognitive neuroscience and the extent to which they inform social cognitive theory; knowledge will be obtained through weekly reading, lecture and discussion of review and empirical articles aimed at presenting multiple points of view 2. Formulate critical questions and generate new hypotheses associated with the core topics, as demonstrated through weekly s ubmission of written discussi on questions and participation in class discussion

200 3. Design a research study examining a social cognitive construct using neuroscience research methods, and present this study in an appropriate grant proposal format Assessment: hesize and expand upon the material in weekly assignments will be assessed on the quality of weekly emailed questions Students’ ability to synt about the assigned articles, participation in class discussions, and responses to in answer -class “quickfire challenges” that require students to open- avorably. Each ended questions about the material. More critical and insightful questions/responses about the readings will be graded more f week, one student will be required to give a short presentation on a paper that complements the assigned readings, but was not read by the other students in the class. This presentation will be judged based on the appropriateness of the chosen paper, the ability to comm unicate the paper’s is able to integrate the findings from that paper cohesively with the assigned findings accurately and clearly, and the extent to which the student readings. Students will also be required to complete a 10- 15 page research proposal on any chosen topic covered in the course, the quality of which will be based on soundness of the research question and methods, command of the background literature and its motivation for the proposed study, and clarity of writing. Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.11 CUNYfirst Course ID Cognitive Neuroscience Department(s) [ ] Under graduate [ X ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ X ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Course Prefix CNS Course Number 79000 Course Title Thesis Research Students complete the MS in Cognit ive Neuroscience by completing a master’s thesis. The thesis research and manuscript enables students to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and data that they have acquired during Catalogue Description their MS coursework and research. For this course, students will work wi th an advisor to formulate a research question that will culminate into the master’s thesis. Students should enroll in this course in their last semester. Pre/ Co Requisites Credits 3 Contact Hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No

201 Course Attribute ( e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ X ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option Detail______________________ [ ] English Composition [ ] World Cultures Course Applicability [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Mathematics [ X ] Science [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Fall 2018 Course Description s thesis. The thesis research and manuscript enables students to Students complete the MS in Cognitive Neuroscience by completing a master’ integrate and synthesize the knowledge and data that they have acquired during their MS coursework and research. For this course, students will work with an advisor to formulate a research question that will culminate into the master’s thesis. Students should enroll in this course in their last semester. Rationale: The thesis will allow students to integrate the knowledge they obtained through their coursework and the data gathered throug h their laboratory - based research. Learning Goals/Outcomes: Integrate and synthesize knowledge into an empirical research project. Gain methodological and analytical skills to assess the neural basis of a cognitive function. Enhance critical thinking and writing skills that will be reflected in the thesis. Assessment: The thesis will be evaluated by the faculty advisor and will be submitted to the other thesis committee members, who must als o approve the project. Section AIV: New Courses

202 AIV.2 st Course ID CUNYfir PhD Program in Economics Department(s) [ Career [ x ] Graduate ] Undergraduate [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental Academic Level [ ] Remedial Subject Area Economics Course Prefix ECON Course Number 85600 ourse Title Inequality, Economic Opportunity, and Public Policy C This course offers an economic analysis of inequality and its relationship to economic opportunity. Theories of human capital development and intergenerational mobility are reviewed to motivate the empirical study of socio- Catalogue Description economic inequalities and the implications for the conduct of public policy, including early child learning, schooling, health care, income support, and taxation. Pre/ Co Requisites None Credits 3 Co ntact Hours 3 ] No [ Liberal Arts [ ] Yes Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option Detail______________________ [ ] World Cultures [ ] English Composition Course Applicability [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Mathematics [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Science [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Effective Term Rationale: Income inequality has risen to the top of the public policy agenda in the United States and many other countries, and this course is needed to help students critically understand the public policy implications from a perspective grounded in economic theory and careful empi rical ana lysis. The course will help students to more deeply understand the facts and empirical studies of causal relationships between inequalit y and opportunity in a way that will allow a critical understanding of public policy responses.

203 Learning goals and outc omes: economic differences in economic To develop a knowledge of microeconomic theory used in modeling the development of human capital, socio- opportunity, and labor market outcomes ional dynamics, and to understand the most common econometric To use theory to construct empirical models of inequality and intergenerat approaches in the study of socio- economic inequalities To review and assess the public policy response to socio- economic inequalities in different countries Assessment Methods ll be determined as follows: The final mark wi Informed engagement: 20 % Student led class discussion: 10 % Paper, first draft: 10 % Referee report: 10 % Paper, second draft: 30 % In class test: 20 % TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE Introduction: Three facts about inequality and social mobility Social mobility and the philosophy of Equality of Opportunity Measuring inequality and social mobility Theories of social mobility The early years and child support Readiness to learn and schooling Access to and returns of higher educ ation Neighborhoods and child outcomes Labor markets and access to jobs Income and income taxation

204 Wealth transmission and estate taxation AV 1.1 CHANGES TO BE OFFERED IN THE RENAISSANCE STUDIES CERTIFICATE PROGRAM CUNYFirst Course ID Intro duction to Renaissance Studies FROM Introduction to Global Early Modern Studies TO Department(s) Department(s) RSCP 72100 Course GEMS 72100 Course Pre or co requisite Prerequisite Hours 3 Hours 3 3 Credits 3 Credits Will e xplore such topics as “Neoplatonism Across Time and Faith” (Fall 2017), which studied the Neoplatonic tradition from late antiquity to the seventeenth century, and examined Jewish, Islamic, and Christian writers active from Baghdad, to Florence, to London; and Description Description Domna Stanton’s “Orientalisms in Early -Modern France” (Fall 2015), which examined various Orientalisms appearing in a period when Europe’s colonial dominance of the East was far from assured. The course will remain a certificate requirement. Requirement ent Designation Requirem D i ti Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Course Attribute (e.g. Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Writing etc Intensive, Honors, etc [ ] Major [ ] Major Course Course Applicability Applicability [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required

205 [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity ession [ ] Creative Expr [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - College Op tion College Option College Option College Option Detail______________________ Detail______________________ Effective Term Rationale: Change in Course Name This application is submitted concurrently with the request to change t he name of the Renaissance Studies Certificate Program to the Certificate in Global Early Modern Studies. ourse will be The introductory course is one of two courses required for the certificate. With the proposed change, the name of this core c d Feisal consistent with the new name of the program. The new title also reflects the emphasis of recent sections of the course: Clare Carroll an e antiquity to the -taught “Neoplatonism Across Time and Faith” (Fall 2017), which explored the Neoplatonic tradition from lat Mohamed’s team na Stanton’s seventeenth century, and examined Jewish, Islamic, and Christian writers active from Baghdad, to Florence, to London; and Dom “Orientalisms in Early -Modern France” (Fall 2015), which examined various Orientalisms appearing in a period when Europe’s colonial dominance of the East was far from assured. The course will remain a certificate requirement. AV 1.2 CHANGES TO BE OFFERED IN THE RENAISSANCE STUDIES CERTIFICATE PROGRAM CUNYFirst Course ID FROM Special Topics in Renaissance Studies TO Topics in Global Early Modern Studies Department(s) Department(s) Course RSCP 83100 Course GEMS 83100 Pre or co requisite Prerequisite

206 Hours 3 3 Hours 3 3 Credits Credits The course number is used to teach non- required courses in the certificate program. To earn the certificate, students must take two courses in early modern studies outside of their home Description Description discipline. The topics number may be used to satisfy this interdisciplinary requirement. The course will remain an elective within the certificate. Requirement Designation Requirement Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e. g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Writing Intensive, Honors, etc etc [ ] Major [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science [ ] Science [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Wo rld Cultures [ ] World Cultures Course Applicability Course Applicability [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression dividual and Society [ ] In [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option College Option College Option Detail______________________ Detail______________________ Effective Term

207 Rationale: Change in Course Name This application is submitted concurrently with the request to change the name of the Renaissance Studies Certificate Program to t he Certificate in To earn the certificate, required courses in the certificate program. Global Early Modern Studies. The course number is used to teach non- isfy this students must take two courses in early modern studies outside of their home discipline. The topics number may be used to sat interdisciplinary requirement. The course will remain an elective within the certificate. AV 1.3 CHANGES TO BE OFFERED IN THE RENAISSANCE STUDIES CERTIFICATE PROGRAM CUNYFirst Course ID FROM TO Readings in Global Early Modern Studies Readings in Renaissance Studies Department(s) Department(s) Course Course GEMS 74100 RSCP 74100 Pre or co requisite Prerequisite Hours Hours 3 3 Credits 3 3 Credits The course number is used to teach non- required courses in the certificate program. To earn the certificate, students must take two courses in early modern studies outside of their home discipline. Description Description The readings number may be used to satisfy this interdisciplinary requirement. The course will remain an elective within the certificate. Requirement Designation Requirement Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Writing Intensive, Honors, etc etc

208 [ ] Major [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics [ ] Science Science [ ] [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures Course Applicabilit Course Applicability y [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World College Option [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option College Option Detail______________________ Detail______________________ Effective Term Rationale: Change in Course Name This application is submitted concurrently with the request to change the name of the Renaissance Studies Certificate Program to the Certifi cate in Global Early Modern Studies. The course number is used to teach non- required courses in the certificate program. To earn the certificate, students must take two courses in early modern studies outside of their home discipline. The readings number may be used to satisfy this interdisciplinary requirement. The course will remain an elective within the certificate. AV 1.4 CHANGES TO BE OFFERED IN THE RENAISSANCE STUDIES CERTIFICATE PROGRAM CUNYFirst Course ID Research Techniques in Renaiss FROM TO Topics in Material History ance Studies Department(s) Department(s) Course RSCP 82100 Course GEMS 82100 Pre or co requisite Prerequisite Hours 3 Hours 3 3 3 Credits Credits

209 Though much printed material is now avail able in digital archives, students must be trained to look beyond this narrow window on the period. Manuscripts remained an essential means for transmitting knowledge, and their circulation offers insight on coteries, patron- client relationships, and intel lectual circles. Current work in material history continues to expand Description Description the scholarly uses to which books and other artifacts are put. The issues and methods of paleography and bibliography are thus fundamental to advanced study in the period, as is, increas ingly, a more expansive consideration of the objects relevant to scholarly inquiry. The course will remain a certificate requirement. Requirement Designation Requirement Designation [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, Honors, Writing Intensive, Honors, etc etc [ ] Major [ ] Major [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] Gen Ed Required [ ] English Composition lish Composition [ ] Eng [ ] Mathematics [ ] Mathematics Course Applicability Course Applicability [ ] Science [ ] Science Flexible [ ] Gen Ed - [ ] Gen Ed - Flexible [ ] World Cultures [ ] World Cultures [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] US Experience in its Diversity

210 [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World [ ] Scientific World College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option [ ] Gen Ed - College Option College Option Detail______________________ Detail______________________ Effective Term Rationale: Change in Course Name This application is submitted concurrently with the request to change the name of the Renaissance Studies Certificate Program to the Certificate in Global Early Modern Studies. Research methods is one of two courses required for the certificate. With the proposed change, the name of this core course will b e consistent with the new name of the program. Though much printed material is now available in digital archives, students must be trained to look beyond this narrow window on the period. client relationships, Manuscripts remained an essential means for transmitting knowledge, and their circulation offers insight on coteries, patron- and intellectual circles. Current work in material history continues to expand the scholarly uses to which books and other artifacts are put. The issues and methods of paleography and bibliography are thus fundamental to advanced study in the period, as is, increasingly, a more expansive consideration of the objects relevant to scholarly inquiry. While maintaining the course’s objective of training fundamental skills, the new title seeks to foreground intellectual conte nt: it teaches essential research methods by focusing on a particular archive and on current issues in material history. Potential topics might be “Colonialism and Resistance in the Irish Book Trade,” or “Prurient Interest: Trafficking Erotic Images and Texts in Early Modernity.” The curr ent title can be taken by prospective students to suggest a dry -as-dust requirement in bibliography; this has not helped enrolment in the course or the certificate. In its present and future sections, the course will provide the research methods with which every student in early modern studies should be famil iar, but attach those to particular topics and problems in material history. As a governing term, “material history” also enables incl usion of topics beyond books and manuscripts, including artifacts of visual culture and objects traditionally overlooked i n scholarship on the period: the inks and linen rags that are necessary for the book trade, and are traded internationally; Chinese and Japanese porcelain and European attempts t o reproduce it; the landscapes, gardens, and deer parks that reflected, and defined, social relations. As before, students will gain experience in utilizing the city’s outstanding archives and rare books libraries, especially the Morgan Library and the New York Public Library. Students will learn how material conditions influence th e transmission and interpretation of early modern culture. As a topics course, this will not only train basic skills, but also apply them to a particular problem or archive: the course will strive to engage in project -based, collaborative research.

211 Assign ir own ments and assessment will assure that students are acquiring key concepts and methods, and that they are applying them to the scholarly interests. Students will: • perform regular exercises in paleography and descriptive bibliography; • deliver an oral presentation related to the course topic, and other forms of collaborative research; and • create an annotated bibliography related to each student’s own particular research interests. The course will remain a certificate req

212 Guttman College Community s – Part A: Academic Matter Chancellor’s University Report AI Special Items AI.1 Modified Policy on Academic Probation Modified Policy on Academic Probation Current Policy on Academic Probation Academic Probatio n Academic Probation 1. Credits Attem pted Minimum Cumulative GPA The minimum cumulative GPA Standard for the purposes of determining ≥0 through 12 1.50 Academic Probation and Dismissal is based upon the cumulative number of a >12 through 24 1.75 student’s attempted credits, as follows: 2.00 >24 Credits Attempted Minimum Cumulative GPA 1. 2. Academic probation and dismissal will be determined at the end of each ≥0 through 12 1.50 semester. 1.75 >12 through 24 >24 2.00 3. Students on probation must meet Federal and/or New York State Financial Aid SAP guidelines for the purpose of eligibility for financial assistance. 2. Probation and D ismissal will be determined at the end of each full Academic The full fall semester is defined as fall I and fall II. The full spring semester. 4. The first time that a student fails to achieve the minimum cumulative GPA, semester is defined as spring I and spring II. that student will be placed on probation at the end of the semester in which the student’s cumulative GPA does not meet the stan dard. A student may have a maximum of three consecutive semesters on Academic Probation, as outlined below, called (1) initial probation, (2) first continuing 5. Students will automatically have one semester of probation. probation, and (3) second continuing probation. 6. Semesters at Guttman are comprised of a 12 week session (fall I or spring I) 3. Students on probation must meet Federal and/or New Yo rk State Financial followed by a six week session (fall II or spring II). If a student is on probation, Aid SAP guidelines for the purpose of eligibility for financial assistance. ve a minimum 2.3 GPA for courses taken in the first he or she must achie session of the semester (fall I or spring I). If a student does not achieve that While on academic probation, students may not register for more than twelve GPA and if, at the end of the semester including fall II or spring II, the student’s (12) academic credits per full semester. cumulative GPA does not meet the minim um standard for number of attempted credits, the student will be dismissed from the College. If a student’s probationary semester GPA equals or exceeds the cumulative All students on academic probation must me et with their advisor before

213 standard for their number of attempted credits, they will automatically receive registering for a subsequent semester. ional semester of Academic Probation (extended probation). one addit (1) Initial Probation Semester The first time that 4. the minimum cumulative earn achieve If a student fails to 7. Students who do not meet the minimum cumulative GPA standard at the by the end of a full semester Standard GPA , that student will be placed on end of their extended probationary semester will be dismissed from the at the end of the semester in which the student’s robation. Academic P College. cumulative GPA does not meet the standard. 8. Dismissed students may apply for readmiss ion no sooner than one full 5. Students will automatically have one semester of probation. semester (i.e., Fall 1 & Fall 2 or Spring 1 & Spring 2) after their dismissal. Students applying for readmission must adhere to admission deadlines. 6. Semesters at Guttman are comprised of a 12 week session (fall I or spring I) followed by a six week session (fall II or spring II). If a student is on probation, While on probation, students may not register for more than 9 credits per he or she must achieve a minimum 2.3 GPA for courses taken in the first ster (i.e. Fall 1 & Fall 2) without the approval of the Committee of seme session of the semester (fall I or spring I). If a student does not achieve that Academic Appeals and Policies. the end of the semester including fall II or spring II, the student’s GPA and if, at cumulative GPA does not meet the minimum standard for number of 10. Determinations of probation and dismissal, and denials of readmission attempted credits, the student will be dismissed from the College. If a following dismissal, may be appealed to the Committee on Academic Appeals eds the cumulative student’s probationary semester GPA equals or exce and Pol icies. Decisions of the Committee are final. standard for their number of attempted credits, they will automatically receive one additional semester of Academic Probation (extended probation). Terms of Academic Probation: Students on Academic Probation must adhere to the following conditions: 6. Semesters at Guttman are comprised of a 12 week session (fall I or spring I) Register for no more than 9 credits per semester (i.e. 6 credits during Fall 1 & 3 followed by a six week session (fall II or spring II). If a student is on probation, hout the approval of the Committee of Academic credits during Fall 2) wit he or she must achieve a minimum 2.3 GPA for courses taken in the first Appeals and Policies session of the semester (fall I or spring I). If a student does not achieve that Complete an Academic Plan with their Advisor and submit it to the Committee GPA and if, at the end of the semester including fall II or spring II, the student’s on Academic Appeals and Policies cumulative GPA does not meet the minimum standard for number of Achieve a 2.3 minimum GPA during the first session of their probation attempted credits, the student will be dismissed from the College. minimum cumulative GPA based on cumulative credits attempted to Achieve a be in good academic standing within one semester During the initial probation semester, a student must earn the mi nimum Attend tutoring at least two hours per week cumulative GPA Standard by the end of the second session. Meet with their Advisor weekly Submit a midterm self assessment to their Advisor - If, by the end of the second session of the initial probation semester, neither a student’s cumulative GPA nor semester GPA meets the minimum standard, the student will be dismissed from the College.

214 (2) First Continuing Probation Semester If, by the end of the second session of their initial probation semester, a student’s cumulative GPA does not meet the minimum standard, but their semester GPA equals or exceeds the cumulative standard, th ey will automatically be placed on the first semester of continuing probation. If, by the end of the second session of the first continuing probation semester, neither a student’s cumulative GPA nor semester GPA meets the minimum standard, the student wi ll be dismissed from the College. (3) Second Continuing Probation Semester If by the end of the second session of their first continuing probation semester, a student’s cumulative GPA does not meet the minimum standard, but their xceeds the cumulative standard, they will semester GPA equals or e automatically be placed on the second semester of continuing probation. 7. Students who do not meet the minimum cumulative GPA standard at the end of their extended probationary semester will be dismissed from the College. If, by the end of the second session of their second continuing probation semester, a student’s cumulative GPA does not meet the minimum standard, the minimum standard whether or not their semester GPA equals or exceeds the student will be dismi ssed from the College. Terms of Academic Probation In addition to the GPA requirements outlined above, students on Academic Probation must adhere to the following terms: (i.e. 6 credits Register for no more than 9 12 credits per full semester A. during Fal l 1 & 3 credits during Fall 2) without the approval of the Committee of Academic Appeals and Policies B. Engage in weekly academic support at the college.

215 C. Meet with an advisor before registering for the next semester. Any student found to be in violation of these terms may be dismissed. To exit from academic probation a student must earn the minimum cumulative GPA standard based on cumulative credits attempted. Complete an Academic Plan with their Advisor and submit it to the Committee on Academic Appeals and Policies Achieve a 2.3 0 minimum GPA during the first session of their probation Attend tutoring at least two hours per week Meet with their Advisor weekly Submit a midterm self - assessment to their Advisor Dismissal and Readmission Academically dismis sed students may not attend any Guttman classes for a minimum of one semester. A student who has been away from Guttman for one semester or more must follow all posted Guttman readmission deadlines and procedures if they wish to reenroll. Denials of readmi ssion following academic dismissal may be appealed to the Provost. Students who are readmitted to the college following academic dismissal will be immediately placed on first continuing probation 8. Dismissed students may apply for readmission no sooner than one full semester (i.e., Fall 1 & Fall 2 or Spring 1 & Spring 2) after their dismissal. Students applying for readmission must adhere to admission deadlines. While on probation, students may not register for more than 9 credits per semester (i.e. Fal l 1 & Fall 2) without the approval of the Committee of Academic Appeals and Policies. 10. Determinations of probation and dismissal, and denials of readmission following dismissal, may be appealed to the Committee on Academic Appeals

216 and Policies. Decisio ns of the Committee are final. Spring 2019 Effective Term The current Guttman policy on Academic Probation is not responsive to students who make incremental progress but whom, as a r Rationale: esult of stipulations sufficiently increase their cumulative GPA as required. The current limitation to nine credits per semester for students on in the current policy, were unable to challe nging to the pursuit of a higher academic probation can negatively impact students’ financial aid eligibility and has proven challenging to fully enforce and GPA. The revised policy reduces the probation semester minimum GPA to the Guttman SAP standard; raises the course limit to tw elve credits per semester; replaces one -size -fits - extends the allowable length of continuing probation to two semesters; all advising requirements with more flexible academic support; and eliminates ambiguity in the policy language. Final version of text without markup reads as follows: Academic Probation purposes of determining Academic Probation and Dismissal is based upon the cumulative number of a student’s The minimum cumulative GPA Standard for the attempted credits, as follows: Credits Attempted Minimum Cumulative GPA ≥0 through 12 1.50 >12 through 24 1.75 >24 2.00 Academic Probation and Dismissal will be determined at the end of each full semester. The full fall semester is defined as fall I and fall II. The full spring semester is defined as spring I and spring II. A student is entitled to a maximum of three consecutive se mesters on Academic Probation, as outlined below, called (1) initial probation, (2) first continuing probation, and (3) second continuing probation. While on academic probation, students may not register for more than twelve (12) academic credits per full semester. All students on academic probation must meet with their advisor before registering for the next semester. (1) Initial Probation Semester If a student fails to earn the minimum cumulative GPA Standard by the end of a full semester, that studen t will be placed on Academic Probation.

217 During the initial probation semester, a student must earn the minimum cumulative GPA Standard by the end of the second sessi on. If, by the end of the second session of the initial probation semester, neither a st udent’s cumulative GPA nor semester GPA meets the minimum standard, the student will be dismissed from the College. (2) First Continuing Probation Semester If, by the end of the second session of their initial probation semester, a student’s cumulative GPA does not meet the minimum standard, but their semester GPA equals or exceeds the cumulative standard, they will automatically be placed on the first semester of continuing probation. If, by the end of the second session of the first continuing probati on semester, neither a student’s cumulative GPA nor semester GPA meets the minimum standard, the student will be dismissed from the College. (3) Second Continuing Probation Semester If, by the end of the second session of their first continuing probation semester, a student’s cumulative GPA does not meet the minimum standard, but their g probation. semester GPA equals or exceeds the cumulative standard, they will automatically be placed on the second semester of continuin If, by the end of the second sess ion of their second continuing probation semester, a student’s cumulative GPA does not meet the minimum standard, whether or not their semester GPA equals or exceeds the minimum standard the student will be dismissed from the College. Terms of Academic Pr obation In addition to the GPA requirements outlined above, students on Academic Probation must adhere to the following terms: Register for no more than 12 credits per full semester. A. B. Engage in weekly academic support at the college. C. Meet with an advisor before registering for the next semester. Any student found to be in violation of these terms may be dismissed. To exit from academic probation a student must earn the minimum cumulative GPA standard based on cumulative credits attempted . Dismissal and Readmission Academically dismissed students may not attend any Guttman classes for a minimum of one semester. A student who has been away from Guttman for one semester or more must follow all posted Guttman readmission deadlines and procedures if they wish to reenroll. Denials of readmission following academic

218 dismissal may be appealed to the Provost. Students who are readmitted to the college following academic dismissal will be im mediately placed on first continuing probation. Errata in the June 2018 CUR AI.2.1 Revisions to the A.A. Liberal Arts and Sciences AI.2.1 Correcting RESOLVED: II.1 from the June 2018 Chancellor’s University Report, correcting the revisions to the That the following clarifications and corrections be item AI h track of the Liberal Arts and Sciences Program ( IRP : 34974) at Guttman Community College Science & Mat , be accepted. Under Science and Math Track .” Electives in the “To:” column, “BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology” be struck and replaced with “ ology BIOL 122 Introduction to Bi “LASC 215” be struck and FURTHER RESOLVED: That in the same item, under Science and Math Track Electives in the “To:” column, the course identified as ”. SCI 215 replaced with “ EXPLANATION: These are typographical errors; Neither BIOL 110 nor LASC 215 are courses in the Guttman catalog. AI.2.2 Correcting Errata in the June 2018 CUR AIV.1 New Course ANTH 101 RESOLVED: That the following clarifications and co rrections to item AIV.1 from the June 2018 Chancellor’s University Report, proposing ANTH 101 Introduction to ”. Cultural Anthropology, be accepted. The Requirement Designation was incorrectly entered; it is “ RLA requisite. - EXPLANATION: These are typographical errors; LASC 221 is not a course in the Guttman catalog and LASC 201 has never had a pre A Correcting Errata in the June 2018 CUR AV.45 Revision of LASC 201 I.2.3 That the following clarifications and co rrections to item AV.45 from the June 2018 Chancellor’s University Report, revising LASC 201 Environmental RESOLVED: ” and the contents Ethics, be accepted. In the “From” column the Course Number should reading “221” should be struck and replaced with course number “ 201 of the “pre or co requisite” row should be in both the “From” and “To” columns and not replaced . Finally, the Requirement D esignation was incorrectly struck entered; it is “ RLA ” and has not changed. EXPLANATION: These are typographical errors; LASC 221 is not a course in the Guttman catalog and LASC 201 has never had a pre - requisite. AI.2.4 Correcting Errata in the June 2018 CUR AVI. 3.Withdrawal of Courses Associated with Health Information Technology (IRP: 34971)

219 RESOLVED: That the following corrections to item AVI.3.8 from the June 2018 Chancellor’s University Report, withdrawing “Legal &Ethical Aspects of Health”, be ” not “HEIT 224”. Course Number should read “ accepted. The HEIT 221 t course number for EXPLANATION: This is a typographical errors; HEIT 224 is the course number for “Health Care Statistics & Research”; HEIT 221 is the correc “Legal & Ethical Aspects of Health”. AIV New Courses AIV.1 SCI 215 CUNYFirst Course ID TBD NCC Academics Department Career [X] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Academic Level [X] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Liberal Arts & Sciences Subject Area Course Pref SCI ix Course Number 215 Course Title Science and Society Catalog Description ing but This course builds upon fundamental science knowledge and skills to focus on specific, contemporary topics in science, includ gy, medical or research science. Students will develop research skills and review science not limited to science policy, biotechnolo ter in literature. Readings and discussions based on original literature will offer students an opportunity to study new subject mat depth. The course will include pre sentations and emphasize effective communication and group work. Students will explore modern research techniques while learning responsible conduct of research and bioethics. Students should consult course overview for current offerings. Topics vary and r eflect the special interests of students and faculty. A term report or examination may be required. Prerequisite(s):MATH 103 or both MATH 103A and MATH 103B Pre/Co Requisites Pre - /Co - requisite(s): ENGL 103 Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 (lecture) Liberal Ar ts [X] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute (e.g. N/A Writing Intensive, Honors, etc) Course Applicability [X] Major

220 [ ] Gen Ed - Required – [ ] Gen Ed Flexible - [ ] Gen Ed [ ] World Cultures College Option [ ] English Composition [ ] Mathematics [ ] US Experience in its Diversity [ ] Creative Expression [ ] Science [ ] Individual and Society [ ] Scientific World Spring 2019 Effective Term Rationale: This course is a 3 credit elective o ption that allows students to hone their scientific literacy skills. It is also a way to explore educational and career - - and pre - their math pre - options in STEM. The co requisites will allow students who want to join the science program of study but may not have completed requisites. This course is applicable to the Liberal Arts and Science program requisites to stay engaged with science coursework while they complete their pre - (IRP: 34974). V Changes in Existing Courses A V.1 A LASC 254 CUNYFirst Course ID 1 19567 FROM TO Department Department N/C NCC Academics Career N/C Career [X] Undergraduate [X] Regular Academic Level Academic Level N/C Subject Area Liberal Arts & Sciences Subject Area N/C Course Prefix LASC Course Prefix N/C Course Number 254 Co urse Number N/C Course Title Capstone Seminar in the Liberal Arts & N/C Course Title Sciences Catalog Description This course brings together the academic N/C Catalog Description experience of the Liberal Arts and Sciences major through interdisciplinary coursework to explore c ontemporary issues related to modern society. As a final course in the Liberal Arts and Sciences major, it allows the student to synthesize these diverse inputs

221 into a one - time evocation of the major. Students will work on a collective project, and each st udent will create a culminating ePortfolio reflecting his or her growth and learning over the course of study. Pre/Co Requisites ENGL 103; ENGL 203; completion of 45 ENGL 103; ENGL 203; completion Pre/Co Requisites degree credits of 42 degree credits Credits 3 Credits N/C 3 (lecture) Contact Hours N/C Contact Hours Liberal Arts [X] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts N/C Course Attribute Course Attribute N/C Writing Intensive Course Applicability [X] Major Co urse Applicability N/C Effective Term Spring 2019 The current 45 - credit pre - requisite was put in place to stipulate that students should be at the end of their degree in order to take this course. In Rationale: practice, students are frequently at the 42 - credit mark in their final 12 - week semester. This forces them to take the course during the 6 - week session, an abbreviated experience that is not preferable for Capstone instruction. The proposed change will remedy this situation. This course is applicab le to the Liberal Arts and Science program (IRP: 34974).

222 Hostos Community College – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report Section AI: Special Actions AI.1 On Chancellor’s Report dated November 7, 2017, under Changes to be offered in the Humanities Errata s, in the To: section. It reads : Prerequisite: GD 105 Game Programming I, Department GD 201 Digital Game Should read: Prerequisite: DD 101 Intro. to Digital Toolbox. Pre/Co - DD 101 Intro. to Digital Toolbox; requisite: GD 105 Game Programming I. This corrects the error. Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses AV.1 Changes to be offered in the Business Department ACC 100 Introduction to Accounting To: From: Prerequisite MAT 20, ENG 91/ESL 91 Prerequisite MA 20 or higher or equivalent; ENG 91/ENG 93 or ESL 91/ESL 93 or hig her Co - requisite BUS 100 Co - requisite Rationale: - or co - Students will be able to graduate in a timely manner without waiting to take BUS 100 as a pre requisite. Fall 2019 Effective: Fall 2019 Effective: ACC 110 College Accounting AV.2 From: To: Co - requisite BUS 100, ENG 110, MAT 30 Co - requisite ENG 110 and MAT 150 or higher. Rationale: Students will be able to graduate in a timely manner without waiting to take BUS 100 as a pre - or co - requisite. Effective: Fall 2019 Effective: Fall 2019 AV .3 BUS 110 Business Ethics

223 From: To: BUS 100 and ENG 91 or ESL 91 Prerequisite ENG 91/ENG 93 or ESL 91/ESL 93 or higher. Prerequisite Students will be able to graduate in a timely manner without waiting to take BUS 100 as a pre or co - - Rationale: requi site. Fall 2019 Effective: Fall 2019 Effective: AV.4 BUS 201 Principles of Management To: From: Prerequisite Prerequisite None BUS 100 - or co - Rationale: Students will be able to graduate in a timely manner without waiting to take BUS 100 as a pre requisite. Fall 2019 Effective: Effective: Fall 2019 BUS 210 Business Law I AV.5 To: From: Prerequisite BUS 100 Prerequisite None Rationale: - or co - Students will be able to graduate in a timely manner without waiting to take BUS 100 as a pre uisite. req Fall 2019 Effective: Effective: Fall 2019 BUS 220 Principles of Marketing AV.6 From: To: Prerequisite BUS 100; MAT 10 or Higher Prerequisite MAT 10 or Higher Rationale: Students will be able to graduate in a timely manner without waiting to take BUS 100 as a pre - or co - requisite. Fall 2019 Effective: Effective: Fall 2019 AV.7 BUS 230 E - Commerce From: To: Prerequisite BUS 100 Prerequisite None

224 Rationale: BUS 100 as a pre - or co - Students will be able to graduate in a timely manner without waiting to take requisite. Fall 2019 Effective: Fall 2019 Effective: AV.8 BUS 240 Entrepreneurship To: From: BUS 100 Prerequisite None Prerequisite Students will be able to graduate in a timely manner without waiting to take BU S 100 as a pre - Rationale: or co - requisite. Effective: Fall 2019 Effective: Fall 2019 OT 101 Computer Keyboarding and Document Formatting I AV.9 From: To: Hours Hours 3 4 Credits 3 Credits 3 Rationale: ts can practice on their own. The extra day was Because the course is offered as a hybrid, the studen needed in the past to ensure that the students had an extra day of practice. Fall 2019 Effective: Effective: Fall 2019 Changes to be offered in the Mathematics Department AV.10 MAT 119 Introduction to P robability and Statistics To: From: Prerequisite Prerequisite MAT 10, MA 10 or equivalent, or placement MAT 10, MA 10 or equivalent, or placement Pre/ ENG 91/ENG 93 or ESL 91/ESL 93 or higher Pre/ ESL 35 : SPA 121 or higher) Co - requisite Co (If taught in Spanish - requisite Rationale: The prerequisites/corequisite for language for this course was originally insufficient for success in the course, so the department wishes to amend it from ESL 35 to ENG 93, ESL 91, ESL 93, or higher. Effective: Spring 201 9 Effective: Spring 2019 AV.11 Changes to be offered in the Mathematics Department MAT 120 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

225 From: To: COMPASS, MAT 20, MAT 15 Prerequisite Prerequisite MAT 15, MAT 20, MA 20 or equivalent, or placement P re/ ENG 91/ENG 93 or ESL 91/ESL 93 or higher Pre/ ESL 35 Co Co - requisite - (If taught in Spanish: SPA 121 or higher) requisite Rationale: The prerequisites/corequisite for language for this course was originally insufficient for success in the course, so th e department wishes to amend it from ESL 35 to ENG 93, ESL 91, ESL 93, or higher. Effective: Spring 2019 Effective: Spring 2019

226 Hunter College – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report Action taken by the Hunter College Senate on September 26 and October 24, 2018. Part A: Academic Matters Section AII: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements STEM: atics & Statistics: Mathem Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences. MATH 15200 MATH 12400 College Algebra and Trigonometry MATH 12550 Precalculus with Workshop Pluralism & Diversity, Group A Jewish Studies Program JS 15000 Special Topics in J ewish Studies JS 25000 Special Topics in Jewish Studies Special Topics in Jewish Studies JS 35000 Section AIII: Changes in Degree Programs AIII.1 The following is the revised curriculum for the Advanced Preparation in Special Education p rogram. Hunter College, CUNY School of Education Department of Special Education Proposed Changes in a Degree Program Program Name and Degree Awarded: Advanced Preparation in Special Education - MSED HEGIS Code: 0808.00

227 NY State Program Code: 31868 Effective term: Fall 2019 Program Learning Outcomes: Program graduates will demonstrate advanced competencies in: s 1. Assessing individual children’s strengths and needs within authentic contexts, and individualize interventions that promote l earning acros developmental and curricular domains. 2. Assessing and evaluating social and physical contextual factors to implement interventions to positively influence learning and development of children. based decision making processes in their everyday work. 3. Using data- 4. Choosing and effectively implementing applicable evidence- based practices/ intervention strategies using both ECE & ECSE methods with fidelity. 5. Consuming, critiquing, and applying the current EI/ECSE evidence base in their professional repertoire. 6. Creating, critiquing, and frequently integrating a variety of low and high technology tools & applications into daily practice. 7. Reflecting to improve practice as a means of self -monitoring and ongoing professional development. 8. Effectively partnering with other team members, including families, across disciplines and systems, to plan, implement and evaluate interventions that fit the developmental strengths and needs of individual children. 9. Demonstrating professionalism in their communication and interactions wi th others across all media, and assume responsibility in their role as an emerging professional. Analyzing the current landscape then prioritize and mobilize to enact a plan for manageable change at the programmatic, local , state 10. and/or federal level. Det ailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s): 1. We removed from the course of study both: a. SPED 78151 - Reading and Writing for Students with Learning Disabilities: Methods 1 b. SPED 78351 - Math, Organizational and Social Strategies for Students with Le arning Disabilities: Methods 2 2. We replaced these courses with: a. SPED 723.5: Special Education Mathematics for Students with Learning Disabilities b. SPED 724. 5: Special Education Writing for Students with Learning Disabilities c. SPED 781.00 or SPED 781.50: Read ing for Students with Disabilities (Grades 1- 6), Methods 1 3. The number of required electives credits was changed from 12 to a range of between 11 and 12 credits to accommodate the change in non- elective requirements in the course of study that now has a 18- 19 credit range.

228 History and Objectives and are seeking a Students in Track 3 of the Advanced Preparation Program in Special Education have initial certification in Special Education Masters degree focused on Early Childhood Special Education. These candidates have four required courses and then a choice of two course ses in sequences for the remainder of required courses, EITHER SPEDE 770.51 and SPED 792.51 OR SPED 781.51 and SPED 783.51. The cour the latter option are under the Childhood Special Educati on program. Recently, the Childhood Special Education program revised its course of study. In this revision, the 3- credit courses, SPED 723.5 and SPED 724.5. credit course, SPED 783.51, was eliminated and replaced with two 2- 781.00 is designed for students who want more intensive training in reading methodology. SPED 781.50 is SPED 781 has two options – SPED Advanced designed for those who may not be expected to teach reading. This proposal is to align the course requirements of the Track 3 Preparation program with the most current Childhood Special Education curriculum. The subsequent required and elective course credits are als o revised to reflect the change in credits between SPED 783.51 and the two courses of SPED 723.5 and SPED 724.5. FROM TO on Requirements Admissi Admis sion Requirements 1. NYS initial or professional certification in students 1. NYS initial or professional certification in students 6 or birth to grade 2 or with disabilities grades 1- 6 or birth to grade 2 or with disabilities grades 1- - NYS permanent certification in special education, K NYS permanent certification in special education, 12. K-12. 2. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution 2. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution 0 or a master’s degree in with a GPA of at least 3. with a GPA of at least 3.0 or a master’s degree in special education (any age- level) with a GPA of at special education (any age- level) with a GPA of at least 3.5. least 3.5. 3. Two professional references. 3. Two professional references. 4. A personal statement. 4. A personal statement. 5. Submission of official score report on the Graduate 5. Submission of official score report on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), except applicants who Record Examination (GRE), except applicants who are certified teacher or school administrators and are certified t eacher or school administrators and hold a graduate degree. hold a graduate degree. Progress Standards Progress Standards Graduate students 1. Minimum GPA for Retention - Graduate students 1. Minimum GPA for Retention - must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to remain at Hunter College. Students whose grades remain at Hunter College. Students whose grades fall below this standard are required to raise their fall below this standard are requi red to raise their GPAs to at least 3.0 within one semester. GPAs to at least 3.0 within one semester. —students who 2. No F in the first two semesters 2. No F in the first two semesters —students who receive a grade of F(WU) in any course in the first receive a grade of F(WU) in any course in the first

229 two semesters will not be allowed to continue in the two semesters will not be allowed to continue in the program. program. rades - 3. Progress holds due to Incomplete G 3. Progress holds due to Incomplete Grades - Students with two or more INs will not be allowed to Students with two or more INs will not be allowed to register for any courses. register for any courses. 4. Key Course Performance Standards: 4. Key Course Performance Standards: Students must receive a grade of at least a Students must receive a grade of at least a B in certain key program courses. (to be B in certain key program courses. (to be determined by programs, labeled in CUNY determined by programs, labeled in CUNY First, and noted in the catalog) First, and noted in the catalog) 5. Students who receive a grade of F/WU in certain 5. Students who receive a grade of F/WU in certain key program courses may not continue in the key program courses may not continue in the program (to be determined by programs, labeled in program (to be determined by programs, labeled in CUNY First, and noted in the catalog). CUNY First, and noted in the catalog). Course of Study Course of Study Early Childhood Speci al Education Track 3 - Education Track 3 - Early Childhood Special Autism Spectrum Disorder: ● SPEDE 77151 - ● Autism Spectrum Disorder: SPEDE 77151 - Characteristics and Implications for Intervention 3cr Characteristics and Implications for Intervention 3cr ● Positive Behavior Support (PBS) SPEDE 77251 - Positive Behavior Support (PBS) ● SPEDE 77251 - and Its Applications to Young Children with Special and Its Applications to Young Children with Special Needs 3cr Needs 3cr ● SPED 70751 - Advanced Seminar in Special SPED 70751 - ● Advanced Seminar in Special Education Practice 3cr Education Practice 3cr Practicum in Early Childhood SPEDE 77951 - ● ● SPEDE 77951 - Practicum in Early Childhood Special Education 3cr Special Education 3cr Plus Plus ● SPEDE 77051 - Individualized Planning, ● SPEDE 77051 - Individualized Planning, Implementation and Progress Monitoring in Early Implementation and Progress Monitoring in Early Childhood (Birth through PreK) Environments and Childhood (Birth through PreK) Environments and Curricula 3cr Curricula 3cr SPED 79251 - - Language Development and ● ● SPED 79251 Language Development and Alternative Communication Systems for Learners Alternative Communication Systems for Learners

230 with Low Incidence Disabilities: Severe Disabilities with Low Incidence Disabilities: Severe Disabilities including Deafblindness 3cr including Deafblindness 3cr Or Or SPED 72350: Special Education Mathematics for SPED 78151 - Reading and Writing for Students ● ● Students with Learning Disabilities 2cr with Learning Disabilities: Methods 1 3cr SPED 7245 ● SPED 7835 1 - Math, Organizational and Social 0: Special Education Writing for ● Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities: Students with Learning Disabilities 2cr SPED 78100: Reading for Students with Learning Methods 2 3cr ● Disabilities (Grades 1- SPED or 6), Methods 1 3cr 78150: Reading and Writing for Students with Plus Learning Disabilities: Methods 1 3cr 12 credits of electives from coursework related to— ● other special education topics, behavioral disorders, Plus autism spectrum disorders, early childhood special 12 credits of electives from coursework related education (could qualify for additional age level), 11- ● to—other special education topics, behavioral blind/VI, deaf/HH, gifted and talented (could apply disorders, autism spectrum disorders, early for a NYS extension), and severe/multiple childhood special education (could qualify for —to disabilities (could apply for a NYS annotation) additional age level), blind/VI, deaf/HH, gifted and be determined jointly with mandatory consultation talented (could apply for a NYS extension), and with a program adviser. (Note: written approval of a severe/multiple disabilities (could apply for a NYS student’s plan is required.) —to be determined jointly with annotation) Exit Requirements mandatory consultation with a program adviser. (Note: written approval of a student’s plan is 1. An overall GPA of 3.0. required.) 2. Maintain a valid and appropriate NYS certification. Exit Requirements 3. Perform satisfactorily on a two- part culminating activity: 1. An overall GPA of 3.0. based oral presentation A comprehensive rese arch- 2. Maintain a valid and appropriate NYS certification. on a current special education issue an original written research proposal and either 3. Perform satisfactorily on a two- part culminating a written proposal for competitive grant funding. or activity: A comprehensive research- based oral presentation 4. Complete the Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) on a current special education issue workshop. and either an original written researc h proposal or a written proposal for competitive grant funding. 4. Complete the Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) Total Credits = 30 workshop.

231 Total Credits = 30 Rationale: 4. The proposed modifications align course credits and content to the new courses in the C hildhood Special Education program. 5. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If yes, list department/program: [ X ] NO [ ] YES – [ ] YES Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO b) Does this affect the Library? [ X ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES ence degree. AIII.2 The following is the revised curriculum for Applied Behavior Analysis leading to the Master’s in Sci School of Education Hunter College, CUNY Special Education Department Proposed Changes in a Degree Program Program Name and Degree Awarded: Applied Behavior Analysis - Master’s in Science HEGIS Code: 2099.00 NY State Program Code: 38933 Effective term: Spring 2019 Program Learning Outcomes:

232 ● Define and identify examples of basic and applied behavioral principles (e.g., reinforcement, stimulus control, matching, prompting) along with relevant research studies in the literature. Define and i dentify examples of advanced basic and applied behavior analytic content (e.g., concept formation, verbal behavior, childhood ● behavior disorders, program development). ● Define and identify examples of single- case research methodology and measurement (e.g., reversal designs, multiple -baseline designs, data collection procedures, frequency, interval recording, momentary time sampling). ● Develop and implement effective and socially valid behavioral intervention plans. ● Develop and conduct assessments and use assessment results to inform interventions. Define and identify examples of ethics and professional standards in ABA (e.g., BACB © conduct guidelines). ● ● Synthesize the above learning goals into a thesis research project consisting of a formal written research proposal that is successfully orally defended, and a formal written research report, based on original experimental research, that is successfully orally defended (MS only). Students who complete the MS in ABA program and the necessary fieldwork experience will be eligible for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst credential and licensure as a behavior analyst in New York State. Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) 1. Clarify the admissions requirements. equirements for MS in ABA students. 2. Add GRE requirement to the admissions r 3. Add EDABA 72000 to course of study for MS in ABA students. 4. Add CEDF 71500 to the course of study for MS in ABA students. 5. Revise so that it is clear students can take either EDABA 79900 or EDABA 79300 in the course of study for the MS in ABA students. 6. Change the MS in ABA credits from 36 to 41. History and Objectives The Masters of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis program was originally developed to meet the needs of students who are seeking the New York State Behavi or Analyst license. During the review process the New York State Department of Education requested a number of changes to the proposed program. The first objective is to clarify admissions requirements. The second objective is to clarify course requirements necessary to meet the New York State Departm. The third objective of this revision is to increase the number courses in the MS program to meet the New York State Department of Education’s requirements for the coursework leading to the behavior analyst license.

233 what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) FROM ( strikethrough List of Course List of Course Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Name Crs. Crs. Name Admission Requirements Admission Requirements 1. A bachelor’s or master’s degree from a om a 1. A bachelor’s or master’s degree fr -accredited university regionally regionally -accredited university and a in an minimum 3.0 GPA. approved human services field and a 2. Resume and two professional references minimum 3.0 GPA. 2. Resume and two professional references to be included with the application for to be included with the application for matriculation. GRE scores. iculation. matr 3. 4. interview with Applicants who meet the eligibility criteria site 3. If requested, an on- program faculty. will be interviewed. Progress Standards Progress Standards 1. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 1. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 in order to continue in the program. 3.0 in order to continue in the program. 2. Students who receive a grade of F in any 2. Students who receive a grade of F in any course in the first 12 credits will not be course in the first 12 credits will not be allowed to continue in the program. allowed to continue in the program. 3. Students with one grade of IN (incomplete) 3. Students with one grade of IN (incomplete) rst 12 credits are restricted from within the fi within the first 12 credits are restricted from registering for more than one additional registering for more than one additional course. Those with two or more Ins will not course. Those with two or more Ins will not be allowed to register for any courses. be allowed to register for any courses. ield experiences will take place in New 4. All field experiences will take place in New 4. All f York City. York City. 5. Any student who receives a grade below a 5. Any student who receives a grade below a B in a field experience course must apply B in a field experience course must apply to the chairperson of the department to to the chairperson of the department to repeat that course, which may only be repeat that course, which may only be repeated once. repeated once. 6. ade of F, I, Any student who receives a gr 6. Any student who receives a grade of F, I N ,

234 or WU may not reregister and will not be or WU may not reregister and will not be allowed to continue in the program. allowed to continue in the program. Key Course Performance Standards Key Course Performance Standards Students must receive a grade of at least a B in Students must receive a grade of at least a B in certain key program courses. (to be determined by certain key program courses. (to be determined by and noted in the programs, labeled in CUNY First, programs, labeled in CUNY First, and noted in the catalog) catalog) Students who receive a grade of F/WU in certain Students who receive a grade of F/WU in certain key program courses may not continue in the key program courses may not continue in the program (to be determined by programs, labeled in program (to be determined by programs, labeled in CUNY First, and noted in the catalog). CUNY First, and noted in the catalog). Course of Study Master of Science Course of Study Master of Science Experimental Analysis of Behavior EDABA 75000 - Diversity CEDF 71500 - EDABA 75500 - Functional Behavior Assessment EDABA 72000 - Managing Behavior Analytic EDABA 77000 - Practicum in Applied Behavior Records Analysis I Analysis of Behavior Experimental EDABA 75000 - Practicum in Applied Behavior EDABA 77100 - Functional Behavior Assessment EDABA 75500 - Analysis II Practicum in Applied Behavior EDABA 77000 - EDABA 78000 - Thesis I Analysis I Thesis II EDABA 78100 - EDABA 77100 - Practicum in Applied Behavior EDABA 79000 - Sin -Subject Research Design gle Analysis II EDABA 79100 - Ethics and Professionalism for Thesis I EDABA 78000 - Applied Behavior Analysts Thesis II EDABA 78100 - Single EDABA 79000 - -Subject Res earch Design EDABA 79300 - Applied Behavior Analytic Autism Ethics and Professionalism for EDABA 79100 - Intervention for Adults Applied Behavior Analysts EDABA 79500 - Applied Behavior Analysis I EDABA 79500 - Applied Behavior Analysis I Applied Behavior Analysis II EDABA 79600 - Applied Behavior Analysis II EDABA 79600 - EDABA 79800 - Behavior Analytic Approaches to Behavior Analytic Approaches to EDABA 79800 - Learning Learning EDABA 79900 - Applied Behavior Analytic Autism Intervention

235 - Take Either - Exit Requirement EDABA 7990 0 - Applied Behavior Analytic Autism 1. An overall GPA of 3.0. Intervention - - Or EDABA 79300 - Applied Behavior Analytic Autism Intervention for Adults Exit Requirement 1. An overall GPA of 3.0. 4. Rationale : For Fall 2018, there were 63 MS in ABA applicants. Cur rently, admissions uses only GPA to identify all eligible applicants because the GRE is not required. By requiring the GRE, it would make it easier to identify better qualified applicants. The MS in ABA program was ap proved by NYS contingent on adding EDAB A 72000 and CEDF 71500 to the course of study, so we would like these courses listed in the catalog for a total of 41 credits for the MS in ABA program. NYS approved the MS in ABA program with one autism course. The program currently offers tw o - EDABA 79900 and EDABA 79300. It should be clarified in the course catalog that students can take either EDBA 79900 or EDABA 79300 as t he one required autism course in the MS program. SPEDE 77100 is currently a prerequisite course for EDABA 79500. MS in ABA students are not required to take SPEDE 77100, so we would like to remove the prerequisite. Consultation Statement: a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Dep artment/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A

236 b. Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A ing to the Advanced Certificate. The following is the revised curriculum for Applied Behavior Analysis lead AIII.3 School of Education Hunter College, CUNY Special Education Department Proposed Changes in a Degree Program Applied Behavior Analysis - Program Name and Degree Awarded: Advanced Certificate HEGIS Code: 0818.00 ogram Code: NY State Pr 33306 Effective term: Spring 2019 Program Learning Outcomes: ● Define and identify examples of basic and applied behavioral principles (e.g., reinforcement, stimulus control, matching, prompting) along terature. with relevant research studies in the li ● Define and identify examples of advanced basic and applied behavior analytic content (e.g., concept formation, verbal behavior, childhood behavior disorders, program development). Define and identify examples of single- case research methodology and measurement (e.g., reversal designs, multiple- baseline designs, ● data collection procedures, frequency, interval recording, momentary time sampling). ● Develop and implement effective and socially valid behavioral intervention plans. ● Develop and conduct as sessments and use assessment results to inform interventions. ● Define and identify examples of ethics and professional standards in ABA (e.g., BACB © conduct guidelines). Students who complete the Advanced Certificate in ABA program and the necessary field work experience will be eligible for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst credential.

237 Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification 1. Clarify the admission requirements. History and Objectives The Advanced Certificate in ABA program was designed to provide academic instruction in applied behavior analysis for individuals who are currently working in professional positions or who are in the process of completing the graduate education necessary to deliv er education and treatment to individuals with a utism. The program meets the coursework requirements for nationally recognized board certification in behavior analysis. The first objective of this revision is to modify the required autism course for the Advanced Certificate in ABA students, so that th eir e for EDABA 795 to requirements match those of the MS in ABA students. The second objective of this revision is to change the prerequisite cours reflect the autism course modification. the change strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline FROM ( s) List of Course List of Course Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Crs. Crs. Name Name Admis sion Requirements Admission Requirements 1. A master’s degree from an accredite 1. A master’s degree from an accredited d institution in education, psychology, or institution in education, psychology, or . analysis and a minimum 3.0 GPA. behavior behavior anaylsis 2. Applicants who meet the eligibility criteria 2. Completed a graduate level course in will be interviewed. autism spectrum disorders. Applicants who have not completed such a course will be admitted with the condition of completing Progress Standards SPEDE 77100 , Autism Spectrum Disorders, during their first semester in the Gra duate 1. Minimum GPA for Retention - program. students must maintain a minimum -site interview will be required. On 3. cumulative GPA of 3.0 to remain at Hunter College. Students whose grades fall below Progress Standards this standard are required to raise their GPAs to at least 3.0 within one semester.

238 Minimum GPA for Retention - Graduate students — No F in the first two semesters 1. 2. ive a grade of F(WU) in any students must maintain a minimum who rece course in the first two semesters will not be cumulative GPA of 3.0 to remain at Hunter allowed to continue in the program. College. Students whose grades fal l below 3. Progress holds due to Incomplete Grades - this standard are required to raise their Students with two or more INs will not be GPAs to at least 3.0 within one semester. 2. No F in the first two semesters —students allowed to register for any courses. who receive a grade of F(WU) in any course in the first two semesters will not be tandards Key Course Performance S allowed to continue in the program. Students must receive a grade of at least a B in 3. Progr ess holds due to Incomplete Grades - certain key program courses. (to be determined by Students with two or more INs will not be programs, labeled in CUNY First, and noted in the allowed to register for any courses. catalog) Students who receive a grade of F/WU in certain Key Course Performance Standards key program courses may not continue in t he Students must receive a grade of at least a B in program (to be determined by programs, labeled in certain key program courses. (to be determined by CUNY First, and noted in the catalog). s, labeled in CUNY First, and noted in the program catalog) Course of Study Students who receive a grade of F/WU in certain EDABA 79100 - Ethics and Professionalism for key program courses may not continue in the Applied Behavior Analysts program (to be determined by programs, labeled in Applied Behavior Analysis I EDABA 79500 - CUNY First, and noted in the catalog). lysis II Applied Behavior Ana EDABA 79600 - EDABA 79800 - Behavior Analytic Approaches to Course of Study Learning - Ethics and Professionalism for EDABA 79100 EDABA 79000 - Single -Subject Research Design Applied Behavior Analysts Applied Behavior Analysis I EDABA 79500 - - Take Either - Applied Behavior Analysis II EDABA 79600 - EDABA 79800 - Behavior Analytic Approaches to EDABA 79900 - Applied Behavior Analytic Autism Learning Intervention -Subject Research Design Single EDABA 79000 - - Or - - - Take Either EDABA 79300 - Applied Behavior Analytic Autism Applied Behavior Analytic Autism EDABA 79900 - Intervention for Adults

239 Intervention Exit Requirements Or - - 1. An overall GPA of 3.0. 2. No course grade below B EDABA 79300 - Applied Behavior Analytic Autism Intervention for Adults : 18 Total Credits Exit Requirements 1. An overall GPA of 3.0. 2. No course grade below B Total Credits : 18 4. Rationale : The change in the admissions requirement was made to clarify the interview process and to offer the opportunity to conduct the int erview online. Consultation Statement: a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b. Does th is affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A AIII.4 The following is the revised curriculum for Educational Psychology leading to the Master of Arts Degree.

240 School of Education NY Hunter College, CU Department of Educational Foundations & Counseling Educational Psychology Proposed Changes in a Degree Program Educational Psychology - MA Program Name and Degree Awarded: 0822.00 HEGIS Code: 32143 NY State Program Code: Effective term: Fall 2019 Program Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the Master's in Educational Psychology program, the student should be able to: 1. understand research methodology, assessment, and evaluation 2. compare different theoretical frameworks used to describe learning and motivation 3. analyze empirical research in education 4. use data to understand what works to improve learning and motivation 5. synthesize evidence to generate theoretically sound, data- based conclusions Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) 1. Chan ged total number of credits required by program from 32 to a range of 31- 32 in order to accommodate the two pathways to program completion and the revised credits for several courses. 2. Changed the instructions for how many courses were required in each of t he following categories: core, concentration, and elective. 3. Made EDPS 711 a required course for concentration 1. 4. Made EDPS 721 a required course for concentration 2. 5. Replaced CEDF 71200: Child and Adolescent Development, 4 cr. with CEDF 713: Childhood and Adolescent Development, Alternative Programs, 3cr. 6. Changed name of EDPS 74201 to “Qualitative Research Methods in Education” and course number to 74200. 7. Added EDPS 714: Applied Motivation Theory in Education, 3 cr. to the course of study. 8. Added EDPS 725: A ssessment in Schools, 3 cr. to the course of study.

241 9. Increased from 2 to 3 credits: EDPS 79500 and 79600 Decreased from 4 to 3 credits: EDPS 712, 713, 722,723 and 742 10. 11. Split EDPS 79000 into two classes: EDPS 79000 & 79100 History and Objectives In 2007, when the Master of Arts in Educational Psychology Program was developed, the School of Education leadership encouraged new credit courses. Accordingly, the program was designed to only offer 4- credit courses with a total of 32 credits. T he program programs to design 4- of offering has two concentration areas: (1) General Educational Psychology and (2) Assessment, Research, and Evaluation. After a decade credit courses, the faculty in the program noticed that the current 4- students 4- credit courses have advantages as well as limitations. Further, the two concentration areas have not been sufficiently differentiated to ensure that students can have both overlapping learning and contents, but also areas of distinctiveness. To improve the program and address the ga ps of the Ed Psych program, we see a need at this point to revise our program with the following objectives: 1. Differentiate the concentration areas clearly and early in the program (second semester in the program). 2. Reduce the course credits from 4 to 3 f or the courses, in both concentration areas. This reduction of credits would give the program leeway to create new courses and further differentiate the concentration areas. 3. Include two new courses, one in each concentration area, to fill the gaps noted in the current program. e in 4. Spread the culminating course (EDPS 790) into two semesters. This distribution would provide students with a richer experienc al psychology. conducting their project, which is a comprehensive review of literature on a topic related to education 5. Increase credits for MA thesis courses (EDPS 79500 and EDPS 79600), from 2 to 3 credits each. The rationale underlying Objective 1: Our students have very diverse undergraduate academic backgrounds. The current CORE courses are insufficien t to provide them with the theoretical grounding for either concentration. Also, in the current program concentrations, there are no required courses that lead students of different cohorts to graduate with different core foundations; therefore, we will change one course that is currently an elective in each concentration to a core requirement for the corresponding concentration. Students who want to pursue work in Concertation I need more exposure to cognitive and learning theories and strategies, while st udents who pursue Concentration II need additional statistical knowledge and skills. To effectively address these needs, we included one existing course from each concentration area as required CORE courses: EDPS 711 Metacogntive and Cognitive Processes in Education for Concentration I, and EDPS 721 Statistics and Statistics Computing in Education II for Concentration II. The rationale underlying Object 2: In the current program, students often end up taking very similar schedules, regardless of their concentration, because not enough courses are offered in their concentration; therefore, changing the credits associated with various courses will allow students to take more courses in either concentration area without adding to the program’s total credits. In addition, having 3- credit courses rather than 4- credit courses allows us to add new options and more depth to the program.

242 The rationale underlying Object 3: Based on faculty’s assessment of the current program, topics related to achievement motivatio n and classroom assessment could be strengthened. Concentration I has added content on metacognitive and cognitive processes to target student learning and program by including current research and strategies. Student motivation has not been a major concern in practice, and we wanted to update the ic properties of practices in the new course, EDPS 714: Motivation Theories. The current content of Concentration II focuses on the psychometr tests and measurement, as well as program evaluation. A course is neede d that focuses on assessment and evaluation at the classroom and school level; therefore, we propose a new course, EDPS 724: Assessments in Schools. The rationale underlying Objective 4: Students in the present program often state that a single semester is insufficient time to complete the culminating experience in EDPS 790, Ed Psych Seminar. This course is designed to engage students in writing a literature revi ew paper that has potential for publication, but students often do not have enough time to conduct a thorough review of literature before composing their paper. Faculty members who have taught this course also indicate the lack of sufficient time, within the span of a single semester, for students to search, read, analyze, and synthesize all the material before writing a paper. Therefore, we will extend this course over a full academic year without increasing the number of credits for the course. Students can spend one semester to conduct a review of literature and focus on their writing in the seco nd semester. The rationale underlying Objective 5: The faculty have found that the number of total credits allocated to EDPS 795, Thesis R esearch, is ate the equivalent of one elective course insufficient for the depth of research and length of a strong research project. We will therefore realloc credit in the concentration area to thesis credits for Thesis students. EDPS 795 will increase from 4 to 6 credits. This results in a differential of 1 credit for Thesis students, who will graduate with 31 credits rather than 32. ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) FROM List of Course List of Course Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Name Name Crs. Crs. Admission Requirements Admission Requirements 1. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited 1. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a GPA of at least 2.8. institution with a GPA of at least 2.8. inimum Students who do not meet the m Students who do not meet the minimum GPA requirement may submit scores on GPA requirement may submit scores on the general aptitude test of the Graduate the general aptitude test of the Graduate nation (GRE) to serve as Record Exami Record Examination (GRE) to serve as evidence of their ability to complete evidence of their ability to complete graduate- level work. graduate- level work. - site interview. 2. On 2. On - site interview.

243 Progress Standards Progress Standards te Gradua 1. Minimum GPA for Retention - 1. Minimum GPA for Retention - Graduate students must maintain a minimum students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to remain at Hunter cumulative GPA of 3.0 to remain at Hunter College. Students whose grades fall below College. Students whose grades fall below this standard are required to raise their this standard are required to raise their GPAs to at least 3.0 within one semester. GPAs to at least 3.0 within one semester. 2. No F in the first two semesters —students —students 2. No F in the first two semesters a grade of F(WU) in any who receive who receive a grade of F(WU) in any course in the first two semesters will not be course in the first two semesters will not be allowed to continue in the program. allowed to continue in the program. 3. Progress holds due to Incomplete Grades - 3. Progress holds due to Incomplete Grades - Students with two or more INs will not be Students with two or more INs will not be allowed to register for any courses. allowed to register for any courses. Key Course Performance Sta Key Course Performance Standards ndards 1. Students must receive a grade of at least a 1. Students must receive a grade of at least a B in certain key program courses. (to be B in certain key program courses. (to be determined by programs, labeled in CUNY ined by programs, labeled in CUNY determ First, and noted in the catalog) First, and noted in the catalog) 2. Students who receive a grade of F/WU in 2. Students who receive a grade of F/WU in certain key program courses may not certain key program courses may not continue in the continue in the program (to be determined program (to be determined by programs, labeled in CUNY First, and by programs, labeled in CUNY First, and noted in the catalog). noted in the catalog). Course of Study Course of Study Core Courses Core Courses courses All students are required to take 4 core courses and a proseminar All students are required to take 3 core and a proseminar ● Educational Psychology EDPS 70000 - Proseminar, 0 cr. EDPS 70000 - Educational Psychology ● EDPS 70100 - Statistics and Statistical ● Proseminar, 0 cr.

244 - EDPS 70100 ● Computing in Education I, 4 cr. Statistics and Statistical Computing in Education I, 4 cr. Educational Research EDPS 70200 - ● Educational Research EDPS 70200 - ● Methods, 4 cr. Methods, 4 cr. ● EDPS 70300 - Learning and Behavior Learning and Behavior EDPS 70300 - ● Theories, 4 cr. Theories, 4 cr. Required Course CORE for Concentration I Concentration Area Courses in their concentration area 8 credits Select ● EDPS 711: Metacognitive and Cognitive ation, 4 cr. Processes in Educ Concentration I: General Educational Psychology - Or - ● EDPS Metacognitive and EDPS 71100 - Cognitive Processes in Education, 4 cr. Required Course CORE for Concentration ● EDPS 71200 - Multicultural Issues in II 4 cr. Learning and Instruction, Cognition and Educational EDPS 71300 - ● ● EDPS 721: Statistics and Statistics 4 cr. Technology, Computing in Education II, 4 cr. Or - - Concentration Area Courses at least 2 courses select Students should in their Concentration II: Assessment, Research, and be counted concentration area; a third course can Evaluation toward the elective course requirement ● Statistics and Statistical EDPS 72100 - Concentration I: General Educational Psychology Computing in Education II, 4 cr. 4 Tests and Measurement, EDPS 72200 - ● Multicultural Issues in EDPS 71200 - ● cr. Learning and Instruction, 3 cr. ● Educational Program EDPS 72300 - Cognition and Educational ● EDPS 71300 - 4 cr. Evaluation, 3 cr. Technology, ● EDPS 714: Applied Motivation Theory in Elective Courses in Educational Psychology Education, 3 cr. Select 8 additional credits either from a concentration area or from the following electives Or - - ● - Child and Adolescent 200 CEDF 71 Concentration II: Assessment, Research, and Development, 4 cr. Evaluation

245 CEDF 71700 - Independent Study in ● Educational Foundations, 1 cr. Tests and Measurement, EDPS 72200 - ● 3 ● Independent Study in CEDF 71800 - cr. Educational Foundations, 2 cr. Educational Program EDPS 72300 - ● ● CEDF 71900 - Independent Study in Evaluation, 3 cr. Educational Foundations, 3 cr. EDPS 725: Assessment in Schools, 3 cr. ● diating Factors in Me ● EDPS 74100 - Student Achievement, 4 cr. ational Psychology Elective Courses in Educ Special Topics in ● EDPS 74200 - Elective Courses (thesis students are required to Educational Research Methods, 4 cr. thesis students select 1 elective course, while non- EDPS 74300 - Special Topics in ● are required to select 2 elective courses) Educational Psychology, 4 cr. ● CEDF 713: Childhood and Adolescent EDPS 711, EDPS 712, EDPS 713, EDPS 721, Development, Alternative Programs, 3cr. EDPS 722 and EDPS 723 may count towards ependent Study in CEDF 71700 - Ind ● electives if not used to fulfill the concentration area Educational Foundations, 1 cr. requirement. CEDF 71800 - Independent Study in ● Educational Foundations, 2 cr. Culminating Courses Independent Study in CEDF 71900 - ● Select either a thesis or a non- thesis option Educational Foundations, 3 cr. Mediating Factors in EDPS 74100 - ● Student Achievement, 4 cr. ● Educational Psychology EDPS 79000 - litative Research Qua EDPS 74200 - ● Seminar, 4 cr. . Methods in Education, 3 cr Special Topics in ● EDPS 74300 - - - Or Educational Psychology, 4 cr. ● EDPS 79501 - Educational Psychology EDPS 71100, EDPS 71200, EDPS 71300, EDPS Thesis Research 1, 2 cr. 72100, EDPS 72200 and EDPS 72300 may count towards electives if not used to fulfill the - - And concentration area requirement. EDPS 79502 ● - Educational Psychology Culminating Courses Thesis Research 2, 2 cr. Select either a thesis or a non- thesis option Students electing Thesis Research ( EDPS 79501 ) ● EDPS 79000 - Educational Psychology ) will prepare a report of a EDPS 79502 and ( Seminar 1, 2 cr. research investigation in which they design and

246 execute an empirical study under the supervision of - And - a faculty advisor. Students electing the non- thesis option will enroll in a seminar course (EDPS 79000) in which they prepare a scholarly publishable- ● Educational Psychology EDPS 79100 - Seminar 2, 2 cr. quality review of the research literature on a topic approved by the faculty. - Or - Exit Requir ements ● EDPS 79500 - Educational Psychology 1. An overall GPA of 3.0. 3 cr. Thesis Research 1, 2. Complete Culminating Experience. - And - Total Credits: 32 ● EDPS 79600 - Educational Psychology Thesis Research 2, 3 cr. Students electing Thesis Research (EDPS 79500) and (EDPS 79600) will prepare a report of a research investigation in which they design and execute an empirical study under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Students electing the non- thesis option will enroll in a seminar course (EDPS 79000) and (EDPS 79100) in which they prepare a quality review of the research scholarly publishable- literature on a topic approved by the faculty. Exit Requirements 1. An overall GPA of 3.0. 2. Complete Culminating Experience. Total Credits: 31 - 32 Rationale :

247 Modifying the existing Ed Psych program has the following rationale. First, we reduced several of our cour ses from 4 to 3 credits to ourses develop 2 new courses (EDPS 714 and EDPS 725) without increasing the total number of credits to the program. Adding the new c better differentiates the concentration areas and provides students with the theoretical grounding for EDPS714: Motivation for Concentration I, and for EDPS 725: Assessment in Schools for Concentration II. Another rationale for reducing the credits fro m 4 to 3 is to extend our course offerings to graduate students in other programs, particularly in the Instructional Leadership (EdD) program in School of credit courses are unattractive to students in other programs who would like to take courses as their electives in Education. The current 4- the Ed Psych program. The required credits for this degree was changed to a range of 31- 32 credits to conform with the changes described above. Consultation Statement: a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Departm ent/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b. Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A AIII.5 The following is the revised curriculum for English leading to the BA Degree. ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Proposed Changes in a Degree Program BA in English Literature Program Name and Degree Awarded: HEGIS Code: 1502 NY State Program Code: 33644 MHC Code HEGIS Code (when applicable): 60156 Effective Term: Fall 2019 Program Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of their studies, English majors will demonstrate broad knowledge of the development of literatures written i n English and be able to place them within their historical, literary, cultural, and social contexts, as well as the close reading skills with which to engage in written and verbal analysis of literary and critical texts.

248 More specifically, students in the Literatures and Criticism concentration will be able to: ing close reading skills appropriate to the genre, and taking into account the texts’ historical, social, and/or 1. Analyze and interpret literary texts us cultural contexts. written and verbal 2. Demonstrate familiarity with literary criticism and theory and apply critical and theoretical concepts and approaches to analysis of literary texts. 3. Construct arguments about literary and critical texts based in disciplinary conventions of argumentation, evidence, and ci tation. 4. Demonstrate the ability to conduct research and critically engage both li terary and critical/theoretical texts in a research paper or project of at 20 pages. least 15- More specifically, students in the Creative Writing concentration will be able to: 1. Analyze and interpret literary texts using close reading skills appropriate to the genre, and taking into account the texts’ historical, social, and/or cultural contexts. tation. 2. Construct arguments about literary and critical texts based in disciplinary conventions of argumentation, evidence, and ci 3. Develop their expressive abilities and create a substantial body of original fiction, poetry, or creative non- fiction. 4. Develop knowledge of literary craft in their chosen genre and the ability to apply that knowledge to their creative work. More specifically, students in the Linguistics and Rhetoric concentration will be able to: 1. Analyze and interpret literary texts using close reading skills appropriate to the genre, and taking into account the text s’ historical, social, and/or cultural contexts. 2. Construct arguments about literary and critical texts based in disciplinary conventions of argumentation, evidence, and citation. 3. Analyze and apply key concepts in Linguistics and Rhetoric to written and verbal analysis of texts, issues, and ideas in t he field(s) based in the disciplinary conventions of argumentation, evidence, and citation. projects as well as 4. Demonstrate the ability to engage both primary and secondary sources appropriate to the field and to design basic research to collect and analyze linguistics and rhe toric data in a research paper or project of at least 15- 20 pages. More specifically, students in the English: Foundations for Adolescent Education concentration will be able to: 1. Analyze and interpret literary texts using close reading skills appropriate to the genre, and taking into account the texts’ historical, social, and/or cultural contexts. 2. Construct arguments about literary and critical texts based in disciplinary conventions of argumentation, evidence, and ci tation. 3. Demonstrate familiarit y with literary criticism and theory and apply critical and theoretical concepts and approaches to written and verbal analysis of literary texts. 4. Analyze and apply key concepts in the fields of Composition and Linguistics to written and verbal analysis of texts, issues, and ideas in the fields based in disciplinary conventions of argumentation, evidence, and citation. 5. Demonstrate the ability to conduct research in either Literature, Rhetoric, Composition, or Linguistics and critically engage both prim ary and secondary sources appropriate to the field in a research paper or project of at least 15- 20 pages. More specifically, students in the English Language Arts concentration will be able to: 1. Analyze and interpret literary texts using close reading skills appropriate to the genre, and taking into account the texts’ historical, social, and/or cultural contexts. 2. Construct arguments about literary and critical texts based in disciplinary conventions of argumentation, evidence, and ci tation.

249 3. Analyz eas in the e and apply key concepts in the fields of Composition and Linguistics to written and verbal analysis of texts, issues, and id fields based in disciplinary conventions of argumentation, evidence, and citation. 4. Demonstrate the ability to conduct research in either Literature, Rhetoric, Composition, or Linguistics and critically engage both primary and 20 pages; or demonstrate their expressive abilities and secondary sources appropriate to the field in a research paper or project of at least 15- knowledge of literary craft in a substantial body of original fiction, poetry, or creative non- fiction. Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) Overall: -level elective requirement for all concentrations (one of ENGL 49000, ENGL 49200, ENGL 48400, or ENGL 49400). 1. A 400 2. Expansion of the list of electives from outside the English department. English For Literatures and Criticism: - 1. change from “Literatures, Language, and Criticism” to “Literatures and Criticism.” Name- Addition of requi 2. rement to take two courses from our offerings in Postcolonial literature, African American literature, Native American -ethnic American literature, or literatures from non- European t raditions. literature, Asian American literature, Latina/o American literature, multi 4. Elimination of the Area of Study requirement. 5. Addition of a requirement to take one course from our offerings in literature, linguistics, or rhetoric pre- 1900. For English – Creative Writing: 1. Expansion of options in requirement to tak e one course from our offerings in Postcolonial literature, African American literature, Native -ethnic American literature, or literatures from non- European American literature, Asian American literature, Latina/o American literature, multi traditions. 2. Expansion of options in requirement to take one course from our offerings in literary theory, linguistics, or rhetoric. 3. Change in American literature requirement from a choice of ENGL 39500, 39600, or 39700 to ENGL 30700 - Survey of American Literature: From Origins to the Civil War (formerly ENGL 39500). Linguistics and Rhetoric: For English – 1. 9 credits in each Addition of flexibility to the requirements for courses in Linguistics and or Rhetoric by requiring students take between 3- rather than 6 i n each. 2. Change in American literature requirement from a choice of ENGL 39500, 39600, or 39700 to ENGL 30700 - Survey of American Literature: From Origins to the Civil War (formerly ENGL 39500). Adding ENGL 34300: Topics in Composition to fulfill the 3. Rhetoric course requirement. For English – Foundations for Adolescent Education: 1. Change in name of the concentration to provide greater clarity for students. 2. Expansion of options in requirement to take one course from our offerings in Postcolonial l iterature, African American literature, Native American literature, Asian American literature, Latina/o American literature, multi -ethnic American literature, or literatures from non- European traditions. 3. Change in American literature requirement from a choice of ENGL 39500, 39600, or 39700 to ENGL 30700 - Survey of American Literature: From Origins to the Civil War (formerly ENGL 39500).

250 4. Adding ENGL 34300: Topics in Composition Studies to fulfill the Writing course requirement and eliminating ENGL 34100: Rhetorical Principles of Expository Writing. For English – English Language Arts: Expansion of options in requirement to take one course from our offerings in Postcolonial literature, African American literature, Native 1. -ethnic American literature, or literatures from non- European American literature, Asian A merican literature, Latina/o American literature, multi traditions. 2. Change in American literature requirement from a choice of ENGL 39500, 39600, or 39700 to ENGL 30700 - Survey of American Literature: From Origins to the Civil War (formerly ENGL 39500). 3. ENGL 30300 Western Expansion of options for additional literature requirement beyond ENGL 30500 Children’s Literature, to include Literary Backgrounds, ENGL 30600 Introduction to Literary Theory, or a Shakespeare course (ENGL 35200, ENGL 35300, and ENGL 35400) Adding ENGL 34300: Topics in Composition Studies to fulfill the Writing course requirement and eliminating ENGL 34100: Rhetor 3. ical Principles of Expository Writing. tives: History and Objec Overall: The English major was expanded from 30 to 39 credits in 2013, in part to align it with the standard practices in the discipli ne, and in part to include the Pathways mandated Introduction to Literary Studies (ENGL 25200), a much needed course that introduces students to modes of critical and theoretical analysis, research methods, critical writing, and a historical sense of the discipline. Having creat ed a common entry point in the major (ENGL 25200), we also began to conceptualize a com mon culminating point, a capstone- type course at the 400 level. Following an -study, across two department retreats, an informal student survey, and a review of required courses by extensive review of the major (in our self committee), we agreed that instituting a more clearly “tiered” major would be beneficial to our students and the undergraduate course of study make the major align more closely both with standard practices in the field and our learning outcomes. Mindful that some form of senior seminar or project is standard practice in most English departments, and having seen the benefits of a common entry point in the major, we will now require students who have completed at least 24 credits in the major to take as one of their electives a 400- anced Seminar in their area of level Adv interest: ENGL 49000 Advanced Seminar in Literatures and Criticism; ENGL 49200 Advanced Seminar in Linguistics and/or Rhetori c; or ENGL 48400 Advanced Seminar in Creative Writing. Eligible students may also fulfill the requir ement by taking 49400 Honors Seminar. This will provide a clear culminating experience in the major, enabling students to develop a substantial research (or creative) project that i ncorporates the skills and knowledge developed in 300- level courses. It wil l also enable the Department to more accurately assess students’ progress through the major. Also in 2013, we introduced an option for students to take a course from outside the English department to reflect our commit ment to interdisciplinarity. This option has proved popular with our students, and we are expanding the list of courses to include new courses. In all, the revised concentration will provide students with a clearer conceptual path through the major (in part by renumbering the two required surveys from 33800 and 39500 to 30400 and 30700 respectively), even as it provides more flexibility in pursuing individual interests and a n opportunity to demonstrate their acquired skills and knowledge in a culminating seminar. History and Objectives s pecific to English - Literature, Language and Criticism (Literatures and Criticism) In 2013, in order to expose students to literature from various periods, we added a pre- 1800 literature requirement separate from our two broad survey courses, ENGL 33800 Survey of British Literature I: Early Texts to the Eighteenth Century and ENGL 39500 Survey of American Literature: From Origins to the Civil War. And because the field has become increasingly interdisciplinary, we enabled students to select one of their electives

251 from a menu of 300- level courses in another department, an addition to the major that has, according to advisors and an informal survey, proved h to analyze literature. popular among students, and has provided students additional contexts and perspectives through whic The Department has long required Literatures, Language and Criticism students to choose three electives in an Area of Study as a way of providing an opportunity for deeper and more focused exposure and exploration in a single aspect of the field. That requirement worked well in the context of 30- credit major where the number of elective requirements was more limited. However, with the additional elective opportunities in the 39- credit (now 42- credit) major, it has outlived its usefulness. Furthermore, it is clear from departmental advisors that students find the area of study requirement confusing and overly restrictive. Rather than allowing them to pursue a specific interest, the requirement too often prevents periods; and it contradicts the department’s commitment to inter -disciplinarity. We fully them from making connections across literatures and time- aking a survey expect that students will informally develop various areas of study by choosing courses that are connected to each other (by t course followed by topics courses in a particular literature, period, or thematic approach), but think that it is beneficial for students themselves to rea of Study requirement. At the same time, we are adding develop these interests and follow their curiosity. Therefore, we plan to eliminate the A a further requirement in earlier literary historical periods: a course (chosen from a broad menu of offerings) in pre- 1900 Literature and/or Rhetoric. udents with a strong grounding in literary history This underscores our commitment to providing st —even students whose interests tend more th st and 21 century literature. readily towards 20 -ethnic and/or Postcolonial literature, to be chosen from a substantially broader list of We are also adding an additional requirement in multi courses than our current requirement allows. These fields have become more integral to literary studies in the twenty -first century, and our requirements should both reflect this development and offer students multiple pat hs to pursue interests within these areas. History and Objectives specific to English - Creative Writing The creative writing major concentration has been running for twenty years and continues to be very popular with our students . In 2009, we introduce it in 2013 for similar reasons. ENGL removed the requirement for ENGL 48400 mainly because of scheduling issues, and did not re- instituted as a required course for all creative writing majors, but rather as an option that fulfills the 400- level elective 48400 is not being re- requirement. We expect that the majority of students in the creative writing concentration will select ENGL 48400, but also expect that some will level offerings (including ENGL 49400: Honors Seminar). choose to fulfill the option through the other 400- 1800 literature requirement separate from our two broad survey courses, so as to As with Literature, Language and Criticism, we added a pre- expose students to literature from various periods. History and Objectives specific to E nglish – Linguistics and Rhetoric: Before the introduction of the concentration in 2013, students interested in studying Linguistics and/or Rhetoric had only three options: a minor in linguistic anthropology, a minor in English, or a major in English that incorporated a few linguistics and/or rhetoric courses into their concentration (for example, Literatures, Language and Criticism majors could choose Linguistics and Rhetoric as their 9- credit Area of Study). With the implementation of the Linguistics and Rhetoric concentration, students are now able to pursue a comprehensive course of study in those fields even as they get a foundation in literary studies. In the last five years the concentration has grown to approximately 75 students, with interests as diverse as speech pathology, pursuing doctoral studies in linguistics, and teaching English as a second language. History and Objectives specific to English – Foundations for Adolescent Education We are changing the name of this concentration from “English: Preparation for Secondary School Education” to “English: Foundations for Adolescent Education concentration” to provide greater clarity. This concentration is open to all students, but it was desig ned specifically to meet the needs of prospective s econdary school English teachers. The concentration provides a foundation in literary studies, writing, rhetoric, and language, essential areas of study for prospective teachers. The concentration follows the guidelines of the National Council of Teachers of

252 English and meets the content area certification requirements of the New York State Department of Education. Students interes ted in meeting the rt of the BA program in Adolescent certification requirements to teach in the New York State public schools will take this course sequence as pa English, Grades 7- 12 jointly offered by the School of Arts & Sciences and the School of Education. Students interested in the BA program in 12 should declare this concentration of the major in English before declaring the joint major with the School of Adolescent English, Grades 7- Education. Students who do not wish to pursue certification do not need to contact the School of Education and will follow th e course of study set out in this English concentration. d Objectives specific to English – English Language Arts History an The English Language Arts concentration was designed to provide students with experience in the study of literature, language, and writing. While it is open to all students and serves for some as a “ generalist” major, it was especially designed to meet the needs of prospective elementary school teachers, particularly Quality Urban Elementary School Teacher (QUEST) students. This continues to be reflected in the scope of required courses.

253 through TO ( underline what will be changed) the changes) strike ( FROM List of Course List of Course Requirements for the Degree Program: Requirements for the Degree Program: - BA (42 credits) English - BA (42 credits) English Major Major The English Department offers students five The English Department offers students five iticism, and Cr , (2) concentrations: (1) Literatures and Criticism concentrations: (1) Literatures , Language (2) Creative Writing, (3) English: ive Writing, (3) English: Foundations for Creat Preparation for Secondary School Teaching , (4) English Language Arts Adolescent Education , (4) English Language Arts, Students must take After taking (ELA), and (5) Linguistics and Rhetoric. and (5) Linguistics and Rhetoric. ENGL 22000 Introduction to Writing about Literature, ENGL 22000 before taking any other English courses. 00- and 400- level requisite for all other required of all students and a pre- Thirty -nine credits (13 classes) in 3 courses in the major, students take thirty courses are required for each concentration. Up to 6 -nine credits and 400- (13 classes) of courses at the 300- credits in the major sequence may be taken for /NC. level, with the exception of the following courses which are part of the major: • ENGL 25200 Introduction to Literary Studies, required of all students and to be taken within one semester of declaring the major ENGL 28000 The Structure of Modern English, • required for ELA, Linguistics and Rhetoric, and Foundations for Adolescent Education students 28500 Introduction to Creative Writing, • ive Writing students). required of all Creat Depending on the concentration, students are required 18 credits in literary studies, a range to take between 9- of credits in courses specific to their concentration, and 15 credits in electives, including one between 9- Up to 6 credits in the level seminar. advanced 400- major sequence may be taken for CR/NC. Literatures, Language and Criticism Concentration Majors who choose the Concentration in Literatures, Language and Criticism (42) take ENGL 22000 Introduction to Writing about Literature (3), and ENGL, four required courses (12), three courses in a specialized area of study (9), one 300- level English course or 400- 3), and with a focus on literature or rhetoric before 1800 ( 4-5 electives (12- 15). The department recommends that students take the five required courses early in their major studies, preferably soon after they have declared the major. The Literatures, Language and Criticism concentration is designed to pro vide students with exposure to a range of literary texts and traditions, as well as to a specific area of study in which to focus. The first two areas of study reflect particular national literatures, and the remaining four are designed with broader approa ches to literary study in mind. With prior approval,

254 ENGL 36300 - Topics in Milton • • 0 - The Age of Satire ENGL 3640 The Later 18th Century ENGL 36500 - • • ENGL 36800 - The 18th Century English Novel th • The 19 ENGL 36900 – Century English Novel ENGL 37100 - • Topics in Romantic Literature Romantic Poetry • ENGL 37200 - ENGL 38200 - Topics in Medieval • Literature Topics in Renaissance • ENGL 38300 - Literature • Topics in Restoration ENGL 38400 - and 18th Century Literature Some courses under the following number (depending on the topic; check department listings) • ENGL 31900 - Topics in Literature by Women (W) Topics in African • ENGL 32100 - American Literature ENGL 32200 - Topics in Gender and • Sexuality in Literature • Topics in Native ENGL 32400 - American Literature ENGL 32900 - -Cultural Topics in Cross • Literature in English (W) Topics in Language and • ENGL 33300 - Linguistics Topics in Rhetoric ENGL 34200 – • Language and Ethnicity ENGL 34700 - • • Topics in Literary ENGL 36600 – Theory and Criticism Topics in British and ENGL 38600 - • American Literature Topics in British and/or ENGL 38700 - • Irish Fiction Genre Topics in Multi- ENGL 38800 - • British and/or Irish Literature One Major Writer (W) • ENGL 38900 - • Topics in British and/ or ENGL 39100 - Irish Poetry • Topics in American ENGL 39200 - Poetry World Literature: ENGL 39400 - • Drama Topics in ENGL 39800 - American • Fiction • ENGL 39900 - Topics in American Multi -Genre Literature (W) Honors Seminar: • ENGL 49400

255 Literature in English (W) • Topics in Language and ENGL 33300 - Linguistics • ENGL 34200 – Topics in Rhetoric • Language and Ethnicity ENGL 34700 - ENGL 36600 – • Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism s in British and Topic ENGL 38600 - • American Literature ENGL 38700 - • Topics in British and/or Irish Fiction Genre • ENGL 38800 - Topics in Multi- British and/or Irish Literature • ENGL 38900 - One Major Writer (W) • ENGL 39100 - Topics in British and/ or Irish Poetry - Topics in American • ENGL 39200 Poetry ENGL 39400 - World Literature: • Drama ENGL 39800 - Topics in American • Fiction ENGL 39900 - • Topics in American -Genre Literature (W) Multi Honors Seminar: ENGL 49400 - • Special Studies D. Required Writing Courses (12 credits ) 1. ENGL 28500 Introduction to Creative Writing C. Four Required Creative Writing Workshops (12) (and pass it with a grade of B or higher) All students who are planning to concentrate in 1. Creative Writing must first take: 30000 ∙ ENGL - Introduction to Creative Writing 2 Students must then take 3 more creative writing (and pass it with a grade of B or higher) workshops from the following, at least one of which 2. Students must then take 3 more creative writing must be a level -II workshop. workshops from the following, at least one of which must be a level -II workshop. -II workshops once for Note: Students may repeat level Note: Students may repeat lev el-II workshops once for -II Workshop credit. Students may not take a Level credit. Students may not take a Level -II Workshop without without first taking the Level -I Workshop in that genre. first taking the Level -I Workshop in that genre. Students Students may not take ENGL 48400 without first taking may not take ENGL 484 without first taking a Level -II -II Workshop in that genre. a Level Workshop in that genre. ENGL 30800 Workshop in • ∙ ENGL 30800 - Workshop in Non- Fiction I (3) Non Fiction I Creative Fiction II (3) - Workshop in Non- ∙ ENGL 30900 • ENGL 30900 Workshop in - Workshop in Fiction I (3) ∙ ENGL 31100 Non Fiction II Creative - Workshop in Fiction II (3) ∙ ENGL 31300 ENGL 31100 Workshop in • - Workshop in Poetry I (3) ∙ ENGL 31400 Fiction I ∙ ENGL 31600 - Workshop in Poetry II (3) • ENGL 31300 Workshop in ∙ ENGL 48400 - Special Studies Seminar (3) Fiction II (offerings vary and may include: Advanced Workshop in • ENGL 31400 Workshop in Poetry; Advanced Prose Writing; Narrative Forms: Poetry I Strategies in Fiction; or The Art of Revision: Poetry and ENGL 31600 Workshop in • S

256 for the course, students must first complete at least 24 credits in the major and meet the prerequisites for the specific Seminar (listed below). ENGL 49000 Advanced Seminar in Literature and Criticism (Prerequisites: ENGL 22000; ENGL 25200; ENGL 30400; ENGL 30600; ENGL 30700; one of ENGL 31700, 31800, 32000, 32100, 32300, 32400, 32500, 32600, 32700, or 32900) ENGL 49200 Advanced Seminar in Linguistics and/or Rhetoric (Prerequisites: ENGL 22000; ENGL 25200; ENGL 28000; ENGL 30100: and one of ENGL 34000, ENGL 34100, ENGL 34200, or ENGL 34300; and one of ENGL 33000, ENGL 33200, ENGL 33300, ENGL 34600, ENGL 34700, ENGL 34800) ENGL 48400 Advanced Seminar in Creative Writing (Prerequisites: ENGL 22000; ENGL 25200; ENGL 28500; ENGL 30400; ENGL 30 700; and both a level 1 and 2 workshop in the student's chosen genre) Students may take any Advanced Seminar for which they meet the prerequisites. If eligible, students may take the Honors Seminar (ENGL 49400) in place in addition to one of the Adv anced Seminars. In of or rare cases, students may take ENGL 48500 Individual Tutorial Project instead of an Advanced Seminar, but only by permission of an advisor and the professor supervising the project. Concentration in English: Preparation for IV. Concentration in English: Foundations for IV. Secondar Adolescent Education (42 credits) y School Teaching (42 credits) The Concentration in English: Preparation for Secondary The Concentration in English: Foundations for School Teaching (42) is designed to prepare students to (42 cr.) is designed to give Adolescent Education teach English in grades 7- 12 by providing a foundation in students the foundation in literary studies, writing, and -Ethnic literatures, as w British, American, and Multi ell as writing and language studies. Students choosing this linguistics that is required for teaching English in grades concentration take ENGL 22000 Introduction to Writing 7-12. This concentration alone does not meet the about Literature (3) and ENGL 25200, Introduction to teaching certification requirements for New York State Literary Studies (3), 18 credits of required literature and New York City public schools. Students interested iting courses, one 3- courses, 6 credits of required wr credit language course, and three electives (9) chosen in meeting these certification requirements will take this from among 300- level courses offered by the and 400- course sequence as part of the BA program in Department, with the option to choose one of their Adolescent English, Grades 7- 12 jointly offered by the electives from a menu of courses in other departments School of Arts & Sciences and the School of E ducation. and programs. en together with the When tak requirements for the Secondary Education minor of the Students interested in the BA program in Adolescent School of Education, this program meets initial English, Grades 7- 12 should declare this concentration certification requirements for New York State and New of the major in English before declaring the joint major York City public schools. Students interested in the with the School of Education. Students who do not wish to the School of Education Education minor must apply

257 requirements for only one of their majors. Students in this concentration are required to take two courses in wishing to take a 300- level course that is not listed below Linguistics and/or Rhetoric (including ENGL 28000: The must get prior written consent from an English advisor, Structure of Modern English) and two writing courses and any such course is subject to pre- requisites of the (including ENGL 30100: Composition Theory and department in which the course is taken. Students also enrolled in the QUEST major may satisfy one of their ELA Practice). The remaining three courses (9 cr.) are elective requirements by taking any Art History, Music electives, one of which is a 400- level advanced History, Theatre, or Dance History course, Taking one of seminar, which will involve a substantial research or sfy 3 credits of the QUEST these courses will also sati creat ive project. Students have the option of taking one Arts Distribution requirement. This option is available only to ELA majors who are also majoring in QUEST. course (3 credits) outside the English department from a menu of options (see below), an independent study -time faculty member, an internship, and/or an with a full Honors seminar if they qualify. Hunter Core Requirement er Core Requirement Hunt Several courses within this major may fulfill parts of the Several courses within this major may fulfill parts of the ommon Core [CCC], Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY C Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY Common Core Hunter Focus, Concurrent Requirements). When [CCC], Hunter Focus, Concurrent Requirements). selecting courses, it may be to a student’s advantage to When selecting courses, it may be to a student’s choose courses that count toward the Hunter Core advantage to choose courses that count toward the Requirement and also advance the student on the path to Hunter Core Requirement and also advance the the major. Details on the Hunter Core Requirement can student on the path to the major. Details on the Hunter be found here: Hunter Core Requirement Core Requirement can be found here: Hunter Core Courses CUNY Common Core Requirement ENGL 22000 English Composition Courses CUNY Common Core Please note that no more than two courses from any one ENGL 22000 English Composition department will count for the CUNY Common Core. Please note that no more than two courses from any one department will count for the CUNY Common Core. he Major Courses Required for t Courses Required for the Major - Introduction to Writing about Literature ∙ ENGL 22000 - Introduction to Writing about Literature ∙ ENGL 22000 (3) (3) Introduction to Literary Studies (3) A. – to be taken within one semester of declaring the major A. Introductory Courses (6 credits) - Introduction to Literary Studies ∙ ENGL 25200 1. ENGL 22000 Introduction to Writing About Literature 2. ENGL 25200 Introduction to Literary Studies B. Four Required Literature Courses ( 12) • ENGL 22000 must be the first course taken in Three Required Courses 1. the major ∙ ENGL 30500 - Studies in Children's Literature (3) • ENGL 25200 must be taken within a semester Ethnic American Literature (3) (W) ∙ ENGL 32000 - Multi- of declaring the major ∙ ENGL 33800 - Survey of British Literature I: Early Texts To the Eighteenth Century (3) B. Survey Courses in Literature (6 credits) ong the following 2. One course chosen from am courses 1. ENGL 30400 Survey of British and Irish Literature: in American Literature (3) Early Texts to 1800 ∙ ENGL 39500 - Survey of American Literature: Origins to 2. ENGL 30700: Survey of American Literature: From the Civil War (W) (3) Origins to the Ci vil War or- - American Prose from Reconstruction to - ∙ ENGL 39600 C. Literature Requirements (6 credits)

258 Folklore COMPL 37100 - Comparative Studies in Myth and Folklore COMPL 38000 - Selected Topics in Comparative Literature COMPL 38100 - Selected Topics in Comparative Literature Economics: ECO 34500 - Women and Men in the Labor Market ECO 35000 - Comparative Economic Systems Law and Ec ECO 37000 - onomics ECO 30500 - Development of Economic Thought Economic History ECO 33100 - The Labor Movement ECO 34600 - Film and Media FILM 32200 - Contemporary Film Theory (prereq: FILM 10100, 21100 or 21200) Narrative Strategies (prereq: FILM 1 FILM 32400 - 0100 and 20100 or 23100) FILM/MEDIA 32600 - America in American Film and Video (prereq: FILM 10100, 21100 or 21200; MEDIA 180) Representations of Race and FILM/MEDIA 32700 - Ethnicity in U.S. Media (prereq: FILM 10100 or MEDIA 180) FILM/MEDIA 32800 - Images of Resistance in the Developing World (prereq: FILM 10100 or MEDIA 180) Myths and Images in the Media FILM/MEDIA 33200 - (prereq: FILM 10100 or MEDIA 180) Media (MEDIA 18000 is a prerequisite for all 200- , , 300- and 400- level MEDIA courses) MEDIA 31300 - The Culture of Publicity Nonfiction Film and Video MEDIA 31500 – Typecasting MEDIA 33300 - The Press and the Public MEDIA 37000 - MEDIA 37300 - Journalism as Literature MEDIA 37500 - Media and Politics MEDIA 38100 - Propaganda and the Mass Media - Women and Media 400 MEDIA 38 Media Ethics MEDIA 38600 - MEDIA 39300 - Media Criticism Cult TV and its Audiences MEDIA 39700 – MEDIA 39800 – Complex TV Narratives French: FREN 24200 – Modern French Civilization: From Revolution to Present FREN 25100 - French Literature and the Arts From Symbolism to Surrealism in FREN 25200 -

259 REL 326 Law, Society and Civil Rights - SOC 320 Religious Meanings of the Qur’an 00 00 SOC 321 - Christian Theology REL 333 Sociology of Organizations SOC 322 - Drugs and Society REL 334 00 Mysticism Sociology of Human Rights: Violation and SOC 32502 - Myth and Ritual 00 REL 335 REL 336 Zen 00 Protection REL 337 Latin American Societies SOC 32506 - 00 Sufism Economic Development and Social Homosexuality in World Religion(W) 00 REL 340 SOC 32519 - 00 REL 360 Inequality in Latin America Special Topics: Theoretical Studies in SOC 36000 - Religion Feminist Social Theory REL 361 00 Special Topics: Issues in Religion SOC 36100 - Development and Modernization (W) 00 REL 362 Special Topics: Religious Traditions SOC 36200 - Sociology of Islam (W) 00 REL 390 Modern Theories of Religion SOC 36300 - Social Change Globalism and Nationalism SOC 36400 - Sociology SO C 36000 - Feminist Social Theory SOC 36100 - Development and Modernization (W) - Migration SOC 307 00 Sociology of Islam (W) SOC 36200 - SOC 309 - Social Movements and Social Change 00 SOC 36300 - Social Change (W) SOC 36400 - Globalism and Nationalism SOC 313 00 - Consumer Behavior 00 - Culture and Consumption SOC 314 Political Science SOC 315 00 - Work and Society (W) SOC 317 - Class, Status, and Power 00 POLSC 301 American Political Thought (W) - Sociology of Human Rights in Latin SOC 31800 POLSC 304 Contemporary Issues in Political Theory America POLSC 305 Democratic Theory (W) - Law, Society and Civil Rights 00 SOC 320 POLSC 307 Theory of Revolution - Sociology of Organizatio SOC 321 00 ns POLSC 309 Feminist Political Theory (W) SOC 322 - Drugs and Society 00 POLSC 310 Comparative Legal Systems (W) SOC 32502 - Sociology of Human Rights: Violation and Protection POLSC 311 Utopian Theory (W) SOC 32506 - Latin American Societies POLSC 316 Political Theory of Human Rights (W) Economic Development and Social SOC 32519 - POLSC 317 Contemporary Issues in American Politics Inequality in Latin America POLSC 320 Ethnic Politics (W) Feminist Social Theory SOC 36000 - POLSC 321 American Political Economy (W) elopment and Modernization (W) SOC 36100 - Dev POLSC 322 Social and Economic Policies in Europe and Sociology of Islam (W) SOC 36200 - the U.S. Social Change SOC 36300 - Globalism and Nationalism SOC 36400 - POLSC 330 American Political Development Feminist Social Theory SOC 36000 - POLSC 340 Constitutional La w: Organizing the SOC 36100 - Development and Modernization (W) Government SOC 36200 - Sociology of Islam (W) POLSC 341 Constitutional Law: Civil Rights Social Change SOC 36300 - POLSC 342 Constitutional Law : The First Amendment Globalism and Nationalism SOC 36400 - POLSC 343 Criminal Law Spanish: POLSC 348 Public Administration and Public Policy Contemporary Latin- American Literature SPAN 26300 – POLSC 351 Government and Politics of Russia and the in Translation -Sov iet States Post SPAN 26400 – Contemporary Spanish Literature in POLSC 352 State and Society in Africa (W) Translation POLSC 353 Social Society, Civil Society, and the State in Latin America Theatre POLSC 356 India’s Democratic Experiment THEA 321 00 Play Analysis ics in Theatre and THEA 323 00 20thcentury Aesthet POLSC 360 Democracy and development in a Film Globalizing World THEA 324 00 Adaptation in Theatre and Film POLSC 372 Contemporary Issues i n Contemporary G f C

260 repeated as different figures are offered. Figure in Medieval Philosophy: Major • PHILO 38250 - Augustine (W) Major Figure in Medieval Philosophy: • PHILO 38254 - Averroes (W) • PHILO 38254 - Major Figure in Medieval Philosophy: Maimonides (W) • PHILO 38256 - Major Figure in Medieval Philosophy: Aquinas (W) - Major Figure in Early Modern Philosophy PHILO 383 (W) A study of the works and legacy of one of the major philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Rousseau. The course may be repeated as diffe rent figures are offered. • PHILO 38350 - Major Figure in Early Modern 4. Rationale : Philosophy: Descartes (W) • PHILO 38351 - Major Figure in Early Modern English The Philosophy: Spinoza (W) Major: Major Figure in Early Modern • PHILO 38352 - level 400- advanced Philosophy: Leibniz (W) elective seminar Major Figure in Early Modern • PHILO 38353 - Philosophy: Hobbes (W) • PHILO 38354 - Major Figure in Early Modern Philosophy: Locke (W) • PHILO 38355 - Major Figure in Early Modern Philosophy: Berkeley (W) • PHILO 38356 - Major Figure in Early Modern Philosophy: Hume (W) • PHIL Major Figure in Early Midern Philosophy: O 38357 - Rousseau (W) PHILO 384 - Kant (W) A study of some of Kant’s major writings. PHILO 385 - Plotinus (W) A study of the background, writings and legacy of Plotinus. PHILO 386 - Hegel (W) Study of some of Hegel ’s major writings. - Nietzsche (W) Study of Nietzsche’s major PHILO 387 writings. PHILO 388 - Wittgenstein (W) Development of Wittgenstein’s thought through intensive study of his major works. PHILO 389 - Heidegger (W) Detailed study of the central themes in Being and Time and their development in his later essays. PHILO 390 - Marx (W) Study of some of Marx’s major writings. Ethics, Politics and Aesthetics: PHILO 344 - Ethics in Contemporary Life (W) A study of th concepts of ethics developed in the 20 century and their relevance to problems of contemporary life, such as personal development, social responsibility, and cultural

261 requirement: h the While our current major has a number of strengths, it lacks a clear structure that allows students to clearly progress throug our major, from our introductory courses (ENGL 22000: Introduction to Writing About Literature and ENGL 25200: Introduction to Literary Studies), required survey courses (which are intended to give students a grounding in literary history and theory), and electives. Whil e we encourage students to take survey courses early in their undergraduate career, in practice they do not always do this, in part because the numbering of the 0400 and ENGL 39500 to 30700). courses has proved to be confusing (see proposal to change the numbering of ENGL 33800 to ENGL 3 Students also lack an obvious culminating experience in the major, in which they might develop a substantial research or creative project (which could be useful for some of our students who wish to go on to do graduate work). When we revised the major in 2013, we were required by Pathways to institute an introductory course (ENGL 25200). While our students have had an entry -point to the major, they currently lack a -study, across two department retreats, a student survey, and a ajor (in our self culminating experience. Following an extensive review of the m review of required courses by the undergraduate course of study), we agreed that instituting a more clearly “tiered” major would be beneficial to or align more closely with our learning outcomes. Also, in 2013, in anticipation of the need for a capstone- style our students and make the maj course, we created an optional 400- level seminar course (ENGL 49000). After researching approximately fifty English majors at comparable in not requiring an institutions (public, private, urban, small and large), we found that our own practices were at odds with the majority of programs style” seminar with a substantial research or creative project; hence why we are proposing to introduce a upper level, senior “capstone- requirement for a 400- level elective across all of our major concentrations, which will involve students completing a substantial research or will fulfill this requirement with ENGL 49000, now titled creative project. We expect that students in the Literatures and Criticism concentration Advanced Seminar in Literary Studies, that students in the Creative Writing concentration will fulfill this requirement with ENGL 48400, now titled Advanced Seminar in Creative Writing, and student s in the Linguistics and Rhetoric concentration will fulfill this requirement with ENGL 49200, but they can also do so with ENGL 49400: Honors Seminar, or any of the other 400- level courses if they have completed the pre- requisites. Rationale specific to English – Literatures and Criticism: 1. Name- change from “Literatures, Language, and Criticism” to “Literatures and Criticism”: Our rationale for changing the title of the nguistics and Rhetoric, which requires students to take courses concentration to “Literatures and Criticism” is that there is a concentration in Li which is “Linguistics studying the English language. Given that we wish to eliminate the areas of study requirement in this concentration (one of and Rhetoric”) (see below), there is no longer an expectation that students in this concentration might take courses in the study of the English language (although students are not restricted from taking courses in Linguistics and Rhetoric and composition, we expect students who develop a interest in these fields to gravitate toward the Linguistics and Rhetoric concentration). substantial 2. Expanding options for literature requirements beyond ENGL 32000 and ENGL 32500: Our rationale for expanding the number of options for courses in Postcolonial literature, African American literature, Native American literature, Asian American literature, Latina/o American literature, multi- ethnic American literature, or literatures from non- European traditions is that these fields have been historically non- canonical but are ones which the department considers integral to the study of literature in English in the twenty -time -first century (as reflected by the number of full faculty who teach these courses regularly). We require students to take two courses from the list to balance out the more canonical listings under the pre- 1800 and pre- 1900 requirements. 3. Eliminating the Area of Study requirement: We propose the removal of the Area of Study requirement because it became evident that, even though it was the cornerstone of the “Literature, Language, and Criticism” 30 credit major, it no longer works with the expanded major. It was clear from faculty advising that students found the area of study requirement confusing and overly restrictive. Rather than all owing them to pursue a specific interest, the area of study requirement prevented them from making connections across literatures and time- periods; and it contradicted the department’s commitment to inter -disciplinarity. We expect that students will inform ally develop various areas of study by choosing courses

262 that are connected to each other (by taking a survey course followed by topics courses in a particular literature, period, or thematic approach), but elop these interests and follow their curiosity. we think that it is beneficial for students to dev 4. Requirement for a course in literatures pre- 1900: We propose adding a further requirement in earlier literary historical periods to continue our th and —even students whose interests tends more readily towards 20 in literary history commitment to providing students with a strong grounding st pre- 1800. In this century literature. In 2013, we instituted a requirement that all students in this concentration take a course in literature 21 program, we wish to add to this requirement with any 3 credits that must be taken in literatures pre- 1900. This additional proposed change to the (even though requirement cannot be filled by taking a Shakespeare course to encourage students to look more broadly at earlier literatures students can of course take additional Shakespeare courses as electives). Rationale specific to English – Creative Writing: 1. Expanding options for literature requirements beyond ENGL 31800, 32000, 32100, 32500, 32700: See above under Rationale specific to Literatures and Criticism #2. 2. Expansion of options in requirement to take one course from our offerings in literary theory, linguistics, or rhetoric: Our rationale for this change is because of new courses that we have been offering since 2012. 3. Eliminating ENGL 39600 and ENGL 39700 as required courses: Our rationale for eliminating ENGL 39600: American Prose from th Century American Poetry is that the courses do not provide students with a sufficient 20 Reconstruction to World War I and ENGL 39700: Pre- grounding in early American literary history, and hence the requirement as is does not conform to a key commitment in the department to expose students to earlier literatures in the British/Irish and the American context (both of these courses focus on late nineteenth- and early twentieth- century American literature). ENGL 30700: Survey of American Literature: From Origins to the Civil War (previously ENGL 39500) is better suited to giving students a grounding in early American literary hi story (it also mirrors ENGL 30400: Survey of British Literature I: Early Texts to the Eighteenth Century, formerly ENGL 33800, which gives students a grounding in early British and Irish literary history). ENGL 39600 and ENGL 39700 are more suited for students who wish to develop a further interest in American literary history and can be taken as electives. Both of these be a course required courses will be eliminated as requirements across all of our concentrations. In the new version of the major, ENGL 30700 will of all English majors, regardless of concentration. Rationale specific to English – Linguistics and Rhetoric: 1. Making the choice of linguistics and/or rhetoric and composition required courses more flexible : Our rationale for changes to the l inguistics and rhetoric requirements stems from an informal student survey conducted in the semester of Spring 2017. Currently students take one required course in Linguistics (ENGL 28000: The Structure of Modern English (formerly ENGL 33100) and one requi red course in Rhetoric and Composition (ENGL 30100 Composition Theory and Practice), and then 6 credits in Rhetoric and 6 credits in Linguistics. Students in the concentration made it clear in the survey that the structure of the requirements was both oner ous to complete and limiting them from pursuing their interests. For some, their interests lay more in linguistics than in rhetoric and composition, while for others it was the re verse (for example, students with an interest in speech therapy find linguist ics courses more useful). Also, it could prove difficult for students to meet the requirements, given the small number of faculty teaching in the field and the number of courses that we can offer per semester. As a result , we propose giving students the option of taking more classes in linguistics (between 3- 9 credits rather than 6) or in rhetoric and composition (between 3- 9 credits rather than 6) if they wish.

263 2. Eliminating ENGL 39600 and ENGL 39700 as required courses: see above under English- Creative Writing # 1. 3. Adding ENGL 34300: Topics in Composition to fulfill the Rhetoric course requirement: Our rationale for adding ENGL 34300: Topics in gap in our offerings. Composition to the list of possible rhetoric and composition courses is that it is a new course to fill a Rationale Specific to English – Foundations for Adolescent Education Our rationale for expanding the number of options for 1. Expanding options for literature requirements beyond ENGL 32000 and ENGL 32500: courses in Postcolonial literature, African American literature, Native American literature, Asian American literature, Latina/o American literature, ethnic American literature, or literatures from non- European traditions is that these fields have been historically non- canonical but are ones multi- which the department considers integral to the study of literature in English in the twenty -first century (as reflected by the number of full -time faculty who teach these courses regularly). 2. Change in American literature requirement : Our rationale for eliminating ENGL 39600: American Prose from Reconstruction to World War I th Century American Poetry is that the courses do not provide students with a sufficient grounding in early American and ENGL 39700: Pre- 20 literary history, and hence the requirement as is does not conform to a key commitment in the department to expose students to earlier literatures in the British/Irish and the American context (both ENGL 39600 and 39700 focus on late nineteenth- and early twentieth- century Amer ican literature). ENGL 30700: Survey of American Literature: From Origins to the Civil War (previously ENGL 39500) is better suited to giving students a grounding in early American literary history (it also mirrors ENGL 30400: Survey of British Literature I: Early Texts to the Eighteenth Century, formerly ENGL 33800, which gives students a grounding in early British and Irish literary history). ENGL 39600 and ENGL 39700 are more suited history. Both of these courses will be eliminated as requirements across all for students who wish to develop a further interest in American literary s of concentration. of our concentrations. In the new version of the major, ENGL 30700 will be a course required of all English majors, regardles 3. Adding ENGL 34300: Topics in Composition Studies to fulfill the Writing course requirement and eliminating ENGL 34100: Rhetorical Principles ition courses is t hat it of Expository Writing. Our rationale for adding ENGL 34300: Topics in Composition to the list of possible rhetoric and compos 34300 would better is a new course to fill a gap in our offerings. As taught, ENGL 34100 is not a course primarily concerned with writing. ENGL reflect the purpose of the requirement. Rationale Specific to English – English Language Arts 1. Expanding options for literature requirements beyond ENGL 32000: See above under Rationale Specific to English – Foundations for Adolescent Education #1 2. Change in American literature requirement: See above Rationale Specific to English – Foundations for Adolescent Education #2 3. Course in Writing Requirement: adding ENGL 34300: Topics in Composition Studies and eliminating ENGL 34100: Rhetorical Princi ples of Expository Writing: see above Rationale Specific to English – Foundations for Adolescent Education #3 4. Expanding options for additional literature requirement beyond ENGL 30500 Children’s Literature: Currently, requirement s for ELA students are limited to the survey courses, ENGL 32000, and ENGL 30500 Children’s Literature. While the last of thes e is popular, we wish to expand the options for a final literature 3- credit requirement to include ENGL 30300 Western Literary Backgrounds, ENGL 30600 Introduction to Literary

264 Theory, or a Shakespeare course (ENGL 35200, ENGL 35300, and ENGL 35400), to giv e students more flexibility and to ground them more in literary history (which they may not find elsewhere in the concentration, depending on their selection of elective credits). English Language Arts is no longer bound by New York State standards for cou rses designed around teaching at the elementary school level. Consultation Statement: a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [x ] YES – If yes, list department/program: The following departments and programs have been consulted: Anthropology, Arabic, History, Sociology, Political Science, Film and Media, no Studies, Comparative Literature, Theatre, Classical Studies, Chinese, Economics, German, Romance Languages, Africana Puerto Rican/Lati Religion, Philosophy, Wom en and Gender Studies, Asian American Studies, and the School of Education. Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [x ] YES [ ] N/A b. Does this affect the Library? [x ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ x] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A AIII. 6 Program Name and Degree Awarded: BA in Mathematics and BA in Mathematics with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Proposed Changes in a Degree Program The following is the revised curriculum for Mathematics leading to the BA Degree. HEGIS Code: 1701.00 NY State Program Code: 33655 MHC Code HEGIS Code (when applicable): 60170 ) Note: Codes can be found in the State's Inventory of Registered Programs at http://www.nysed.gov/heds/irpsl1.html Effective term: Fall 2018 Program Learning Outcomes: Mathematics Major (B.A.) Program Learning Outcomes 1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental principles of major areas of mathematics —including Calculus and Linear Algebra, Abstract Algebra and Analysis, and Probability and Statistics —by explaining key concepts and theorems, performing computations, and solving problems. 2. Students will be able to reason mathematically and create and critique mathematical proofs that are clear, complete, and concise.

265 3. Students will demonstrate proficiency in symbolic computation. 4. Students will demonstrate the ability to think critically and apply mathematical principles to solve complex problems in pure and applied mathematics and other fields of study. Mathematics Major (B.A.) with Concentration in Quantitative Biology.Program Learning Outcomes —including Calculus and Linear 1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental principles of major areas of mathematics Algebra, Abstract Algebra and Analysis, and Probability and Statistics —by explaining key concepts and theorems, performing computations, and solving problems. 2. Students will be able to reason mathematically and create and critique mathematical proofs that are clear, complete, and concise. 3. Students will demonstrate proficiency in symbolic computation. 4. Students will demonstrate the ability to think critically and apply mathematical principles to solve complex problems in pure and applied mathematics and other fields of study. —including numerical algorithms, stochastic and deterministic 5. Students will apply statistical and mathematical reasoning and methods models, and probabilistic models —to process, store, anal yze, visualize and model molecular biological data and make statistical inference from such data. Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) Data gathered for students taking MATH 10100 shows there is an unacceptably high DFW rate. In order to increase student success, we are geted students introducing an alternative course, MATH 101EN, where students get enhanced instruction to enable them to succeed. We have tar with the lowest placement scores to recommend that they take this course, but students are free to decide which they prefer. rigonometry) One of the main changes is to replace the course Math 12500 (Precalculus) with two courses, Math 12400 (College Algebra and T and Math 12550 (Precalculus with Workshop). The former course is for students who do not intend to continue on to calculus while the latter course is an enhanced version of Math 12500 for students who plan to take calculus (it also includes a recitation hour). Math 12400 is essentially the same course as the current Math 12500, w hich is kept on our books for transfer students to get credit, but Math 12400 changes title to avoid the connotation that it is intended for calculus. In addition, we add a 1 credit, 2 hour course Math 10150 (Mastery of Symbolic Computation), for students in Math 10100/101EN who do not earn a B - or better. This course is offered online during intersession and summer so students do not lose time on their road to a degre e. Finally, we add a 1 credit, 2 hour course Math 14000 (Mathematical Reasoning Workshop), for transfer students who have credit for Math 12500 or Math 12400 students who change their minds and find they need calculus or Math 12550 students who do not earn a B - or better. This course is a corequisite to Math 15000/15200, so students do not lose time on their road to a degree.

266 History and Objectives Data in the courses for which Math 10100/101EN is a prerequisite (Stat 11300, Math 12500) has been gathered that shows a high DFW rate in those courses and the new course, Math 10150, is designed to raise the skill levels of students who need a higher level of mastery to be more successful in their next math course. Data has also been gathered that shows a high DFW rate in Math 15000 and the objectives of these changes is to improve student’s pros pects for success. The proposed course Math 12550 addresses this deficit. In addition, we introduce Math 14000 as a bridge course for transfer students who have credit for the equivalent of Math 12400 or Math 12500 or n a B -, as a corequisite for Math 15000/152000. Students do not get training in logical thinking and students in Math 12550 who do not ear Calculus requires a strong grasp of logical principles; this course is designed to fill that gap. ( strikethrough FROM TO ( underlin e the changes) what will be changed) List of Course List of Course Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Name Crs. Name Crs. Mathematics - BA (33 - 51 credits) credits) 53 - (33 BA - Mathematics The major consists of at least 33 credits of The major consists of at least 33 credits of coursework: 24 -39 credits of core mathematics 41 coursework: 24- credits of core mathematics and statistics courses and 9 credits of advanced and statistics courses and 9 credits of advanced elective courses chosen by students according to elective courses chosen by students according to their career plans. Proficiency in symbolic their career plans. Proficiency in symbolic computation is also required. Modif ications are computation is also required. Modifications are permitted with the consent of the mathematics permitted with the co nsent of the mathematics advisor. With permission of the advisor, a student advisor. With permission of the advisor, a student may take graduate courses in statistics or may take graduate courses in statistics or mathematics. Mathematics majors interested in mathematics. Mathematics majors interested in bioinformatics should refer to the requirements for bioinformatics should refer to the requirements for athematics Major with a Concentration in the M the Mathematics Major with a Concentrat ion in BA Quantitative Biology – BA Quantitative Biology – Courses Required for the Major Courses Required for the Major

267 Based on placement exams or transferred courses, Based on placement exams or transferred courses, students may place into some more advanced students may place into some more advanced courses without taking Hunter College pre- courses without taking Hunter College pre- requisites. See the Mathematics and Statistics requisites. See the Mathematics and Statistics department for details. department for details. 17 credits) Calculus Sequence (0- MATH 10100: Algebra for College Students (3) ∙ ∙ MATH 10100: Algebra for College Students (3)* OR MATH 101EN: Algebra for College Students – Enhanced (3)* MATH 10150: Mastery of Symbolic Computation (1)* MATH 12550 (STEM): Precalculus with Workshop (4) * B– or better; with a grade of ∙ MATH 12500 (STEM): Precalculus (4) ollowing: OR one of the f [MATH 12400 (STEM): College Algebra and Trigonometry(4)* OR ∙ MATH 15000 (STEM) – Calculus with Analytic * ∙ MATH 12500 (STEM): Precalculus (4) Geometry I (4) MATH 15500 (STEM) – with Analytic ∙ Calculus PLUS II (4) Geometry MATH 14000: Mathematical Reasoning Workshop (1) * MATH 15600 - Introduction to Math ∙ ematical Proof ∙ Calculus I (4) * MATH 15000 (STEM) – Workshop (1) MATH 15500 (STEM) – Calculus II (4) ∙ * with Analytic Geometry Calculus MATH 25000 - ∙ III (4) Required M ath Courses (24 Credits) Ordinary Differential Equations (3) MATH 25400 - ∙ Introduction to Mathematical Proof MATH 15600 - ∙ Vector Analysis (3) MATH 25500 - ∙

268 MATH 26000 - Linear Algebra (4) ∙ Workshop (1)* Abstract Algebra I (3) Calculus III (4) MATH 25000 - ∙ ∙ MATH 31100 - MATH 25400 - ∙ ∙ MATH 35100 - Mathematical Analysis I (3) Ordinary Differential Equations (3) Introduction to Applied STAT 21300 (STEM) - ∙ ∙ MATH 25500 - Vector Analysis (3) MATH 26000 - - Probability Theory Statistics (3) or ∙STAT 31100 ∙ Linear Algebra (4) ∙ MATH 31100 - Abstract Algebra I (3) (3) MATH 35100 - Mathematical Analysis I (3) ∙ STAT 21300 (STEM) - ∙ Introduction to Applied Elective Courses - Probability Theory credit Statistics (3) or ∙STAT 31100 The student must complete three 3- mathematics or statistics courses chosen from the (3) 300- or 400- level courses in mathematics or Elective Courses (9 credits) statistics listed by the department and approved by the undergraduate mathematics advisor. credit The student must complete three 3- Factors affecting the choice of electives will include mathematics or statistics courses chosen from the the student’s career goals (preparation for graduate or 400- level courses in mathematics or 300- study; education; careers in business, government statistics listed by the department and approved by service or industry), the student’s other major, the undergraduate mathematics advisor. where applicable, and the availability of courses Factors affecting the choice of electives will include due to the course rotation schedule. the student’s career goals (preparation for graduate study; education; careers in business, government Symbolic Computation Proficiency Requirement (0- service or industry), the student’s other major, 3 credits) where applicable, and the availability of courses As a requirement for graduation with a BA in due to the course rotation schedule. Mathematics, students must demonstrate entry Symbolic Computation Proficiency level proficiency in symbolic computation. The -3 credits) Requirement (0 requirement can be met in any of the following ways: As a requirement for graduation with a BA in a) passing any of Mathematics, students must demonstrate entry - ∙ MATH 12600 - Precalculus Technology level proficiency in symbolic computation. The Laboratory (1) requirement can be met in any of the following - An Introduction to ∙ MATH 15400 Symbolic ways: Computation (1) a) passing any of ∙ MATH 38500 - Numerical Methods I (3) ∙ MATH 12600 - Precalculus Technology b) passing a departmental exam in a computer Laboratory (1) algebra system (currently we use MATHEMATICA ∙ MATH 15400 - An Introduction to Symbolic

269 Computation (1) or the equivalent) ∙ MATH 38500 - Numerical Methods I (3) b) passing a departmental exam in a computer algebra system (currently we use MATHEMATICA or the equivalent) *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one program. with a Concentration in Mathematics Mathematics with a Concentration in Quantitative Quantitative Biology - 80 credits) (63- BA Biology - BA (63 -78 credits) Major Major This program is for students intending to pursue This program is for students intending to pursue research careers in biomedical sciences. It research careers in biomedical sciences. It dents with a working knowledge of provides stu provides students with a working knowledge of computing and biological sciences for computing and biological sciences for bioengineering careers in bioinformatics, the bioengineering careers in bioinformatics, the pharmaceutical industry, and the biotechnology pharmaceutical industry, and the biotechnology industry. industry. Students interested in this concentration in the Students interested in this concentration in the mathematics major should consult the mathematics major should consult the BioInformatics advisor. BioInformatics advi sor. Courses Required for the Major Courses Required for the Major 45 credits) Core Courses (30 - credits) 47 Core Courses (30 - Based on placement exams or transferred courses, Based on placement exams or transferred courses, students may place into some more advanced students may place into some more advanced courses without taking Hunter College pre- courses without taking Hunter College pre- requisites. See the Mathematics and Statistics requisites. See the Mathemati cs and Statistics depart ment for details. department for details. Calculus Sequence (0- 17 credits) MATH 10100: Algebra for College Students (3)* ∙ ∙ MATH 10100: Algebra for College Students (3)* OR

270 MATH 101EN: Algebra for College Students – Enhanced (3) MATH 10150: Mastery of Symbolic Computation (1)* MATH 12400 (STEM): College Algebra and ∙ MATH 12500 (STEM): Precalculus (4)* Trigonometry(4)* OR ∙ MATH 12500 (STEM): Precalculus (4)* OR MATH 12550 (STEM): Precalculus with Workshop (4)* MATH 15000 Calculus ∙ with Analytic Geometry I MATH 14000: Mathematical Reasoning Workshop * (1) (4)* Calculus ∙ MATH 15500 (STEM) - with Analytic MATH 15000 Calculus I (4)* ∙ II (4) Geometry ∙ MATH 15500 (STEM) - Calculus II (4) * Required Math Courses (30 credits) Proof MATH 15600 - Introduction to Mathematical ∙ Workshop (1)* oof ∙ MATH 15600 - Introduction to Mathematical Pr Calculus MATH 25000 - ∙ with Analytic Geometry Workshop (1)* III MATH 25000 - ∙ Calculus III (4) (4) Ordinary Differential Equations (3) ∙ MATH 25400 - MATH 25400 - ∙ Ordinary Differential Equations (3) ∙ Vector Analysis (3) MATH 25500 - MATH 25500 - ∙ Vector Analysis (3) Linear Algebra (4) ∙ MATH 26000 - MATH 26000 - Linear Algebra (4) ∙ Abstract Algebra I (3) MATH 31100 - ∙ ∙ Abstract Algebra I (3) MATH 31100 - ∙ Mathematical Analysis I (3) MATH 35100 - Mathematical Analysis I (3) MATH 35100 - ∙ Introduction to Applied STAT 21300 (STEM) - ∙ Introduction to Applied ∙ STAT 21300 (STEM) - Statistics (3) Statistics (3) and and ∙ Probability Theory (3) STAT 31100 - ∙ STAT 31100 - Probability Theory (3) ∙ STAT 31900 – Baysian Statistics (3)** ∙ STAT 31900 – Baysian Statistics (3)** The symbolic proficiency requirement is **Note: **Note: The symbolic proficiency requirement is

271 met by taking STAT 31900. met by taking STAT 31900. ired Courses (33 credits) Additional Required Courses (33 credits) Additional Requ ∙ CSCI 13200 - Practical UNIX and Programming, - Practical UNIX and Programming, CSCI 13200 ∙ with Lab (3)* with Lab (3)* - Relational Databases and SQL CSCI 23200 ∙ - Relational Databases and SQL CSCI 23200 ∙ Programming, with Lab (3)* Programming, with Lab (3)* ∙ ∙ CHEM 10200 (STEM) - General Chemistry I (4)* General Chemistry I (4)* CHEM 10200 (STEM) - ∙ General Chemistry II (4)* CHEM 10400 (STEM) - ∙ CHEM 10400 (STEM) - General Chemistry II (4)* General Chem CHEM 10600 (STEM) - ∙ istry ∙ CHEM 1 0600 (STEM) - General Chemistry Laboratory (3)* Laboratory (3)* CHEM 22200 - Organic Chemistry Lecture I (4)* ∙ ∙ CHEM 22200 - Organic Chemistry Lecture I (4)* ∙ BIOL 10000 (STEM) - Principles of Biology I (4.5)* ∙ BIOL 10000 (STEM) - Principles of Biology I (4.5)* - Molecular Biology and Genetics BIOL 20300 ∙ ∙ BIOL 20300 - Molecular Biology and Genetics (4.5)* (4.5)* BIOL 42500 ∙ - Computational Molecular Biology ∙ BIOL 42500 - Computational Molecular Biology (3)* (3)* courses may be counted for credit in more *These *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one program. than one program. Note: The proposal should show the complete text of existing requirements and of proposed requirements. The State Education department requires that all program changes include a complete listing of required courses. Please make sure to list ALL courses required prior to the major. 4. Rationale : (Single paragraph justification) Data gathered shows that a number of STEM- related courses in mathematics and statistics have high DFW rates. All of the curriculum changes are designed to address this lack of success. Data indicates that transfer students are less likely to be successful going fr om our previous Math 12500 course on to calculus, so we revised the sequence to incorporate a corequisite course in critical think ing in mathematics for those taking calculus. Given that many of our non- transfer students who show weakness in Math 12500 also had problems with calculus, we are requiring students with below a B curriculum between our Math 10100/100EN courses to the - grade to take this corequisite course. We also revised the next level to include a requirement for mastery of symbolic computations, Math 10150. All changes were designed so as not to impede student progress toward their degrees but increase success. Consultation Statement: c. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs?

272 [ ] NO [X] YES – If yes, list department/program: Programs.  Environmental Studies: Earth Science Concentration Environmental Studies: Management and Policy Concentration   Human Biology  Psychology Medical Laboratory Science: Clinical Science  • Biological Sciences: Basic Concentration Biological Sciences: Concentration in Behavioral Neurobiology • • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Bioinformatics • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Biophysics • Chemistry: Major I Chemistry: Major II • Computer Science • • Computer Scienc e with Concentration in Bioinformatics • Economics • Mathematics • Mathematics with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Physics Option 1 Physics Option 2 • • Physics Option 3 • Statistics • Statistics Major with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Medical Laboratory Sciences: Biomedical Science Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [X] YES [ ] N/A d. Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [X] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [X] YES [ ] N/A AIII. 7 Program Name and Degre e Awarded: BA in Statistics and BA in Statistics with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY

273 Proposed Changes in a Degree Program The following is the revised curriculum for Statistics leading to the BA Degree. HEGIS Code: 1702.00 NY State Program Code: 02468 MHC Code HEGIS Code (when applicable): 60188 ) d.gov/heds/irpsl1.html Note: Codes can be found in the State's Inventory of Registered Programs at http://www.nyse Effective term: Fall 2019 Program Learning Outcomes: BA in Statistics 1. Students will demonstrate proficiency in the fundamentals of probability and statistical theory and methods by explaining key concepts and solving problems. 2. Students will be able to organize and present data effectively and use it to compute standard statistical summaries and analysis clearly and accurately. 3. Students will demonstrate the ability to think critically and apply statistical principles to solve complex problems in pure and applied statistics and other fields of study. Program Learning Outcomes: BA in Statistics with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology 1. Students will demonstrate proficiency in the fundamentals of probability and statist ical theory and methods by explaining key concepts and solving problems. 2. Students will be able to organize and present data effectively and use it to compute standard statistical summaries and analysis clearly and accurately. 3. Students will demonstrat e the ability to think critically and apply statistical principles to solve complex problems in pure and applied statistics and other fields of study. 4. Students will apply statistical and mathematical reasoning and methods , stochastic and deterministic models, —including numerical algorithms and probabilistic models —to process, store, analyze, visualize and model molecular biological data and make statistical inference from such data. Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) Data gathered for students taking MATH 10100 shows there is an unacceptably high DFW rate. In order to increase student success, we are introducing an alternative course, MATH 101EN, where students get enhanced instruction to enable them to succeed. We have tar geted students with the lowest placement scores to recommend that they take this course, but students are free to decide which they prefer. One of the main changes is to replace the course Math 12500 (Precalculus) with two courses, Math 12400 (College Algebra and T rigonometry) and Math 12550 (Precalculus with Workshop). The former course is for students who do not intend to continue on to calculus wh ile the latter course is an enhanced version of Math 12500 for students who plan to take calculus (it also includes a r ecitation hour). Math 12400 is essentially the same course as the current Math 12500, which is kept on our books for transfer students to get credit, but Math 12400 changes title to avoid the connotation that it is intended for calculus.

274 In addition, we add a 1 credit, 2 hour course Math 10150 (Mastery of Symbolic Computation), for students in Math 10100/101EN who do not earn a B e. - or better. This course is offered online during intersession and summer so students do not lose time on their road to a degre Finally, we add a 1 credit, 2 hour course Math 14000 (Mathematical Reasoning Workshop), for transfer students who have credit for Math 12500 or Math 12400 students who change their minds and find they need calculus or Math 12550 students who do not earn a B - or better. This course is a corequisite to Math 15000/15200, so students do not lose time on their road to a degree. History and Objectives Data in the courses for which Math 10100/101EN is a prerequisite (Stat 11300, Math 12500) has been gathered t hat shows a high DFW rate in those courses and the new course, Math 10150, is designed to raise the skill levels of students who need a higher level of mastery to be more successful in their next math course. Data has also been gathered that shows a high DFW rate in Math 15000 and the objectives of these changes is to improve student’s prospects for success. The proposed course Math 12550 addresses this deficit. In addition, we introduce Math 14000 as a bridge course for transfer students who have credit for the equivalent of Math 12400 or Math 12500 or students in Math 12550 who do not earn a B -, as a corequisite for Math 15000/152000. Students do not get training in logical thinking and Calculus requires a strong grasp of logical principles; this course is designed to fill that gap.

275 ( what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) FROM strikethrough List of Course List of Course Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Name Crs. Name Crs. BA (33 - 48 credits) Statistics - Statistics - BA (33 - 50 credits) The statistics major consists of at least 33 credits of The statistics major consists of at least 33 credits of coursework: 30- 47 credits of core mathematics and 45 credits of core mathematics and coursework: 30- statistics courses and any additional 3- credit credit statistics courses and any additional 3- statistics, mathematics, or computer science statistics, mathematics, or c omputer science course approved by the statistics advisor. course approved by the statistics advisor. Modifications are permitted with the consent of the Modifications are permitted with the consent of the statistics advisor. With permission of the advisor, a statistics advisor. With permission of the advisor, a student may take graduate courses in statistics and student may take graduate courses in statistics and applied mathematics. Statistics majors interested in applied mathematics. Statistics majors interested in bioinformatics should refer to the requirements for bioinformatics should refer to the requirements for the Statistics Major with a Concentration in the Statistics Major with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology – BA Quantitative Biology – BA Courses Required for the Major Courses Required for the Major Core Courses (30 - 47 credits) Core Courses (30 - 45 credits) Based on placement exams or transferred courses, Based on placement exams or transferred courses, students may place into some more advanced students may place into some more advanced tics courses without taking Mathematics and Statis Mathematics and Statistics courses without taking Hunter College pre- requisites. See the requisites. See the Hunter College pre- Mathematics and Statistics department for details. Mathematics and Statistics department for details. 17 credits) Calculus Sequence (0- ∙ MATH 10100 Algebra for College Students (3) MATH 10100: Algebra for College Students (3)* ∙ OR MATH 101EN: Algebra for College Students – Enhanced (3)* MATH 10150: Mastery of Symbolic Computation (1)*

276 MATH 12550 (STEM): Precalculus with Workshop * (4) - Precalculus (4) ∙ MATH 12500 (STEM) B– or better; with a grade of OR one of the f ollowing: [MATH 12400 (STEM): College Algebra and Trigonometry(4)* OR with Analytic ∙ MATH 15000 (STEM) - Calculus * MATH 12500 (STEM): Precalculus (4) ∙ Geometry I (4) - Calculus ∙ MATH 15500 (STEM) with Analytic Geometry II (4) PLUS MATH 14000: Mathematical Reasoning Workshop ematical Proof ∙ MATH 15600 Introduction to Math (1) * Workshop (1) III with Analytic Geometry ∙ MATH 25000 - Calculus (4) - Calculus I (4) ∙ MATH 15000 (STEM) * ∙ MATH 15500 (STEM) - Calculus II (4) * ∙ MATH 25400 - Ordinary Differential Equations (3) or uired Math Courses (30 credits) Other Req - Dynamical Systems and Chaos (3) ∙ MATH 35400 ∙ MATH 15600 Introduction to Mathematical Proof * Workshop (1) ∙ MATH 26000 - Linear Algebra (4) - Calculus III (4) ∙ MATH 25000 ∙ STAT 21200 – Discrete Probabili ty (3) – Introduction to Applied Statistics ∙STAT 21300 - ∙ MATH 25400 Ordinary Differential Equations (3) (3) or – Data Analysis Using Statistical ∙STAT 21400 - Dynamical Systems and Chaos (3) ∙ MATH 35400 Software (3) – Probability Theory (3) ∙ STAT 31100 - Linear A ∙ MATH 26000 lgebra (4) ∙ STAT 31200 – Stochastic Processes (3) ∙ STAT 21200 – Discrete Probability (3) – Introduction to Mathematical ∙ STAT 31300 – Introduction to Applied Statistics ∙STAT 21300 ) Statistics (3 (3) ∙STAT 21400 – Data Analysis Using Statistical Elective Courses (3 credits) Software (3) The student must complete one additional ∙ STAT 31100 – Probability Theory (3) 3-credit statistics or mathematics course approved ∙ STAT 31200 – Stochastic Processes (3) by the undergraduate statistics advisor. – Introduction to Mathematical ∙ STAT 31300 Statistics (3) Actuarial Sequence

277 A student interested in actuarial work should take Elective Courses (3 credits) the following courses. Students are also The student must complete one additional encouraged to take courses in accounting, 3-credit statistics or mathematics course approved economics and computer science. A student by the undergraduate statistics advisor. majoring either in Statistics or Mathematics could also complete the Actuarial Sequence as a part of Actuarial Sequence his/her major requirements. A review for the A student interested in act uarial work should take rial Exams is not a part of the curriculum, Actua the following courses. Students are also however, and it is left to the individual student to encouraged to take courses in accounting, study for and take those exams. - Calculus with Analytic ∙MATH 15000 (STEM) economics and computer science. A student Geometry I (4) majoring either in Statistics or Mathematics could with Analytic - Calculus ∙MATH 15500 (STEM) also complete the Actuarial Sequence as a part of II (4) Geometry his/her major requirements. A review for the ∙ MATH 15600 Introduction to Mathematical Proof Actuarial Exams is not a part of the curriculum, Workshop (1) however, and it is left to the individual student to III with Analytic Geometry - Calculus ∙MATH 25000 study for and take those exams. (4) - Calculus I (4) ∙MATH 15000 (STEM) ∙MATH 26000 - Linear Algebra (4) ∙MATH 15500 (STEM) - Calculus II (4) ∙STAT 31100 - Probability Theory (3) ∙ MATH 15 600 Introduction to Mathematical Proof ∙STAT 31300 - Introduction to Mathematical Workshop (1) Statistics (3) ∙MATH 25000 - Calculus III (4) ∙MATH 26000 - Linear Algebra (4) ∙STAT 31100 - Probability Theory (3) ∙STAT 31300 - Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one program. Statistics Major with a Concentration in Quantitative Statistics Major with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology credits) -80 – BA (63 -78 credits) – BA (63 Biology For students intending to pursue research careers For students intending to pursue research careers in biomedical sciences. It provides students with a in biomedical sciences. It provides students w ith a working knowledge of computing and biological working knowledge of computing and biological sciences for bioengineering careers in sciences for bioengineering careers in bioinformatics, the pharmaceutical industry, and the bioinformatics, the pharmaceutical industry, and the biotechnology industry. biotechnology industry. Students interested in this concentration in the Students interested in this concentration in the statistics major should consult the bioinformatics statistics major should consult the bio informatics

278 advisor. advisor. Courses Required for the Major Courses Required for the Major credits) 47 Core Courses (30 - 45 credits) Core Courses (30 - Based on placement exams or transferred courses, Based on placement exams or transferred courses, students may place into some more advanced students may place into some more advanced Mathematics and Statistics courses without taking Mathematics and Statistics courses without taking requisites. Hunter College pre- See the requisites. See the Hunter College pre- Mathematics and Statistics department for details. Mathematics and Statistics department for details. 17 credits) Calculus Sequence (0- ∙ MATH 10100 Algebra for College Students (3)* ∙ MATH 10100: Algebra for College Students (3)* OR MATH 101EN: Algebra for College Students – Enhanced (3) MATH 10150: Mastery of Symbolic Computation (1)* MATH 12400 (STEM): College Algebra and Trigonometry(4)* OR - Precalculus (4)* ∙ MATH 12500 (STEM) MATH 12500 (STEM): Precalculus (4)* OR ∙ MATH 12550 (STEM): Precalculus with Workshop (4)* with Analytic - Calculus ∙ MATH 15000 (STEM) MATH 14000: Mathematical Reasoning Workshop Geometry I (4)* * (1) - Calculus ∙ MATH 15500 (STEM) with Analytic II (4)* Geometry - Calculus I (4)* ∙ MATH 15000 (STEM) ∙ MATH 15500 (STEM) - Calculus II (4)* ∙MATH 15600 - Introduction to Mathematical Proof Other Required Math Courses (30) Workshop (1) ∙MATH 15600 cal Proof - Introduction to Mathemati III ∙MATH 25000 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry Workshop (1) * (4) - Calculus III (4) ∙MATH 25000 ∙MATH 26000 - Linear Algebra (4) ∙MATH 26000 - Linear Algebra (4) - Ordinary Differential Equations (3) ∙MATH 25400 - Ordinary Differential Equations (3) ∙MATH 25400 or or Dynamical Systems and Chaos (3) ∙MATH 35400 -

279 ∙MATH 35400 Discrete Probability (3) - Dynamical Systems and Chaos (3) ∙STAT 21200 - - Discrete Probability (3) ∙STAT 21200 - Introduction to Applied ∙STAT 21300 (STEM) - Introduct ∙STAT 21300 (STEM) Statistics (3)* ion to Applied Statistics (3)* ∙STAT 21400 - Data Analysis Using Statistical Software (3) ∙STAT 21400 - Data Analysis Using Statistical Software (3) ∙STAT 31100 - Probability Theory (3) ∙STAT 31100 - Probability Theory (3) ∙STAT 31200 - Stochastic Processes (3) - Stochastic Processes (3) - Introduction to Mathematical ∙STAT 31300 ∙STAT 31200 ∙STAT 31300 - Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) Statistics (3) Additional Required Courses (33 credits) Additional Required Courses (33 credits) - Practical UNIX and Programming, ∙CSCI 13200 - Practical UNIX and Programming, ∙CSCI 13200 with Lab (3)* with Lab (3)* - Relational Databases and SQL ∙CSCI 23200 Programming, with Lab (3)* - Relational Databases and SQL ∙CSCI 23200 - General Chemistry I (4)* Programming, with Lab (3)* ∙CHEM 10200 (STEM) ∙CHEM 10200 (STEM) I (4)* - General Chemistry I ∙CHEM 10400 (STEM) - General Chemistry I (4)* ∙CHEM 10600 (STEM) - General Chemistry II (4)* ∙CHEM 10400 (STEM) - General Chemistry neral Chemistry Laboratory (3)* ∙CHEM 10600 (STEM) - Ge Laboratory (3)* - Organic Chemistry Lecture I (4)* ∙CHEM 22200 ∙BIOL 10000 (STEM) - Principles of Biology I (4.5)* ∙CHEM 22200 - Organic Chemistry Lecture I (4)* ∙BIOL 10000 (STEM) - Molecular Biology and Genetics ∙BIOL 20300 - Principles of Biology I (4.5)* (4.5) - Molecular Biology and Genetics ∙BIOL 20300 - Computational Molecular Biology (3) ∙BIOL 42500 (4.5) - Computational Molecular Biology (3) ∙BIOL 42500 *These courses may be counted for credit in more *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one program. than one program. Note: The proposal should show the complete text of existing requirements and of proposed requirements. The State Education department ALL courses required prior to the major. requires that all program changes include a complete listing of required courses. Please make sure to list 4. Rationale : (Single paragraph justification) Data gathered shows that a number of STEM- related courses in mathematics and statistics have high DFW rates. All of the curriculum changes are designed to address this lack of success. Data indicates that transfer students are less likely to be successful going fr om our previous Math 12500 course on to calculus, so we revised the sequence to incorporate a corequisite course in criti cal thinking in mathematics for those taking calculus. Given that many of our non- transfer students who show weakness in Math 12500 also had problems with calculus, we are requiring

280 students with below a B vised the curriculum between our Math 10100/100EN courses to the - grade to take this corequisite course. We also re impede student next level to include a requirement for mastery of symbolic computations, Math 10150. All changes were designed so as not to progress toward their degrees but increase success. Consultation Statement: e. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [X] YES – If yes, list department/program: Programs.  Environmental Studies: Earth Science Concentration  Environmental Studies: Management and Policy Concentration  Human Biology Psychology   Medical Laboratory Science: Clinical Science Concentration • Biological Sciences: Basic • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Behavioral Neurobiology • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Bioinformatics • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Biophysics • Chemistry: Major I • Chemistry: Major II • Computer Science e with Concentration in Bioinformatics • Computer Scienc • Economics Mathematics • • Mathematics with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Physics Option 1 • Physics Option 2 • Physics Option 3 • Statistics • Statistics Major with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Medical Laboratory Sciences: Biomedical Science Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [X] YES [ ] N/A f. Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [X] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [X] YES [ ] N/A

281 evised curriculum for Childhood Education, Grades 1 -6 leading to the Bachelor of Arts Degree. AIII.8 The following is the r Hunter College, CUNY School of Education Department of Curriculum & Teaching Department of Educational Foundations & Counseling Department of Special Education Proposed Changes in a Degree Program Childhood Ed 1- BA Program Name and Degree Awarded: 6 Quest - HEGIS Code: 0 802.00 25635 NY State Program Code: MHC Code HEGIS Code : 60351 / 0802.00 Effective term: Fall 2019 Program Learning Outcomes: By the comp letion of this program students will be able to: ● Critically understand the development of education in the U.S. and engage with issues, ideas and concepts central to the soci al, historical and philosophical foundations of education and their relationship to practice Demonstrate effective pedagogy in their subject areas grounded in the latest field- ● based research and practice ● Employ skills and tools for reflective practice and inquiry that leads to improvement in their professional work ● Develop skill and ex pertise in the analysis and use of student performance assessments to inform instruction and create beneficial learning environments for their students ● Acquire the knowledge and skills to become responsive to the assets of all learners with a wide range of backgrounds, cultures, languages, gender and sexuality identification, abilities, and prior knowledge and lived experiences; ● Effectively collaborate and develop trusting relationships with parents, families, community members, and school faculty and staff to provide a supportive, ethical, humane, and more inclusive classroom and school environment ● Develop the practical and theoretical knowledge of effective and judicious uses of technology in a variety of school settings and for a broad spectrum of learner s

282 Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) There are several modifications proposed in this curriculum revision: 1. We have stopped using the word ‘admission’ when referring to how students join a School of Education (SOE) program. In lieu of “Applying for Admission” we now use “Declaring the Major”. 2. We have also eliminated the requirement to complete an on- site writing sample as part of the major declaration process. 3. We removed the requirement for transfer students to have a GPA of 3.3 removed language about GPA and primary major requirements from the “declaring the major” section, since these duplicate the 4. We program’s listed requirements in the following section of the catalog. 5. The section covering the academic requirements modified for clarity the language used to describe the program’s requirement for English composition, removed the requirement to have no more than 6 credits taken CR/NC, removed the requirement to take the math placement tudents to have an incoming GPA of 3.3 or 12 credits at Hunter in order to declare the test, and removed the requirement for transfer s major. 6. The section on the New York State Liberal Arts & Science Distribution Requirement (LAS distribution) has been completely removed, and ards have been revised where the progress standard was tied to one of the courses listed in the distribution the related progress stand requirement. History and Objectives These revisions were initiated by the July 20, 2016 memo from Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provos t Vita Rabinowitz, which defines CUNY Policy on “how prerequisite courses for degree requirements are presented in course catalogues and other publications and communications.” Our undergraduate teacher preparation programs all require significant revisio ns to our LAS distribution requirements, since by y make part of our the memo’s standards these are considered either allied or foundational requirements that we must either eliminate or formall official course of study for each major. They can also be considered hidden, since they are only “required” of students who have already declared the major, but are not listed in DegreeWorks. But in lieu of merely moving these credits into the Course of Study, the Schoo l of Education is taking advantage of these re quired revisions in order to address concerns that the SOE has had with the LAS distribution requirement for many years. many cr edits that Revisions to the LAS distribution had already been contemplated for some time for a number of reasons. For one they added so the average student could not realistically complete the degree in 120 credits. Transfer students were disproportionately im pacted by these additional credits, since they arrive with an already tight credit situation due to the obligations of t he dual major and their advanced credit standing. But most important is that since the implementation of the CUNY Common Core Requirements (CCCR), our LAS distribution requirement is entirely duplicative. So while there was a time when these courses were required by the SOE in order to meet NYSED requirements for certification, the CCCR now effectively achieves the same result.

283 The SOE has also changed the way prospective teacher candidates are evaluated before they can declare an SOE major. We used to require site writing sample, but as the SOE has made a push to expand our undergraduate programs, the proctoring of that students complete an on- these tests has failed to scale efficiently. We now assess writing skills by spending more time analyzing eac h candidate’s transcript and based courses. To reflect current practice, the requirement for the writing test is removed from the catalog in this revision. performance in writing- A number of revisions to our admissions requirements were also required to promote greater clarity and ensure that students faced fewer barriers to applying. The standards have not changed. Rather the way we publish them addresses misunderstandings that our advisors have noted are fairly consistent among prospective students. The requirement for a grade of B or better in ENGL 120: Intro to Expository Writing is perhaps most widely misunderstood. In practice, the SOE will take in its place a grade of B or better in any course designated as writing intensive. But most . Such a seek to repeat 120 if they got a grade below B. The English department regularly asks if we approve of this, which we do not students repeat is not covered by financial aid, nor does it advance students towards their degree. We assess for writing ability in prospective teacher candidates, but prefer not to set such a rigid benchmark. And lastly, such a rigid requirement only serves to dissuade students from applying to the SOE, if they think that they must change this one grade in order to be eligible to join a teacher preparation program. In order to avoid this, we modify this language in the catalog for clarity. Another barrier to declaring the major is presented by the requirement that an applicant have no more than 6 cr. of CR/NC grades. While th is may factor into our decision making process, it is too narrowly written to be effective. The SOE removes this language, since wi thout context this metric does not reveal enough about a candidate’s strengths or weaknesses to justify the chilling effect it has on prospects. This same effect was behind the decision to remove the requirement that transfer students complete 12 credits of coursework at Hunter College before applying, unless nstitution. The concern with this metric is that its ability to predict future they have more than 60 credits and a GPA of 3.3 from their sending i success would be inconsistent, since the meaning of the GPA from each sending institution would vary. But most important is that in practice we take applications from all Hunt er students, and it is up to program faculty to decide whether or not the candidate is ready. We remove these requirements since it only encourages transfer students to rule themselves out of contention, delay their application, and/or undermine their chances of completing the program in a timely manner. FROM ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) List of Course List of Course urse Number (XXXXX), and Prefix, Five Digit Co Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Name Crs. Name Crs. Requirements for the Degree Program: Requirements for the Degree Program: Introduction Introduction The Childhood Education, Grades 1- 6, The Childhood Education, Grades 1- 6, undergraduate teacher education program undergraduate teacher education program prepares students to become New York State prepares students to become New York State

284 certified teachers of childhood education. certified teachers of ch ildhood education. This program is committed to the preparation of This program is committed to the preparation of urban elementary school teachers who can deal urban elementary school teachers who can deal effectively with the wide range of diverse learning effectively with the wide range of diverse learning needs found among the City’s students. Teacher needs found among the City’s students. Teacher candidates will take a specified sequence of candidates will take a specified sequence of education courses in addition to fulfilling the CUNY education courses in addition to fulfilling the CUNY Common Core Requirement and the requirements Common Core Requirement and the requirements of their liberal arts or sciences major. These of their liberal arts or sciences major. These programs include fieldwork in New York City Public York City Public programs include fieldwork in New Schools. Schools. 45 This is a 42- credit program in which students program in which students have This is a 36- credit have an option to complete the course of study an option to complete the course of study over four over four or six semesters. or six semesters. Declaring the Major Applying for Admission Before you can declare a School of Education Before Hunter students can declare a School of major as part of your bachelor’s degree, you must Education major or minor, they must apply to the complete a group interview with faculty. Signing up School of Education and be accepted. The School for an interview can be done through the School of of Education application is open to current Hunter Education website. Current Hunter students can students throughout the year, and can be accessed request an interview throughout the year. online through the School of Education website. Students interested in an Education program Students interested in an Education program should as early as is possible in the semester apply should interview as early as is possible in the ch they plan to enroll. prior to the one in whi semester prior to the one in which they plan to Transfer students should seek advisement about enroll. Transfer students should seek advisement applying to the School of Education as soon as as School of Education major about declaring a Transfer they have been admitted to Hunter. soon as they have been admitted to Hunter. students who have a GPA of at least 3.3 may apply to start an Education program in their first term at The School of Education does not accept non- Hunter. degree or second- degree students. Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee entry All applicants must complete an on- site writing test into the program. to assess written English skills, as well as participate in a group interview with other students

285 Requirements to Declare the Major and School of Education faculty members. iate Accepted students will declare both an appropr ● 30 credits in liberal arts and sciences major in the School of Arts & Sciences, and a major ( Students may apply to QUEST if the total or minor in the School of Education. of their completed credits plus credits in which they are currently enrolled is at least Undergraduate teacher education programs require 30 credits. ) a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. Candidates for A Hunter College Grade Point Average ● BA/MA programs must also receive approval for (GPA) of 3.0 or better. udy by the relevant department in level st graduate- ● Evidence of advanced writing ability the School of Arts & Sciences. The School of through a review of English composition degree or second- Education does not accept non- and writing intensive coursework. degree students. Meeting minimum admission Declaration of an appropriate liberal arts ● requirements does not guarantee entry into the and sciences major. program. Participation in a group interview. ● Admission Requirements Liberal Arts and Sciences Major Requirement ts in liberal arts and sciences ● 30 credi ( Students may apply to QUEST if the total All students in School of Education programs must of their completed credits plus credits in also declare a major in the School of Arts & which they are currently enrolled is at least or must lead to a BA degree. Sciences. This maj ) 30 credits. See the for more School of Arts & Sciences ● Minimum GPA of 3.0. information on major options. ● Prerequisite for MATH 10400 (STEM): gh on the CUNY either a score high enou Academic Progress Standards COMPASS to be placed in MATH 10400 (STEM) or completion of MATH 10100. Students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 and or 300- ENGL 12000 (or a 200- ● level writing an education sequence index of at least 3.0. course), with a grade of B or better. Students must receive grades of C or better in ● Declaration of an appropriate liberal arts Childhood Education courses that do not include and sciences major. fieldwork. QUEST fieldwork courses require a ● Transfer students may ente r the program grade of B or better. All QUEST courses are with 40 to 72 credits. (Students with more repeatable once by students who have received a than 72 credits should complete their grade of D in a non- fieldwork course or a grade liberal arts and sciences major and apply to below B in a fieldwork course. Students must the master’s degree program in childhood

286 register for these courses. Students - officially re education.) Transfer students with 60 or more credits, who receive an F in any course may not continue ● in the program. Students who receive an F or D in a GPA of 3.3 or bett er and a grade of B or fieldwork may not continue in the program. better in ENGL 12000 do not have to present Hunter College grades. Transfer or QSTAP 40600 - In order to register f students with GPAs below 3.3 will have to Mathematics Teaching and Learning in Elementary complete 12 credits of coursework at School, students must have completed MATH Hunter College with a GPA of at least 3.0 10400 (STEM) and MATH 10500. If progress on their before a final decision will be made through the QUEST program would be delayed by application to the School of Education. the requirement for MATH 10500 as a prerequisite, Liberal Arts and Sciences Major Requirements then the program coordinator may allow students to enroll in QSTAP 40600 after completing MATH All students in School of Education programs must 10400 (STEM) and registering for MATH 10500. also declare a major in the School of Arts & Sciences. This major must lead to a BA degree. Course of Study School of A See the for more rts & Sciences information on major options. HEDP 31400 - Health Education for the Classroom Teacher 3cr New York State Liberal Arts & Science Distribution Requirement MATH 10400 (STEM): Math for Elementary Teachers in elementary schools are required to Education 1 3cr teach all subject areas in the curriculum and thus need a broad liberal arts background in addition to MATH 10500: Math for Elementary Education 2 specialized knowledge of teaching. Therefore, 3cr students will be required to complete the following liberal arts and sciences courses, or their Child Growth and Development 2cr QSTB 20280 - equivalent (most of these courses can be taken Hunter Core requirements within the ). QSTB 40380 - Social Foundations of Urban Education 3cr These courses require a grade C or better. ENGL 12000 - Expository Writing ● QSTB 41380 - Psychology of Teaching and Introduction to Writing about ENGL 22000 - ● Learning 2cr Literature (W)

287 - People and Their ● GEOG 10100 Fieldwork I: Fieldwork for Child QSTP 30000 - Environment Development and Developmental Reading 1cr HIST 15100 - The United States from the ● Colonial Era to the Civil War (W) Fieldwork II: Fieldwork for Literacy QSTP 30100 - ● The United States from the HIST 15200 - Across the Content Areas and Teaching Social r Era to the Present (W) Civil Wa Studies Mathematics for MATH 10400 (STEM) - ● Elementary Education I QSTP 30200 - Fieldwork III: Fieldwork for MATH 10500 - Mathematics for Elementary ● Mathematics Teaching and Learning in Elementary Education II of Teaching and Learning School and Psychology ● Two semesters of science, at least one of 1cr which is a laboratory science,* 6 credits in the arts (courses in ARTCR, ● The Art of Effective Teaching 3cr QSTAP 40080 - ARTH , FILM, MUSHL, THEA)** ● At least 6 credits in the study of a language other than English Developmental Reading 2cr QSTAP 40180 - Two additional courses that are required for QSTAP 40680 - Mathematics Teaching and students in the childhood education program are Learning in Elementary School 2cr ● Health Education for the HEDP 31400 - QSTAP 40780 - The Arts: An Interdisciplinary Classroom Teacher 3cr Learning Experience Teaching Students with ● SPED 30800 - Special Needs in Inclusive Settings Literacy Across the Content Areas QSTAP 41080 - Note(s): 2cr *Computer Science does not count as a science Teaching Social Studies through QSTAP 41280 - course in meeting this requirement. Literature, the Arts, and Technology in Elementary Schools 2cr ** Courses in FILMP, MEDIA, and MEDP do not meet the arts requirements. QSTAP 41480 - Teaching Science in Elementary Academic Progress Standards Schools 2cr Students m ust maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 and

288 an education sequence index of at least 3.0. QSTAP 41580 - Student Teaching 4cr Students must receive grades of C or better in SPED 30800 - Teaching Students with Special required coursework in liberal arts and sciences Needs in Inclusive Settings 3cr courses that do not include and in QUEST fieldwork. QUEST fieldwork courses require a Six -Semester Track grade of B or better. All QUEST courses are repeatable once by students who have received a Semester 1 -, D+ or D in a non- grade of C fieldwork course or a grade below B in a fieldwork course. Students must ● HEDP 31400 - Health Education for the -register for these courses. Students officially re 3cr Classroom Teacher who receive an F in any course or a D+ or D in ● QSTAP 40080 - The Art of Effective fieldwork may not continue in the program. Teaching 3cr ● MATH 10400 (STEM) : Math for Mathematics In order to register for QSTA 40600 - ary Education 1 (or its Element Teaching and Learning in Elementary School, prerequisite, if required: MATH 10100 or students must have completed MATH 10400 MATH 101EN) 3cr (STEM) and MATH 10500. With t he approval of the program coordinator, transfer students may be Semester 2 allowed to enroll in QSTA 40600 after completing MATH 10400 (STEM) and registering for MATH - Developmental Reading ● QSTAP 40180 10500 if their progress through the QUEST 2cr ● - Child Growth and QSTB 20280 program would be delayed by the requirement for 2cr Development as a prerequisite. MATH 105 QSTP 30000 - Fieldwork I: Fieldwork for ● In order to register for QSTA 41400 - Teaching Child Development and Developmental Science in Elementary Schools, students must 1cr ading Re have completed two courses in science, at least MATH 10500 : Math for Elementary ● one of which must be a laboratory science. Education 2 (or MATH 10400 if not yet taken) 3cr In order to register for QSTA 41200 - Teaching Semester 3 Studies through Literature, the Arts, and Social Technology in Elementary Schools, students must ● - Literacy Across the QSTAP 41080 have completed HIST 15100 and HIST 15200, or Content Areas 2cr one of these courses plus GEOG 10100. ● QSTAP 41280 - Teaching Social Studies

289 through Literature, the Arts, and Take and pass both the Educating All Students test 2cr Technology in Elementary Schools (EAS) and the appropriate Content Specialty Test Fieldwork II: Fieldwork for - ● QSTP 30100 (CST) of the New York State Teacher Certification Literacy Across the Content Areas and Exams prior to student teaching. Teaching Social Studies through Complete at least 21 credits in an approved Arts & Literature, the Arts, and Technology in Sciences major before student teaching. Elementary Schools 1cr MATH 10500 ● : Math for Elementary Education 2 (if not yet taken) 3cr Sem ester 4 Course of Study QSTB 41380 - Psychology of Teaching ● Six -Semester Track 2cr and Learning ● - Mathematics Teaching QSTAP 40680 Semester 1 and Learning in Elementary School 2cr QSTP 30200 - Fieldwork III: Fieldwork for ● h Education for the HEDP 31400 ● - Healt Mathematics Teaching and Learning in 3cr Classroom Teacher Elementary School and Psychology of - The Art of Effective ● QSTAP 40080 1cr Teaching and Learning 3cr Teaching Semester 5 Semester 2 ● - The Arts: An QSTAP 40780 ● QSTAP 40180 - Developmental Reading 3cr Interdisciplinary Learning Experience 2cr - Social Foundations of ● QSTB 40380 QSTB 20280 ● - Child Growth and Urban Education 3cr Development 2cr ● - Teaching Students with SPED 30800 ● QSTP 30000 - Fieldwork I: Fieldwork for 3cr Special Needs in Inclusive Settings Child Development and Developmental Reading 1cr Semester 6 Semester 3 ● - Teaching Science in 0 QSTAP 4148 2cr Elementary Schools QSTAP 41080 ● - Literacy Across the 4cr - Student Teaching QSTAP 41580 ● Content Areas 2cr QSTAP 41280 - Teaching Social Studies ●

290 through Literature, the Arts, and -Semester Track Four Technology in Elementary Schools 2cr Semester 1 ● QSTP 30100 - Fieldwork II: Fieldwork for Literacy Across the Content Areas and - Health Education for the HEDP 31400 ● Teaching Social Studies through Literature, Classroom Teacher 3cr the Arts, and Technology in Elementary - The Art of Effective ● QSTAP 40080 1cr Schools 3cr Teaching Semester 4 QSTAP 40180 - Developmental Re ading ● 2cr - Psychology of Teaching QSTB 41380 ● QSTB 20280 ● - Child Growth and and Learning 2cr 2cr Development QSTAP 40680 ● - Mathematics Teaching ● - Fieldwork I: Fieldwork for QSTP 30000 2cr and Learning in Elementary School Child Development and Developmental QSTP 30200 ● - Fieldwork III: Fieldwork for Reading 1cr Mathematics Teaching and Learning in MATH 104 (or its prerequisite MATH ● Elementary School and Psychology of 101, if required) Teaching and Learning 1cr Semester 2 Semester 5 ● - Social Foundations of QSTB 40380 ● - The Arts: An QSTAP 40780 Urban Education 3cr 3cr Interdisciplinary Learning Experience ● - Literacy Across the QSTAP 41080 QSTB 40380 ● - Social Foundations of Content Areas 2cr 3cr Urban Education ● QSTAP 41280 - Teaching Social Studies ● - Teaching Students with SPED 30800 through Literature, the Arts, and 3cr Special Needs in Inclusive Settings Technology in Elementary Schools 2cr - Fieldwork II: Fieldwork for QSTP 30100 ● Semester 6 Literacy Across the Content Areas and Teaching Social Studies through ● - Teaching Science in QSTAP 41480 Literature, the Arts, and Technology in 2cr Elementary Schools 1cr Elementary Schools 4cr ● - Student Teaching QSTAP 41580 MATH 105 (or MATH 104 if not yet ● taken) -Semester Track Four

291 Semester 1 Semester 3 HEDP 31400 - Health Education for the ● QSTAP 40780 ● - The Arts: An Classroom Teacher 3cr 3cr Interdisciplinary Learning Experience QSTAP 40080 ● - The Art of Effective - Teaching Students with ● SPED 30800 Teaching 3cr cial Needs in Inclusive Settings 3cr Spe QSTAP 40180 ● - Developmental Reading QSTB 41380 ● - Psychology of Teaching 2cr 2cr and Learning ● QSTB 20280 - Child Growth and QSTAP 40680 ● - Mathematics Teaching Development 2cr and Learning in Elementary School 2cr ● QSTP 30000 - Fieldwork I: Fieldwork for ● - Fieldwork III: Fieldwork for QSTP 30200 Child Development and Developmental Mathematics Teaching and Learning in 1cr Reading Elementary School and Psychology of Teaching and Learning 1cr Semester 2 ● MATH 105 (if not yet taken) ● - Social Foundations of QSTB 40380 Semester 4 Urban Education 3cr QSTAP 41080 ● - Literacy Across the ● - Teaching Science in QSTAP 41480 Content Areas 2cr 2cr Elementary Schools ● QSTAP 41280 - Teaching Social Studies QSTAP 41580 ● 4cr - Student Teaching through Literature, the Arts, and Technology in Elementary Schools 2cr School of Education Exit Standards ork II: Fieldwork for QSTP 30100 - Fieldw ● Literacy Across the Content Areas and teria in order Students must meet the following cri Teaching Social Studies through Literature, to graduate with a School of Education major or the Arts, and Technology in Elementary minor: 1cr Schools ● Have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 Semester 3 Complete the Dignity for All Students Act ● -bullying workshop. The DASA (DASA) anti - The Arts: An QSTAP 40780 ● workshop is required for all students in a Interdisciplinary Learning Experience 3cr NYS certification program at the School of ● SPED 30800 - Teaching Students with Education. The workshop requires six 3cr Special Needs in Inclusive Settings clock hours of coursework or training. - Psychology of Teaching QSTB 41380 ●

292 and Learning 2cr 45 Total credits required = 42 - QSTAP 40680 ● - Mathematics Teaching 2cr and Learning in Elementary School QSTP 30200 - Fieldwork III: Fieldwork for ● Mathematics Teaching and Learning in Elementary School and Psychology of Teaching and Learning 1cr Semester 4 - Teaching Science in ● QSTAP 41480 Elementary Schools 2cr 4cr - Student Teaching ● QSTAP 41580 School of Education Exit Standards n order to Students must meet the following criteria i graduate with a School of Education major or minor: ● Have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 Complete the Dignity for All Students Act ● (DASA) anti -bullying workshop. The DASA workshop is required for all students in a NYS certification program at the School of Education. The workshop requires six clock hours of coursework or training. Total credits required = 36 Note: The proposal should show the complete text of existing requirements and of pro posed requirements. The State Education department requires that all program changes include a complete listing of required courses. Please make sure to list ALL courses required prior to the major. 4. Rationale : (Single paragraph justification)

293 policy requires that hidden credits, such as the SOE’s LAS distribution requirements, must be formally acknowledged as part of the major CUNY or eliminated. We chose to remove those courses where they duplicated exposure across subject areas achieved through t he CUNY common core. This makes our programs more accessible to our students as these credits will be recognized for financial aid. A number of changes were urrent practices. We also make these changes in also made in order to make our requirements clearer, less arbitrary, and align better with our c the hope that more students will approach the SOE in order to declare one of our majors. Since we already intend to put students through a formal vetting process before signing off on a major declaration form, any barrier in a student’s mind to applying serves only to put viable candidates in a position that might keep them from joining an SOE program early enough to complete it in a reasonable time fr ame. Consultation Statement: ely to affect other Departments or Programs? a. Is the proposed change lik If yes, list department/program: [X] NO [ ] YES – Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b. Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subjec t liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A AIII.9 The following is the revised curriculum for Early Childhood Education, Birth - Grade 2, leading to the Bachelor of Arts Degree. Hunter College, CUNY School of Education Department of Curriculum & Teaching artment of Educational Foundations & Counseling Dep Department of Special Education Proposed Changes in a Degree Program Early Child Edu B -2 - BA Program Name and Degree Awarded: HEGIS Code: 0 823.00 NY State Program Code: 37691 MHC Code HEGIS Code : 37752 / 0823.00 Effective term: Fall 2019

294 Program Learning Outcomes: By the completion of this program students will be able to: ● Critically understand the development of education in the U.S. and engage with issues, ideas and concepts central to the soci al, his torical and philosophical foundations of education and their relationship to practice Demonstrate effective pedagogy in their subject areas grounded in the latest field- based research and practice ● Employ skills and tools for reflective practice and inquiry ● that leads to improvement in their professional work ● Develop skill and expertise in the analysis and use of student performance assessments to inform instruction and create benef icial learning environments for their students Acquire the knowledge and skil ls to become responsive to the assets of all learners with a wide range of backgrounds, cultures, ● languages, gender and sexuality identification, abilities, and prior knowledge and lived experiences; ● Effectively collaborate and develop trusting relationshi ps with parents, families, community members, and school faculty and staff to provide a supportive, ethical, humane, and more inclusive classroom and school environment ● Develop the practical and theoretical knowledge of effective and judicious uses of technology in a variety of school settings and for a . broad spectrum of learners Detailed Description of the Proposed Modification(s) There are several modifications proposed in this curriculum revision: 1. We have stopped using the word ‘admission’ when refer ring to how students join a School of Education (SOE) program. In lieu of “Applying for Admission” we now use “Declaring the Major”. 2. We have also eliminated the requirement to complete an on- site writing sample as part of the major declaration process. 3. We removed the requirement for transfer students to have a GPA of 3.3 4. We removed language about GPA and primary major requirements from the “declaring the major” section, since these duplicate the program’s listed requirements in the following section of the catalog. 5. The section covering the academic requirements modified for clarity the language used to describe the program’s requirement f or English composition, removed the requirement to have no more than 6 credits taken CR/NC, removed the requirement t o take the math placement test, and removed the requirement for transfer students to have an incoming GPA of 3.3 or 12 credits at Hunter in order to declare the major. 6. The section on the New York State Liberal Arts & Science Distribution Requirement (LAS distribution) has been completely removed, and the related progress standards have been revised where the progress standard was tied to one of the courses listed in the dis tribution requirement. History and Objectives

295 he July 20, 2016 memo from Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost Vita Rabinowitz, which defines These revisions were initiated by t CUNY Policy on “how prerequisite courses for degree requirements are presented in course catalogues and other publications and communications.” Our undergraduate teacher preparation programs all require significant revisions to our LAS distribution requirements, since by y make part of our the memo’s standards these are considered either allied or foundational requirements that we must either eliminate or formall official course of study for each major. They can also be considered hidden, since they are only “required” of students who have already declared the major, but are not listed in DegreeWorks. But in lieu of merely moving these credits into the Course of Study, the School of Education is taking for many years. advantage of these required revisions in order to address concerns that the SOE has had with the LAS distribution requirement ated for some time for a number of reasons. For one they added so many credits that Revisions to the LAS distribution had already been contempl pacted by these the average student could not realistically complete the degree in 120 credits. Transfer students were disproportionately im arrive with an already tight credit situation due to the obligations of the dual major and their advanced credit standing. additional credits, since they But most important is that since the implementation of the CUNY Common Core Requirements (CCCR), our LAS distribution requirement i s entirely duplicative. So while there was a time when these courses were required by the SOE in order to meet NYSED requirements for certification, the CCCR now effectively achieves the same result. The SOE has also changed the way prospective teacher candidates are evaluated before they can declare an SOE major. We used to require that students complete an on- site writing sample, but as the SOE has made a push to expand our undergraduate programs, the proctoring of these tests has failed to scale effi ciently. We now assess writing skills by spending more time analyzing each candidate’s transcript and performance in writing- based courses. To reflect current practice, the requirement for the writing test is removed from the catalog in this revision. A number of revisions to our admissions requirements were also required to promote greater clarity and ensure that students f aced fewer barriers to applying. The standards have not changed. Rather the way we publish them addresses misunderstandings that o ur advisors have noted are fairly consistent among prospective students. The requirement for a grade of B or better in ENGL 120: Intro to Expository Wr iting is perhaps most widely misunderstood. In practice, the SOE will take in its place a grade of B or better in any course designated as writing intensive. But most students seek to repeat 120 if they got a grade below B. The English department regularly asks if we approve of this, which we do not. Such a repeat is not covered by financial aid, nor does it advance students towards their degree. We assess for writing ability in prospective teacher candidates, but prefer not to set such a rigid benchmark. And lastly, such a rigid requirement only serves to dissuade students from applying to they think that they must change this one grade in order to be eligible to join a teacher preparation program. In order to a void this, we the SOE, if modify this language in the catalog for clarity. Another barrier to declaring the major is presented by the requir ement that an applicant have no more than 6 cr. of CR/NC grades. While this may factor into our decision making process, it is too narrowly written to be effective. The SOE removes this language, since wi thout context this metric does not reveal enough about a candidate’s strengths or weaknesses to justify the chilling effect it has on prospects. This same effect was behind the decision to remove the requirement that transfer students complete 12 credits of coursework at Hunter College before applying, unless

296 lity to predict future they have more than 60 credits and a GPA of 3.3 from their sending institution. The concern with this metric is that its abi success would be inconsistent, since the meaning of the GPA from each sending institution would vary. But most important is that in practice we take applications from all Hunter students, and it is up to program faculty to decide whether or not the candidate is ready. We remove these requirements since it only encourages transfer students to rule themsel ves out of contention, delay their application, and/or undermine their chances of completing the program in a timely manner. strikethrough FROM what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) ( List of Course List of Course , and Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX), and Prefix, Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX) Name Name Crs. Crs. Requirements for the Degree Program: Requirements for the Degree Program: Introduction Introduction The Early Childhood, Birth through Grade 2 The Early Childhood, Birth through Grade 2 ation program undergraduate teacher education program undergraduate teacher educ prepares students to become New York State prepares students to become New York State certified teachers of early childhood education. certified teachers of early childhood education. This program is designed to prepare prospective This program is designed to prepare prospective teachers to serve as high- quality educators for quality educators for teachers to serve as high- students in urban schools and other childcare students in urban schools and other childcare ake a specified settings. Teacher candidates will t setting s. Teacher candidates will take a specified sequence of education courses in addition to sequence of education courses in addition to fulfilling the CUNY Common Core Requirement and fulfilling the CUNY Common Core Requirement the requirements of their liberal arts or sciences and the requirements of their liberal arts or sciences major. These programs include fieldwork major. These programs include fieldwork in New York City Public schools. in New York City Public schools. credit This is a 36- program in which students have 42 credit program in which students This is a 39- have an option to complete the course of study an option to complete the course of study over four or six semesters. over four or six semesters. Applying for Admission Declaring the Major

297 Before you can declare a School of Education Before Hunter students can declare a School of major as part of your bachelor’s degree, you must Education major or minor, they must apply to the complete a group interview with facult Education and be accepted. The School School of y. Signing up for an interview can be done through the School of of Education application is open to current Hunter Education website. Current Hunter students can students throughout the year, and can be accessed request an interview throughout the year. online through the School of Education website. Students interested in an Education program Students interested in an Education program should is possible in the semester as early as apply should interview as early as is possible in the prior to the one in which they plan to enroll. semester prior to the one in which they plan to Transfer students should seek advisement about enroll. Transfer students should seek advisement applying to the School of Education as soon as as about declaring a School of Education major Transfer they have been admitted to Hunter. soon as they have been admitted to Hunter. y apply students who have a GPA of at least 3.3 ma to start an Education program in their first term at The School of Education does not accept non- Hunter. degree students. Meeting degree or second- minimum admission requirements does not All applicants must complete an on- site writing test guarantee entry into the program. to assess written English skills, as well as participate in a group interview with other students Requirements to Declare the Major and School of Education faculty members. Complete at least 30 credits toward the ● Accepted students will declare both an appropriate Bachelor’s degree. Students with more major in the School of Arts & Sciences, and a major than 72 credits should consider pursuing or minor in the School of Education. Early Childhood Education at the graduate Undergraduate teacher education programs require level. a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. Candidates for ● Attain a Hunter College Grade Point ams must also receive approval for BA/MA progr Average (GPA) of 3.0 or better. graduate- level study by the relevant department in ● Evidence of advanced writing ability the School of Arts & Sciences. The School of through a review of English composition degree or second- Education does not accept non- and writing intensive coursework. degree students. Meeting minimum admission ● Declare an appropriate liberal arts and ry into the requirements does not guarantee ent major either preceding admission sciences program. or upon admission to the program. Admission Requirements

298 Complete at least 30 credits toward the ● Liberal Arts and Sciences Major Requirement Bachelor’s degree. Students with more than 72 credits should consider pursuing All students in School of Education programs must Early Childhood Education at the graduate also declare a major in the School of Arts & level. Sciences. This major must lead to a BA degree. ● Attain a Hunter College Grade Point (GPA) of 3.0 or better. Average the See for more School of Arts & Sciences ● Have taken the CUNY COMPASS exam information on major options. for math placement, or taken MATH 10100, Academic Progress Standards requisite for or have an equivalent pre- MATH 10400. Students must meet the following criteria in order ● or Have completed ENGL 12000 (or a 200- to continue in the program: level writing course) with a grade of B 300- or better. field A minimum grade of C or better in all non- ● Declare an appropriate liberal arts and courses (Courses can only be r epeated once) sciences major either preceding admission or upon admission to the program. A minimum grade of B or better in all fieldwork ● Have completed at least 12 credits at courses. (Fieldwork courses can only be repeated Hunter College. Transfer students with a once) GPA of 3.3 or better may be immediately Maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 considered for admission. Liber al Arts and Sciences Major Requirements Complete 6 credits of study in a foreign language (or be exempt from the foreign language All students in School of Education programs must prior to the completion of ECC 30600: requirement) also declare a major in the School of Arts & Language and Literacy for Children of Diverse Sciences. This major must lead to a BA degree. -2 Backgrounds, K for more See the School of Arts & Sciences Complete Math 10400 (STEM) with a minimum information on major options. grade of C prior to registering for ECC 31000: Mathematics in Early Childhood. New York State Liberal Arts & Science Distribution Requirement Follow the course sequence, which represents the The courses listed below are required for all Early required classes that Early Childhood students Childhood teacher candidates, and constitute must take each semester. The courses for each

299 semester must be completed successfully in that several of the pre - requisites for courses in the term. program. A minimum grade of C must be earned in these classes in order for them to count towards the program. Course of Study (These courses do not have to be completed for a MATH 10400 (STEM): Math for Elementary student to be considered for admission) Education 1 3cr ● ENGL 12000 - Expository Writing an Development and Theories of Hum ECF 20000 - Introduction to Writing ● ENGL 22000 - Learning, Prenatal -Age 8 3cr about Literature ● Any 3 credits eligible to meet CUNY’s Social and Historical Foundations of ECF 20100 - Common Core in Creative Expression Early Childhood Care and Education 2cr ● Two semesters of natural science. Courses used to meet CUNY’s Common ECF 40000 - Assessment in Early Childhood, Birth Core in Life and Physical Sciences, and in through 2nd Grade 3cr Scientific World can be used to meet this requirement (with the exception of Early Childhood Programs and ECC 30000 - computer science (CSCI) and economics Curricular Frameworks 3cr (ECO) courses) ● POLSC 11000 - American Government: ECC 30100 - Field work/Internship 1 1cr A Historical Introduction Any 3 credits eligible to meet CUNY’s ● ECC 30200 - Field work/Internship 1cr Common Core in World Cultures and Global Issues Field work/Internship 1cr ECC 30300 - SOC 10100 - Introduction to Sociology ● to meet CUNY’s ● Any 3 credits eligible -Based Creative Arts and Play ECC 30400 - Common Core in Individual and Society Learning 2cr (Humanities) ● 6 credits of foreign language Language and Literacy for Chi ldren ECC 30500 - MATH 10400 (STEM) - Mathematics for ● -Prekindergarten) 3cr of Diverse Backgrounds (B Elementary Education I ECC 30600 - Language and Literacy for Children Academic Progress Standards of Diverse Backgrounds, Kindergarten through 2nd Students must meet the following criteria in order to Grade 3cr

300 rogram: continue in the p ECC 30800 - Inclusionary Practices and Teaching A minimum grade of C or better in all non- field Children of Diverse Backgrounds 3cr courses (Courses can only be repeated once) ECC 3100 0 - Mathematics in Early Childhood 3cr A minimum grade of B or better in all fieldwork courses. (Fieldwork courses can only be repeated ECC 31100 - - Early Childhood Science and Inquiry once) Based Learning 2cr Maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 Health, Family, and Community ECC 31400 - Partnerships 3cr Complete 6 credits of study in a foreign language prior to the completion of ECC 306: Language and Student Teaching 3cr ECC 40100 - Literacy for Children of Diverse Backgrounds, K -2 Complete Math 104 with a minimum grade of C Six -Semester Track prior to registering for ECC 310: Mathematics in Early Childhood. Semester 1 with a minimum grade of C two Complete velopment and Human De ECF 20000 - ● semesters of natural science prior to registering for 3cr -Age 8 Theories of Learning, Prenatal ECC 311: Early Childhood Science and Inquiry - Early Childhood Programs ● ECC 30000 - Based Learning. Courses used to meet CUNY’s and Curricular Frameworks 3cr Common Core in Life and Physical Sciences, and Social and Historical ● ECF 20100 - meet this in Scientific World can be used to Foundations of Early Childhood Care and requirement (with the exception of computer 2cr Education science (CSCI) and economics (ECO) courses). : Math for MATH 10400 (STEM) ● Elementary Education 1 (or its Take and pass both the Academic Literacy Skills prerequisite, if required: MATH 10100 or Test (ALST) and the Educating All Students test MATH 101EN) 3cr (EAS) of the New York State Teacher Certification Exams prior to student teaching. Semester 2 Complete at least 21 credits in an approved Arts & Language and Literacy for ● ECC 30500 - Sciences major before student teaching. Children of Diverse Backgrounds (B - Prekindergarten) 3cr

301 - Creative Arts and Play - ECC 30400 ● Follow the course sequence, which represents the 2cr Based Learning required classes that Early Childhood students 1cr Field work ● ECC 30100 - /Internship 1 must take each semester. The courses for each MATH 10400 (STEM) ● - Mathematics for semester must be completed successfully in that term. Elementary Education I (if not yet taken) 3cr Course of Study Semester 3 Six -Semester Track Language and Literacy for ● ECC 30600 - Children of Diverse Backgrounds, Semester 1 Kindergarten through 2nd Grade 3cr ● ECC 30800 - Inclusionary Practices and ECF 20000 - Human Development and ● Teaching Children of Diverse Backgrounds 3cr -Age 8 Theories of Learning, Prenatal 3cr Early Childhood Programs ECC 30000 - ● ● ECC 30200 - Field work/Internship 1cr 3cr and Curricular Frameworks ● ECF 20100 - Social and Historical Semester 4 Foundations of Early Childhood Care and Education 2cr ECC 31000 - ● Mathematics in Early Childhood 3cr Semester 2 Early Childhood Science and ECC 31100 - ● -Based Learning Inquiry 2cr ECC 30500 - ● Language and Literacy for 1cr Field work/Internship ECC 30300 - ● Children of Diverse Backgrounds (B - Prekindergarten) 3cr Semester 5 ECC 30400 - ● -Based Creative Arts and Play Learning 2cr ● ECC 31400 - Health, Family, and Field w ork/Internship 1 1cr ECC 30100 - ● Community Partnerships 3cr Assessment in Early ECF 40000 - ● Semester 3 Childhood, Birth through 2nd Grade 3cr ECC 30600 - Language and Literacy for ● Semester 6 Children of Diverse Backgrounds, 3cr Kindergarten through 2nd Grade Student Teaching ECC 40100 - 3cr ● Inclusionary Practices and ● ECC 30800 - Teaching Children of Diverse Backgrounds

302 3cr -Semester Track Four Field work/Internship 1cr ● ECC 30200 - Semester 1 Semester 4 ● ECF 20000 - Human Development and ● ECC 31000 - Mathematics in Early Theories of Learning, Prenatal -Age 8 3cr Childhood 3cr ● ECC 30000 - Early Childhood Programs ● Early Childhood Science and ECC 31100 - and Curricular Frameworks 3cr 2cr Inquiry -Based Learning ECC 30400 - ● Creative Arts and Play - 1cr Field work/Internship ECC 30300 - ● Based Learning 2cr Language and Literacy for ECC 30500 - ● Semester 5 - Children of Diverse Backgrounds (B 3cr Prekindergarten) Health, Family, and ECC 31400 - ● Field work/Internship 1 ● 1cr ECC 30100 - 3cr Community Partnerships : Math for Elementary ● MATH 10400 ECF 40000 ● - Assessment in Early Education 1 (or its prerequisite MATH Childhood, Birth through 2nd Grade 3cr 10100, if required) Semester 6 Semester 2 Student Teaching ECC 40100 - ● 3cr ECF 20100 - ● Social and Historical Foundations of Early Childhood Care and Four -Semester Track 2cr Education Semester 1 ECC 30600 - Language an d Literacy for ● Children of Diverse Backgrounds, Human Development and ● ECF 20000 - Kindergarten through 2nd Grade 3cr 3cr -Age 8 Theories of Learning, Prenatal ● ECC 30800 - Inclusionary Practices and Early Childhood Programs ECC 30000 - ● Teaching Children of Diverse Backgrounds 3cr Curricular Frameworks and 3cr Creative Arts and Play ● ECC 30400 - -Based 1cr Field work/Internship 2 ● ECC 30200 - 2cr Learning ● - Mathematics for MATH 10400 (STEM) Language and Literacy for ECC 30500 - ● Elementary Education I (if required) - Children of Diverse Backgrounds (B Semester 3 3cr Prekindergarten) ● ECC 30100 - Field work/Internship 1 1cr ● ECF 40000 - Assessment in Early

303 Childhood, Birth through 2nd Grade 3cr Semester 2 Mathematics in Early ECC 31000 - ● 3cr Childhood ● Social and His torical ECF 20100 - ECC 31100 - ● Early Childhood Science and Foundations of Early Childhood Care and 2cr -Based Learning Inquiry 2cr Education ● ECC 30300 - 1cr Field work/Internship 3 ECC 30600 - Language and Literacy for ● Children of Diverse Backgrounds, Semester 4 Kindergarten through 2nd Grade 3cr ● Inclusionary Practices and ECC 30800 - ECC 31400 - ● Health, Family, and 3cr Community Partnerships Teaching Children of Diverse Backgrounds 3cr Student Teaching ECC 40100 - ● 3cr 1cr Field work/Internship 2 ● ECC 30200 - School of Education Exit Standards Semester 3 Students must meet the following criteria in order ● ECF 40000 - Assessment in Early to graduate with a School of Education major or 3cr Childhood, Birth through 2nd Grade mino r: Mathematics in Early ECC 31000 - ● 3cr Childhood ● Have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 Early Childhood Science and ECC 31100 - ● ● Complete the Dignity for All Students Act Inquiry 2cr -Based Learning -bullying workshop. The DASA (DASA) anti 1cr ● ECC 30300 - Fiel d work/Internship 3 workshop is required for all students in a NYS certification program at the School of Semester 4 Education. The workshop requires six of coursework or training. clock hours ● Health, Family, and ECC 31400 - 3cr Community Partnerships ● ECC 40100 - Student Teaching 3cr Total credits required = 39 -42 School of Education Exit Standards Students must meet the following criteria in order to graduate with a School of Education major or minor:

304 Have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 ● ● Complete the Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) anti -bullying workshop. The DASA workshop is required for all students in a NYS certification program at the School of Education. The workshop requires si x clock hours of coursework or training. Total credits required = 36

305 4. Rationale : (Single paragraph justification) CUNY policy requires that hidden credits, such as the SOE’s LAS distribution requirements, must be formally ack nowledged as part of the major or eliminated. We chose to remove those courses where they duplicated exposure across subject areas achieved through the CUN Y common core. This makes our programs more accessible to our students as these credits will be rec ognized for financial aid. A number of changes were ake these changes in also made in order to make our requirements clearer, less arbitrary, and align better with our current practices. We also m the hope that more students will approach the SOE in order to declare one of our majors. Since we already intend to put students through a formal vetting process before signing off on a major declaration form, any barrier in a student’s mind to applying serves onl y to put viable candidates in a position that mi ght keep them from joining an SOE program early enough to complete it in a reasonable time frame. Consultation Statement: a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b. Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A AIII.10 Change in Degree Program: Chemistry Major I BA Chemistry

306 ROM F TO Requirements for the Program: Requirements for the Program: the changes. underline ** strikethrough ** what is to be changed. HEGIS Code 1905.00 HEGIS Code 1905.00 Program Code 88149 Program Code 88149 Dept Chemistry Dept Chemistry Macaulay Honors Code 60146 Macaulay Honors Code 60146 – BA ( 78 - 93 credits) – Chemistry: Major I 80 - 96 credits) BA ( Chemistry: Major I Major Major The requirements for this major consist of a The requirements for this major consist of a minimum of 54 credits in chemistry. This major is minimum of 54 credits in chemistry. This major is recommended for students preparing for recommended for students preparing for or careers in admission to graduate school or f admission to graduate school or for careers in chemical research. It will also be useful to chemical research. It will also be useful to students seeking a position in the chemical or students seeking a position in the chemical or allied industries, as it is ac credited by the allied industries, as it is accredited by the Committee on Professional Training of the Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society. American Chemical Society. Hunter Core Requirement Hunter Core Requirement urses within this major may fulfill parts Several co Several courses within this major may fulfill parts of the Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY Common of the Hunter Core Requirement (CUNY Common Core Requirement [CCCR], Concurrent Core Requirement [CCCR], Concurrent When selecting courses, it may Requirements). Requirements). When selecting courses, it may be to a student’s advantage to choose courses be to a student’s advantage to choose courses that count toward the Hunter Core Requirem that count toward the Hunter Core Requirement ent and also advance the student on the path to the and also advance the student on the path to the major. Details on the Hunter Core Requirement major. Details on the Hunter Core Requirement can be found here: Hunter Core Requirement can be found here: Hunter Core Requirement In the case of the Chemistry Major I, the courses In the case of the Chemistry Major I, the courses that meet CCC are: that meet CCC are: Courses CUNY Common Core Courses CUNY Common Core Requirem ent Requirement MATH 12500 Math & Quantitative Reasoning MATH 12500 Math & Quantitative Reasoning CHEM 10200 (STEM) Scientific World and Life CHEM 10200 (STEM) Scientific World and Life and Physical Sciences and Physical Sciences CHEM 10400 (STEM) Scientific World and Life Scientific World and Life CHEM 10400 (STEM) and Physical Sciences and Physical Sciences CHEM 10600 (STEM) Scientific World and Life CHEM 10600 (STEM) Scientific World and Life and Physical Sciences and Physical Sciences M 11100 (STEM) Scientific World and Life CHE CHEM 11100 (STEM) Scientific World and Life and Physical Sciences and Physical Sciences CHEM 11200 (STEM) Scientific World and Life CHEM 11200 (STEM) Scientific World and Life and Physical Sciences and Physical Sciences Please note that no more than two courses from Please note that no more than two courses from any one department will count for the CUNY any one department will count for the CUNY Common Core Requirement. Common Core Requirement.

307 Rationale: The program is being updated to reflect the following changes made to the Calculus sequence by the Math Department : MATH 101EN was created as an alternative to MATH 10100 • MATH 10150 was created to help students who received a C in MATH 10100/101EN so they are prepared for MATH 12400/12550 • MATH 12400 and MATH 12550 were created to replace MATH 12500. • MATH 12500 will still be given to transfer students • MATH 14000 was created to help student who took MATH 12400 or MATH 12500 or students who received a C in MATH 12550 so they are prepared for MATH 15000 25000 · MATH 15600 was added since it is now a pre- req to MATH AIII.1 1 Change in Degree Program: Chemistry Major II BA Chemistry FROM TO Requirements for the Program: Requirements for the Program: the changes. underline ** strikethrough what is to be changed. ** HEGIS Code 1905.00 HEGIS Code 1905.00 Program Code 33654 Program Code 33654 Dept Chemistry Dept Chemistry Macaulay Honors Code 60147 Macaulay Honors Code 60147 Chemistry BA - BA Chemistry - Major Major There are two chemistry majors: Major I, a 43- There are two chemistry majors: Major I, a 43- credit concentration in addition to an 11- credit concentration in addition to an 11- credit credit general chemistry core, is designed to prepare stry core, is designed to prepare general chemi the students with intensive training for the students with intensive training for professional research and graduate study. Major professional research and graduate study. Major II consists of three options: Option 1 for students II consists of three options: Option 1 for students interested in the chemical industry; Option 2 (the interested in the chemical industry; Option 2 (the biochemistry option) for students i nterested in the biochemistry option) for students interested in the pharmaceutical industry, medicine, dentistry, pharmaceutical industry, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine or physical therapy; Option 3 veterinary medicine or physical therapy; Option 3 (bioinformatics option) for students interested in (bioinformatics option) for students interested in graduate studies in biochemistry and graduate studies in biochemistry and bioinformatics as well as pharmaceutical and bioinformatics as well as pharmaceutical and

308 biote chnology industry. Major II includes a ogy industry. Major II includes a biotechnol minimum concentration of 28 credits (option 1), minimum concentration of 28 credits (option 1), 29 credits (option 2), and 23.5 credits (option 3) 29 credits (option 2), and 23.5 credits (option 3) in 200- level and above chemistry courses, in level and above chemistry courses, in in 200- addition to an 11- credit general chemistry core. addition to an 11- credit general chemistry core. Options 1- opriate for students Options 1- 3 are all appropriate for students 3 are all appr pursuing teacher education programs. pursuing teacher education programs. Students considering a chemistry major should Students considering a chemistry major should consult the departmental adviser during their first consult the departmental adviser during their first semester to plan the proper sequence of courses, semester to plan the proper sequence of courses, and they are urged to consult with the adviser at and they are urged to consult with the adviser at least once each succeeding semester. A year of once each succeeding semester. A year of least General Chemistry and the accompanying General Chemistry and the accompanying General Chemistry Laboratory are prerequisites General Chemistry Laboratory are prerequisites for admission to both Major I and Major II. for admission to both Major I and Major II. Honors Work Honors Work Opportunity for an individual research experience Opportunity for an individual research experience is provided by an honors course is provided by an honors course Introduction to Research CHEM 49101 - CHEM 49101 - Introduction to Research CHEM 49102 - Introduction to Research CHEM 49102 - Introduction to Research Electives Electives Advanced lecture courses in special areas of Advanced lecture courses in special areas of chemistry, and lab courses providing training in chemistry, and lab courses providing training in inorganic and organic chemistry and in research inorganic and organic chemistry and in research e offered as electives for Major I techniques, are offered as electives for Major I techniques, ar and are open to students enrolled in Major II who and are open to students enrolled in Major II who have fulfilled the course prerequisites. have fulfilled the course prerequisites. Chemistry Major II Chemistry Major II Chemistry Option 1 Chemistry Option 1 - - Courses Required for the Major (62- credits) 71 Courses Required for the Major (62- 73 credits) For students interested in a career i For students interested in a career in the n the chemical industry. It consists of a minimum of 28 chemical industry. It consists of a minimum of 28 credits in chemistry above the introductory level credits in chemistry above the introductory level

309 and an 11 - credit general chemistry core for a credit general chemistry core for a - and an 11 minimum total of 39 credits of chemistry. One minimum total of 39 credits of chemistry. One year of physics and three semesters of calculus year of physics and three semesters of calculus equired. are also required. are also r Based on placement exams or transferred Based on placement exams or transferred courses, students may place into some more courses, students may place into some more advanced Mathematics and Statistics courses advanced Mathematics and Statistics courses without taking Hunter College prerequisites. See without taking Hunter College prerequisites. See the Mathematics and Statistics department for the Mathematics and Statistics department for MATH MATH details. Students who are exempt from details. Students who are exempt from 10100/101EN, MATH 10150, MATH 10100 and MATH 12500 (STEM) do not have to make up the credits. 12400/12500/12550 and MATH 14000 do not ke up the credits. have to ma Required Chemistry Courses (39- 41 cr.) Required Chemistry Courses (39- 41 cr.) Choose One General Chemistry Sequence (11 Choose One General Chemistry Sequence (11 cr.) cr.) General Chemistry I (4 CHEM 10200 (STEM) - General Chemistry I (4 CHEM 10200 (STEM) - cr.) cr.) and- - - and- General Chemistry II (4 CHEM 10400 (STEM) - CHEM 10400 (STEM) - General Chemistry II (4 cr.) cr.) - and- - and- General Chemistry CHEM 10600 (STEM) - CHEM 10600 (STEM) - General Chemistry Laboratory (3 cr.) Laboratory (3 cr.) - or- - or- CHEM 11100 (STEM) - Chemical Principles (5.5 CHEM 11100 (STEM) - Chemical Principles (5.5 cr.) and CHEM 11200 (STEM) Thermodynamics cr.) and CHEM 11200 (STEM) Thermodynamics and Solution Chemistry (5.5 cr) and Solution Chemistry (5.5 cr) Organic Chemistry (13 cr.) Organic Chemistry (13 cr.) Organic Chemistry Lecture I and CHEM 22200 - Organic Chemistry Lecture I and CHEM 22200 - CHEM 22300 O rganic Chemistry Laboratory I CHEM 22300 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (6.5 cr.) (6.5 cr.) CHEM 22400 Organic Chemistry Lecture II and - CHEM 22400 - Organic Chemistry Lecture II and

310 CHEM 22500 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II CHEM 22500 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (6.5 cr.) (6.5 cr.) Additional Required Courses (12 cr.) Additional Required Courses (12 cr.) Quantitative Analysis (3 cr.) CHEM 24900 - Quantitative Analysis (3 cr.) CHEM 24900 - CHEM 35200 - cr.) Physical Chemistry I (3 cr.) CHEM 35200 - Physical Chemistry I (3 CHEM 35400 - Physical Chemistry II - F (3 cr.) CHEM 35400 - Physical Chemistry II - F (3 cr.) or- - or- - Physical Chemistry II - S (3 cr.) CHEM 35600 - S (3 cr.) CHEM 35600 - Physical Chemistry II - CHEM 35500 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory I Physical Chemistry Laboratory I CHEM 35500 - (1.5 cr.) (1.5 cr.) CHEM 35700 - CHEM 35700 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory II Ph ysical Chemistry Laboratory II (1.5 cr.) (1.5 cr.) (3-5 cr.) -5 cr.) Required elective course (3 Required elective course Any chemistry course at the 300 level or above Any chemistry course at the 300 level or above excluding CHEM 49101 excluding CHEM 49101 22 cr.) Required Math Courses (12- cr.) Required Math Courses (12- 19 MATH 10100 - Algebra for College Students (3 cr.)* ∙ MATH 10100: Algebra for College Students (3)* alculus (4 cr.)* MATH 12500 (STEM) - Prec OR ∙ MATH 101EN: Algebra for College Students – Enhanced (3)* ∙ MATH 10150: Mastery of Symbolic Computation (1)* ∙ MATH 12400 (STEM): College Algebra and Trigonometry(4)* OR ∙ MATH 12500 (STEM): Precalculu s (4)* OR ∙ MATH 12550 (STEM): Precalculus with

311 Workshop (4)* And ∙ MATH 14000: Mathematical Reasoning Workshop (1) * unless students earn a grade of with Analytic MATH 15000 (STEM) - Calculus I (4 cr.)* B- or above in MATH 12550. Geometry Calculus MATH 15500 (STEM) - with Analytic Geometry II (4 cr.)* Calculus I (4 cr.)* MATH 15000 (STEM) - Calculus MATH 25000 - with Analytic Geometry MATH 15500 (STEM) - Calculus II (4 cr.)* MATH 15600 Introduction to Mathematical Proof III (4 cr.)* Workshop (1 cr.) Calculus III (4 cr.)* MATH 25000 - Required Physics Courses (11 cr.) PH YS 11100 (STEM) - General Physics: Required Physics Courses (11 cr.) Introductory Course in Mechanics, Heat, and PHYS 11100 (STEM) - General Physics: Sound (5.5 cr.)* Introductory Course in Mechanics, Heat, and General Physics: PHYS 12100 (STEM) - Sound (5.5 cr.)* Introductory Course in Electricity and Magnetism, PHYS 12100 (STEM) - General Physics: Light, and Atomic Physics (5.5 cr.)* Introductory Course in Electricity and Magnetism, Light, and Atomic Physics (5.5 cr.)* redit in *These courses may be counted for c more than one program. *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one program. Chemistry Major II: Biochemistry Option 2 y Option 2 Chemistry Major II: Biochemistr credits) 75 Courses Required for the Major (66- Courses Required for the Major (66- 73 credits) For students preparing for admission to medical, For students preparing for admission to medical, dental, veterinary schools or physical therapy dental, veterinary schools or physical therapy programs, or for students interested in a career in programs, or for students interested in a career in the pharmaceutical industry. It consists of a the pharmaceutical industry. It consists of a imum of 29 credits above the introductory minimum of 29 credits above the introductory min credit general chemistry core for credit general chemistry core for level and an 11- an 11- level and a minimum total of 40 credits of chemistry. One a minimum total of 40 credits of chemistry. One year of physics, one year of biology and one year year of physics, one year of biology and one year of calculus are also required. Based on of calculus are also required. Based on placement exams or transferred courses, placement exams or transferred courses, anced students may place into some more adv students may place into some more advanced

312 Mathematics and Statistics courses without Mathematics and Statistics courses without taking Hunter College prerequisites. See the taking Hunter College prerequisites. See the Mathematics and Statistics department for Mathematics and Statistics department for MATH MATH details. Students who are exempt from details. Students who are exempt from ATH 10100/101EN, MATH 10150, M do not have to 10100 and MATH 12500 (STEM) do not 12400/12500/12550 and MATH 14000 make up the credits. have to make up the credits. Required Chemistry courses (40 cr.) Required C hemistry courses (40 cr.) Choose One General Chemistry Sequence (11 Choose One General Chemistry Sequence (11 cr.) cr.) CHEM 10200 (STEM) - General Chemistry I (4 CHEM 10200 (STEM) - General Chemistry I (4 cr.) and CHEM 10400 (STEM) General Chemistry cr.) and CHEM 10400 (STEM) General Chemistry II (4 cr.) II (4 cr.) General Chemistry CHEM 10600 (STEM) - General Chemistry CHEM 10600 (STEM) - Laboratory (3 cr.) Laboratory (3 cr.) or- - - or- CHEM 11100 (STEM) - Chemical Principles (5.5 CHEM 11100 (STEM) - Chemical Principles (5.5 cr.) and CHEM 11200 (STEM) Thermodynamics cr.) and CHEM 11200 (STEM) Thermodynamics and Solution Chemistry (5.5 cr.) and Solution Chemistry (5.5 cr.) Organic Chemistry (13 cr.) Organic Chemistry (13 cr.) CHEM 22200 - Organic Chemistry Lec ture I and Organic Chemistry Lecture I and CHEM 22200 - CHEM 22300 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I CHEM 22300 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (6.5 cr.) (6.5 cr.) Organic Chemistry Lecture II and CHEM 22400 - Organic C CHEM 22400 - hemistry Lecture II and CHEM 22500 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II CHEM 22500 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (6.5 cr.) (6.5 cr.) Additional Required Chemistry Courses (13 cr.) Additional Required Chemistry Courses (13 cr.) CHEM 35000 - Biophysical Chemistry (4 cr.) Biophysical Chemistry (4 cr.) CHEM 35000 - M 37600 - Biochemistry I (3 cr.) CHE CHEM 37600 - Biochemistry I (3 cr.) CHEM 37700 - Biochemistry II (3 cr.) Biochemistry II (3 cr.) CHEM 37700 - CHEM 37800 - Biochemistry Laboratory (3 cr.) CHEM 37800 - Biochemistry Laboratory (3 cr.) Required Elective Course (3 cr.) Required Elective Course (3 cr.) Any chemistry course at the 300 level or above Any chemistry course at the 300 level or above

313 excluding CHEM 34900 Instrumental Analysis excluding CHEM 34900 Instrumental Analysis and CHEM 49101 Introduction to Research. Also and CHEM 49101 Introduction to Research. Also acceptable CHEM 24900 Quantitative Analysis acceptable CHEM 24900 Quantitative Analysis Required Biology courses (9 cr.) Required B iology courses (9 cr.) BIOL 10000 (STEM) - Principles of Biology I (4.5 Principles of Biology I (4.5 BIOL 10000 (STEM) - cr.)* cr.)* BIOL 10200 (STEM) - Principles of Biology II (4.5 Principles of Biology II (4.5 BIOL 10200 (STEM) - cr.)* cr.)* cr.) 17 Required Math Courses (8- cr.) Required Math Courses (8- 15 ∙ MATH 10100: Algebra for College Students (3)* MATH 10100 - Algebra for College Students (3 OR cr.)* – ∙ MATH 101EN: Algebra for College Students r.)* Precalculus (4 c MATH 12500 (STEM) - Enhanced (3)* ∙ MATH 10150: Mastery of Symbolic Computation (1)* ∙ MATH 12400 (STEM): College Algebra and Trigonometry(4)* OR ∙ MATH 12500 (STEM): Precalculu s (4)* OR ∙ MATH 12550 (STEM): Precalculus with Workshop (4)* And ∙ MATH 14000: Mathematical Reasoning Workshop (1) * unless students earn a grade of B- or above in MATH 12550. with Analytic Calculus MATH 15000 (STEM) - Geometry I (4 cr.)* MATH 15500 (STEM) - with Analytic Calculus II (4 cr.)* Geometry MATH 15000 (STEM) - Calculus I (4 cr.)* MATH 15500 (STEM) - Calculus II ( 4 cr.)*

314 Required Physics Courses (9 cr.) PHYS 11000 (STEM) - General Physics: Introductory Course in Mechanics, Heat, and Required Physics Courses (9 cr.) Sound (4.5 cr.)* General Physics: PHYS 12000 (STEM) - PHYS 11000 (STEM) - General Physics: Introductory Course in Electricity and Magnetism, Introductory Course in Mechanics, Heat, and Light, and Atomic Physics (4.5 cr.)* Sound (4.5 cr.)* PHYS 12000 (STEM) - General Physics: Introductory Course in Electricity and Magnetism, NOTE: *These courses may be counted for credit Light, and Atomic Physics ( 4.5 cr.)* in more than one program. NOTE: *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one program. Chemistry Major II: Bioinformatics Option 3 Chemistry Major II: Bioinformatics Option 3 Courses Required for the Major (72.5- 81.5 79 .5 Courses Required for the Major (72.5- credits) credits) For students interested in graduate studies in For students interested in graduate studies in biochemistry and bioinformatics as well as the biochemistry and bioinform atics as well as the n pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. In pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. I order to enroll in this Option, students must earn order to enroll in this Option, students must earn an average grade of B - or above in CHEM 10400 an average grade of B - or above in CHEM 10400 (STEM), CHEM 22200, BIOL 10000 (STEM) and (STEM), CHEM 22200, BIOL 10000 (STEM) and MATH 15000 (STEM). In addition, no more than MATH 15000 (STEM). In addition, no more than one C grade is allowed in these four courses to one C grade is allowed in these four courses to declare Option 3. This option consists of a option consists of a declare Option 3. This minimum of 23.5 credits above the introductory minimum of 23.5 credits above the introductory level and an 11- credit general chemistry core for level and an 11- credit general chemistry core for a minimum total of 34.5 credits of chemistry. a minimum total of 34.5 credits of chemistry. , one year of physics, Three semesters of biology Three semesters of biology, one year of physics, one year of computer science, one year of one year of computer science, one year of calculus, and one semester of statistics are also calculus, and one semester of statistics are also required. required. Based on placement exams or transferred Based on placement exams or transferred courses, students may place into some more courses, students may place into some more

315 advanced Mathematics and Statistics courses advanced Mathematics and Statistics courses without taking Hunter College prerequisites. See hout taking Hunter College prerequisites. See wit Statistics department for the Mathematics and the Mathematics and Statistics department for MATH details. Students who are exempt from details. Students who are exempt from MATH 10100/101EN, MATH 10150, MATH 10100 and MATH 12500 (STEM) do not have to do not 12400/12500/12550 and MATH 14000 make up the credits. have to make up the credits. Required Chemistry Courses (34.5 cr.) Required Chemistry Courses (34.5 cr.) Choose One General Chemistry Sequence (11 l Chemistry Sequence (11 Choose One Genera cr.) cr.) CHEM 10200 (STEM) - General Chemistry I (4 General Chemistry I (4 CHEM 10200 (STEM) - cr.) cr.) and and CHEM 10400 (STEM) - General Chemistry II (4 CHEM 10400 (STEM) - General Chemistry II (4 cr.) cr.) and and General Chemistry CHEM 10600 (STEM) - General Chemistry CHEM 10600 (STEM) - Laboratory (3 cr.) Laboratory (3 cr.) or or Chemical Principles (5.5 CHEM 11100 (STEM) - CHEM 11100 (STEM) - Chemical Princi ples (5.5 00 (STEM) Thermodynamics cr.) and CHEM 112 cr.) and CHEM 11200 (STEM) Thermodynamics and Solution Chemistry (5.5 cr.) and Solution Chemistry (5.5 cr.) Organic Chemistry (10.5 cr.) Organic Chemistry (10.5 cr.) Organic Chemistry Lecture I and CHEM 22200 - CHEM 22200 - Organic Chemistry Lecture I and CHEM 22300 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ( CHEM 22300 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ( 6.5 cr.) 6.5 cr.) Organic Chemistry Lecture II (4 CHEM 22400 - Organic Chemistry Lecture II CHEM 22400 - (4 cr.) cr.) red Chemistry Courses (13 cr.) Additional Requi Additional Required Chemistry Courses (13 cr.) CHEM 35000 - Biophysical Chemistry (4 cr.) Biophysical Chemistry (4 cr.) CHEM 35000 - CHEM 37600 - Biochemistry I (3 cr.) Biochemistry I (3 cr.) CHEM 37600 - CHEM 37700 - Biochemistry II (3 cr.) CHEM 37700 - Biochemistry II (3 cr.) CHEM 33300 - Computational Drug Discovery (3 CHEM 33300 - Computational Drug Discovery (3 cr.) cr.)

316 Required Biology Courses (12 cr.) Required Biology Courses (12 cr.) Principles of Biology I (4.5 BIOL 10000 (STEM) - BIOL 10000 (STEM) - Principles of Biology I (4.5 cr.)* cr.)* Principles of Biology II Principles of Biology II BIOL 10200 (STEM) - BIOL 10200 (STEM) - (4.5 cr.)* (4.5 cr.)* Computational Molecular Biology (3 BIOL 42500 - BIOL 42500 - Computational Molecular Biology (3 cr.) cr.) Required Mathematics and Statistics Courses Required Mathematics and Statistics Courses cr.) cr.) 20 (11- 18 (11- MATH 10100 - Algebra for C ollege Students (3 ∙ MATH 10100: Algebra for College Students (3)* cr.)* OR MATH 12500 (STEM) - Precalculus (4 cr.)* ∙ MATH 101EN: Algebra for College Students – with Analytic Calculus MATH 15000 (STEM) - Enhanced (3)* Geometry I (4 cr.)* MATH 15500 (STEM) - Calculus with Analytic ∙ MATH 10150: Mastery of Symbolic Computation Geometry II (4 cr.)* (1)* Introduction to Applied STAT 21300 (STEM) - Statistics (3 cr.)* ∙ MATH 12400 (STEM): College Algebra and Trigonometry(4)* OR s (4)* ∙ MATH 12500 (STEM): Precalculu OR ∙ MATH 12550 (STEM): Precalculus with Workshop (4)* And ∙ MATH 14000: Mathematical Reasoning Workshop (1) * unless students earn a grade of B- or above in MATH 12550. ∙ MATH 15000 (STEM) – Calculus I (4)* ∙ MATH 15500 (STEM) – Calculus II (4)*STAT Required Physics Courses (9 cr.) 21300 (STEM) - Introduction to Applied Statistics

317 - General Physics: PHYS 11000 (STEM) (3 cr.)* Introductory Course in Mechanics, Heat, and Required Physics Courses (9 cr.) Sound (4.5 cr.)* PHYS 12000 (STEM) - General Physics: PHYS 11000 (STEM) - General Physics: Introductory Course in Electricity and Magnetism, Introductory Course in Mechanics, Heat, and Light, and Atom ic Physics (4.5 cr.)* Sound (4.5 cr.)* PHYS 12000 (STEM) - General Physics: Required Computer Science Courses (6 cr.) Introductory Course in Electricity and Magnetism, CSCI 13200 - Practical UNIX and Programming, Light, and Atomic Physics (4.5 cr.)* with Lab (3 cr.) - Relational Databases and SQL CSCI 23200 Required Computer Science Courses (6 cr.) Programming, with Lab (3 cr.) - Practical UNIX and Programming, CSCI 13200 with Lab (3 cr.) CSCI 23200 - Relational Databases and SQL NOTE: *These courses may be counted for credit Programming, with Lab (3 cr.) in m ore than one program. NOTE: *These courses may be counted for credit in more than one program. Rationale: The program is being updated to reflect the following changes made to the Calculus sequence by the Math Department : • MATH 101EN was created as an alternative to MATH 10100 MATH 10150 was created to help students who received a C in MATH 10100/101EN so they are prepared for MATH 12400/12550 • MATH 12400 and MATH 12550 were created to replace MATH 12500. MATH 12500 will still be given to transfer stude nts • • MATH 14000 was created to help student who took MATH 12400 or MATH 12500 or students who received a C in MATH 12550 so they are prepared for MATH 15000 · MATH 15600 was added since it is now a pre- req to MATH 25000 Section AIV: New Courses AIV.1.1 D epartment of Special Education

318 Course Prefix & EDABA 72000 Number Course Title Managing Behavior Analytic Records Pre and/or Co Requisites None -, (specify which are pre co -, or both) Credits 2 (per week) Contact Hours 2 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Core Requirement t Applicable No X If course is being ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) ( Note: considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cult ures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society Grading Method C/NC? A C, F - 3. Course Description: A. College catalog: This course provides a comprehensive review of the legal and ethical management of behavior analytic records in the context of prof essional behavior analytic practice. Topics to be covered include the legal and regulatory requirements for behavior analytic record keeping along with use of behavior analytic data in professional practice.

319 B. Writing Requirements: Students will produce f our written products that are consistent with those products that applied behavior analysts write during the conduct of their professional duties with regard to the management and maintenance of behavior analytic records. 4. Rationale: rk State for the Master of Science in ABA program was contingent on the addition of a course that specifically addresses Approval by New Yo how to appropriately manage and maintain client records. This new course was designed to provide students with a comprehensiv e review o f the legal and ethical management of behavior analytic records in the context of professional behavior analytic practice Projected Enrollment 5. 20 students per semester. 6. Consultation Statement Is the proposed change likely to affect another Department or Program? If yes, list department/program: [ X ] NO [ ] YES – Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES AIV.2.1 Department of Educational Foundations and Counseling Programs Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX) & EDPS 71400 Prefix Course Title Applied Motivation Theory in Education Pre and/or Co Requisites none Credits 3 Contact Hours (per week) 3

320 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [x] Not Applicable Core Requirement __x__ Not Applicable If course is being Note: ( ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) ____ English Composition ered for the consid ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning Common Core, please use ____ Life and Physical Science CUNY Common Core ____ Scientific World Submission Forms [see below]. The section VI ____ Creative Expression ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity form must be submitted ____ World Cultures and Global Issues along with the proposal ____ Individual and Society ) and syllabus. Grading Method A ls take Note: Most proposa -C, F -3 semesters to be 2 available for student to register 3. Course Description: A. A brief description for the College Catalog. The goal of this graduate course is to review the major questions, methods, and theories of motivation in educational psychology —both past and present. A historical perspective is provided as a foundation for understanding the evolution and development of var ious theories of motivation in educational and psychology, which shape current thinking and researc h in the field. Furthermore, contemporary methods, research, and theory will be provided. Implications for practice will be discussed. B. Writing Requirement:

321 Students will write 3 short essays (2- dress one of the questions 3 pages) throughout the semester. Each essay should ad 15 page) to explore a topic in motivation in discussed/posted during class. In addition, students will write a literature review paper (10- greater detail. Rationale: (Justification) 4. This proposed course contributes to the breadth of the courses offered to graduate students in the School of Education, and builds on the growing faculty expertise of the school. Students can use what they learn in this course to pursue research in this topic area and will be able to apply this k nowledge in practical settings. This course relates to other courses offered by extending the key concepts to focus on of Education. motivation. There is very little overlap between the content covered in this course, and other courses offered in the School Projected Enrollment 5. 15 graduate students 6. Consultation Statement a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [x] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No c) Does this affect the Library? [ x ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ X ] YES AIV.2.2 Departm ent of Educational Foundations and Counseling Programs

322 Five Digit Course EDPS 72500 Number (XXXXX) & Prefix Course Title Assessment in Schools Pre and/or Co Requisites None Credits 3 (per week) Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [x] Not Applicable [ ] Yes [ ] No Core Requirement __x__ Not Applicable ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) ____ English Composition ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Scientific World ____ Creative Expression ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ____ Individual and Society Grading Method A - C, F 3. Course Description: A. A brief description for the College Catalog.

323 The goal of this graduate course is to introduce students to the field of educational assessment taken broadly, with a focus on how st -16 education within the US and internationally in the 21 academic assessments are used in prek century. Students will become familiar with theory, research, and practice in the areas of classroom assessment, assessment of teacher quality, and assessment of large educational systems. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to critique assessment policies in terms of implementatio n, ethics, and impacts. B. Writing Requirement: Students will keep an electronic journal in which, each week, they will write an argument with a substantiated claim about the week's topic. Students are expected to use Hunter library resources to access peer -reviewed empirical research to support their claims. Each journal entry is be approximately 500 words, and 12 are assigned over the course of the semester. (Justification) 4. Rationale: This proposed course contributes to the breadth of the courses offered to graduate students in the School of Education, and builds on the faculty expertise of the school. Students can use what they learn in this course to pursue research in this topic area and wi ll be able to apply this knowledge in practical settings. This course relates to other courses offered by extending the key concepts of testing, measurement, and evaluation into assessment in school setting. There is very little overlap between the content covered in th is course, and other courses offered in the School of Education. Projected Enrollm 5. ent 15 graduate students 6. Consultation Statement a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [x] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No

324 [X] NO [ ] YES c) Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [X] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? AIV.2.3 nd Counseling Programs Department of Educational Foundations a Five Digit Course Number & Prefix EDPS 79100 Course Title Educational Psychology Seminar 2 Pre and/or Co Requisites prereq: EDPS 70000, EDPS 70100, EDPS 70200, EDPS 70300, EDPS 79000, and either EDPS 72100 or EDPS 71100 Cred its 2 Contact Hours (per week) 2 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [x] Not Applicable

325 Core Requirement __x__ Not Applicable ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) ____ English Composition ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Scientific World ____ Creative Expression ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ____ Individual and Society Grading Method A - C, F 3. Course Description: description for the Col A. A brief lege Catalog. This is semester 2 of the seminar course which provides an opportunity for students to prepare an original scholarly review of research literature or theoretical paper of publishable quality on an educational psychological topic of interes t. The general goal of the course is to enable students to apply their knowledge of educational psychological issues and research through the development of a scholarly research paper. B. Writing Requirement: The major assignment of this course is the literature review paper. Students will submit a final paper in the form of a potentially publishable manuscript, in addition to two drafts. The final literature review paper will be a complete, well -written 25- 30 page manuscript, with a minimum of 30 refer ences. Further details, a grading rubric, and a writing checklist will be provided in class. 4. Rationale: (Justification)

326 We would like the current culminating seminar, EDPS 790 (4 credits), to be offered as EDPS 79001 (2 credits) and EDPS 79002 ( 2 credits). This configuration will give students the fall semester to conduct a literature review, and the spring semester to focus on their writing, and thus will allow them sufficient time to complete their culminating project. Both students and faculty me mbers have often indicated the lack of sufficient time within the span of a single semester for students to search, read, analyze, and synthes ize all the material before writing a paper. Faculty members who teach EDPS 79001 and 79002 will teach both semest ers. This proposal creates the course for the second semester of the culminating experience. 5. Projected Enrollment 15 graduate students 6. Consultation Statement a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ X ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No c) Does this affect the Library? [ X ] NO [ ] YES [ ] NO [X] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? AIV.3.1 CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT

327 Prefix & Five Digit Course CHEM 69200 Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. ntroduction to Radiochemistry Course Title I Pre and/or Co Requisites Departmental permission (specify which are pre -, -, or both) co Credits 3 5 hours ( 2 lecture, 3 lab) Contact Hours (per week) x ] Yes [ ] No [ Liberal Arts __ Not Applicable __ x Core Requirement If c Note: ( ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) ourse is being considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World section VI below]. The ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society A C, F - Grading Metho d -F; Undergraduate A Graduate A C, F; C/NC - NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course.

328 3. Course Description: A. A brief description for the College Catalog. Introduction to Radiochemistry is a lecture course with a laboratory component. The course will provide an introduction to the fundamental principles of radiochemistry, radioactive counting instrumentation, radioisotope production and applications of radiochemistry. B. Writing Requirement: the number of papers and their approximate length, the extent to which library or electronic research is expected, or a statement of other writing requirements. Any absence of a formal writing requirement must be specified. The laboratory component has a writing requi rement in that students will write laboratory reports for each experiment. Each laboratory report will consist of ½ to 1 page introduction, experimental and results and discussion. References will be incl uded ent lab report rubric will be used to grade these reports. at the end of the report. The standard departm A final project is required. 4. Rationale: (Justification) A. Nature of the proposed course: 1. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the progr am (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) Introduction to Radiochemistry is not part of a new academic program, but is a critical addition to our growing chemistry maj ors that could use is as elective and our offerings in radiochemistry at Hunter College. 2. Introduction to Radiochemistry If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: will be part of an established academic program. a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); Radiochemistry is a subject that is not taught by the majority of colleges and universities in the US and even globally. Radiochemistry was popular in the 1940s and 1950s but interest waned as new inorganic and nanotechnology techniques became popular in the 1970s. As a result, colleges and universities have not hired radiochemistry faculty and the courses and labor atories were dropped from the course offerings. However, the need for rad iochemists has skyrocketed over the past two decades due to the need for scientists to investigate the nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear security, nuclear forensics and the medical applicatio ns of radiochemistry, specifically, molecular imaging with Positron Emi ssion Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). It is presently very clear that as the Radiochemistry professional population retires, there are few you ng

329 scientists to replenish the National Laboratories, Academic Laborator ies and Industrial Laboratories that investigate and develop the above radiochemistry applications. Consequently, the radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry community is desperate for trained workers and there are clear job market needs. This course will b e one of the few in the country that will prepare students for either future graduate work or work as a technician in the applications described above. The National Academy of Science has declared that training in radiochemistry is a “national need”. b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; Introduction to Radiochemistry utilizes concepts of many courses offered in the Chemistry Department; this is due to the interdisciplinary nature of Radiochemistry. For example, General Chemistry teaches kinetics that directly applies to radioactive decay so students should feel comfortable when introduced to this concept. Many of the necessary background information is given in General Chemistry; this includes a qu antum mechanical description of the atom, discussion of the nucleus and electrons, –complex brief history of chemistry. Inorganic Chemistry teaches metal ligand complexation that plays a large role in radiometal t and in medicine. Quantitative Analysis teaches techniques that lay the groundwork synthesis and in applications in environmen for modern radioanalytical and counting methods of analysis. Concepts taught in Biochemistry courses are directly relatable to radiochemical applications in medicine. c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); Introduction to Radiochemistry may relate to courses in other departmen ts. Specific courses would include Math and Physics introductory courses. The concepts taught in these courses would relate to advanced applications of radioactive decay (differential equations, calculus) the different types of decay of radioisotopes (P hysics). Bioimaging applications would include some biology. d. Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course proposed; Though radiochemistry builds upon concepts in chemistry and physics, there is no substantial overlap between the proposed course and any existing course at Hunter or even CUNY. The course will provide compelling applications of the concepts taught in other chemistry courses. Radiochemistry is interdis ciplinary in scope. e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. No this graduate course has not been offered before. f. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) NONE B. The following additional information must be supplied in the special instances noted: 1. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pr e- or co- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the course.

330 This does not apply. organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be 2. In the case of courses given in non- given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be noted that a course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. This does not apply. 5. Projected Enrollment: 20 students graduate program 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If yes, list department/program: [x ] NO [ ] YES – tment/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ x] N/A Has the Depar listed? If so, please list all courses affected. b. Is this course cross- No. c. Does this affect the Library? [ x] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [x ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AIV.3.2 CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT Prefix & Five Digit Course CHEM 35100 Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Course Title Biophysics Laboratory Pre and/or Co Requis ites (specify which are pre -, Co -Req Chem 35000 -, or both) co Pre -Req Chem 37600 and Chem 22500

331 Credits 3 cr 4 hours (3 lab, 1 Rec) Contact Hours (per week) [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Core Requirement __x__ Not Applicable ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) If course is being ( Note: considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use Math and Quantitative Reasoning ____ CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see __ __ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society F - Grading Method A -F; Undergraduate A C, F; C/NC Gra duate A - NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: A. A brief description for the College Catalog. • Basic theory and application of a variety of spectroscopic techniques used to determine structure, function and other properties of biological molecules. B. Writing Requirement: the number of papers and their approximate length, the extent to which library or electronic research is expected, or a statement of other writing requirem ents. Any absence of a formal writing requirement must be specified. • Writing Lab reports for each experiment are required.

332 4. Rationale: (Justification) As part of our approved ASBMB certification for Chemistry I Option 2 (biochemistry) major, we are r • equired to offer now a biophysical lab. • Under this major curriculum, it will count as a 300 level elective, because due to out increasing # of majors we are in high demand of electives. A. Nature of the proposed course: 1. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) 2. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); As part of our approved ASBMB certification for biochemistry major we are now required to offer a biophysical lab. We will al • so use that as an elective for our majors , because due to our increasing number of majors we are experiencing high demand for electives. b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; • This is a laboratory course that relates to CHEM 35000, our Bi ochemistry Lecture, which doesn’t have a lab component right now. c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); • course will not relate with courses in other departments. This d. Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course proposed; • There is no overlap with other courses. e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. • This course was never offered as a special topics or experimental course. f. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new c ourse is adopted. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.)

333 • NONE B. The following additional information must be supplied in the special instances noted: o-requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the 1. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- or c course. organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be 2. In the case of courses given in non- given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be noted that a course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. 5. Projected Enrollment – at the beginning probably 20- 30 students (2- 3 lab x 8 students) 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [x] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ x] N/A b. Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c. Does this affect the Library? [ x] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [x ] YES [] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AIV.3.3 CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT/PROGRAM NAME Prefix & Five Digit Course CHEM 39200 Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Course Title Introduction to Radiochemistry

334 Pre and/or Co Requi sites requisites: CHEM 22400 and CHEM 22500 - Pre -, (specify which are pre AND co -, or both) Co -requisite: CHEM 35000 or CHEM 35200 3 Credits 5 hours (2 lecture, 3 lab) Contact Hours (per week) [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts __ Not Applicable x __ Core Requirement y below) ____ Common Core: (also indicate categor If course is being ( Note: considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society F - A G rading Method -F; Undergraduate A C, F; C/NC - Graduate A NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: A. A brief description for the College Catalog. Introduction to Radiochemistry is a lectu re course with a laboratory component. The course will provide an introduction to the fundamental principles of radiochemistry, radioactive counting instrumentation, radioisotope production and applications of radiochemistry.

335 B. Writing Requirement: the number of papers and their approximate length, the extent to which library or electronic research is expected, or a statement of other writing requirements. Any absence of a formal writing requirement must be specified. The laboratory component has a writing requirement in that students will write laboratory reports for each experiment. Each laboratory report will consist of ½ to 1 page introduction, experimental and results and discussion. References will be incl uded at the end of the report. The standar d department lab report rubric will be used to grade these reports. 4. Rationale: (Justification) A. Nature of the proposed course: sheet or 1. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover Appendix) Introduction to Radiochemistry is not part of a new academic program, but is a critical addition to our growing chemistry maj ors that could use is as elective and our offerings in radiochemistry at Hunter College. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: Introduction to Radiochemistry 2. will be part of an established academic program. a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); This is a lecture laboratory course that can satisfy our elective needs b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; Introduction to Radiochemistry utilizes c oncepts of many courses offered in the Chemistry Department; this is due to the tive interdisciplinary nature of Radiochemistry. For example, General Chemistry teaches kinetics that directly applies to radioac introduced to this concept. Many of the necessary background information is decay so students should feel comfortable when given in General Chemistry; this includes a quantum mechanical description of the atom, discussion of the nucleus and electro ns, brief history of chemistry. Inorganic Chemistry teaches metal ligand complexation that plays a large role in radiometal –complex synthesis and in applications in environment and in medicine. Quantitative Analysis teaches techniques that lay the groundwo rk for modern radioanalytical and counting methods of analysis. Concepts taught in Biochemistry courses are directly relatable to radiochemical applications in medicine. c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, poss ibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); Introduction to Radiochemistry may relate to courses in other departments. The concepts taught in these courses would rela te to advanced applications of radioactive decay (differential equations, calc ulus) the different types of decay of radioisotopes (Physics). Bioimaging applications would include some biology.

336 d. Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course proposed; Though radiochemistry builds upon concepts in chemistry and physics, there is no substantial overlap between the proposed in course and any existing course at Hunter or even CUNY. The course will provide compelling applications of the concepts taught other chemistry courses. Radiochemistry is interdisciplinary in scope. e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. Introduction to Radiochemistry was offered as a Special Topics in Chemistry CHEM 38855 course. f. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) NONE B. The following additional infor mation must be supplied in the special instances noted: or co- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the 1. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- course. This does not apply. 2. In the case of courses giv en in non -organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be noted that a may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. course This does not apply. 5. Projected Enrollment: 20 students for undergraduate course 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likel y to affect other Departments or Programs? [x ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ x] N/A b. Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No. c. Does this affect the Library? [ x] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [x ] YES [] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult.

337 AIV.4.1 Department of Classical & Oriental Studies Prefix & Five Digit for 300 JPN 30300 level Special Topic Course Number (XXX XX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Course Title SPECIAL TOPICS IN TRADITIONAL JAPANESE CULTURE Pre and/or Co Requisites Pre -Requisite ENGL 12000 and one 200 or 300 level JPN course (specify which are pre -, -, or both) co Credits 3 Contact Hours (per week) 3 Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Core Requirement __X_ Not Applicable If course is being ___ Common Core: (also indicate category below) ( Note: considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World section VI below]. The ____ Creati ve Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues and syllabus. ) ____ Individual and Society

338 Grading Method F - A -F; Undergraduate A - Graduate A C, F; C/NC NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be ourse. submitted at the same time as the proposal for the c 3. Course Description: A. A brief description for the College Catalog. An in -depth examination of the key figures, social circumstances, politics, and various artistic forms that are integral to underst anding Japan’s traditions and culture. B. Wr iting Requirement: the number of papers and their approximate length, the extent to which library or electronic research is expected, or a statement of other writing requirements. Any absence of a formal writing requirement must be specified. A minimum of 3 to 5 pages of formal writing which will take the form of play analysis. Students will have the option to write an 8- 10 page analysis paper (revisions not included) as requirement for final exam. Midterm exam includes the option to write an original 10 -page play (revisions not included). In lieu of an analysis paper, an original 10- page play (revisions not included) may be submitted in fulfillment of final exam. 4. Rationale: (Justification) This course will build on the Department of Classical & O riental Studies’ commitment to providing culture- based pedagogy by providing a new perspective that asks students to consider Japan through its performing arts. Students will be introduced to art forms, plays, and hape Japanese thought and identity. persons that have shaped and continue to s A. Nature of the proposed course: 3. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) The proposed course is part of an establi shed academic program. 4. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes:

339 needs); a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market While the Japanese program provides courses in language, culture, history, and literature, it does not currently have courses dedicated to the performing arts of Japan, which is a major part of Japan’s history and contemporary life. This 300- level course will provide minors with the chance to enrich their current understanding of Japanese culture and pursue more advanced and focused studies on the popular and elite arts of Japan. As this course will also be open to all students, it will introduce thos e new to Japanese studies important topics in Japan’s history and culture. The course will benefit students who plan to enter graduate programs in Japanese studies, students who plan to study abroad, and those who wish to work professionally in a variety of cross- cultural careers. b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; The course would add to the department’s interest in providing students with a comprehensive understanding of Japan. c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); While the Theatre department offers genre- based analysis of Japanese performing arts as part of its History of World Theatre course and as part of an Asian Performing Arts special topics course, currently there are no classes at Hunter dedicated specificall y to the study of Japan’s performing arts. d. Justification for any substantial overl ap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course proposed; This course does not substantially overlap with other courses in the college curriculum. e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. This course has not been offered as a topics or experimental course in the past. f. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. (Note: Dropping cour ses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) No courses will be withdrawn when this course is adopted. B. The following additional information must be supplied in the special instances noted:

340 1. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the or co- course. Students have the option to write an 8- 10 page analysis paper as part of the course final exam. Additionally, students will need to demonstrate the ability to consolidate information from, and respond to, texts the course engages with through written response assignments. 2. In the case of courses given in non- organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an expl anation must be be noted that a given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. N/A 5. Projected Enrollment 25 students 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If yes, list department/program: Theatre Department [ ] NO [X ] YES – Has the Department/P rogram been consulted? [ ] NO [ X] YES [ ] N/A Theatre Department has agreed to cross -list course. b. Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. Yes, THEATRE c. Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [X ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ X] YES [ ] N/A Librarian WENDY TAN has been consulted regarding books used for course. AIV.4.2 Department of Classical & Oriental Studies

341 Prefix & Five Digit for 300 JPN 40300 level Special Topic Course Number (XXXXX) trar’s Check with the Regis Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Special Topics In Contemporary Japanese Culture Course Title Pre - Requisite: ENGL 12000 and one 200 or 300 level JPN c ourse Pre and/or Co Requisites (specify which are pre -, co -, or both) 3 Credits Contact Hours (per week) 3 [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Core Requirement __X_ Not Applicable If course is being ___ Common Core: (also indicate category below) ( Note: considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression d form must be submitte ____ U .S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society F - A Grading Method -F; Undergraduate A - C, F; C/NC Graduate A

342 NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: A. A brief description for the College Catalog. -depth examination of Japanese culture from 1900 to the present. Utilizing Japanese cultural theory, plays, manga, film, and An in performance writing, this course will examine the relationship of c ontemporary Japanese culture to shifts in the arenas of arts, society, economy, and politics. B. Writing Requirement: the number of papers and their approximate length, the extent to which library or electronic research is expected, or a statement of other writing requirements. Any absence of a formal writing requirement must be specified. A minimum of 10 to 12 pages of revised formal writing (not including drafts), which will take the form of an analysis essay a nd article/book/play reviews. Informal writ ing such as blog posts will also be required. 4. Rationale: (Justification) This course will build on the Department of Classical & Oriental Studies’ commitment to providing culture- based pedagogy by providing a ider Japan through its performing arts. Students will be introduced to art forms, plays, and new perspective that asks students to cons persons that have shaped and continue to shape Japanese thought and identity. A. Nature of the proposed course: 1. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) The proposed course is part of an established academic program. 2. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); While the Japanese program provides courses in language, culture, history, and literature, it does not currently have courses dedicated to the performing arts of Japan, which is a major part of Japan’s history and contemporary life. This 400- level course will provide minors with the chance to enrich their current understanding of Japanese culture and pursue more advanc ed and focused

343 studies on the contemporary arts of Japan. As this course will also be open to all students, it will introduce those new to J apanese graduate programs in studies important topics in Japan’s contemporary history. The course will benefit students who plan to enter Japanese studies, students who plan to study abroad, and those who wish to work professionally in a variety of cross -cultural careers. b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; The course would add to the department’s interest in providing students with a comprehensive understanding of Japan. c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, es for interdisciplinary use might be given); possibiliti based analysis of Japanese traditional performing arts as part of its History of World While the Theatre department offers genre- Theatre course and as part of an Asian Performing Arts special topics course, currently there are no classes at Hunter dedicated specifically to the study of Japan’s contemporary theatre movements. d. Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the cours e proposed; This course does not substantially overlap with other courses in the college curriculum. e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. This course has not been off ered as a topics or experimental course in the past. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. f. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) No courses will be withdrawn when this course is adopted. B. The following additional information must be supplied in the special instances noted: 1. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- or co- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the course. Students will be expected to write a 10- 12 page analysis paper as part of the course requirements. Additionally, students will need to demonstrate the ability to consolidate information from, and respond to, texts the course engages w ith through written response assignments.

344 organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be 2. In the case of courses given in non- given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be noted that a course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. N/A 5. Projected Enrollment 15 students 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [X ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Theatre Department Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ X] YES [ ] N/A Theatre Department has agreed to cross -list cour se. b. Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. Yes, THEATRE 212, THEA Special Topics (offered irregularly) c. Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [X ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ X] YES [ ] N/A WENDY TAN has been consulted regarding books used for course. Librarian AIV.5.1 JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM Prefix & Five Digit Course JS 15000 Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used.

345 Course Title Special To pics in Jewish Studies Pre and/or Co Requisites None -, (specify which are pre -, or both) co 3 Credits 3 Contact Hours (per week) Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Core Requirement __x__ Not Applicable ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) If course is being ( Note: considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please u se ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society Grading Method F - A -F; Undergraduate A C, F; C/NC - Graduate A NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of thes e categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: A. Special Topics related to Jewish Studies at the introductory level. B. Writing Requirement: Will vary depending on class.

346 4. Rationale: (Justification) A. Nature of the proposed course: 1. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) ationale that includes: 2. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a r needs); a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market tudies currently has no courses at this This course allows students to understand the foundations and variety of Jewish Studies. Jewish S level so this course will allow us to extend our offerings. b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; This course enriches the options for students and can supplement what we currently offer in Jewish Studies which are only internships and individual study. c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); Most of the special topics courses will be cross -listed in other departments, including History, English, Sociology and Hebrew Studies. d. Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course proposed; There is no current overlap e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. N/A List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. f. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) B. The following additional information must be supplied in the special instances noted: 1. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified or co- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the as a Pre- course. N/A 2. In the case of courses given in non- organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be noted that a course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. N/A

347 5. Projected Enrollment 25 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [x ] YES – If yes, list department/program: English/History/Sociology/Hebrew Studies Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [x ] YES [ ] N/A listed? If so, please list all courses affected. Some of the courses will be cross -listed in b. Is this course cross- English/History/Sociology/Hebrew Studies c. Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [x ] YES ulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [x ] YES [ ] N/A Have you cons For new courses or programs, please consult. JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AIV.5.2 Prefix & Five Digit Course JS 25000 Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Special Topics in Jewish Studies Course Title Pre and/or Co Requisites None (specify which are pre -, co -, or both) Credits 3 Contact Hours (per week) 3 Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No

348 __x__ Not Applicable Core Requirement ( If course is being ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) Note: consid ered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society Grading Method F - A Undergraduate A -F; C, F; C/NC Graduate A - NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusio n of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: A. Special Topics related to Jewish Studies that move beyond the introductory level into more detailed understandings of the subject. B. Writing Requirement: Will vary depending on class. 4. Rationale: (Justification) A. Nature of the proposed course: 1. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover s heet or Appendix) 2. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); This course allows students to understand the foundations and variety of Jewish Studies. Jewish Studies currently has no cour ses at this level so this course will allow us to extend our offerings.

349 ses within the department of origin; This course enriches the options for b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other cour students and can supplement what we currently offer which are solely internships and individual study. c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); Most of the special topics courses will be cross -listed in other departments, including History, English, Sociology and Hebrew Studies. for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course d. Justification proposed; There is no current overlap. nd state the prefix and number. N/A e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past a f. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) B. The following additional information m ust be supplied in the special instances noted: 1. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- or co- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the course. N/A 2. In the case of courses given in non- organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be be noted that a given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should s than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. N/A course may not carry more credit 5. Projected Enrollment 25 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [x ] YES – If yes, list depart ment/program: English/History/Sociology/Hebrew Studies Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [x ] YES [ ] N/A b. Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. Some of the courses will be cross -listed in English/History/Soc iology/Hebraic Studies c. Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [x ] YES

350 Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [x ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AIV.5.3 DEPARTMENT/PROGRAM NAME Prefix & Five Digit Course JS 35000 Number (XXXXX ) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Course Title Special Topics in Jewish Studies Pre and/or Co Requisites None (specify which are pre -, co -, or both) Credits 3 Contact Hours (per week) 3 Liber al Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No

351 pplicable __x__ Not A Core Requirement ( ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) If course is being Note: considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues and syllabus. ) ____ Individual and Society Grading Method A - F Undergraduate A -F; Graduate A - C, F; C/NC NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale stat ements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: ies that go into advanced studies of the field. A. Special Topics related to Jewish Stud B. Writing Requirement: Will vary depending on class. 4. Rationale: (Justification) A. Nature of the proposed course: 3. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectiv es of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) 4. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departm ental, community, job market needs); This course allows students to understand the foundations and variety of Jewish Studies. Jewish Studies currently has no cour ses at this level so this course will allow us to extend our offerings.

352 b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; This course enriches the options for students and can supplement what we currently offer (internships and individual study). c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); Most of the special topics courses will be cross -listed in other departments, including History, English, Sociology and Hebrew S tudies. d. Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course proposed; There is no current overlap. e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. N/A f. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) B. The following ad ditional information must be supplied in the special instances noted: 1. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- or co- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the course. N/A 2. In the case of courses given i n non -organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be be noted that a given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. N/A course may 25 5. Projected Enrollment 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [x ] YES – If yes, list department/program: English/History/Sociology/Hebrew Studies Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [x ] YES [ ] N/A b. Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. Some of the courses will be cross -listed in English/History/Sociology/Hebraic Studies c. Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [x ] YES

353 Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [x ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AIV.6.1 ENGLISH DEPARTMENT rse Prefix & Five Digit Cou ENGL 49200 Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Course Title ADVANCED SEMINAR IN LINGUISTICS AND/OR RHETORIC Pre and/or Co Requisites minimum of 24 credits in the major, including ENGL 22000, Prerequisite: a -, (specify which are pre ENGL 25200, ENGL 28000, ENGL 30100; at least one of ENGL 34000, ENGL ; and at least one of ENGL 33000, co 34100, ENGL 34200, or ENGL 34300 -, or both) ENGL33200, ENGL33300, ENGL34600, ENGL34700, or ENGL 34800; and two courses at 300 or 400 level Credits 3 Contact Hours (per week) 3 Liberal Arts [ x] Yes [ ] No

354 _ x __ Not Applicable Core Requirement ( ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) If course is being Note: considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ C reative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society Grading Method A - F Undergraduate A -F; Graduate A - C, F; C/NC NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Wr iting Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: level study of a special focus in Linguistics and/or Rhetoric, with a goal of producing a substantial piece of research writi ng. A. Advanced- Focus may vary from semester to semester. B. Writing Requirement: A 15- to 20- page revised research paper or equivalent (not including drafts), as well as shorter writing assignments that may take the form of analysis essays, précis, book reviews, shorter formal response papers, or blog posts an d in- class response papers. Students will be required to present drafts of their work in (for example) a peer workshop. 4. Rationale: (Justification) A. Nature of the proposed course: 1. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) N/A 2. The proposed course is part of an established academic program. 3. Rationale:

355 level seminars the English Department intends to offer, covering the various tracks within t he a. This course is one of a set of advanced 400- major. This course is focused on linguistics and/or rhetoric and will fulfill the requirement that English majors must take one 400- level elective course. The course will enable students to pursue focused study in linguistics and/or rhetoric and to dev elop a substantial researched- based paper that responds to a conversation among scholars within those fields. The course will direct students in producing scholarly research and writing within the linguistics or rhetoric disciplines, resulting in a writing sample that will be useful for those who plan to enter the job market or graduate school. By the end of the course, students should be able to meet the following learning outcomes: • iplines of rhetoric and/or linguistics; Engage with scholarly conversations on a research focus within the disc • Critically examine and evaluate texts as rhetorical and/or linguistic by drawing upon secondary sources in linguistics and/or rhetoric; Interrogate the public and political implications of texts connected to researc h focus in linguistics and/or rhetoric; • • Engage with interdisciplinary theories that inform scholarship on a particular research focus; • Conduct primary and secondary research and produce the equivalent of a 15- to 20 -page research project that intervenes in existing scholarly conversations in rhetoric and/or linguistics. ethos, b. This course intersects with other rhetoric and linguistics courses with its attention to issues of language, argument, style, audience, and genre, but it requires deeper reading in the discipline and more sustained research writing. c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given) N/A d. This course does not substantially overlap with other courses in the college curriculum. e. This course has not been offered as a topics or experimental course in the past. No courses will be withdrawn when this course is adopted. f. B. The following additional infor mation must be supplied in the special instances noted: 3. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- or co- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the course. N/A

356 4. In the case of courses given in non- organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be be noted that a given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should N/A course may not carry mor e credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. 5. Projected Enrollment 15 students 6. Consultation Statement d. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If yes, list department/program: [x] NO [ ] YES – Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x] N/A e. Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. N/A Does this affect the Library? [x] NO [ ] YES f. Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AIV.7.1 MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT MATH 10150 Prefix & Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Co urse Title Mastery of Symbolic Computation Pre and/or Co Requisites MATH 10100/MATH 101EN with a grade of C or better. Not credited Req: - Pre -, (specify which are pre for students who have previously passed any course number at or above MATH co -, or both) 12400. Credits 1

357 Contact Hours (per week) 2 [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Core Requirement __X__ Not Applicable If course is being Note: ( ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression form must be submitt ed ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society Grading Method A - F Undergraduate A -F; C, F; C/NC Graduate A - NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Plural ism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: This online course focuses on developing increased mastery of symbolic computational skills and strategies needed for manipul ating symbols and solving equations and inequalities in precalculus -level mathematics and elementary statistics. 4. Rationale: (Justification) There is a need to address the substantial DFW problems in precalculus -level mathematics and statistics coursework. The requirement for success in these courses is solid mastery when working with algebra. This course is intended to increase mastery and fluidity with algebraic manipulations by students in their work with algebra. It is for students whose mastery is inadequate for further work at higher levels of mathematics and statistics. A. Nature of the proposed course:

358 This gree without course is intended to be taught online during winter and summer sessions so as to enable students to continue toward their de bolic manipulation. losing time. The course is designed to have students work intensively on solving problems that involve the use of sym 4. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) includes: 5. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that f. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); This moves to fix the high DFW problem in subsequent math courses. g. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; This course builds on students’ earlier work in MATH 10100 or MATH 101EN h. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); N/A Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course i. proposed; Some students need more work to bring their skills to a level commensurate with success in the next course. This course builds on MATH 10100 and MATH 101EN. j. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. No, it was not off ered experimentally. It is planned to be offered as MATH 10N06 in summer, 2019. k. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal. ) N/A

359 B. The following additional information must be supplied in the special instances noted: requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the 5. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- or co- course. 6. In the organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be case of courses given in non- noted that a given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. 5. Projected Enrollment 300 per year; 25 per class 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [X] YES – If yes, list department/program: Programs that list MATH 12500 as required course and will need MATH 10150 added as a requirement. Biological Sciences: Basic Concentration • • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Behavioral Neurobiology • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Bioinformatics • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Biophysics • Chemistry: Major I Chemistry: Major II • • Computer Science Computer Science with Concentration in Bioinformatics • • Economics • Mathematics • Mathematics with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Medical Laboratory Sciences: Biomedical Science • Physics Option 1 • Physics Option 2 • Physics Option 3 • Statistics • Statistics Major with a Concentration i n Quantitative Biology  Environmental Studies: Earth Science Concentration

360  Environmental Studies: Management and Policy Concentration Human Biology  Medical Laboratory Science: Clinical Science   Psychology list ed? If so, please list all courses affected. b. Is this course cross- c. Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [X] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AIV.7.2 MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Five Digit Course Prefix & MATH 14000 Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Course Title Mathematical Reasoning Workshop Pre and/or Co Requisites 00, MATH 12500, or MATH 12550. Not credited to Req: MATH 124 - Pre -, (specify which are pre students who have previous credit for MATH 15600. co -, or both) Credits 1 Contact Hours (per week) 2 Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No

361 __X__ Not Applicable Core Requirement ( If course is being ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) Note: considered for the ____ English Composition use Common Core, please ____ Math and Quantitative Reas oning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World section VI below]. The ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society Grading Method F - A Undergraduate A -F; C, F; C/NC Graduate A - : If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separat NOTE e rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: This workshop focuses on developing mathematical thinking skills needed for MATH15000. Students will learn applications with formal mathematical logic and mathematical reasoning, including proofs that use methods of direct proof, indirect proof, and mathematical induction. 4. Rationale: (Justification) There are numerous changes in the curriculum designed to address the substantial DFW problem in MATH 15000. This new course addresses the issue in two ways. First, for transfer students, whose success in MATH 15000 is dramatically lower than any other group that enters MATH 15000 with credit for MATH 12500: Precalculus, this new course is intended to improv e the mathematical reasoning for this group without requiring that they lose time in their march toward their degree, since this course is a corequisite to MATH 15000 for such students. In addition, for students who do not achieve a grade of B - or better i n the newly designed Hunter course MATH 12550: Precalculus with Workshop, this course should help them in thinking through the various analytical steps they encounter in calculus. Agai n, there is no loss in time toward their degree since the course is a corequisite for MATH 15000.

362 ite or possibly a Courses like CSCI 15000, which require strong mathematical reasoning skills, will want to consider this course as a prerequis corequisite, to raise their students’ prospects for success. A. Nature of the proposed course: 1. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) N/A 2. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); This course is needed for transfer students who come to Hunter with credit for precalculus but have an unusually high DFW rate. It is also ion, we see this as needed for filling in the blanks for students whose mathematical reasoning skills are inadequate to handle calculus. In addit a bridge for students who take MATH 12400 but decide afterwards that they should take calculus. b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; This course is designed to increase the analytical skills of students seeking to be successful in calculus, especially students whose mastery of prec alculus skills suggest a deficit in applying logic to mathematical applications. c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); The terminology of logic (philosophy) is used but applications are math- specific. d. Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course proposed;

363 There is no overlap with any earlier coursework. e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. This course was not offered experimentally; it is planned to be offered experimentally as Nath 10N05 in the spring. It is like the course MATH 15600 but at a much lower level since it does not require calculus. f. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) None B. The following additional information must be supplied in the special instances noted: or co- 1. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the course. organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be 2. In the case of courses given in non- given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be noted that a course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. 5. Projected Enrollment 275 per year; 35/class 6. Consultation Statement d. Is the pro posed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If yes, list department/program: [ ] NO [X] YES – Programs with MATH 15000 as a required course and will need MATH 14000 added to the curriculum. • Biological Sciences: Basic Concentration • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Behavioral Neurobiology • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Bioinformatics • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Biophysics • Chemistry: Major I • Chemistry: Major II • Computer Science

364 • Computer Science with Concentration in Bioinformatics Economics • Mathematics • Mathematics with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Physics Option 1 • • Physics Option 2 • Physics Option 3 • Statistics • Statistics Major with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Medical Laboratory Sciences: Biomedical Science Has the Department/Program been consulted? [] NO [X] YES [ ] N/A e. Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No. Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [X] YES f. YES [ ] N/A Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [X] For new courses or programs, please consult. AIV.7.3 MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Prefix & Five Digit Course MATH 12400 Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Course Title College Algebra and Trigonometry

365 Pre and/or Co Requisites or better Pre - Req: MATH 10100/MATH 101EN with a grade of B - OR (specify which are pre -, co MATH 10100/MATH 101EN with a grade of C or better and MATH 10150 with a -, or both) grade of C or bette r; or the appropriate score on the mathematics placement test. Not open to students who have taken MATH 12500. 4 Credits 4 Contact Hours (per week) [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts ____ Not Applicable Core Requirement ( __X__ Common Core: (also indicate category below) Note: If course is being considered for the ____ English Composition Co mmon Core, please use Quantitative Reasoning __X__ Math and CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues and syllabus. ) ____ Individual and Society Grading Method F - A -F; Undergraduate A - Graduate A F; C/NC C, NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new c ourse in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: A. This course is replacing the course MATH 12500 for students who do not intend to take calculus. Functions and their graphs; linear, q uadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; topics in trigonometry; graphical and analytical solutions to systems of equations. Students who would plan on taking calculus should register for MATH 12550 instead of this course. Students who complete this course will need to register for MATH 14000 in order to take calculus.

366 4. Rationale: (Justification) The redesign of courses in the current sequence MATH 10100, MATH 12500, MATH 15000/ MATH 15200, is intended to a ddress the substantial DFW problem in these courses, as well as in the course CSCI 15000. This course is replacing the course MATH 12500 for students who do not intend to take calculus. As such, the course title “College Algebra and Trigonometry” reflects the actual content of the course rather than the title “Precalculus” used in MATH 12500, which suggests preparation for students intending to take calculus. MATH 12500 will stay in the catalog for transfer students to get course equivalency when a 4- hour, 4-credit course is needed for giving students credit in Precalculus. The new course MATH 12550, “Precalculus with Workshop” will replace MATH 12500 with a 4- hour course that will better prepare students for calculus. For credit, 5- departments that do not require calculus but do require MATH 12500, MATH 12400 will be the replacement to recommend to their students, but they should also accept any of the courses: MATH 12400, MATH 12500, or MATH 12550. Students who complete MATH 12400 with a grade of C or bet ter can change their intent and take calculus along with the new 1- credit, 2- hour course, MATH 14000, which will be a corequisite for these students. There need be no loss in time for these students to get their degree. This course was not offered experim entally since the course material follows the same syllabus as that in the existing course MATH 12500. The course title “College Algebra and Trigonometry” is used at other colleges for having a college- level math course requirement beyond high school algebra. A. Nature of the proposed course: 6. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) 7. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: The old course title is needed for transfer students; this is the same content as MATH 12500 with a new title and this new course is only for students who do not intend to go on to calculus. a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; This course splits off students who do not need calculus yet do need a strong algebra background. As such, the term “precalculus” is inappropriate.

367 c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); e. Departments and programs that currently require MATH 12500 but not MATH 15000 should replace that requirement with this cours d. Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course proposed; As above, this is to split students who need calculus from those who do not. e. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. It has been offered with the title Precalculus in MATH 12500. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. f. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) None. itional information must be supplied in the special instances noted: B. The following add 7. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- or co- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the course. 8. In the case of courses given in non- organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be noted that a course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. 5. Projected Enrollment 1,000 students per year; 35/class 6. Consultation Statement a. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs?

368 [ ] NO [X] YES – If yes, list department/program: Courses with MATH 12500 as a pre- requisite BIOL 10000 (STEM) - Principles of Biology I • • CHEM 10200 (STEM) - General Chemistry I CHEM 11100 (STEM) - Chemical Principles • Introductory Chemistry • CHEM 11500 - CSCI 12700 - Introduction to Computer Science (STEM) • CSCI 15000 - Discrete Structures • • Techniques of Economic Analysis ECO 22000 - Economic Statistics • ECO 22100 - • MATH 12600 - Precalculus Technology Laboratory MATH 15000 (STEM) - Calculus with Analy tic Geometry I • • Matrix Algebra MATH 16000 - PHYS 11000 (STEM) - General Physics: Introductory Course in Mechanics, Heat, and Sound • • PHYS 23100 - Fundamentals of Laser and Fiber Optics • PSYCH 24800 - Statistical Methods in Psychological Research • Discrete Probability STAT 21200 - Introduction to Applied Statistics • STAT 21300 (STEM) - • STAT 21400 - Data Analysis Using Statistical Software STAT 29500 - Intermediate Topics in Statistics • • Advanced Biometrics STAT 35100 - Programs that list MATH 12500 as required cour se. Biological Sciences: Basic Concentration • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Behavioral Neurobiology • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Bioinformatics • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Biophysics Chemistry: Major I • • Chemistry: Major II • Com puter Science • Computer Science with Concentration in Bioinformatics • Economics • Environmental Studies: Earth Science Concentration • Environmental Studies: Management and Policy Concentration

369 • Human Biology Mathematics • Mathematics with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Medical Laboratory Science: Clinical Science • Physics Option 1 • • Physics Option 2 • Psychology • Physics Option 3 • Statistics • Statistics Major with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Medical Laboratory Sciences: Biomedical Science • Ha s the Department/Program been consulted? [] NO [X] YES [ ] N/A listed? If so, please list all courses affected. b. Is this course cross- c. Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A For new cours es or programs, please consult. AIV.7.4 MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT MATH 12550 Prefix & Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX) Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Course Title Precalculus with Workshop

370 Pre and/or Co Requisites or better - Pre - Req: MATH 10100/101EN with a grade of B -, OR (specify which are pre co MATH 10150 with a grade of C or better; or the appropriate score on the -, or both) taken MATH Mathematics placement test. Not open to students who have 12500 4 Credits Contact Hours (per week) 5 (4 hr lecture, 1 hr recitation) Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Core Requirement ____ Not Applicable If course is being _X__ Common Core: (also indicate category below) ( Note: considered for the ____ English Composition Common Core, please use _X__ Math and Quantitative Reasoning CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ific World ____ Scient ction VI below]. The se ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues ) and syllabus. ____ Individual and Society A F - Grading Method Undergraduate A -F; C, F; C/NC - Graduate A NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Cor e Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new course in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: A. This course replaces the course MATH 12500 for students who intend to take calculus. It is designed to develop an understanding of topics and skills which are fundamental to the study of calculus and other science classes. The topics covered are: linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs and applications; the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra; sequences, sums, and the Binomial Theorem. In addition to lecture, students are also required to attend a 50- minute recitation session once a week.

371 B. No formal writing requirement. 4. Rationale: (Justification) The current precalculus course (MATH 12500) is inadequate on several fronts: it has a high DFW problem itself and doesn't prepare students well enough for calculus and other courses for which it is a prerequisite (MATH 15000/15200/CSCI150). The new course, MATH 12550, equipped with an additional recitation hour, would serve to better pre pare students for these courses. In addition to covering most of the material in the current MATH 12500, the new course would also cover sequences, series and the Binomial Theorem, which are crucial topics for subsequent courses. ive students a much needed outlet for practice and honing of analytical skills needed to master the material. The recitation hour will g A. Nature of the proposed course: on a cover sheet or 1. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., Appendix) 2. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: g. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); This course is intended to address the high DFW rate. h. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; This version is solely for students intending to go on to calculus, MATH 15000. i. The way i n which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curr iculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course j. proposed; This version is solely for students intending to go on to calculus, MATH 15000. k. Please specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number.

372 It is being offered experimentally in Fall 2018 as MATH 10N04. There is a strong overlap with the current MATH 12500 but with greater focus on certain topics that will better prepare students for MATH 15000, MATH 152000, and CSCI 150000. l. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. (Note: Dropping courses requires a separate Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) None. B. The following additional information must be supplied in the spec ial instances noted: or co- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writing that is to be done in the 9. When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- course. In the case of courses given in non- organized classes such as field work, internshi 10. p, independent study, etc., an explanation must be given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be noted that a y courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laborator 5. Projected Enrollment 600; 35/class 6. Consultation Statement d. Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [X] YES – If yes, list department/program: Courses w ith MATH 12500 as a pre- requisite  BIOL 10000 (STEM) - Principles of Biology I CHEM 10200 (STEM) -  General Chemistry I CHEM 11100 (STEM) - Chemical Principles   - Introductory Chemistry CHEM 11500  CSCI 12700 - Introduction to Computer Science (STEM)  CSCI 15000 - Discrete Structures  ECO 22000 - Techniques of Economic Analysis ECO 22100 -  Economic Statistics  MATH 12600 - Precalculus Technology Laboratory  MATH 15000 (STEM) - Calculus with Analytic Geometry I  MATH 16000 - Matrix Algebra  PHYS 11000 (STEM) - General Physics: Introductory Course in Mechanics, Heat, and Sound

373  Fundamentals of Laser and Fiber Optics PHYS 23100 - PSYCH 24800 - Statistical Methods in P  sychological Research Discrete Probability STAT 21200 -  Introduction to Applied Statistics  STAT 21300 (STEM) - STAT 21400 -  Data Analysis Using Statistical Software  STAT 29500 - Intermediate Topics in Statistics STAT 35100 - Advanced Biometrics  Programs that list MATH 12500 as required course. Will need new courses added as options to replace MATH 12500; no credit change. Environmental Studies: Earth Science Concentration   Environmental S tudies: Management and Policy Concentration  Human Biology Psychology   Medical Laboratory Science: Clinical Science • Biological Sciences: Basic Concentration • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Behavioral Neurobiology • Biologic al Sciences: Concentration in Bioinformatics • Biological Sciences: Concentration in Biophysics • Chemistry: Major I • Chemistry: Major II Computer Science • • Computer Science with Concentration in Bioinformatics Economics • • Mathematics • Mathematics with a Conc entration in Quantitative Biology • Physics Option 1 Physics Option 2 • • Physics Option 3 • Statistics • Statistics Major with a Concentration in Quantitative Biology • Medical Laboratory Sciences: Biomedical Science Has the Department/Program been consulted? [] NO [X] YES [ ] N/A

374 listed? If so, please list all courses affected. e. Is this course cross- Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES f. Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. 1 CLASSICAL & ORIENTAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT AIV.8. Prefix & Five Digit Course Number (XXXXX) ARB 49000 Check with the Registrar’s Office to make sure the course # has never been used. Course Title The Arabic Senior Capstone Pre and/or Co Requisites requisites) - level ARB course (pre - ARB 15000 AND one 200 , which are pre- (specify ARB 40100 (co -requisite) co -, or both) Credits 3 Contact Hours (per week) 3 Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No

375 __X__ Not Applicable Core Requirement Note: ( If course is being ____ Common Core: (also indicate category below) considered for the ____ English Composition Comm on Core, please use antitative Reasoning ____ Math and Qu CUNY Common Core ____ Life and Physical Science Submission Forms [see ____ Scientific World The section VI below]. ____ Creative Expression form must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the proposal ____ World Cultures and Global Issues and syllabus. ) ____ Individual and Society Grading Method A - F Undergraduate A -F; C/NC Graduate A - C, F; NOTE: If the new course is also proposed for the Core Requirement, Writing Intensive, Pluralism & Diversity, and/or STEM, separate rationale statements must be submitted for each. It is recommended that applications for inclusion of the new cour se in any of these categories be submitted at the same time as the proposal for the course. 3. Course Description: A. A brief description for the College Catalog. This capstone course is intended to have students integrate and synthesize the knowledge of the Arab world that they have developed through previous coursework into a final project in Arabic. Projects may include: academic papers synthesizing primary and secondary sources; artistic and/or documentary videos; source or archival surveys; annotated bibliographies; live and/or recorded artistic performances; exhibitions/installations; literary or cultural criticism; feature- length journalism; reports on services; websites or computer applications. The final project will evaluated mainly on the basis of the level, range, and linguistic accuracy of the Arabic that is used in it. B. Writing Requirement: the number of papers and their approximate length, the extent to which library or electronic research is expected, or a statement of other writing requi rements. Any absence of a formal writing requirement must be specified. Short written assignments such as questions on readings and response papers (250- 400 words) to be submitted during the semester and one longer (~ 1,000 words) proposal of final project. If the student chooses to do a final written essay as their project, they will need to submit that at the end of the semester (~5,000- 7,000 words)

376 4. Rationale: (Justification) . A. Nature of the proposed course: 3. If the proposed course is part of a new academic program, refer to the overall objectives of the program (i.e., on a cover sheet or Appendix) and to provide them with a deep The Arabic Major is designed to bring students to the advanced level according to the ACTFL scale knowledge of Arab culture. The total number of credits is 27- 33 depending on the level of Arabic a student enters the program with. capstone course (The Arabic Senior Capstone) that will provide students with the Included within this course load is the Graduates of the Arabic Major will have attained a broad array of opportunity to delve deeply, in Arabic, into a project of their choice. ll, and cultural competency that will allow them to pursue careers or advanced studies in a number of integrated knowledge, linguistic ski fields, both academic and applied. 4. If the proposed course is part of an established academic program, present a rationale that includes: a. The advantages offered by the proposal and/or the needs met by the course (i.e., student, departmental, community, job market needs); - This course will be a required capstone course in our Arabic major. For students minoring in Arabic and/or other students, the course will be a helpful deep dive into Arab cultures that will allow students to tie together the knowledge they will have acquired from our other Arabic language and Arab culture courses. b. The way in which the proposed course relates to other courses within the department of origin; - -language class offerings and as part of our Arabic major that we are We are proposing this course to expand our non currently developing. This course would also be applicable to the Arab Studies minor that we currently have . c. The way in which the course relates to courses in other departments, divisional or interdisciplinary programs (if appropriate, possibilities for interdisciplinary use might be given); - This course will allow students to engage intellectually and critically wit h Arab Studies as a field and will serve as the culmination of their Arabic studies at Hunter. d. Justification for any substantial overlap with other courses in the college curriculum, indicating the unique/specific focus of the course proposed;

377 - none e. Pleas e specify if this course was offered as a topics or experimental course in the past and state the prefix and number. It was not. - f. List of courses, if any, which are to be withdrawn when the new course is adopted. te Substantive Change in Existing Course proposal.) (Note: Dropping courses requires a separa B. The following additional information must be supplied in the special instances noted: When ENGL 12000 is to be specified as a Pre- requisite, the rationale must justify this in terms of the writ ing that is to be done in the 11. or co- course. 12. organized classes such as field work, internship, independent study, etc., an explanation must be In the case of courses given in non- given as to how the student will earn the credits consistent with the student effort required in organized classes. It should be noted that a course may not carry more credits than contact hours. Laboratory courses usually carry one credit per two contact hours. 5. Projected Enrollment 15 6. Consultation Statement likely to affect other Departments or Programs? a. Is the proposed change If yes, list department/program: [x ] NO [ ] YES – Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ x] N/A b. Is this course cross- listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No c. Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [ x] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [x ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. We will consult with Lisa Finder on how to best utilize the library collection for this course. Section AV: Cha nges in Course Number, Title, Description, Credits, Hours, Co - or Pre -Requisites.

378 AV.1.1 Substantive Change in course field experience hours Department of Special Education/Applied Behavior Analysis Hunter College, CUNY strikethrough what will b e changed) TO ( FROM the changes) ( underline Name Name Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course EDABA 770.00 EDABA 770.00 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites EDABA 795.00 and approval of graduate EDABA 795.00 and approval of graduate (specify which (specify which advisor advisor are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours plus 12 hours of field experience 3 180 hours of field experience 3 plus Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description This course is the first of a two- This course is the first of a two- course course sequence in conducting fieldwork in sequence in conducting fieldwork in applied behavior analytic settings. A total applied behavior analytic settings. A total of 180 hours of fieldwork which includes of 180 hours of fieldwork which includes designing, conducting, and analyzing and analyzing designing, conducting, data from applied behavior analytic data from applied behavior analytic interventions is required. Specific interventions is required. Specific fieldwork topics to be covered during this fieldwork topics to be covered during this course include: Conducting stimulus course include: Conducting stimulus

379 preference assessments, discrete trial preference assessments, discrete trial instruction, prompting, data collection, instruction, prompting, data collection, sis, time -delay prompting, and data analy data -delay prompting, and analysis, time incidental teaching. incidental teaching. Liberal Arts Changes in LA status should be reflected in the course [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No learning Outcomes listed in the sample syllabus. Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduat Undergraduat -C, F Graduate A -C, F Graduate A -F; e A -F; e A Graduate A Graduate A -C, -C, F; C/NC F; C/NC Core Core __X__ Not Applicable __X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ative ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantit being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science ase Core, ple ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity see Appendix ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global B for CUNY

380 Issues Common Core Issues ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Submission Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Spring 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 3. Rationale: There was an error in the course proposal cover sheet for EDABA 77000 that was transcribed onto the catalog. The error indicated that the fieldwork hours were 12. We would like to fix that typo and show that the fieldwork hours are 180. 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult.

381 Substantive Change in course field experience hours AV.1.2 Department of Special Education/Applied Behavior Analysis Hunter College, CUNY strikethrough FROM what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) ( Name Name I Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis II Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course EDABA 771.00 EDABA 771.00 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites EDABA 770.00 and approval of graduate EDABA 770.00 and approval of graduate (specify (specify which which advisor advisor are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 12 hours of field experience 3 plus 3 plus 180 hours of field experience Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description This course is the second of a two- This course is t he second of a two- ting fieldwork course sequence in conduc course sequence in conducting fieldwork in applied behavior analytic settings. A in applied behavior analytic settings. A total of 180 hours of fieldwork which total of 180 hours of fieldwork which includes designing, conducting, and includes designing, conducting, and analyzing data from applied behavior analyzing data from applied behavior analytic interventions is required. analytic interventions is required. Specific Specific fieldwork topics to be covered fieldwork topics to be covered ourse include: during this c during this course include:

382 Environmental assessment, developing Environmental assessment, developing target responses, using research target responses, using research literature to guide clinical practice, literature to guide clinical practice, measuring behavior, analyzing graphic measuring behavior, analyzing graphic data, and measuring generalization and data, and measuring generalization and maintenance. maintenance. Liberal Arts Changes in LA status should be reflected in the course [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No learning Outcomes listed in the sample syllabus. Grading ding Gra Scale Scale Undergraduat Undergraduat -C, F Graduate A -C, F Graduate A -F; e A e A -F; Graduate A Graduate A -C, -C, F; C/NC F; C/NC Core Core __X__ Not Applicable __X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and P hysical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please

383 ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity _ U.S. Experience in its Diversity ___ see Appendix B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Issues Common Core Issues ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Submission . The Forms form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Spring 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 3. Rationale: There was an error in the c ourse proposal cover sheet for EDABA 77100 that was transcribed onto the catalog. The error indicated that the fieldwork hours were 12. We would like to fix that typo and show that the fieldwork hours are 180. 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the propos ed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES

384 Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.1.3 Substantive Change in course pre -requisite nalysis Department of Special Education/Applied Behavior A Hunter College, CUNY ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) FROM Name Name Applied Behavior Analysis I Applied Behavior Analysis I Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course EDABA 79500 EDABA 79500 Number Number XXXXX) ( (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites (specify which (specify which SPEDE 77100 pre- requisite No pre- requisite are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 45 45 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description The primary focus of this course is on The primary focus of this course is on foundational principles and methods in foundational principles and methods in applied behavior analysis, and their applied behavior analysis, and their basic and general applications in basic and general applications in educational and similar settings. Topics educational and similar settings. Topics to be covered include defining and to be covered include defining and measuring behavior, displaying and measuring behavior, displaying and

385 ng data, experimental analysis of analyzi analyzing data, experimental analysis of behavior change procedures, positive behavior change proced ures, positive and negative reinforcement, positive and and negative reinforcement, positive and negative punishment, and schedules of negative punishment, and schedules of reinforcement reinforcement Liberal Arts Changes in LA status should be reflected in the course [ ] Yes [ X ] No [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts learning Outcomes listed in the sample syl labus. Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduat Undergraduat -C, F Graduate A Graduate A -C, F -F; e A -F; e A Graduate A -C, -C, Graduate A F; C/NC F; C/NC Core Core __X__ Not Applicable __X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity see Appendix ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global B for CUNY

386 Issues Common Core Issues ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Submission Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Spring 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 3. Rationale: SPEDE 77100 is currently a prerequisite for EDABA 79500. After having ran this course, we realized that the content from SPED E 77100 is not required for success in EDABA 79500. We have also found that the SPEDE 77100 requirement is frequently waived. Based on this equesting to information we have determined that students do not require an autism background to be successful in EDABA 79500, so we are r remove the prerequisite. 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, pl ease list all courses affected. No. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES

387 Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. Substantive change in course credits and pre- requisite AV.2.1 Hunter College, CUNY Department of Educational Foundations and Counseling Programs Educational Psychology Program Substantive change in course credits and pre- requisite FROM ( strikethrough the changes) TO ( underline changes) Cognition and Educ ational Cognition and Educational Name Name Technology Technology Five Digit Five Digit EDPS 71300 EDPS 71300 Course Number Course Number & Prefix & Prefix Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereq: EDPS 70300 None Requisites Requisites Hours (per week) 4 hours Hours (per week) 3 hours Credits Credits 3 credits 4 credit This course covers research about Description Description This course covers research about the influence of the influence of educational educational technology on technology on the development of the development of thinking and thinking and learning. learning.

388 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [X ] Not Applicable [ X ] Not Applicable Grading Scale: Grading Scale: C, F A - A - C, F Core Core X_ Not Applicable __ _X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression ____ Life and Physical ____ Life and Physical Science Science ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity Diversity ____ World Cultures and ____ W orld Cultures and Global Issues Global Issues ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Effective Term Fall 2019 3. Rationale: By reducing this course from 4 to 3 credits (and making similar reduction in credits in other classes), students will be free to take additional courses without increasing the total number of credits required by the program. In adding course options, the program increases the areas of concentrat ion available to students. We reduced the workload for the course by reducing the number of readings per week by one item per class, and by reducing the amount of time devoted to the major project. Rather than done individually, the work for this project w ill now be shared across small teams.

389 So students can also take this course during their first semester in the program, we decided to remove the pre -requisite. -req of the learning theories course Instructors who have taught this course indicate that the readings for it do not need pre (EDPS 703). 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: ] NO [ ] YES Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ -listed? b) Is this course cross No c) Does this affect the Library? [ X ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES AV.2.2 es, and description Substantive change in course credits, title, prerequisit Hunter College, CUNY Department of Educational Foundations and Counseling Programs Educational Psychology Program Substantive change in course credits, title, prerequisites, and description FROM ( strikethrough the changes) TO ( unde rline changes) Name Educational Psychology Seminar Name Educational Psychology Seminar 1

390 Five Digit Five Digit EDPS 79000 EDPS 79000 Course Number Course Number & Prefix & Prefix prereq: EDPS 70000, EDPS 70100, EDPS prereq: Students must complete Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co a minimum of 24 Requisites 70200, EDPS 70300, and either EDPS Requisites credits. 72100 or EDPS 71100 Hours (per Hours (per week) week) Credits 2 credits 4 credits Credits This course provides an Description This is semester 1 of the seminar course Description provides an opportunity for which opportunity for s tudents to prepare an original scholarly students to prepare an original scholarly review of research literature or review of research literature or theoretical paper of publishable theoretical paper of publishable quality quality on an educational on an educational psychological topic of psychological topic of interest. interest. The general goal of the course The general goal of the course is is to enable students to apply their to enable students to apply their knowledge of educational psychological knowledge of educational issues and research through the psychological issues and development of a scholarl y research research through the paper. development of a scholarly research paper. Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ X ] Not Applicable [X ] Not Applicable Grading Scale: A - Grading Scale: A - C, F C, F

391 Core _X__ Not Applicable __X_ Not Applicable Core ____ Common Core Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ English Compos ____ English Composition ition ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression ____ Life and Physical ____ Life and Physical Science Science ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity Diversity ____ World Cultures and ____ World Cultures and Global Issues Global Issues ____ Indiv ____ Individual and Society idual and Society Effective Term Fall 2019 3. Rationale: We would like the current culminating seminar, EDPS 790 (4 credits), to be offered as EDPS 79000 (2 credits) and EDPS 79100 (2 credits). This configuration will give students the fall semester to conduct a literature review, and the spring semester to focus on their writing, and thus will allow them sufficient time to complete their culminating pr oject. Both students and faculty members have often indicated the lack of sufficient time within the span of a single semester for students to search, read, analyze, and synthesize all the material before writing a paper. Faculty members who teach EDPS 79000 and 79100 will teach both semesters. 4. Consultation Statement:

392 a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ X ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: ] NO [ ] YES Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ b) Is this course cross -listed? N/A c) Does this affect the Library? [ X ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES Substantive change in course credits, number, and pre- AV.2.3 requisites Hunter College, CUNY Department of Educational Foundations and Counseling Programs Educational Psychology Program Substantive change in course credits, number, and pre- requisites strikethrough FROM ( TO ( underline changes) the changes) Educational Psychology Thesis Educational Psychology Thesis Na Name me Research 1 Research 1 Five Digit Five Digit EDPS 79500 EDPS 79501 Course Number Course Number & Prefix & Prefix

393 Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereq: Students must complete prereq: EDPS 70000, EDPS 70100, Requisites Requisites EDPS 70200, EDPS 70300, and either a minimum of 24 credits. EDPS 72100 or EDPS 71100 Hours (per Hours (per week) 3 hours 2 hours week) Credits Credits 3 credits 2 credits Description Description This course provides an This course provides an opportunity opportunity for students to for students to conduct original research in the field of educational conduct original research in the psych field of educational psychology ology under the supervision of a under the supervision of a faculty member. faculty member. [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ X ] Not Applicable [X ] Not Applicable Grading Scale: Grading Scale: - C, F A A - C, F Core Core __X_ Not Applicable _X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core Common Core ____ ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression ____ Life and Physical ____ Life and Physical Science Science ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity Diversity ____ World Cultures and ____ World Cultures and Global Issues Global Issues

394 ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Fall 2019 Effective Term 3. Rationale: rom two to three. First, increasing the credits will provide adequate There are two rationales for increasing the course credits f depth literature review. Second, this increase in credits time for students to complete a higher quality thesis, including an in- a reasonable empirical study, and get IRB approval if necessary. will enable students to identify a suitable topic, design Furthermore, this three credit structure aligns with the thesis requirements in other departments across schools at Hunter (e.g., Arts and Sciences). 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Is this course cross -listed? No c) Does this affect the Li brary? [ X ] NO [ ] YES [ ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? AV.2.4 Substantive Change in course credits, number, and pre -requisites

395 Hunter College, CUNY Department of Educational Foundations and Counseling Programs Educational Psychology Substantive Change in course credits, number, and pre- requisites the changes) TO ( underline changes) FROM ( strikethrough Educational Psychology Thesis Educational Psychology Thesis Research 2 Research 2 Name Name Five Digit Course Five Digit Course EDPS 79502 EDPS 79600 Number & Prefix Number & Prefix Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereq: EDPS 70000, EDPS 70100, prereq: Students must complete a Requisites Requisites minimum of 24 credits. EDPS 70200, EDPS 70300, EDPS (specify which are (specify which are 79500, and either EDPS 72100 or pre, co, or both) co, or both) pre, EDPS 71100 3 2 Hours (per week) Hours (per week) 3 credit Credits Credits 2 credit This course provides an Description This course provides an opportunity Description opportunity for st udents to for students to conduct original conduct original research in the research in the field of educational field of educational psychology psychology under the supervision of under the supervision of a faculty a faculty member. member. Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [X ] Not Applicable [ X ] Not Applicable

396 Grading Scale: Grading Scale A A - C, F - C, F C/NC? Undergraduate -F; Graduate A -C, Undergraduate A -F; -C, Graduate A A F; C/NC F; C/NC Core Requirement Core Requirement _X__ Not Applicable _X__ Not Applicable ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression ____ Life and Physical Science Physical Science ____ Life and ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity ____ World Cultures and Global Diversity ____ World Cultures and Global Issues Issues ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Effective Term Fall 2019 3. Rationale: There are two rationales for increasing the course credits from two to three. First, i ncreasing the credits will provide adequate time for students to complete a higher quality thesis, including an in- depth literature review. Second, this increase in credits will enable students to identify a suitable topic, design a reasonable empirical st udy, and get IRB approval if necessary. Furthermore, this three credit structure aligns with the thesis requirements in other departments across schools at Hunter (e.g., Arts and Sciences).

397 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Is this course cross -listed? NO If so, please list all courses affected. this affect the Library? c) Does [ X ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.2.5 Substantive change in course credits Hunter College, CUNY Department of Educational Foundations and Counseling Programs Educational Psychology Program Substantive change in course credits FROM ( strikethrough the changes) TO ( underline changes) Multicultural Issues in Learning Multicultural Issues in Learning and Name Name Instruction and Instruction Five Digit Five Digit EDPS 71200 EDPS 71200 Course Number Course Number

398 & Prefix & Prefix Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereq or coreq: prereq or coreq: EDPS 70200 EDPS 70200 Requisites Requisites Hours (per ours (per H 3 hours 4 hours week) week) Credits Credits 3 credits 4 credits Description Description This course will examine the This course will examine the current -12 current research in K -12 education to explore research in K the role of multicultural issues in education to explore the role of teaching and learning. multicultural issues in teaching and learning. Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No [X ] Not Applicable [ X ] Not Applicable Grading Scale: Grading Scale: A - A - C, F C, F Core Core __X_ Not Applicable _X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning ____ Creative Expression Creative Expression ____ ____ Life and Physical ____ Life and Physical Science Science ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity Diversity ____ World Cultures and ____ World Cultures and Global Issues Global Issues

399 ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Fall 2019 Effective Term 3. Rationale: Two rationales for reducing the course credits from four to three are (1) reducing one credit from four to three is to provide ent students additional exposure to new courses in the program, and (2) allowing an instructor’s flexibility to identify the curr and relevant research pertinent to cultural issues faced in education. 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been c onsulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Is this course cross -listed? NO If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [ X ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES AV.2.6 Substantive change in course credits Hunter College, CUNY Department of Educational Foundations and Counseling Programs Educational Psychology Program

400 Substantive change in course credits the changes) TO ( FROM ( changes) strikethrough underline Name Name Tests and Measurement Tests and Measurement Five Digit Five Digit Course EDPS 72200 EDPS 72200 Number & Prefix Course Number & Prefix Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereq: EDPS 701 and EDPS 701 prereq: Requisites Requisites 702 Co -req : EDPS EDPS 702 Hours (per Hours (per week) 4 hours 3 hours week) Credits Credits 4 credits 3 credits Description Description This course covers the following This course covers the following topics: classical test theory, tests topics: classical test theory, construction, reliability estimation tests construction, reliability ability theory, and generaliz estimation and generalizability theory, validation, it validation, item analysis, test bias, em analysis, and introduction to item response test bias, and introduction to item response theory, and the - theory, and the use of high stakes -stakes testing in use of high testing in educational policy. educational policy. Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [X ] Not Applicable [ X ] Not Applicable Grading Scale: Grading Scale: C, F C, F A A - -

401 Core Core Requirement __X_ Not Applicable _X__ Not Applicable Requirement ____ Common Core If course is Note: ( ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition being considered for ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World the Common Core, ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative please use CUNY Reasoning Reasoning Common C ore ____ Creative Expression ive Expression ____ Creat Submission Forms ____ Life and Phy sical ____ Life and Physical section VI [see below]. Science Science The form must be ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its submitted along with Diversity Diversity the proposal and ____ World Cultures and ____ World Cultures and syllabus.) Global Issues Global Issues ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Fall 2019 Effective Term 3. Rationale: By reducing this c ourse from 4 to 3 credits (and making similar reduction in credits in other classes), students will be free to take additional courses without increasing the total number of credits required by the program. In adding course options, the program increases t he areas of concentration available to students. We reduced the workload for the course by omitting aptitude testing, non -cognitive measurement, item -writing, and test -based accountability. Rather than done individually, the work for this project will now be shared across small teams. We also changed EDPS 702 from pre -req. to co- req.so that students in EDPS 702 who have successfully completed EDPS 701 (statistics) can enroll in EDPS 722 (Tests and Measurement).

402 4. Consultation Statement hange likely to affect other Departments or Programs? a) Is the proposed c [ X ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No c) Does this affect the Library? [ X ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ X ] NO [ ] YES AV.2.7 Substantive change in course credits Hunter College, CUNY Department of Educational Foundations and C ounseling Programs Educational Psychology Program Substantive change in course credits FROM ( strikethrough the changes) TO ( underline changes) Educational Program Evaluation Educational Program Evaluation Name Name

403 Five Digit Course Five Digit Course EDPS 72300 EDPS 72300 Number & Prefix Number & Prefix Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co none none Requisites Requisites (specify which are (specify which are pre, co, or pre, co, or both) both) 4 hours Hours (per week) 3 hours Hours (per week) 3 credit 4 credit Credits Credits This course is designed to provide Description vide This course is designed to pro Description students with an overview of key students with an overview of key concepts, theories, and concepts, theories, and methodologies utilized in the field methodologies utilized in the field of educational evaluation. educational evaluation. Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [X ] Not Applicable [ X ] Not Applicable Grading Scale: - C, F - A C, F Grading Scale A dergraduate Un C/NC? A -F; Graduate A Undergraduate - C, F; C/NC -F; Graduate A -C, A F; C/NC Core Core Requirement __X_ Not Applicable _X__ Not Applicable Requirement ____ Common Core If course is Note: ( ____ Common Core ____ English Composition being considered for ____ English Composition ____ Scientific World orld ____ Scientific W the Common Core, ____ Math and Quantitative please use CUNY ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning Common Core Reasoning ____ Creative Expression Submission Forms ____ Creative Expression

404 ____ Life and Physical section VI [see ____ Life and Physical Science Science below]. The form ____ U.S. Experience in its must be submitted ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity along with the Diversity ____ World Cultures and proposal and ____ World Cultures and Global Issues syllabus.) Global Issues ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Effective Term Fall 2019 3. Rationale: By reducing this course from 4 to 3 credits (and making similar reduction in credits in other classes), students will be free to take additional courses without increasing the total number of credits required by the program. In adding course options, the program increases the areas of concentration available to students. We reduced the workload for the course by omitting the topic of needs assessment, and by reducing the amount of time devoted to the major pro ject. Rather than done individually, the work for this project will now be shared across small teams. 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/pro gram: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Is this course cross -listed? NO c) Does this affect the Library? [ X ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES

405 2.8 Substantive change in course credits, course number and name AV. Hunter College, CUNY Department of Educational Foundations and Counseling Programs Educational Psychology Program Substantive change in course credits, course number and name stri kethrough the changes) TO ( underline changes) FROM ( Qualitative Research Methods in Special topics in Educational Name Name Education Research methods Five Digit Course Five Digit EDPS 74200 EDPS 74201 Course Number Number & Prefix & Prefix Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereq: none EDPS 701, EDPS Requ Requisites isites 702, and EDPS 703 4 hours Hours (per week) 3 hours Hours (per week) 3 credit Credits Credits 4 credit Description Description This course will examine in - depth a - This course will examine in selected method of research and depth a selected method of cal research and statisti statistical procedure in an educational procedure in an educational psychology -related field. Topics and -related field. psychology corresponding readings will vary each

406 semester. Topics and corresponding readings will vary each semester. [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No [ X ] Not Applicable [X ] Not Applicable Grading Scale: Grading Scale A - C, F C, F A - Core Requirement Core __X_ No _X__ Not Applicable t Applicable Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ( If course Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World is being ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative considered for Reasoning Reasoning the Common ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression Core, please use ____ Life and Physical ____ Life and Physical CUNY Common Science Science Core Submission ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in it s Forms [see Diversity Diversity section VI below]. ____ World ____ World Cultures and Cultures and The form must be Global Issues Global Issues submitted along ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society proposal with the and syllabus.) Effective Term Fall 2019 3. Rationale: This course focuses on qualitative research methods, and thus we want to rename it in order to better ref lect the contents covered.

407 to By reducing this course from 4 to 3 credits (and making similar reduction in credits in other classes), students will be free take additional courses without increasing the total number of credits required by the program. In adding course options, the program increases the areas of concentration available to students. We reduced the workload for the course through reduced -credit model, and by narrowing the scope of the required readings by one article or chapter per week to reflect a three historical and philosophical perspectives of qualitative research approaches/methods. In addition, we decided to remove all the pre- req for this course since it is an introductory course regarding qualitative the pre- req, we will also be able to allow students from other program to take this course. research methodologies. Without req of Statistics (EDPS 701) and Quantitative Research Methods (EDPS 702) are Instructors had indicated that the prior pre- unnecessary for this course. 15 4. sultation Statement Con a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES AV.3.1 Routine Change in Course Number

408 Department of English Hunter College, CUNY Routine Change in Course Number Instructions: Please complete the entire “FROM” column. Only complete the proposed changes in the “TO” column strikethrough the changes) FROM ( underline changes) ( TO Survey of British Literature I: Early Survey of British Literature I: Early Name Name texts to the Eighteenth Century Texts to the Eighteenth Century Course & Course & 33800 ENGL ENGL 30400 Prefix Prefix Pre and/or Pre and/or Co Co Requisites Requisites (specify ecify (sp ENGL 22000 ENGL 22000 which are which are pre, co, or pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description A survey of British literature from its A survey of British literature from its earliest manifestations to the early earliest manifestations to the early eighteenth century, encompassing a eighteenth century, encompassing a range of authors and genres in their range of authors and genres in their social, and historical cultural, cultural, social, and historical contexts. contexts. Requir ed for all English majors. [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Grading Grading A-F A-F Scale Scale Core Core _x___ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable

409 Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ English Composition ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is e ____ Math and Quantitativ ____ M ath and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression for the ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Common ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its Core, please Diversity Diversity see Appendix ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global B for CUNY Issues Issues Common ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Core Submission Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Fall 2019 Term 2. Rationale: The course is required of all English majors. It is intended to be taken in students’ first or second semester of study and serves as a foundation for further study in British literature. The current number can be misleading to students, suggesting a more advanced course. Indeed, its number is higher than our Medieval literature courses. Re- numbering it to 30400 will make the course’s level and place in the major more visible and explicit. While the Department considered re- numbering to the 200 level, the course content and goals are more aligned with Hunter’s 300 -level description, and we do not intend any substantive changes to the course requirements. 3. Consultation Statement:

410 Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? – If yes, lis t department/program: [x ] NO [ ] YES Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ x ] N/A -listed? If so, please list all courses. Is this course cross Does this affect the Library? [ x] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ x] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. Routine Change in Course Number and Title AV.3.2 DEPARTMENT of English Hunter College, CUNY Routine Change in Course Number and Title Instructions: Please complete the entire “FROM” column. Only complete the proposed changes in the “TO” column FROM ( strikethrough the changes) TO ( underline changes) Survey of American Literature: Survey of American Literature: From Name Name Origins to the Civi Origins to the Civil War l War Course & Course & ENGL ENGL 30700 39500 Prefix Prefix Pre and/or Pre and/or Co Co Requisites Requisites (specify (specify ENGL 22000 ENGL 22000 which are which are pre, co, or pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 3 3

411 Credits Credits 3 3 Descripti on Description An introduction to American literature An introduction to American literature up to the Civil War, sur veying up to the Civil War, surveying material in a range of genres and material in a range of genres and periods and encompassing a variety periods and encompassing a variety of interpretive approaches. Required of interpretive approaches. of all English majors. [ x ] Yes [ ] No [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Liberal Arts Grading Grading A-F A-F Scale Scale Core Core ___x_ No t Applicable __x__ Not Applicable Requirement Req uirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression for the ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Common ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its Core, please Diversity Diversity see Appendix ____ World Cultures and ____ World Cultures and Global Global B for CUNY Issues Issues Common Individual and Society ____ ____ Individual and Society Core Submission Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Fall 2019 Term

412 2. Rationale: ENGL 39500 is currently a required course for the Literature, Language, and Criticism concentration and one of three choices to fulfill the American literature survey requirement for the other four concentrations. It is intended to be taken in students’ first or second semester of study in the major, and to serve as a foundation for further study in American literature. Beginning in Fall 2019, the current number can be misleading to students, suggesting a more advanced course. course will be required of all majors. The Re -numbering it 30700 will make the course’s level and its place in the major more visible and explicit. While the Department level description, and numbering to the 200 level, the course content and goals are more aligned with Hunter’s 300- considered re- we do not intend any substantive changes to the course requirements. The addition of the word “from” in the title corrects the en to mean that the course focuses on the origins of the Civil War, which is not ambiguity of the current title, which can be tak accurate. 3. Consultation Statement: Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ x ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses. Does this affect the Library? [ x] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ x] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.3.3 Substantive Change in course number and level ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Substantive Change in course number and level FROM TO

413 Name Name g Introduction to Creative Writin Introduction to Creative Writing Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course 28500 30000 ENGL ENGL Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites ENGL 22000 (specify w hich ENGL 22000 (specify which are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description genre w - This multi This multi - genre workshop is an orkshop is an introduction to creative writing and introduction to creative writing and will focus on poetry, fiction, and will focus on poetry, fiction, and fiction. Course work will creative non- creative non- fiction. Course work will include both reading and writing in writing in include both reading and these three genres, writing exercises, these three genres, writing exercises, and, as students will and, as students will present copies of their work to the class for present copies of their work to the discussion, an introduction to class for discussion, an introduction to workshop methods of critiquing workshop methods of critiquing student poems. Weekly reading and student poems. Weekly reading and writing assignments will introduce writing assignments will introduce students to literary terms, poetic students to literary terms, poetic devices and narrative strategies. The devices and narrative strategies. The emphasis will be on revision and emphasis will be on revision and writing as a process. Work includes writing as a process. Work includes Reading Response Journal and Reading Response Journal and portfolio of work done in these three portfolio of work done in these three genres. genres.

414 Liberal Arts Changes in LA status should be reflected in the course [X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No learning Outcomes listed in the sample syllabu s. Grading Grading Scale Scale A-F A-F Undergraduate Undergraduate A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate - A - C, F; C/NC C, F; C/NC A Core Core __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is itative ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quant being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted

415 along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Fall 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register English 30000 is an introductory creative writing course, yet it has been listed at the 300 level, a level traditionally 3. Rationale: reserved for more advanced courses. The course is a prerequisite for all other creative w riting workshops (30800, 30900, 31100, 31300, 31400, 31600, and 48400) and it is also currently a prerequisite for declaring the Creative Writing concentration, the only such 300 -level prerequisite in the major. The course’s number can therefore be confusi ng to students, especially since it is both a prerequisite for and part of the Creative Writing concentration. Changing the number to 28500 will more accurately place the course in the creative writing sequence and more accurately reflect the actual requir ements of the course. (Under the proposed changes to the major, ENGL 28500 will no longer be a prerequisite for declaring the Creative Writing concentration. However, students must earn a grade of B or better in the course to continue in the concentration. ) Furthermore, our research shows that -level courses, and it has been the English Department’s introductory creative writing courses are more commonly taught as 200 practice to accept such numbered courses as equivalent to 30000 for transfer credits. 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. No. c) Does this affect the Library? [X ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A

416 For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.3.4 Substantive Change in Course Number and Level DEPARTMENT of English Hunter College, CUNY Substantive Change in Course Number and Level Instructions: Please complete the entire “FROM” column. Only complete the proposed changes in the “TO” column ( strikethrough the changes) TO ( underline changes ) FROM Name Name The Structure of Modern English The Structure of Modern English Course & Course & ENGL 33100 28000 ENGL Prefix Prefix Pre and/or Pre and/or Co Co Requisites Requisites (specify (specify ENGL 22000 ENGL 22000 which are which are pre, c o, or pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description ourse offers an introduction to This c Exploration of the acquisition, structure, and use of modern English the study of the linguistic and and its regional and social variations. rhetorical structures of English, in particular sound systems Satisfies linguistics but not literature . requirements (phonology), word formation (morphology), grammatical constructions (syntax), and language

417 as social and cultural practice (discourse analysis and stylistics). Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ x] Yes [ ] No [ x ] Yes [ ] No Grading Grading A-F A-F Scale Scale Core Core __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is Math and Quantitative ____ ____ Math and Quantitat ive being Reasoning Reasoning considered ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression for the ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Common ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its Core, please Diversity Diversity see Appendix ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global B for CUNY Issues Issues Common ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Core Submission Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Fall 2019 Term 2. Rationale:

418 ourse for the Linguistics and Rhetoric, ELA, and Preparation for Secondary School ENGL 33100 is currently a required c nguistics concentrations. It has been taught as an introductory course to the study of linguistics and rhetoric, and students in the Li and Rhetoric concentration are recommended to take it in their first or second semester of study in the major. In this way, the course serves as a foundation for the more advanced 300- level Linguistics and Rhetoric courses. The current number can be misleading to students in suggesting a more advanced course. Re -numbering it 28000 will make the course’s level and its place in the Linguistics and Rhetoric concentration more visible and explicit. In addition, the course content and goals are more aligned ; thus, we do not need to make any substantive changes to the course requirements. with Hunter’s 200 -level course descriptions -level introductory and 200 Furthermore, it has been the English Department’s practice to accept transfer equivalency for 100- linguistics courses from both community and senior colleges. We do, however, propose making changes in the course description as listed above in order to outline the specific topics of study currently taught in the ENGL 33100 syllabus and remove the not a focus on the course. mention of “regional and social variations,” which is 3. Consultation Statement: Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? – If yes, list department/program: [ x ] NO [ ] YES Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] N O [ ] YES [ x ] N/A Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses. Does this affect the Library? [ x] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ x] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. Substantive Change in Title, Pre AV.3.5 -Requisites, and Description ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Requisites, and Description Substantive Change in Title, Pre- FROM ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes)

419 Advanced Seminar in Creative Name Name Special Studies Seminar Writing Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course ENGL 48400 ENGL 48400 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) a minimum of 24 Prerequisites: credits in the major, including ENGL Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Prerequisites: ENGL 22000, ENGL 22000, 25200 , ENGL 28500 ENGL Requisites Requisites 30000, level I and II workshops in (formerly 30000), ENGL 30400, (specify which specified genre (30800 and 30900; (specify which ENGL 30700, level I and level II are pre, co, or 31100 and 31300; or 31400 and are pre, co, or workshops in specified genre (30800 both) 31600). both) and 30900; 31100 and 31300; or 31400 and 31600). Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description Advanced seminar in a specific Topics in British and American genre of creative writing (fiction, ture or linguistics. Some topics litera poetry, or creative non- fiction), with satisfy PD requirements; check the an emphasis on craft, style, and/or schedule of classes and with the strategies for creative writers . undergraduate adviser. [ x] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate C, F; C/NC A A - C, F; C/NC - Core Core _x___ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core If ____ English Composition ( Note: ____ English Composition

420 ____ Scientific World course is ____ Scientific World ____ Math and Quantitative being ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning considered for Reasoning ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please see Appendix ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its B for CUNY Diversity Diversity ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Submission Issues ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllab us.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Fall 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: Both the current name and catalog description are misleading, if not completely incorrect. At l east since 2002, ENGL 48400 has functioned as the capstone course in creative writing, not a topics course in British and American literature or specific and requires students to have completed both a l evel I and II linguistics. Every course taught under 48400 is genre- workshop in that genre. The proposed title and description will both correct the mistaken catalog description and align the t itle with our other 400 -level elective courses: 49000 Advanced Seminar in Literatures and Criticism and 49200 Advanced Seminar in Linguistics and/or Rhetoric. Under the proposed changes to the English major, 48400 will be one of the options students will have to fulfill the 400 -level elective requirement. While we expect most Creative Writing majors to take the course, i t is not required that they do so. They may choose instead to take 49000, 49200, or, if eligible ENGL 49400 Honors Seminar, provided they meet those courses’ prerequisites. Similarly, students in other concentrations may take 48400 if they meet the prerequisites. Finally, it

421 should be noted that under the proposed changes to the major, ENGL 30400 and 30700 will be required of all majors and are therefore listed under the course prerequisites. 3. Consultation Statement: o affect other Departments or Programs? a) Is the proposed change likely t [ x] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. NA. b) Is this course cross c) Does this affect the Library? [x ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. Substantive Change in title, pre -requisites, and description AV.3.6 ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Subst antive Change in title, pre -requisites, and description ( FROM what will be changed) TO strikethrough underline the changes) ( in Literature and Advanced Seminar Name Name Seminar Topics Advanced Criticism Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course ENGL 4 9000 ENGL 49000 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co ENGL 22000 a minimum of 24 credits in the major,

422 Requisites Requisites EN GL ENGL 22000, including (specify which (specify which 25200, ENGL 30400 (currently are pre, co, or are pre, co, or ENGL 338), ENGL 30600, ENGL both) both) 30700 (currently 395); and one of ENGL 31700, ENGL 31800, ENGL 32000, ENGL 32100, ENGL 32300, ENGL 32400, ENGL 32500, ENGL 32600, ENGL 32700, or ENGL 32900. Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description Focused study of and research on Focused study of and research on a author or authors, texts, selected selected authors, texts and/or and/or periods in relation to a periods in relation to a particular particular literary, cultural, historical, linguistic, rhetorical, cultural, literary, or theoretical theme. historical, or theoretical theme. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credi t if a different topic is taken. Liberal Arts Changes in LA status should be reflected in the course ] No [x ] Yes [ Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No learning Outcomes listed in the sample syllabus. Grading Grading A-F A-F Scale Scale

423 Undergraduate Undergraduate A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate - C, F ; C/NC A C, F; C/NC A - Core Core _ x_ __ Not Applicable __ Not Applicable x __ Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take FALL 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 3. Rationale: This course is primarily for Literature and Criticism students but is open to students i n other concentrations, such as English: Preparation for Secondary School Teaching, English Language Arts, or Creative Writing who have met the prerequisites. Students should take this seminar toward the end of their time as a Hunter College English major, hence why we

424 require them to have completed 24 credits in the Major, including Introduction to Literary Studies (ENGL 25200), Introduction to Literary Theory (ENGL 30600), Survey in British Literature: Early Texts to the Eighteenth Century (now ENGL 33800, in the process of being changed to ENGL 30400), and Survey in American Literature: Origins to the Civil War (now ENGL 39500, in the process of new Advanced being changed to ENGL 30700). In addition to making changes to the pre -existing ENGL 49000, we are proposing a requisites designed primarily for students in the Linguistics and Seminar in Linguistics and/or Rhetoric (ENGL 49200), with pre- Rhetoric track, which is why all reference to such courses are removed from the current course description. While ENGL 49000 has been taught a few times as a Topics course, it will now be offered as a regular course with multiple cho the sections per semester. Because this course is a culminating course for majors, it may be not be repeated. It is designed to e of ENGL 25200. The gateway course to the major, ENGL 25200 has sections which are offered in a variety of literatures and format themes, but all of them follow the same overall learning outcomes. ENGL 49000 will follow the same logic, offering students a range of options in terms of subject matter but following the same learning outcomes. By the end of ENGL 49000, students will be abl e to • Critically examine literary texts on the subject of the seminar nar • Engage with scholarly conversations on the subject of the semi • Conduct primary and secondary research and produce a 15 - to 20 -page research paper (or equivalent -length research project) that intervenes in existing scholarly conversations on the subject of the seminar. We currently have twenty -five full- y specializing in literary studies who can teach this course. time facult 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If yes, list department/program: [x ] NO [ ] YES – Has the Department/Program been con sulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ x] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. NO c) Does this affect the Library? [x ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.4.1 Change in Course Pre- Requisites

425 CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY -Requisites Change in Course Pre strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) FROM ( Essentials of General Chemistry Esse ntials of General Chemistry Name Name Lecture Lecture Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course CHEM 10000 CHEM 10000 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites : MATH 10100 or or Coreq Prereq ify which (specify which (spec prereq: MATH 10100 101EN are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 4 hrs (3 lec, 1 rec) 4 hrs (3 lec, 1 rec) Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description Essential facts, laws, and theories of Essential facts, laws, and theories of general chemistry. general chemistry. Primarily for nursing, nutrition and Primarily for nursing, nutrition and food science and community health food science and community health education students. education students. Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Libera l Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate - C, F; C/NC A - C, F; C/NC A Core Core ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement __X__ Common Core __X__ Common Core

426 If Note: ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ( __X__ Scientific World course is __X__ Scientific World ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being considered for Reasoning Reasoning ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Creative Expression __X__ Life and Physical Science __X__ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Submission Issues ____ Individual and Society Forms. The ____ Individual and Society form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Fall 2019 2-3 semesters to be avail able for student to register 2. Rationale: The Mathematics and Statistics department created MATH 101EN as an enhanced version of MATH 10100, i.e MATH 10100 with an extra hour of instruction. Since these are the same class, both should be lis ted as pre -requisites for this course. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N /A

427 b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. Requisites AV.4.2 Change in Course Pre- CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY -Requisites Change in Course Pre FROM what will be changed) TO strikethrough underline the changes) ( ( Name Name General Chemistry I General Chemistry I Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course CHEM 10200 CHEM 10200 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites MATH prereq or coreq: 12400 or 12500 prereq or coreq: MATH 12500, (specify which (specify which 15000 or equiv. or 12550 or 15000 are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 5 hrs (4 lec, 1 rec) 5 hrs (4 lec, 1 rec) Credits Credits 4 4

428 Description Description - In depth introduction to In - depth introduction to stoichiometric calculations, atomic stoichiometric calculations, atomic and molecular structure and and molecular structure and chemical bonding. chemical bonding. Primarily for pre -med , medical -med, medical Primarily for pre laboratory sciences and science laboratory sciences and science majors. majors. Note: No student may receive credit Note: No student may receive credit 10100 and for both CHEM 10000- for both CHEM 10000- 10100 and - 10200 10200 - 10300 or 11100. 10300 or 11100. [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate - C, F; C/NC A - C, F; C/NC A Core Core ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement __X__ Common Core __X__ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If __X__ Scientific World __X__ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common __X__ Life and Physical Science __X__ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity UNY B for C ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and

429 syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Fall 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rational e: MATH 12400 and MATH 12500 are being created to replace MATH 12500, which will be kept on the books for transfer students. -requisites for this course. Since MATH 12400 and MATH 12550 are equivalent to MATH 12500 they are being added as pre tation Statement: 3. Consul a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A b) Is this course cross ist all courses affected. -listed? If so, please l c) Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.4.3 Requisites Change in Course Pre- CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT Hunter C ollege, CUNY Change in Course Pre -Requisites

430 the changes) strikethrough TO ( underline FROM what will be changed) ( Name Name Introductory Chemistry Introductory Chemistry Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course CHEM 11500 CHEM 11500 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites 12500 prereq or coreq: MATH 12400 or (specify which (specify which prereq or coreq: MATH 12500 or 12550 are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hour s Hours 4 hrs (3 lec, 1 rec) 4 hrs (3 lec, 1 rec) Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description An introduction to the fundamental An introduction to the fundamental concepts in chemistry including concepts in chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, and chemical bonding, stoichiometry, and solution chemistry. solution chemistry. This course is appropriate for This course is appropriate for students who students who have had no prior have had no prior coursework in chemistry. coursework in chemistry. [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate Undergraduate A-F A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate A - C, F; C/NC A - C, F; C/NC Core Core le __X__ Not Applicab __X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: course is ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World

431 ____ Math and Quantitative being ____ Math and Quantitative Reasoning Reasoning considered for the Common ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression Core, please ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science see Appendix ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its B for CUNY Diversity Diversity Common Core ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Submission Issues Issues Forms. The ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Fall 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: MATH 12400 and MATH 12500 are being created to replace MATH 12500, which will be kept on the books for transfer students. Since MATH 12400 and MATH 12550 are equivalent to MATH 12500 they are being added as pre -requisites for this course. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected.

432 c) Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] YES [ ] N/A Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.4.4 -Requisites Routine Change in Course Pre CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Routine Change in Course Pre -Requisites ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline th e changes) FROM Name Name Chemical Principles Chemical Principles Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course CHEM 11100 CHEM 11100 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites 12500 prereq or coreq: MATH 12400 or or 2500 prereq or coreq: MATH 1 (specify which (specify which equiv , MATH 12600 or 12550 are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 9 hrs (4 lec, 3 lab, 2 workshop) 9 hrs (4 lec, 3 lab, 2 workshop) Credits Credits 5.5 5.5 Description Description de pth introduction to chemical depth introduction to chemical - In In - principles including measurement, principles including measurement, stoichiometric calculations, inorganic stoichiometric calculations, inorganic nomenclature, gas laws, equilibrium, nomenclature, gas laws, equilibrium, acids, bases and buffers. Emphasis acids, bases and buffers. Emphasis

433 solving, oral solving, oral - is placed on problem - is placed on problem presentations, and collaborative presentations, and collaborative work. Laboratory and coursework work. Laboratory and coursework emphasize analysis and evaluation emphasize analysis and evaluation of data. of data. Primarily for pre -med, medical Primarily for pre -med, medical laboratory sciences and science laboratory sciences and science majors. majors. Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Grading Grading Scale Scale A-F Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate A - C, F; C/NC A - C, F; C/NC Core Core le ____ Not Applicab ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement __X__ Common C __X__ Common Core ore ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If __X__ Scientific World __X__ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common __X__ Life and Physical Science __X__ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission dual and Society ____ Individual and Society ____ Indivi Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Fall 2019

434 Term Note: Most proposals take 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: MATH 12400 and MATH 12500 are being created to replace MATH 12500, which will be kept on the books for transfer students. TH 12400 and MATH 12550 are equivalent to MATH 12500 they are being added as pre Since MA -requisites for this course. requisites because students need MATH 12500 in order to take MATH 12600. Only We are deleting MATH 12600 from the pre- Math 12500 is required. This is an old typo. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [ ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A is course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. b) Is th c) Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.1 Routine Change in Course pre -requisites MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY

435 -requisites Routine Change in Course pre ( what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) FROM strikethrough Mathematics for Elem Mathematics for Elementary entary Name Name Education 1 Education 1 Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course MATH 10400 (STEM) MATH 10400 (STEM) Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co -req: grade of C or better in Pre Requisites Requisites -req: grade of C or better in Pre MATH 10100 or MATH 101EN MATH 10100 or appropriate score on (specify which (specify which or appropriate score on the the placement exam are pre, co, or are pre, co, or placement exam both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description Fundamental and relevant Fundame ntal and relevant mathematics as recommended by mathematics as recommended by the NCTM for prospective the NCTM for prospective elementary school teachers, elementary school teachers, including problem solving, sets, logic, including problem solving, sets, logic, numeration, computation, integers numeration, computation, integers and number theory. Required of and number theory. Required of students planning to teach in dents planning to teach in stu elementary schools. Not open to elementary schools. Not open to other students. other students. [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Grading Grading Scale Scale A-F Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate A - C, F; C/NC - C, F ; C/NC A

436 Core Core ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core __X__ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: __x__ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is __x__ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Spring 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: The Mathematics and Statistics department created MATH 101EN as an enhanced version of MATH 10100, i.e MATH 10100 with an extra hour of instruction. Since these are the same class, both should be listed as pre- requisites for this course. 3. Consultation Statement:

437 a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If yes, list department/program: [x ] NO [ ] YES – Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. b) Is this course cross c) Does this affect the Library? [ x] NO [ ] YES Have you c onsulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.2 Routine Change in Course pre- requisites MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Routine Change in Course pre -requisites ( strikethrough FROM TO ( underline the changes) what will be changed) Matrices, Vectors and Linear Matrices, Vectors and Linear Name Name Programming Programming Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course MATH 11100 MAT H 11100 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Pre -req: MATH 10100 or MATH Requisites Requisites -req: MATH 10100 or appropriate 101EN Pre (specify which (specify which score on the placement exam or appropriate score on the are pre, co, or are pre, co, or placement exam both) both) Hours Hours 3 3

438 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description Not open to students who have Not open to students who have completed MATH 16000 or 26000. completed MATH 16000 or 26000. Recommended for accounting Recommended for accounting students; not recommended for students; not recommended for students majoring in mathematics or students majoring in mathematics or es statistics. Introduction to matric istics. Introduction to matrices stat and vectors, systems of linear and vectors, systems of linear equations and linear programming equations and linear programming with applications. with applications. [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Grading Grading Scale Scale A-F Undergraduate Undergraduate A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate C, F; C/NC A - C, F; C/NC - A Core Core __x__ Not Applicable __x__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experienc e in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The be form must submitted along with the proposal and

439 syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Spring 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: The Mathematics and Statistics department created MATH 101EN as an enhanced version of MATH 10100, i.e MATH 10100 with an extra hour of instruction. Since these are the same class, both should be listed as pre- requisites for this course. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [x ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [ x] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.3 Routine Change in Course title MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY

440 Routine Change i n Course title TO ( underline strikethrough what will be changed) FROM ( the changes) Name Name Calculus with Analytic Geometry Calculus 2 2 Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course MATH 15500 MATH 15500 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co nd/or Co Pre a Requisites Requisites prereq: grade of C or better in MATH prereq: grade of C or better in MATH (specify which (specify which 15000 15000 are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 4 4 Credits Credits 4 4 Description Description Differentiation and integration of Differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, integration transcendental functions, integration techniques, infinite sequences and techniques, infi nite sequences and series, improper integrals, polar series, improper integrals, polar coordinates. coordinates. Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate Undergraduate A-F A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate - A C, F; C/NC A - C, F; C/NC

441 re Co Core ___ Not Applicable _ ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement __X__ Common Core __X__ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is __X__ Math and Quantitative __X__ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take FALL 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: Calculus is no longer taught with Analytic Geometry, so it does not belong in the title. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program:

442 Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. b) Is this course cross c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.4 Routine Change in Prerequisite MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPAR TMENT Hunter College, CUNY Routine Change in Prerequisite ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) FROM Name Name Matrix Algebra Matrix Algebra Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course MATH 16000 MATH 16000 Num ber Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co MATH 12400 or MATH prereq: Requisites Requisites prereq: MATH 12500 or appropriate or MATH 12550 12500 or (specify which (specify which score on placement exam appropriate score on placement are pre, co, or are pre, co, or exam both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3

443 Description Description Systems of linear equations, Systems of linear equations, ma trices, determinants, introduction matrices, determinants, introduction to vector spaces and linear to vector spaces and linear transformations, applications. transformations, applications. [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate A-F A-F Undergraduate A-F; Graduate A-F; G raduate - C, F; C/NC - A C, F; C/NC A Core Core __X__ Not Applicable __X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ld Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global ____ Wor Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most FALL 2019 proposals take 2 - 3 semesters

444 to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: This is a routine addition of similar but alternative prerequisite coursework newly offered by the Department of Mathematics & Statistics. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: ed? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A Has the Department/Program been consult b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.5 Routine Change in Course pre- requisites MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Routine Change in Course pre -requisites FROM ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) Name Name tistics Elementary Probability and Statistics Elementary Probability and Sta Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course STAT 11300 STAT 11300 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co - Pre req: grade of C or better in Pre -req: grade of C or better in Requisites Requisites MATH 10100 or MATH 101EN MATH 10100 or appropriate score on (specify which (specify which or appropriate score on the the placement exam are pre, co, or are pre, co, or placement exam

445 both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 escription Description D Not open to students who have Not open to students who have completed STAT 21300 (STEM) or completed STAT 21300 (STEM) or PSYCH 24800. Not credited for PSYCH 24800. Not credited for majors in statistics or mathematics r mathematics majors in statistics o unless minor is elementary unless minor is elementary education. An introduction to applied education. An introduction to applied statistics and statistical computing. statistics and statistical computing. Hands -on data analysis. Graphical -on data analysis. Graphical Hands inference. The five number inference. The five number summary, box plots, scatterplots, normal summary, box plots, scatterplots, probability plots. Elementary normal probability plots. Elementary probabi probability. Statistical estimation and lity. Statistical estimation and hypothesis testing. Linear hypothesis testing. Linear regression. regression. Students are expected to Students are expected to analyze real data sets and write reports. analyze real data sets and write Students who have taken calculus or reports. Students who have taken place into calculus by the placement calculus or place into calculus by the exam should take STAT 21300 placement exam should take STAT 21300 instead of STAT 11300. instead of STAT 11300. Liberal Arts [ x ] Yes [ ] No [ x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts Grading Grading Scale Scale A-F A-F Undergraduate Undergraduate A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate A A - C, F; C/NC C, F; C/NC - Core Core ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement __x__ Common Core __x__ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World course is ____ Scientific World

446 __x__ Math and Quantitative being __x__ Math and Quantitative Reasoning considered for Reasoning the Common ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression Core, please ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science see Appendix ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its B for CUNY Diversity Diversity Common Core ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Submission Issues Issues Forms. The ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note : Most proposals take Spring 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: The Mathematics and Statistics department created MATH 101EN as an enhanced version of MATH 10100, i.e MATH 10100 with an extra hour of instruction. Si nce these are the same class, both should be listed as pre- requisites for this course. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [x ] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A

447 b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [ x] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [x ] N/A For new cours es or programs, please consult. AV.5.6 Routine Change in Prerequisite MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Routine Change in Prerequisite underline ( what will be changed) TO ( the changes) strikethrough FROM Name Name lity Discrete Probability Discrete Probabi Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course STAT 21200 STAT 21200 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co MATH 12400 or MATH prereq: Requisites Requisites prereq: MATH 12500 or STAT 11300 12500 or or STAT or MATH 12550, or appropriate score on placement (specify which (specify which 11300 or appropriate score on exam. are pre, co, or are pre, co, or placement exam both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description Combinations, permutations, discrete Combinations, permut ations, discrete probability. Characteristics of probability. Characteristics of probability distributions. Model probability distributions. Model building. Additional topics like building. Additional topics like

448 sampling, random walks or game sampling, random walks or game theory will be introduced from time to theory will be introduced from time to time. time. X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate - A C, F; C/NC A C, F; C/NC - Core Core ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement __X__ Common Core __X__ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is __X__ Math and Quantitative __X__ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expr ____ Creative Expression ession the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Core Common Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term FALL 2019 Note: Most proposals take 2 - 3 semesters

449 to be available for student to register routine addition of similar but alternative prerequisite coursework newly offered by the Department of 2. Rationale: This is a Mathematics & Statistics.. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If ye s, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.7 Routine Change in Prerequisite MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Routine Change in Prerequisite FROM ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) Name Name Introduction to Applied Statistics Introduction to Applied Statistics Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course STAT 21300 STAT 21300 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereq: MATH 12400 or MATH Requisites Requisites prereq: MATH 12500 or appropriate 12500 or or MATH 12550, score on placement exam. (specify which (specify which appropriate score on placement are pre, co, or or are pre, co, exam

450 both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description escription D Sampling, estimation, tests of Sampling, estimation, tests of hypotheses, including one- and two- hypotheses, including one- and two- sample tests, two- way way and three- sample tests, two- and three- tables for nominal and ordinal data, tables for nominal and ordinal data, linear regression, analysis of linear regression, analysis of way with variance through two- variance through two- way with interaction, appropriate statistical interaction, appropriate statistical software. software. iberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No L Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate C, F; C/NC A A - C, F; C/NC - Core Core ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement __X__ Common Core __X__ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is __X__ Math and Quantitative __X__ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted

451 along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take FALL 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register This is a routine addition of similar but alternative prerequisite coursework newly offered by the Department of 2. Rationale: Mathematics & Statistics.. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses aff ected. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. Routine Change in Prerequisite AV.5.8 MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT , CUNY Hunter College Routine Change in Prerequisite FROM ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) Name Name Data Analysis Using Statistical Data Analysis Using Statistical

452 Software Software Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course STAT 21400 STAT 21400 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereq: STAT 21300 or MATH 12400 Requisites Requisites prereq: STAT 21300 or MATH 12500 or MATH 12550 and or MATH 12500 and STAT 11300 with grade of C or (specify which (specify which STAT 11300 with grade of C or better in each course. are pre, co, or are pre, co, or better in each course. both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description Analysis of variance, simple and Analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression, nonparametric multiple regression, nonparametric statis tics, statistical model building statistics, statistical model building Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate A-F A-F Undergraduate A-F; Gr A-F; Graduate aduate - A - C, F; C/NC A C, F; C/NC Core Core __X__ Not Applicable __X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physi cal Science Core, please see Appendix ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity B for CUNY Diversity

453 ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Submission Issues Issues Forms. The ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take FALL 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: This is a routine addition of similar but alternative prerequisite coursework newly offered by the Department of Mathematics & Statistics. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If yes, list d epartment/program: [X] NO [ ] YES – Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.9 Routine Change in Prerequisite MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY

454 Routine Change in Prerequisite TO ( ( what will be changed) the chang es) FROM strikethrough underline Name Name Intermediate Topics in Statistics Intermediate Topics in Statistics Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course STAT 29500 STAT 29500 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Prereq STAT 21300 or STAT 11300 Prereq STAT 21300 or STAT 11300 Requisites Requisites and MATH 12500; additional or MATH 12500 MATH 12400 or and (specify which (specify which prereqs. depend on specific course eqs. MATH 12550; additional prer are pre, co, or are pre, co, or offered. depend on specific course offered. both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description Topics to be studied in any given Topics to be stu died in any given term will be announced prior to term will be announced prior to registration. May be repeated as registration. May be repeated as topics vary, but not more than twice. topics vary, but not more than twice. Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts X [ X ] Yes [ ] No Grading Grading Scale Scale A-F A-F Undergraduate Undergraduate A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate C, F; C/NC A - C, F; C/NC - A Core Core __X__ Not Applicable __X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is being ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative considered for Reasoning Reasoning

455 ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please see Appendix e in its ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experienc Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The be form must submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take FALL 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register This is a routine addition of similar but alternative prerequisite coursework newly offered by the Department of 2. Rationale: Mathematics & Statistics. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.10 Routine Change in Prerequisite

456 MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Routine Change in Prerequisite strikethrough what will be changed) FROM TO ( underline the changes) ( Name Name Advanced Biometrics Advanced Biometrics Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course STAT 35100 STAT 35100 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites MATH prereq: math at level of prereq: math at level of MATH (specify which (specify which MATH 12500, MATH 12550, 12400. 12500, STAT 11300, 21300 are pre, co, or are pre, co, or STAT 11300, 21300 both) both) Hours Hours 3 3 Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description A second course in statistics A second course in statistics covering quantitative methods covering quantitative methods applicable in the life sciences. Topics applicable in the life sciences. Topics include experimental design, life include experimental design, life table analysis, ethical issues, survival table analysis, ethical issues, analysis, logistic regression and Cox survival analysis, logistic regression and Cox regression. Linear algebra regression. Linear algebra recommended but not required. recommended but not required. X Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ ] No Grading Grading Scale Scale A-F A-F Undergraduate Undergraduate

457 - A F; Graduate F; Graduate - A A - C, F; C/NC - A C, F; C/NC Core Core __X__ Not Applicable __X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If ____ Scientific World ____ Scienti fic World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take FALL 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 2. Rationale: This is a routine addition of similar but alternative prerequisite coursework newly offered by the Department of Mathematics & Statistics. 3. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change l ikely to affect other Departments or Programs?

458 [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. b) Is this course cross c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. /corequisites AV.5.11 Substantive Change in pre- DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Hunter College, CUNY /corequisites Substantive Change in pre- ( strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline the changes) FROM Name Name Precalculus Technology Laboratory Precalculus Technology Laboratory Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Dig it Course MATH 12600 MATH 12600 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereq: grade of C or better in MATH Requisites Requisites MATH 12400, MATH 12500, prereq: 10100 or appropriate score on (specify which (specify which or MATH 12550 or appropriate score placement exam are pre, co, or are pre, co, or on placement exam or coreq prereq : MATH 12500 both) both) Hours Hours 2 2 Credits Credits 1 1 Description Description Students are introduced to Students are introduced to MATHEMATICA as a tool for MATHEMATICA as a tool for exploring qualitative features of exploring qualitative features of calculus - ing pre functions and solv functions and solving pre - calculus

459 problems: simplifying algebraic s: simplifying algebraic problem expressions, solving equations, expressions, solving equations, plotting functions and curves, finding plotting functions and curves, finding and approximating zeros and solving and approximating zeros and solving systems of equations. MATH 12600 systems of equations. MATH 12600 cannot be taken for credit after a cannot be taken for credit after a student has passed MATH 15000. student has passed MATH 15000. Students who have passed MATH Students who have passed MATH 15000 should register for MATH 15000 should register for MATH 15400 to satisfy the symbolic 15400 to satisfy the symbolic proficiency requirement. proficiency requirement. Liberal Arts Changes in LA status should be reflected in the course [ X] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts ] No ] Yes [ X [ learning Outcomes listed in the sample syllabus. Grading Grading Scale Scale A-F Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate C, F; C/NC A C, F; C/NC - - A Core Core __X__ Not Applicable __X__ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quant itative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for the Common _ ___ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression

460 Core, p lease ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix ____ U.S. Experience in its Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core ____ World Cultures and Global Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take FALL 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 3. Rationale: Students who have not had a course similar in content to Math 12500 are not adequately prepared, so we have raised it from a corequisite to a prerequisite. The prerequisites have been updated to reflect the new courses (MATH 12400 and 12550) that are equivalent to MATH 12500. 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program: Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A

461 For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.12 Sub /corequisites stantive Change in course title and pre- MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Substantive Change in course title and pre -/corequisites the changes) strikethrough what will be changed) TO ( underline FROM ( Name Name I Calculus with Analytic Geometry Calculus I Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course MATH 15000 MATH 15000 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Prereq: MATH 12550 with a grade of B– or better; or Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co prereqs of MATH 12400, MATH Requisites Requisites prereq: grade of C or better in MATH 12500, or MATH 12550, with a grade (specify which (specify which 12500 or appropriate score on of C or better, AND coreq MATH are pre, co, or are pre, co, or placement exam. 14000; or both) both) prereq of appropriate score on placement exam . Hours 4 4 Credits Credits 4 4 Description Description Limits, continuity, differentiation and Limits, continuity, differenti ation and integration of elementary functions integration of elementary functions and trigonometric functions, and trigonometric functions, applications. applications. Liberal Arts X ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ No [ X ] Yes [ ] Changes in LA

462 status should be reflected in the course learning Outcomes listed in the sample syllabus. Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate A - C, F; C/NC A - C, F; C/NC Core Core ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement __X__ Common Core __X__ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition (Note: If ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is _X___ Math and Quanti _X___ Math and Quantitative tative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science ease Core, pl ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Fall 2019 Term

463 Note: Most proposals take 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 3. Rationale: Calculus is no longer taught with Analytic Geometry, so it does not belong in the title. Also, The new prerequisites are desi gned to depth preparation without delaying studen ts in completing their BA. address the substantial DFW problem with greater in- 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If yes, list department/program: [X] NO [ ] YES – Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b) Is thi s course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. Substantive Change in pre- /corequisites AV.5.13 MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Substantive Change in pre- /corequisites FROM ( strikethrough TO ( underline the changes) what will be changed)

464 Name Name Calculus for Life and Calculus for Life and Social Sciences Social Sciences Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course MATH 15200 MATH 15200 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) MATH 12550 with a grade of Prereq: B– or better; or MATH 12500 with a grade of prereq: prereq: of MATH 12400, MATH Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co C or higher, or appropriate score on ade 12500, or MATH 12550, with a gr Requisites Requisites the CUNY math of C or better, and coreq MATH placement exam. (specify which (specify which 14000; Not open to students who have taken are pre, co, or are pre, co, or MATH 15000. or appropriate score on placement both) both) . exam Not open to students who have taken MATH 15000 Hours Hours 4 4 Credits Credits 4 4 Description Description Limits, continuity and the derivative. Limits, contin uity and the derivative. The power rule, product and quotient The power rule, product and quotient rules, the chain rule, and implicit rules, the chain rule, and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem and the Intermediate Value Theorem and the Intermediate Value Theorem. curve sketching and Theorem. curve sketching and optimization, and linear optimization, and linear approximation. Riemann integral and approximation. Riemann integral and the Fundamental Theorem of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Various applications to Calculus. Various applications to economics, life sciences, and economics, life sciences, and physical sciences. Students will not physical sciences. Students will not be allowed to obtain credit for both be allowed to obtain credit for both MATH 15200 and MATH 15000. MATH 15200 and MATH 15000. Students planning on taking more Students planning on taking more than one semester of calculus should than one semester of calculus should

465 take MATH 15000 instead. take MATH 15000 instead. Liberal Arts Changes in LA status should be reflected in the course X [ Liberal Arts ] Yes [ ] No ] Yes [ ] No [ X learning Outcomes listed in the sample syllabus. Grading Grading Scale Scale A-F Undergraduate A-F Undergraduate A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate C/NC A - C, F; C/NC C, F; - A Core Core ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement __X__ Common Core _X___ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is _X___ Math and Quantitative _X___ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creative Expression the Common ____ Life and ____ Life and Physical Science Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society ms. The For form must be submitted

466 along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take Fall 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 3. Rationale: depth preparation without delaying The new prerequisites are designed to address the substantial DFW problem with greater in- students in completing their BA. 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? If y es, list department/program: [X] NO [ ] YES – Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [ ] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult. AV.5.14 Change in Course title and prerequisite

467 MATHEMATICS & STATISTICS DEPARTMENT Hunter College, CUNY Change in Course title and prerequisite strikethrough what will be changed) FROM ( underline the changes) ( TO Name Name 3 Calculus Calculus 3 with Analytic Geometry Prefix & Five Prefix & Five Digit Course Digit Course MATH 25000 MATH 25000 Number Number (XXXXX) (XXXXX) Pre and/or Co Pre and/or Co Requisites Requisites and Math prereq: MATH 15500 (specify which (specify which prereq: MATH 15500 15600 are pre, co, or are pre, co, or both) both) Hours Hours 4 4 Credits Credits 4 4 Description Description Vector geometry, dot and cross Vector geometry, dot and cross products, partial derivatives, products, partial derivatives, matrices, determinant s, Jacobians, matrices, determinants, Jacobians, multiple integration. multiple integration. X Liberal Arts ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes [ ] No [ Grading Grading Scale Scale Undergraduate Undergraduate A-F A-F A-F; Graduate A-F; Graduate C, F; C/NC - A A - C, F; C/NC

468 Core Core ____ Not Applicable ____ Not Applicable Requirement Requirement ____ Common Core ____ Common Core ____ English Composition ____ English Composition If (Note: ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World course is ____ Math and Quantitative ____ Math and Quantitative being Reasoning Reasoning considered for ____ Creative Expression ____ Creati ve Expression the Common ____ Life and Physical Science ____ Life and Physical Science Core, please ____ U.S. Experience in its ____ U.S. Experience in its see Appendix Diversity Diversity B for CUNY ____ World Cultures and Global ____ World Cultures and Global Common Core Issues Issues Submission ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society Forms. The form must be submitted along with the proposal and syllabus.) Effective Term Note: Most proposals take FALL 2019 2-3 semesters to be available for student to register 3. Rationale: Calculus is no longer taught with Analytic Geometry, so it does not belong in the title. Also, students need a solid foundation with Epsilon -Delta Proofs, which they can only get in Math 15600. 4. Consultation Statement: a) Is the proposed change likely to affect other Departments or Programs? [X] NO [ ] YES – If yes, list department/program:

469 Has the Department/Program been consulted? [ ] NO [ ] YES [X] N/A b) Is this course cross -listed? If so, please list all courses affected. c) Does this affect the Library? [X] NO [ ] YES Have you consulted the subject liaison? [ ] NO [ ] YES [ ] N/A For new courses or programs, please consult.

470 John Jay College – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS Section AII: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements AII.1 Additions to the General Education Program English Composition tative Reasoning Mathematics and Quanti Life and Physical Sciences World Cultures & Global Issues U.S. Experience in Diversity Creative Expression Individual and Society CSL 250 Intimate Relationships: Love, Sex & Attachment Scientific World PHI 204 Symbolic Logic College Option Justice Core I: Justice and the Individual (100 - Level) Justice Core II: Struggle for Justice & Equality in the U.S. (300 Level) - Justice Core II: Justice in Global Perspective (300 - Level) Learning from the Past Communications

471 Sectio n AIII: Changes in Degree Programs The following revisions are proposed for the BA in Gender Studies AIII.1 BA in Gender Studies Program: 32948, 35821 (MHC) Program Code: Effective: Fall 2018 : The Gender Studies Program added a new research methods course to the major, GEN 350 (CUR) in Spring 2017. Description of the changes At that time, it became one option for Part Three. Research Methods along with SSC 325 and HJS 315. We are now removing the alternative courses so Gender Studies majors will be required to complete their methods requirement with the course specifically tailored to their needs and discipline. From To Cr edit s Course Description Cr s edit Course Description GENDER STUDIES, BS GENDER STUDIES, BS Subtotal: 12 cr. etical Foundations PART ONE. Historical and Theor P ART ONE . Historical and Theoretical Foundations Subtotal: 12 cr. Required Required GEN 101 Introduction to Gender Studies Introduction to Gender Studies GEN 101 or or ISP 145 Why Gender Matters GEN 205 Gender and Justice ISP 145 Why Gender Matters GEN 255/ Biology of Gender & Sexuality BIO 255 GEN 205 Gender and Justice GEN 36 GEN 255 4/HIS 364 History of Gender and Sexuality: Prehistory Biology of Gender & Sexuality to 1650 GEN 364/HI S 364 History of Gender and Sexuality: Prehistory to 1650 Part Two. Critical Methods Part Two. Critical Methods Subtotal: 3 Subtotal: 3 Required Required eories of Gender and Sexuality Th GEN 333/PHI 333 GEN 333/PHI 333 Th eories of Gender and Sexuality Part Three. Research Methods Subtotal: 3 Part Three. Research Methods Subtotal: 3 Required Choose one Feminist and Crit GEN 350 ical Methodologies GEN 350 Feminist and Crit ical Methodologies

472 HJS 315 Research Methods in Humanities and Justice SSC 325 Research Methods in Criminology and Sociology Part Four. Senior Seminar Subtotal: 3 cr. Required Subtotal: 3 cr. GEN 401 Part Four. Senior Seminar Senior Seminar in Gender Studies Required GEN 401 Senior Seminar in Gender Studies Part Five. Gender Studies Area Electives Subtotal: 15 cr. - designated Part Five. Gender Studies Area Electives Students select five electives from Gender Studies Subtotal: 15 cr. courses and may substitute a semester -long internship in a -designated courses -related field or an approved Independent Study with a gender Students select five electives from Gender Studies -long internship in a gender -related field GS faculty (GEN 389 or GEN 489) for one elective. To ensure and may substitute a semester or an approved Independent Study with a GS faculty (GEN 389 or GEN that students are exposed to significant and significantly 489) for one elective. To ensure that students are exposed to different approaches to thinking about gender and sexuality, significant and significantly different approaches to thinking about students must take at least two courses in each of the gender and sexuality, stude nts must take at least two courses in each following two categories: of the following two categories: Category A. Diversities and Cultural Representations of Genders and Sexualities Category A. Diversities and Cultural Representations of Genders and Sexualities –dominant U.S. constructions of These courses focus on non –dominant U.S. constructions of gender gender and sexuality internationally and among diverse These courses focus on non communities and cultures in the United States. Some of these and sexuality internationally and among diverse communities and cultures in the United States. Some of these courses focus on the courses focus on the study of art, media, literature, cultural produ ction both as sites of theoretical and political work about study of art, media, literature, cultural production both as sites of gender and sexuality and as sources of the construction and theoretical and political work about gender and sexuality and as representation of gendered/sexed identities. ion and representation of gendered/sexed sources of the construct identities. Choose at least two Choose at least two AFR 248 Men: Masculinities in the United States ANT 210/PSY 210/SOC AFR 248 Men: Masc ulinities in the United States 210 Sex and Culture ART 222 Body Politics Sex and Culture SY 210/SOC 210 ANT 210/P ART 224/AFR 224 African American Women in Art Body Politics ART 222 ART 224/AFR 224 African American Wo men in Art COR 320 Race, Class and Gender in a Correctional Context DRA 243 Black Female Sexuality in Film ender in a Correctional Context nd G Race, Class a COR 320 DRA 245 Women in Theatre DRA 243 Black Female Sexuality in Film Women in Theatre DRA 245 GEN 356/HIS 356 Sexuality, Gender, and Cul ture in Muslim

473 GEN 356/HIS 356 Sexuality, Gender, and Culture in Muslim Societies Societies GEN 380 GEN 380 Selected Topics in Gender Studies Selected Topics in Gender Studies HIS 265/LLS 265 Class, Race and Family in Latin American tin American History Class, Race and Family in La HIS 265/LLS 265 HIS 270 Marriage in Medieval Europe History HIS 270 Marriage in Medieval Europe HIS 323 History of Ly nching and Collective Violence HIS 375 Female Felons in the Premodern World (was Female Felons HIS 323 History of Lynching and Collective Violence HIS 375 Female Felons in the Prem odern World (was Female in Premodern Europe & Americas) Felons in Premodern Europe & Americas) ISP 334 Sex, Gender and Justice in Global Perspective Gender and Identity in Literary Traditions ISP 334 Sex, Gender and Justice in Global Perspective LIT 316 LIT 316 LLS 255 Gender and Identity in Literary Traditions Latin American Woman in Global Society LLS 255 Latin American Woman in Global Society Sociology of Sexualities C 243 SO SOC 243 Sociology of Sexualities -Political and Economic Systems and Gender and Category B. Socio Ca Sexuality Political and Economic Systems and tegory B. Socio- Gender and Sexuality of gender and sexuality within These courses address the construction the legal, economic and social structures of our society. They look at These courses address the construction of gender and the very pragmatic ways that societies both reinforce and undermine sexuality within the legal, economic and social structures of our society. They look at the very pragmatic ways that gender and sexuality through their policies and social practices. Courses that satisfy this requirement will investigate historical or societies bot h reinforce and undermine gender and sexuality through their policies and social practices. Courses that satisfy contemporary gender and sexuality within law, sociology, economics, this requirement will investigate historical or contemporary government, criminology and psychology. gender and sexuality within law, sociology, economics, psychology. Choose at least two government, criminology and RJ 420/SOC 420 Women and Crime C Gender & Work Life (was Counseling in CSL 260 Choose at least two Gender & Work Life) The Political Economy of Gender ECO 327 CRJ 420/SOC 420 Women and Crime POL 237 Women and Politics CSL 260 Gender & Work Life (was Counseling in Gender & Work Life) POL 318 Law & Politics of Sexual Orientation ECO 327 The Political Economy of Gender POL 319 Gender and Law PSC 235 Women in Policing POL 237 Women and Politics POL 318 Law & Politics of Sexual Orientation PSY 333 Psychology of Gender Gender and Law POL 319 SOC 215 Social Control and Gender: Women in American Society SOC 333 PSC 235 Women in Policing International Criminal Justice Gender Issues in PSY 333 Psychology of Gender Students should consult with the Gender Studies Major Coordinator to SOC 215 Social Control and Gender: Women in American ensure adequate coverage. Society

474 TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 36 SOC 333 Gender Issues in International Criminal Justice Students should consult with the Gender Studies Major r to ensure adequate coverage. Coordinato TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 36 Rationale: This program change was included in the governance process when the new methods course for gender studies was approved. This item is being submitted now to update Degreeworks for students who enter the major beginning in Fall 2018. 2 The following revisions are proposed for the BS in Criminal Justice (Institutional Theory and Practice) AIII. Program: BS in Criminal Justice (Institutional Theory and Practice) MHC), 32563 (KBCC), 32568 (LGCC), 33085 (BMCC), 32247 (HOCC), 32344 (QBCC), 32357 (BXCC) Program Codes: 02536, 35817 ( Spring 2019 Effective: We are submitted a refreshed list of courses for Part Three. Distribution Areas to make all versions of the major in Description of the changes: Degreeworks include all possible courses that can be used to satisfy these areas. This list was approved by John Jay’s College Council in April 2017. From To ption Crs Course Description Crs Course Descri Criminal Justice (Institutional Theory and Practice), BS Criminal Justice (Institutional Theory and Practice), BS FOUNDATIONAL COURSES Subtotal: 6 cr. FOUNDATIONAL COURSES Subtotal: 6 cr. Required Required POL 101 American Government and Politics POL 101 American Government and Politics SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology ogy SOC 101 Introduction to Sociol Advisor recommendation: Students are strongly urged to Advisor recommendation: Students are strongly urged to complete complete these prerequisite courses during their first year in these prerequisite courses during their first year in the College. SOC the College. SOC 101 can fulfill the Flexible Core: Individual 101 can fulfill the Flexible Core: Individual and Society and POL 101 can fulfill the Flexible Core: U.S. Experience in its Diversity areas of the and Society and POL 101 can fulfill the Flexible Core: U.S. College’s General Education requirements. Experience in its Diversity areas of the College’s General

475 ducation requirements. E PART ONE. CORE REQUIREMENTS Subtotal: 24 cr. Subtotal: 24 cr. PART ONE. CORE REQUIREMENTS Required Required CJBS 101 Introduction to the American Criminal Justice System CJBS 101 Introduction to the American Criminal Justice or Criminal Justice CJBS 250 Research Methods and Statistics f System CJBS 300 Criminal Justice: Theory in Practice CJBS 415 Capstone Seminar for BS in Criminal Justice CJBS 250 Research Methods and Statistics for Criminal Justice COR 101 Introduction to Corrections CJBS 300 Criminal Justice: Theory in Practi LAW 203 Constitutional Law ce PSC 101 Introduction to Police Studies CJBS 415 Capstone Seminar for BS in Criminal Justice COR 101 Introduction to Corrections SOC 203 Criminology LAW 203 Constitutional Law PSC 101 Introduction to Police Studies RSITY Subtotal: 3 cr. PART TWO. DIVE Select One SOC 203 Criminology COR 320 Race, Class and Gender in a Correctional Context CRJ 420/SOC 420 Women and Crime PART TWO. DIVERSITY Subtotal: 3 cr. Select O LAW 313/POL 313 The Law and Politics of Race Relations ne Law, Affirmative Action and COR 320 Race, Class and Gender in a Correctional Context LAW 340 Employment Discrimination Police Organization CRJ 420/SOC 420 Women and Crime PSC 202 Police and Diversity LAW 313/POL 313 The Law and Politics of Race Relations LAW 340 Employment Discrimination Law, Affirmative Action PSC 235 Women in Policing and Police Organization PSC 202 Police and Diversit PART THREE. DISTRIBUTION AREAS Subtotal: 9 cr. y -C. PSC 235 Women in Policing Select three courses, one from each category A e courses MUST be at the 300- Please note: at least 2 of th level or above and must come from different categories. PART THREE. DISTRIBUTION AREAS Subtotal: 9 cr. Select three courses, one from each category A -C. Category A. Police Please note: at least 2 of the courses MUST be at the 300 - Select One level or above and must come from different categories. CJBS 377 Internship for Criminal Justice, Law and Policing CRJ 255 Computer Applications in Criminal Justice Cate gory A. Police CRJ 425 Seminar on Major Works Select One in Criminal Justice PSC 107 Introduction to Criminal Investigations CJBS 377 Internship for Criminal Justice, Law and Policing CRJ 255 Computer Applications in Criminal Justice PSC 201 Police Organization and Administration PSC 227 Police Training Programs: Goals, Content and Administration CRJ 321/PHI 321 Police Ethics PSC 300 Police Management and Administration in the U.S. CRJ 425 Seminar on Major Works in Criminal Justice PSC 321 Police Ethics PSC 107 Introduction to Criminal Invest igations

476 PSC 405 Organized Crime in America PSC 201 Police Organization and Administration PSC 204 The Patrol Function PSC 415 Seminar on Terrorism PSC 216 Crime Mapping Category B. Law and Courts PSC 227 Police Training Programs: Goals, Content and Select one Administration PSC/PSY 271 Psychological Foundations of Police Work CJBS 377 Internship for Criminal Justice, Law and Policing Administration in the U.S. PSC 300 Police Management and CRJ 322/PHI 322 Judicial and Correctional Ethics PSC 306 Police Work with Juveniles LAW 202 Law and Evidence PSC 309 Comparative Police Sytems LAW 206 The American Judiciary PSC 324 Police Use of Force: Legal, Theoretical and LAW 209 Criminal Law Practical Implications LAW 212 The Criminal Process and Criminal Procedure Law PSC 340 Planning for Police Operations and Management LAW 259/POL 259 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems PSC 380 Selected Topics in Pol icing LAW 301 Jurisprudence PSC 385 Faculty mentored Research Experience in Police LAW 310/PHI 310 Ethics and Law Science LAW 401 Problems of Constitutional Development PSC 405 Organized Crime in America LAW 420 /PAD 420 Contemporary Administration and the Judiciary PSC 415 Seminar on Terrorism Category C. Corrections Category B. Law and Courts Select one Select one COR 201 The Law and Institutional Treatment COR 202 The Administration of Correctional Programs for Juveniles CJBS 377 Internship for Criminal Justice, Law and Policing CRJ 322/PHI 322 Judicial COR 230/PSC 230 Sex Offenders in the Criminal Justice S and Correctional Ethics ystem EJS 240 Environmental Crime (was SUS 240) COR 282 Principles of Correctional Operations LAW 202 Law and Evidence COR 303 Comparative Correction Systems LAW 204 Criminal Law of New York COR 310 Fieldwork in Corrections COR 320 Race, Class and Gender in a Correctional Context LAW 206 The American Judiciary COR 401 Evaluating Correctional Methods and Programs LAW 209 Criminal Law -based Corrections Programs of Community COR 402 Administration LAW 212 The Criminal Process and Criminal Procedure Law act of Mass Media on the LAW 213/DRA 213 The Imp COR 415 Major Works in Corrections Administration of Justice COR 430 Senior Seminar in Correctional Studies CRJ 322/PHI 322 Judicial and Correctional Ethics LAW 259/POL 259 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems LAW 301 Jurisprudence Note: courses can only be used to satisfy one area in the major. LAW 310/PHI 310 Ethics and Law LAW 320 Seminar in the Law of Search and Seizure d Topics in Criminal Justice can be applied to CBJS 385 Selecte LAW 370/PSY 370 Psychology and the Law -C if topic is appropriate. Categories A LAW 380 Sel ected Topics in Law To LAW 401 Problems of Constitutional Development tal Credits for Major: 42

477 General Education: 42 LAW 420/PAD 420 Contemporary Administration and the Electives: 36 Judiciary Total Credits for BS Degree: 12 0 Category C. Corrections Select one COR 201 The Law and Institutional Treatment rams for COR 202 The Administration of Correctional Prog Juveniles COR 230/PSC 230 Sex Offenders in the Criminal Justice System COR 250 Rehabilitation of the Offender COR 282 Principles of Correctional Operations COR 303 Comparative Correction Systems COR 310 Fieldwork in Corrections COR 320 Race, Class and Gender in a Correctional Context COR 380 Selected Topics in Corrections COR 401 Evaluating Correctional Methods and Programs COR 402 Administration of Community -based Corrections Programs COR 415 Major Works in Corrections rrectional Studies COR 430 Senior Seminar in Co CRJ 322/PHI 322 Judicial and Correctional Ethics Note: courses can only be used to satisfy one area in the major. CBJS 385 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice can be applied -C if topic is appropriate. to Categories A To tal Credits for Major: 42 General Education: 42 Electives: 36 Total Credits for BS Degree: 120 Rationale : We offer all of these courses regularly and students take them. When they are not in Degreeworks, it le ads to many course substitutions. Adding all courses makes student progress in the major more seamless. Ensuring that the CUNY Justice Academy versions of the major include all elective choices also eliminates bottlenecks to their graduation.

478 IV: New Courses Section A AIV.1 Department(s) Counseling and Human Services Career x ] Undergraduate [ Academic Level x ] Regular [ Subject Area Human Services; Community Justice Course Number CSL 250 Course Title Intimate Relationships: Love, Sex and A ttachment Short Title Intimate Relationships Catalogue Description This course explores the individual, couple, and contextual factors that affect the development, maintenance, and decline of intimate relationships in social and cultural context. Stude nts will be introduced to the concepts, principles and trends in intimate relationship scholarship and apply these to relationships they have observed, read about, and personally experienced. By examining scholarly articles and non- fiction texts in personal and socio- cultural terms, students will become more critical, analytical and reflective when it comes to intriguing topics like attraction, love, and effective communication. The course will also include in class discussions for students to reflect on their own behavior in intimate relationships. Prerequisites ENG 101 Credits 3 Contact Hours 3 Liberal Arts [x ] Yes Course Attribute General Education _X__ Flexible Component ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Creative Expression __X_ Individual and Society _____Scientific World : There is increased recognition of a distinct developmental stage for those between late adolescenc e and young adulthood, when many Rationale young people attend college. During this phase, individuals are discovering themselves, trying out different careers, forming intimate relationships,

479 and slowly taking on more adult responsibilities. These young adults are also conceptualizing who they are and what their life goals will be, as well as forming expectations about relationship roles and responsibilities. One primary task during this developmental stage is preparation for long- term committed relationships, as s tudents move from dependency to autonomy and from bonds shared with primary care givers to bonds shared est predictors of with romantic partners. In fact, research suggests that the quality of adolescent romantic relationships is one of the strong adolescent well -esteem, depression, and suicide attempts and completions. In some instances, college students’ -being indicators, including self dating relationships are associated with positive developmental outcomes such as desirable influences on academic perfor mance, development of -risk youth. In other instances, however, they are interpersonal skills, support of identity formation and future aspirations, and resilience in at associated with negative outcomes, including adolescent depression, dating partner abus e, unintended pregnancies, and sexually transmitted diseases. Relationships make us happy, and they can be part of what we need to feel successful. Colleges and universities a im at developing successful adults, thus coursework focused on relationships has clear potential benefits and is compatible with the academic mission. Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses AV: 1 Changes to be offered in the Department of Philosophy TO FROM Departments Departments N/C Philosophy PHI 204 Symbolic Logic PHI 204 Logic Course Course Symbolic Logic Short title Logic Prerequisite Prerequisite N/C ENG 101 3 Hours 3 Hours 3 Credits 3 Credits l Logic is the study of the necessary inferentia An exposition of formal and informal methods Description Description structure of language. As such, it can be used of evaluating reasoning in arguments and for translating natural language sentences into ne systems or models of texts. We will exami symbols that yield computationally derivable deductive reasoning, problems of translation conclusions, equivalences and relations of from natural to formal languages, reasoning coherence and contrariety. It is also the basis and rhetoric in complex arguments and the such as those used in for artificial language foundations of the logic of investigation. computer programming, and in solving puzzles and games such as Sudoku and chess. This course will first cover propositional logic, and then introduce the quantified predicate logic, which combines the

480 propositional logic with basic e lements of set theory. Flexible Core: Scientific World Requirement Requirement None Designation Designation [ X ] Yes Liberal Arts Liberal Arts [ X ] Yes Course Attribute Course Attribute General Education ral Education Gene _X__ Flexible __ Not Applicable Component Component __X ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Individual and Society _X__ Scientific World Effective Effective Fall 2019 tionale : This course has been approved by the CUNY Faculty Review Committee to be part of the Flexible Core: Scientific World category in Ra the Gen Ed Program. The title and description have been refreshed to emphasize symbolic logic.

481 Kingsborough Community College – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report ERRATA FOR OCTOBER 2018 CHANCELLOR'S UNIVERSITY REPORT PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS AIV. NEW COURSES Department of English ata is in Item AIV. 2.1: ENG , Introduction to Creative 5400 1. Err Writing Prerequisite: ENG 1200 Corequisite: None Pre/Co -requisite: None Credits: 3 Equated Credits: N/A Hours: 3 Course Description to the writing of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, in which students explore literary form : Introduction and the writing process. Students will write, revise, and share their work with other members of the class, and read and analyze selected works by contemporary aut hors. Effective: FALL 2019 Error in course number assigned, change to ENG 5900 - Introduction to Creative Writing

482 LaGuardia Community College – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS P art A: demic Affa irs Aca AI: Spe cial Actions: Informational Items Section AI.1 Section AII: Changes in G eneric Degree Requir ements Section s in Degr ee Progr am: AIII: Change AIII.1 Education and Language Acquisition Progr am: Liberal Arts: Secondary Education – Teacher Education Transfer Option HEGIS Cod e: 01066 Re Revision of Program Core vision: Effecti ve: Fall 2019 e: Rational Develop ment of First Year Seminar for Education Liberal Arts: Secondary Education Teacher Teacher – – Liberal Arts: Secondary Education Educatio n Transfer Option Education Transfer Option Proposed Current Pathways Common Core Pathways Common Core A. Required Core: 12 Credits A. Required Core: 12 Credits English: 6 credits English: 6 credits ENG101 English Composition I or ENG101 English Composition I or ENA101 or ENC101 (depending on placement scores) ENA101 or ENC101 (depending on placement scores) ENG102 Writing through Literature ENG102 Writing through Literature Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning: 3 credits Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoni ng: 3 credits : Select one course from the following Select one course from the following : MAT107: Mathematics and the Modern World MAT107: Mathematics and the Modern World MAT115 College Algebra and Trigonometry MAT115 College Algebra and Trigonometry MAT117 Algebra and Trigono metry (depending on MAT117 Algebra and Trigonometry (depending on 1

483 placement scores) placement scores) MAT119 Statistics with Elementary Algebra (depending MAT119 Statistics with Elementary Algebra (depending on placement scores) on placement scores) MAT120 Elementary Statistics MAT120 Elementary Statistics Life & Physical Sciences: 3 credits Life & Physical Sciences: 3 credits Select one course from the following : Select one course from the following : SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences SCB101 Topics in Biological Science s SCB206 Introduction to Neuroscience SCB206 Introduction to Neuroscience SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC102 Chemistry of Photography SCC102 Chemistry of Photography SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP140 Topics in Astronomy SCP140 Topics in Astronomy B. Flexible Core: 18 Credits B. Flexible Core: 18 Credits Select one course from each of the five flexible core Select one course from each of the five f lexible core categories and one additional course from any flexible categories and one additional course from any flexible . . core category core category World Cultures and Global Issues World Cultures and Global Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual Individual Society Scientific World Society Scientific World To complete the degree requirements from the To complete the degree requirements from the Flexible xible Core, students are advised to select courses Core, students are advised to select courses from the Fle ted on the program from the recommended course selections listed on the recommended course selections lis . website . program website Program Core: 30 Credits Program Core: 30 Credits Liberal Arts: 3 Credits Education Core: 9 Credits LIF101 First Year Seminar for Liberal Arts 3 3 EDF101 First Year Seminar for Education ELE204 Language and Literacy in Secondary Education Education Core: 6 C redits 3 ELE204 Language and Literacy in Secondary ELN122 Foundations of American Education: Education 3 Grades 7 -12 3 ELN122 Foundations of American Education: -12 3 Grades 7 Education & Language Acquisition: 9 Credits Education & Language Acquisition: 9 Credits ELL101 Introduction to Language 3 ELL101 Introduction to Language 3 Two Modern L anguage Courses in the same Two Modern Language Courses in the same Language 6 Language 6 2

484 Social Science: 3 Credits Social Science: 3 Credits SSY105 Learning and Education 3 SSY105 Learning and Education 3 Choose One of the following concentrations: Choose One of the following concentrations: Adolescent Education English: 9 credits Adolescent Education English: 9 credits Select two of the following: Select two of the following: ENG290 British Literature 1 3 ENG290 British Literature 1 3 ENG291 Briti ENG291 British Literature 2 3 sh Literature 2 3 ENG292 American Literature 1 3 ENG292 American Literature 1 3 an Literature 2 3 ENG293 Americ ENG293 American Literature 2 3 Select one of the following: Select one of the following: ENG204 Asian American Literature 3 ENG204 Asian American Literature 3 ENG225 Afro -American Literature 3 -American Literature 3 ENG225 Afro ENG247 The Woman Writer 3 ENG247 The Woman Writer 3 ENG248 Latino/Lat ina Writing in the US 3 ENG248 Latino/Latina Writing in the US 3 ENG 266 Shakespeare 3 ENG 266 Shakespeare 3 ENG270 Introduction to Poetry 3 ENG270 Introduction to Poetry 3 ENG 280 Children’s Literature 3 ENG 280 Children’s Literature 3 Adolescent Education Math: 9 credits Adolescent Education Math: 9 credits Unre Unrestrictive elective 1 strictive elective 1 Select two of the following: Select two of the following: MAT 201 Calculus 1 4 MAT 201 Calculus 1 4 MAT 202 Calculus 2 4 MAT 202 Calculus 2 4 MAT 230 Introduction to Discrete MAT 230 Introduction to Discrete Mathematical Structures 4 Mathematical Structures 4 Adolescent Education Science: 9 credits Adolescent Education Science: 9 credits 1 Unrestrictive elective Unrestrictive elective 1 Select two of the following: Select two of the following: 4 SCB201 General Biology 1 4 SCB201 General Biology 1 SCB201 General Biology 2 4 SCB201 General Biology 2 4 SCC201 General Chemistry 1 SCC201 General Chemistry 1 4 4 Adolescent Education Social Science: 9 credits Adolescent Education Social Science: 9 credits Select three of the following: Select three of the following: 3

485 SSH101 Themes in American History I 3 SSH101 Themes in American History I 3 SSH102 Themes in American History II 3 SSH102 Themes in American History II 3 SSH103 Western Civilization fr om Ancient SSH103 Western Civilization from Ancient Times to the Renaissance 3 Times to the Renaissance 3 SSH104 Western Civilization from the Renaissance the Renaissance SSH104 Western Civilization from to Modern Times 3 to Modern Times 3 SSH105 World History from Ancient Times to 1500 3 SSH105 World History from Ancient Times to 1500 3 SSH106 World History from 1500 to the present 3 SSH106 World History from 1500 to the present 3 SSA101 Cultural Anthropology 3 3 SSA101 Cultural Anthropology SSA106 Anthropology of Latin America 3 SSA106 Anthropology of Latin America 3 SSS100 Introduction to Sociology American Society 3 SSS100 Introduction to Sociology American Society 3 SSS280 Sociology of the Family 3 SSS280 Sociol ogy of the Family 3 SSP101 US Power and Politics 3 SSP101 US Power and Politics 3 Adolescent Education Spanish: 9 credits Adolescent Education Spanish: 9 credits ELS204 Latin American Civilizations 3 ELS204 Latin American Civilizations 3 ELS210 Advanced Spanish Composit ELS210 Advanced Spanish Composition 3 ion 3 Select one of the following: Select one of the following: ELS200 Latin American Literature I 3 ELS200 Latin American Literature I 3 ELS201 Latin American Literature II 3 ELS201 Latin American Literature II 3 TOTAL: 60 Credits TOTAL: 60 Credits AIII.2 Education and Language Acquisition am: Education Associate: The Bilingual Child Progr HEGIS Cod e: 01066 Re vision: Revision of Program Core Effecti ve: Fall 2019 Development of First Year Seminar for Education e: Rational Education Associate: The Bilingual Child Education Associate: The Bilingual Child Proposed Current Pathways Common Core Pathways Common Core A. Required Core: 12 Credits A. Required Core: 12 Credits English: 6 credits English: 6 credits ENG101 English Composition I or ENG101 English Composition I or ENA101 or ENC101 (depending on placement scores) ENA101 or ENC101 (depending on placemen t scores) 4

486 ENG102 Writing through Literature ENG102 Writing through Literature Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning: 3 credits Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning: 3 credits : : Select one course from the following Select one course from the following MAT107: Mathematics and the Modern World MAT107: Mathematics and the Modern World MAT115 College Algebra and Trigonometry MAT115 College Algebra and Trigonometry MAT117 Algebra and Trigonometry (depending on MAT117 Algebra and Trigonometry (depen ding on placement scores) placement scores) MAT119 Statistics with Elementary Algebra MAT119 Statistics with Elementary Algebra (depending (depending on placement scores) on placement scores) Elementary Statistics MAT120 MAT120 Elementary Statistics Life & Physical Sciences: 3 credits Life & Physical Sciences: 3 credits : Select one course from the following : Select one course from the following SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences SCB206 Introduction to Neuroscience SCB206 In troduction to Neuroscience SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC102 Chemistry of Photography SCC102 Chemistry of Photography SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP140 Topics in Astronomy SCP140 Topics in Astronomy B. Flexible Core: 18 Credits B. Flexible Core: 18 Credits Select one course from each of the five flexible core Select one course from each of the five flexible core categories and one additional course from any flexible categories and one additional course from any flexible core category . . core category World Cultures and Global Issues World Cultures and Global Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual Individual Society Scientific World Society Scientific World To complete the degree requirements from the To complete the degree requirements from the Flexible Core, students are advised to select courses from the Flexible Core, students are advised to select courses recommended course selections listed on the program from the recommended course selections listed on the program website . . website Program Core: 30 Credits Program Core: 30 Credits Liberal Arts: 3 Credits Education Core: 12 Credits LIF101 First Year Seminar for Liberal Arts 3 3 EDF101 First Year Seminar for Education ELE110 Arts in Education 3 ELE203 Language and Literacy in Childhood Education Education Core: 9 Credits 3 ELE11 0 Arts in Education 3 ELE203 Language and Literacy in Childhood ELN123 Foundations of Bilingual Education 3 5

487 Education 3 ELN123 Foundations of Bilingual Education 3 n & Language Acquisition: 12 Credits Educatio Education & Language Acquisition: 12 Credits ELL101 Introduction to Language 3 ELL101 Introduction to Language 3 ELL220 Sociolinguistics 3 ELL220 Sociolinguistics 3 ELS210 Advanced Spanish Composition 3 ELS210 Advanced Spanish Composition 3 ELS204 Latin American Ci vilization 3 ELS204 Latin American Civilization 3 Social Science: 9 Credits Social Science: 9 Credits SSH106 World History from 1500 to Present 3 SSH106 World History from 1500 to Present 3 SSY105 Learning and Education 3 SSY105 Learning and Education 3 TOTAL: 60 Credits TOTAL: 60 Credits AIII.3 Education and Language Acquisition Progr am: Liberal Arts: Childhood Education Option HEGIS e: 01066 Cod Re vision: Revision of Program Core Fall 2019 Effecti ve: Rational e: Develo pment of First Year Seminar for Education Liberal Arts: Childhood Education Option Liberal Arts: Childhood Education Option Current Proposed Pathways Comm on Core Pathways Common Core A. Required Core: 12 Credits A. Required Core: 12 Credits English: 6 credits English: 6 credits ENG101 English Composition I or ENG101 English Composition I or ENA101 or ENC101 (depending on placement scores) ENA101 or ENC101 (depending on placement scores) Writing through Literature ENG102 Writing through Literature ENG102 Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning: 3 credits Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning: 3 credits Select one course from the following : : Select one course from the following MAT107: Mathematics and the Modern World MAT107: Mathematics and the Modern World MAT115 College Algebra and Trigonometry MAT115 College Algebra and Trigonometry MAT117 Algebra and Trigonometry (depending on placement MAT117 Algebra and Trigonometry (depending on placemen t scores) scores) MAT119 Statistics with Elementary Algebra (depending on MAT119 Statistics with Elementary Algebra (depending on placement scores) placement scores) 6

488 tistics MAT120 Elementary Sta MAT120 Elementary Statistics Life & Physical Sciences: 3 credits Life & Physical Sciences: 3 credits Select one course from the following : : Select one course from the following SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences uroscience SCB206 Introduction to Ne SCB206 Introduction to Neuroscience SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC102 Chemistry of Photography SCC102 Chemistry of Photography SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP105 L ife in the Universe SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP140 Topics in Astronomy SCP140 Topics in Astronomy B. Flexible Core: 18 Credits B. Flexible Core: 18 Credits Select one course from each of the five flexible core categories and Select one course from each of the five flexible core categories and . one additional course from any flexible core category one additional course from any flexible core category . World Cultures and Global Issues World Cultures and Global Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Society & Individual Individual & Society Scientific World Scientific World To complete the degree requirements from the Flexible Core, To complete the degree requirements from the Flexible Core, students are advised to select courses from the recommended students are advised to select courses from the recommended . course selections listed on the program website course selections listed on the program website . Program Core: 30 Credits ore: 30 Credits Program C Liberal Arts: 3 Credits LIF101 First Year Seminar for Liberal Arts 3 Education & Language Acquisition: 9 Credits Education & Language Acquisition: 12 Credits ELE110 Arts in Education 3 EDF101 First Year Seminar for Education 3 ELE203 Language and Literacy in Childhood Education 3 ELE110 Arts in Education 3 ELN120 Foundations of American Education 3 ELE203 Language and Literacy in Childhood Education 3 ELN120 Foundations of American Education 3 Humanities: 3 Credits Hum anities: 3 Credits HUC116 Survey of Speech, Language and Hearing Disorders 3 HUC116 Survey of Speech, Language and Hearing Disorders 3 Social Science: 9 Credits Social Science: 9 Credits SSH101 Themes in American History I 3 SSH101 Themes in American History I 3 can History II 3 SSH101 Themes in Ameri SSH101 Themes in American History II 3 SSY105 Learning and Education 3 SSY105 Learning and Education 3 7

489 MEC: 3 Credits MEC: 3 Credits MAT104 Math ematics in Elementary Education 3 MAT104 Mathematics in Elementary Education 3 TOTAL: 60 Credits TOTAL: 60 Credits AIII.4 Education and Language Acquisition Progr am: Liberal Arts: Early Childhood Education Option Cod e: 01066 HEGIS vision: Revision of Program Core Re Effecti ve: Fall 2019 e: Develop ment of First Year Seminar for Education Rational Liberal Arts: Early Childhood Education Option Liberal Arts: Early Childhood Education Option Proposed Current Pathways Common Core Pathways Common Core A. Required Core: 12 Credits A. Required Core: 12 Credits English: 6 credits English: 6 credits ENG101 English Composition I or ENG101 English Composition I or ENA101 or ENC101 (depending on placement scores ENA101 or ENC101 (depending on placement scores) ) ENG102 Writing through Literature ENG102 Writing through Literature Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning: 3 credits Mathematical & Quantitative Reasoning: 3 credits : Select one course from the following : Select one course from the following MAT107: Mathematics and the Modern World MAT107: Mathematics and the Modern World MAT115 College Algebra and Trigonometry MAT115 College Algebra and Trigonometry MAT117 Algebra and Trigonometry (depending on MAT117 Algebra and Trigonometry (depending on cement scores) pla placement scores) MAT119 Statistics with Elementary Algebra MAT119 Statistics with Elementary Algebra (depending (depending on placement scores) on placement scores) MAT120 Elementary Statistics MAT120 Elementary Statistics Life & Physical Sciences: 3 credits Life & Physical Sciences: 3 credits Select one course from the following : Select one course from the following : SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences on to Neuroscience SCB206 Introduction to Neuroscience SCB206 Introducti SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC102 Chemistry of Photography SCC102 Chemistry of Photography SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP101 Topics in Physics 8

490 SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP140 Topics in Astronomy SCP140 Topics in Astronomy B. Flexible Core: 18 Credits B. Flexible Core: 18 Credits Select one course from each of the five flexible core Select one course from each of the five flexible core and one additional course from any flexible categor categories ies and one additional course from any flexible core category core category . . World Cultures and Global Issues World Cultures and Global Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual Individual Society Scientific World Society Scientific World To complete the degree requirements from the Flexible To complete the degree requirements from the Core, students are advised to select courses from the Flexible Core, students are advised to select courses recommended course selections listed on the program from the recommended course selections listed on the . website . program website Program Core: 30 Credits Program Core: 30 Credits Liberal Arts: 3 Credits Education Core: 15 Credits LIF101 First Year Seminar for Liberal Arts 3 EDF101 First Year Seminar for 3 Education 3 ELE110 Arts in Education ELE205 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood Education Core: 12 Credits ELE110 Arts in Education 3 Education 3 ELE205 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood ELN121 Foundations of Early Childhood Education 3 Education 3 ELN206 Family, School & Community in Early Chi ldhood ELN121 Foundations of Early Childhood Education 3 Education 3 ool & Community in Early ELN206 Family, Sch Childhood Education 3 Humanities: 3 Credits Humanities: 3 Credits HUC116 Survey of Speech, Language and Hearing HUC116 Survey of Speech, Language and Hearing Disorders 3 Disorders 3 Soc ial Science: 12 Credits Social Science: 12 Credits SSY101 General Psychology 3 SSY101 General Psychology 3 SSY105 Learning and Education 3 SSY105 Learning and Education 3 SSY230 Abnormal Psychology 3 SSY230 Abnormal Psychology 3 SSY240 Developmental Psychology 3 SSY240 Developmental Psychology 3 TOTAL: 60 Credits TOTAL: 60 Credits 9

491 AIII.5 Math, Engineering and Computer Science Computer Network Administration and Security Program Progr am: e: 01072 Cod HEGIS vision: Revision of Program Core and Title Change Re ve: Fall 2019 Effecti e: Change in Program title and addition of courses to Program Core. Rational Network Administration and Information Security Computer Operations: Option Computer Network Administration and Security Program Required Core: 12 credits Required Core: 12 credits English: 6 credits English: 6 credits ENG101 English Composition I 3 credits ENG101 English Composition I 3 credits ENG102 Writing through Literature 3 credits ENG102 Writing through Literature 3 credits 3 Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning: Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning: 3 credits credits Select one course from the following: Select one course from the following: MAT119 Statistics with Elementary Algebra MAT117 Algebra and Trigonometry (depending on (depending on placement scores) placement scores) or MAT120 Elementary Statistics MAT115 College Algebra and Trigonometry Life and Physical Sciences: 3 credits Life and Physical Sciences: 3 credits Select one course from the following: 3 credits Select one course from the following: 3 credits SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences SCB101 Topics in Bi ological Sciences SCB206 Introduction to Neuroscience SCB206 Introduction to Neuroscience SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP105 Life in the Universe 10

492 stronomy SCP140 Topics in A SCP140 Topics in Astronomy 15 credits : B. Flexible Core: 9 credits B. Flexible Core Select one course from each of the five flexible core Select one course from three of the five flexible core categories categories World Cultures and Global Issues World Cultures and Global Issues US Experience in its Diversity US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World Note: Student can sel Student can select only one courses from any ect only one courses from any Note: one discipline. Students are advised to select one one discipline. Students are advised to select one s. Urban Study course to complete college requirement to complete college requirements. Urban Study course PROGRAM CORE: 39 CREDITS 33 CREDITS PROGRAM CORE: Business & Technology Business & Technology BTA111 Principles of Accounting I 3 credits BTM101 Introduction to Business 3 credits BTM101 Introduction to B usiness 3 credits MEC Courses MEC Courses CSF101 First Year Seminar for Computer Science CSF101 First Year Seminar for Computer Science 2 credits 2 credits MAC108 Introduction to Programming with Python MAC10 8 Introduction to Programming with Python 3 credits 3 credits MAC232 UNIX Network Op erating Systems MAC232 UNIX Network Operating Systems 3 credits 3 credits MAC233 Windows Network Operating System MAC233 Windows Network Operating Syst em 3 credits 3 credits Network and Systems Security MAC245 MAC245 Data Communication and Network 3 credits Security 3 credits Advanced Network and Systems Security MAC246 MAC246 Advanced Network Security 3 credits 3 credits MAC252 Advanced UNIX 3 credits 11

493 MAC253 Advanced Windows 3 credits d Windows MAC254 Advanced UNIX an MAC293 Computer Repair and Network Maintenance 4 credits 4 credits MAC250 Database Management Systems 3 credits MAC227 Introduction to Cryptography and 3 credits Applications MAC237 Computer Security 3 credits MAC247 Advanced Systems Security 3 credits MAC257 Digital Forensics 3 credits Total 60 Credits Total 60 Credits AIII.6 Math, Engineering and Computer Science am: Progr Computer Technology HEGIS Cod e: 85082 replacement of courses Revision of Program Core vision: and Re Fall 2019 ve: Effecti Rational Program revised to reflect industry standards e: : Computer Technology Program/Degree Program/Degree : Computer Technology Current Proposed Pathways Common Core Pathways Common Core A. Required C A. Required Core: 12 credits ore: 12 credits English: 6 credits English: 6 credits ENG101 English Composition I ENG101 English Composition I (ENA101 or ENC101 depending on placement scores) (ENA101 or ENC101 depending on placement scores) ENG102 Writing through Literature ENG102 Writing through Literature Mathematical and Quantitative Mathematical and Quantitative 3 credits : Reasoning Reasoning: 3 credits MAT115 College Algebra & Trigonometry etry MAT115 College Algebra & Trigonom (MAT117 Al gebra & Trigonometry depending on placement (MAT117 Algebra & Trigonometry depending on placement scores) 12

494 scores) Select one of the following: Life and Physical Sciences: 3 credits Life and Physical Sciences: 3 credits Select one of the following: SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences SCB101 Topics in Biological Sciences SCB206 Introduction to Neuroscience SCB206 Introduction to Neuroscience SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC101 Topics in Chemistry SCC 102 Chemistry of Photography SCC 102 Chemistr y of Photography SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP101 Topics in Physics SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP105 Life in the Universe SCP140 Topics in Astronomy SCP140 Topics in Astronomy credits B. Flexible Core: 9 B. Flexible Core: 9 credits Select one course from three of the five flexible core categories Select one course from three of the five flexible core categories World Cultures and Global Issues World Cultures and Global Issues US Experience in its Diversity sity US Experience in its Diver Creative Exp ression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society Scientific World Scientific World Note: Student can select only one courses from any one discipline. Note: Student can select only one courses from any one discipline. Students Students are advised to select one Urban Study course to complete are advised to select one Urban Study course to complete college requirement. college requirement. Program core: 3 Program core: 30 credits 4 credits omputer Science Engineering and Computer Science Math, Math, Engineering and C ECF090 First Year Seminar for Engineering and Computer Science 0 credits CSF101 First Year Seminar for Computer Science 2 MAT200 Pre -Calculus 4 MAT241 Technical Mathematics I 4 MAC241 Computer Electronics I 4 MAT242 Technical Mathematics II 4 MAC242 Computer Electronics II 3 s I 4 MAC241 Computer Electronic MAC265 Computer Hardware Interfacing and Programming 3 s II 3 MAC242 Computer Electronic Lab 2 Project MAC289 Computer Technology 4 MAC291 Computer Logic, Design and Implementation I MAC265 Computer Hardware Interfacing and Programming 3 MAC292 Computer Logic, Design and Implementation II Lab 2 Project MAC289 Computer Technology 4 MAC293 Computer Repair and Network Maintenance 4 MAC291 Computer Logic, Design and Implem entation I 4 4 MAC292 Computer Logic, Design and Implementation II MAC295 Computer Architecture 4 MAC293 Computer Repair and Network Maintenance 4 4 re MAC295 Computer Architectu 13

495 Business & Technology Business & Technology BTM101 Introduction to Business 3 BTM101 Introduction to Business 3 Unrestricted elective* 2 *Students are encouraged to take Introduction to Programming with Python (MAC108) to fulfill their unrestricted elective requirement. Total: 60 Credits Total 60 Credits AIII.7 Math, Engineering and Computer Science Progr Computer Network Administration and Security Certificate am: Cod 37279 HEGIS e: vision: Revision of Program Core and Title Change Re ve: Fall 2019 Effecti Rational e: Update to reflect industry standards Computer Network Administration and Security Network and Information Security Certificate Certificate Required Core: 18 credits Required Core: 15 credit s MAC232 UNIX Network Operating Systems MAC232 OR MAC233 3 credits 3 credits MAC233 Windows Network Operating System 3 credits Network and Systems Security MAC245 MAC245 Data Communication and Network Security 3 credits 3 credits Advanced Network and Systems Security MAC246 MAC246 Advanced Network Security 3 credits 3 credits MAC252 Advanced UNIX 3 credits MAC227 Introduction to Cryptography and Applications 3 credits MAC237 Computer security 3 credits MAC247 Advanced systems security 3 credits 14

496 AIV: New Courses t 1 D e p ar t me n . s I A V Education and Language Acquisition C areer X ] U n d e [ gradu a t e [ ] Gr a d u a t e r c a d em A c Le v el i [ X ] R e g u l ar [ ] C o m p e n sa to r y [ ] D e v e l o p m e n t al [ ] R e m e di al u e c t A bj S rea Education o N rse C umb e r u EDF101 o u rse C itl e T First Year Seminar for Education C l o g ue ata The Education First Year Seminar is required of all new students majoring in Education. Its goals are to introduce students to the liberal arts, campus culture, and the education field, and to Description develop a better understanding of the learning process and acquire essential academic skills. Taught by ELA faculty and supported by Peers Advisors, and co -curr icular professionals, this course addresses issues related to contemporary college life and the field of education (birth through 12th Grade). P re C o / /co NONE requisites: Pre R it uis q e e C t s redi 3 Liberal A r t s [ ] Y es X ] N o [ C t a c t n H o u rs o 4 (3 clas sroom, 1 lab) C u rse o Attribute (e.g. Intensi ve, Writing WAC, etc.) e n er a l G e bl ca pli _X _ N o t A p Education Flexible Required nent Compo English C omposi tion World C ultures and Global Issu es Mathem US Experience in i ts Div ersity atics Sci ence Creative E xpress ion Individual a nd Soc iety Sci entific World v e e c t i ff E Fall 2019 Rationale: First Year Seminar in education is designed to assist incoming students in education to make a successful transition to their major and coll ege life. 15

497 V . 2 D e p ar t I n t s A me Math, Engineering and Computer Science C areer [ X ] U n e r gradu a t e [ ] Gr a d u a t e d c a d em A c Le v el i [ X ] R e g u l ar [ ] C o m p e n sato r y [ ] D e v e l o p m e n t al [ ] R e m e di al S bj e c u A rea t Network Administration and Information Sec urity C u rse o umb e r N MAC227 o u rse T itl e C Introduction to Cryptography and Applications C ata l o g ue This course is an introduction to cryptography and its history, introducing students to classical as Description well as modern concepts of cryptography. Topics covered include substitution, transposition, shared key cryptosystems (DES, 3DES, and AES), public key cryptosystems (RSA), key -mail security, Secure Socket Layer and exchange, digital signatures, digital certificates, PGP, e IPSec. / o P re C MAC108 or MAC101 MAT115/MAT117 Prerequisites: Pre/corequisites: e it uis q R e t s C redi 3 A r t s Y Liberal es [ X ] N o [ ] o n t a c t H o u C rs room , 2 lab) 4 (2 class C o u rse (e.g. Attribute ve, Writing Intensi WAC, etc.) G n er a l e e l b ca _X_ N pli o A p t Education Required Flexible nent Compo English C omposi tion World C ultures and Global Issu es US Experience in i ts Div ersity atics Mathem Sci ence Creative E xpress ion Individual a nd Soc iety Sci entific World E ff e c t i v e Fall 2019 Rationale: Desig ned for Network Administration and Information Security Program. 16

498 t 3 D e p ar t me n . s I A V Math, Engineering and Computer Science C areer X ] U n d e [ gradu a t e [ ] Gr a d u a t e r c a d em A c Le v el i [ X ] R e g u l ar [ ] C o m p e n sato r y [ ] D e v e l o p m e n t al [ ] R e m e di al S e c t bj A rea u Network Administration and Information Security C u rse o umb e r N MAC237 e rse T itl u C o Computer Security ata l o g ue C This course introduces students to different aspects of computer security. Topics include security Description er authentication mechanisms, access control, attacks, intrusion- detection, fundamentals, us malicious software, malicious code and countermeasures, software security, operating system rinciples, security, human resources security, application security, browser attacks and security p database security, SQL injection, security risk assessment and cloud security. re / C o P MAC227 MAC250 Pre/corequisites: Prerequisites: it uis q e R e C t s redi 3 Liberal A r t s [ ] Y es [ X ] N o o n t a c t H o u rs C classroom , 2 lab) 4 (2 C o u rse Attribute (e.g. Intensi ve, Writing WAC, etc.) G n er a l e e bl ca pli _X_ p N t A o Education Required Flexible nent Compo English C omposi tion World C ultures and Global Issu es US Experience in i ts Div ersity atics Mathem Sci ence Creative E xpress ion Individual a nd Soc iety Sci entific World E ff e c t i v e Fall 2019 Rationale: Designed for Network Administration and Information Security Program. 17

499 n . 4 D e p ar t me V t s A I Math, Engineering and Computer Science C areer [ X ] U n d r gradu a t e [ ] G r a d u a t e e c a d em A c Le v el i [ X ] R e g u l ar [ ] C o m p e n sato r y [ ] D e v e l o p m e n t al [ ] R e m e di al S bj e c t u rea A Network Administration and Information Security C o u rse N umb e r MAC247 C o u rse T itl e Advanced Systems Security ata l o g ue C This course pr esents advanced topics in systems security. Topics covered include, access Description controls, asset management, security controls, change management, patch management, risk management, security assessment activities, monitoring systems, network monitoring and contr ol, secure device management, network -based security devices, endpoint device security, big data access control and application vulnerabilities, software - defined networks, and clustering. re C o P / Pre/corequisites: MAC237 Prerequisites: it uis q e R e C t s redi 3 Liberal A r t s [ ] Y es [ X ] N o o n t a c t H o u rs C classroom 4 (2 , 2 lab) C u rse o Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensi ve, A C, etc.) W G n er a l e e bl ca pli _X_ N o t A p Education Flexible Required Compo nent English C omposi tion World C ultures and Global Issu es Mathem atics US Experience in i ts Div ersity Sci ence Creative E xpress ion Individual a iety nd Soc Sci entific World E ff e c t i v e Fall 2019 Rationale: Designed for Network Administration and Infor mation Security Program. 18

500 I . 5 D e p ar t me n t s A V Math, Engineering and Computer Science areer C ] X ] U n d e r gradu a t e [ [ Gr a d u a t e A a d em c c Le v el i [ X ] R e g u l ar [ ] C o m p e n sato r y [ ] D e v e l o p m e n t al [ ] R e m e di al S e c t A bj u rea Network Administration and In formation Security e o rse N umb u r C MAC257 C o u rse T itl e Digital Forensics ata o g ue l C This course introduces the methods and technologies relevant to conducting a computer forensic Description g, preserving and reporting forensic investigation. Topics include collecting, analyzing, recoverin evidence. Students will learn how to retrieve data from a computer, and recover deleted, encrypted or damaged files; legal considerations and ethics will be covered as well. Various including Windows, Macintosh and Linux. operating systems will be considered P / C o re MAC246 Pre/corequisites: MAC237 , Prerequisites: MAC254 e uis q e R it C redi s t 3 A r t s [ ] Y Liberal [ X ] N o es C o n a c t H o u rs t classroom , 2 lab) 4 (2 C u rse o Attribute (e.g. Intensi Writing ve, W A C, etc.) G e n er a l N e bl ca _X_ o t A p pli Education Required Flexible Compo nent English C omposi tion World C ultures and Global Issu es Mathem atics US Experience in i ts Div ersity Sci ence Creative E xpress ion Individual a iety nd Soc Sci entific World E ff e c t i v e Fall 2019 Rationale: Designed for Network Administration and Information Security Program. 19

501 I V 6 D e p ar t me n t s A . Math, Engineering and Computer Science areer C ] X ] U n d e r gradu a t e [ [ Gr a d u a t e c d em i a v el A c Le [ X ] R e g u l ar [ ] C o m p e n sato r y [ ] e v e l o p m e n t al [ ] R e m e di al D S u e c t A rea bj Network Administration and Information Security o u rse C umb e r N MAC254 C o u rse T itl e A W indows & UNIX S dvanced A dministration ystem C ata l o g ue This course provides students with the practical skills needed to serve as Windows and UNIX Description system administrators. Topics include installation and maintenance of Windows and UNIX servers, user administration and security, file system and folder permissions, DNS, LDAP deployment, Samba, NFS, lo gin scripts, profiles and policy editor, directory services, DHCP, IIS, Apache, e mail, printers, PowerShell, shell scripting, server and workstation troubleshooting, and - network monitoring. re / C o P 2, uisites: Pre/coreq MAC233 Prerequisites: MAC23 it uis q e R e C t s redi 4 Liberal A r t s [ ] Y es [ X ] N o o n t a c t H o u rs C classroom 5 (3 , 2 lab) C u rse o Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensi ve, A C, etc.) W G n er a l e e bl ca pli _X_ N o t A p Education Flexible Required Compo nent English C omposi tion World C ultures and Global Issu es Mathem atics US Experience in i ts Div ersity Sci ence Creative E xpress ion Individual a iety nd Soc Sci entific World E ff e c t i v e Fall 2019 Rationale: Designed for Network Administration and Information Security Prog ram. 20

502 Section AV: Changes in Ex isting Courses AV.1 FROM TO Departments Departments Education and Language Acquisition Education and Language Acquisition Course Course B asic W riting f or Non - Native Native Speakers of E - on S A099 Basic Writing I for N of English English Speakers Pre or co requisite Pre or co requisite er v i a w or ESL/ESR099 Pre/corequisite: ESL/ESR099 er Prerequisite: v i a w or Hours Hours 6 classroom (4 lecture, 2 lab) (Equivalent to 6 ENG099) Credits Credits 0 0 Description on Descripti g co aim s a t developin e college - urs Thi s This course aims at developing college - level leve l writin g proficienc y . writing proficiency, emphasizing the writing process, summary writing, paraphrasing, and , the writin By emphasizing g process English language skills. The course also y summar rhetorica l conventions, introduces students to the conventions of l and analytica paraphrasing , writing academic writing and rhetorical conv entions, e wil language l the cours skills, and prepares them for timed essays, such as , high - prepar e student s for timed the CUNY Assessment Test in Writing stake suc h as the CATW. In s essays, (CATW). Students learn to write reader l lear identify s wil student , addition n to response essays and to rectify lexical, s in error grammatica t correc and l grammatical, and rhetorical errors. lear r ow n compositions and thei n to r employ othe and e argumentativ mode shor rhetorica t essa y a s in l writte for m to clearl n y expres s ideas English. in academic Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.) Intensive, WAC, etc.) General Education General Education Component Component __ Not Applicable __ Not Applicable __ X __ X 21

503 ____ Required ___ Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science _ _ Science Flexible ____ ____ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ ___ Creative Expression Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society ___ ____ ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Effective Effective Fall 2019 Rationale: Course is adjusted to reflect focus on college writing preparation. 2 AV. TO FROM Departments Departments Computer Science Math, Engineering and Computer Science Math, Engineering and Course Course C 2 4 5 N e t w ork and S y s t ems S e curi t y MAC245 Data Communication and Network M A Security Pre or co requisite Pre or co requisite MAC108 or MAC101 Pre/corequisite: M A C233 Prerequisites: C232 A or M - or Corequisites: or MAC252 Pre C253 MA Hours Hours lab) 4 (3 class, 1 4 (2 class, 2 lab) Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description This course provides an introduction to data detailed, provides a in - course This communications and networking network of overview depth security technologies. Topics covered include and problems potential discusses fundamentals of networks, OSI model, soluti ons. The course covers a broad networking protocols, signaling, cables, of important security topics variety connectors and networking dev ices. It will as cryptography , authentication, such also cover multiplexing, circuit and packet worms, attacks, -of-service denial switching, IP configuration, network design, switching, routing, firewalls, network security and spyware phishing, Trojan viruses, and port configuration. This course prepares the allow will course The horse. 22

504 student examine network and to students to pass the CompTIA Network+ exam. defense ity secur computer mechanisms. t Requirement Requiremen Designation Designation [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts Course Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, (e.g. Writing WAC, etc.) Intensive, WAC, etc.) General Education General Education Component Component Not Applicable __ Not Applicable __X ____ ____ Required ___ Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ____ Science _ _ Science ____ Flexible ____ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society ___ ____ Scientific World ____ Scientific World Effective Fall 2019 Effective Course was revised to reflect changes in the Network Administration and Information Security Program. Rationale: 23

505 AV. 3 FROM TO Departments Departments Math, Engineering and Computer Science Math, Engineering and Computer Science Course Course 46 A d v an c ed M N e t w ork and S y s t ems Advanced Network Security MAC246 A C 2 y t curi e S o requisite Pre or co requisite Pre or c MAC245 Prerequisites: MAC232 or MAC233 , Corequisite: , Pre - ENA/ENC/ENG101 or MA C245 Hours Hours lab) 4 (3 class, 1 4 (2 class, 2 lab) Credits Credits 3 3 Description Description This course covers a wide variety of security a continuatio n o f CI S s 245 , Networ k i Thi s topics such as threats, vulnerabilities, data , coverin g advanced and Syste ms Securit y and host security, access control, identity network s securit h as biometric s suc topic y, management, cryptography, attacks and intrusio n detection, securit y and top wrappers defense mechanisms. Security policies and s s in the field topic pertinent other and . Thi procedures will also be covered. Additional y + cours full y to e maps s Securit ’ A CompTI topics include firewalls, VPNs, NAC, switch hands Exa and . Extensiv e m objectives -on and router security, intrusion detection and prevention, malware, file security and data resear ch project s will plac e student s activel y in defenses. The course will prepare students professional student the rol e of securit y . The for the CompTIA Security + Exam. overvie l hav e a comprehensiv e wil w of k c concept security fro s to m basi networ advanced topics. Requirement Requirement Designation Designation Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [ X ] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Intensive, WAC, WAC, etc.) etc.) General Education General Education Component Componen t __X __ Not Applicable Not Applicable ____ ____ Required ___ Required ____ English Composition ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics 24

506 ____ Science Science _ _ ____ Flexible ____ Flexible ___ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression ___ Creative Expression Individual and Society Individual and Society ___ ____ Scientific World ____ ____ Scientific World Effective Effective Fall 2019 Rationale: Course was revised to reflect changes in the Network Administration and Information Security Program. Section AVI: Courses Withdr awn Section AVII: Affiliation Agreem ents 25

507 Lehman College – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS Section AIII: Changes in Degree Programs Undergraduate Curricula AIII.1 Art, B.F.A Name of Program and Degree Award: Hegis Number: 08345 1002.00 Program Code: Effective Term: Spring 2019 for the The following revisions are proposed from the Depa rtment of Art. Art, B.F.A. FROM: TO: Art, B.F.A. (60 Credit Major) Art, B.F.A. (60 Credit Major) The B.F.A. program is open to students who wish to pursue The B.F.A. program is open to students who wish to pursue . Upon declaring the an intensive program in studio art. Upon declaring the an intensive program in studio art major, students are required to schedule a meeting with the major, students are required to schedule a meeting with the BFA Program Coordinator for advising. BFA Program Coordinator for advising. Credits (60) Credits (60) credits in Foundation requirement consisting of: credits in Foundation requirement consisting of: 18 15 Credits Credits ART 100 Basic Drawing 3 ART 100 Basic Drawing 3

508 - ART 101 ction to Two - Dimensional Design 3 3 Dimensional Design Introdu ction to Two Introdu ART 101 Dimensional Design 3 ion to Three- Introduct ART 102 ART 102 Introduct ion to Three- Dimensional Design 3 ART 112 3 igital Imaging 3 Introduction to D ART 108 Introduction to Photography Tradition and In 3 ART 112 Introduction to Digital Imaging 3 ARH 167 novation in the Art of the West ARH 167 in General Art History requirement consisting 9 credits 3 rt of the West Tradition and In novation in the A of: Credits 9 credits in General Art History requirement consisting of: Three Art History courses Three Art History courses, at least one of which must be at Credits the 100 level. Three Art History courses his requirement. ARH 167: Cannot be counted toward t Three Art History courses, at least one of which must be at the 100 level. 12 credits in General Studio work to be selected from: ARH 167: Cannot be counted toward this requirement. Credits level ART courses ART , or 300- 100- , 200- 12 credits in General Studio work to be selected from: 15 credits in Art Specialization: Credits , 200- 100- ART lev -, and 400- , 300 A sequence of 200- el courses (ART level ART courses , or 300- (CGI) 451, ART (CGI) 480, ART (CGI) 481, ART 486, ART 15 credits in Art Specialization: 487 may be counted in this category, pending approval by faculty in area of specialization) in one of the following A sequence of 200- , 300 -, and 400- level courses (ART disciplines: ceramics, computer imaging, design, drawing, (CGI) 451, ART (CGI) 480, ART (CGI) 481, ART 486, ART 487 may be counted in this category, pending approval by painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpture. Students should consult the Department for specific courses that faculty in area of specialization) in one of the following disciplines: ceramics, computer imaging, design, drawing, constitute a sequence. painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpture. Students 3 credits Practicum: should consult the Department for specific courses that Credits constitute a sequence. sual Arts 3 ART 488 Professional Practices in the Vi 6 credits Thesis: Credits 6 credits Thesis:

509 ART 494 Bachelor of Fine Arts Thesis I 3 Credits Bachelor of Fine Arts Thesis II ART 494 Bachelor of Fine Arts Thesis I 3 ART 496 3 ART 496 Bachelor of Fine Arts Thesis II 3 Rationale: s seeking professional education in the arts. As such, the Art Department has The BFA is the standard degree for student —opening and found it necessary to require a practicum for all BFA students that will cover professional practices operating a studio; developing and documenting work for portfoli os; preparing and submitting proposals for exhibitions, residencies and grants; securing gallery representation and/or commissions; and negotiating consignment agreements and other contracts. Date of Art Department Approval: May 9 , 2018 Date of Senate App roval : October 10, 2018 AIII.2 Name of Program and Degree Award: Computer Graphics and Imaging, B.S. Hegis Number: 26891 Program Code: 1009.00 Fall Effective Term: 2019 The following revisions are proposed for the Computer Graphics and Imaging, B.S. fro m the Depa rtment of Art. FROM: TO: Computer Graphics and Imaging, B.S. (58 Credit Major) Computer Graphics and Imaging, B.S. (58 Credit Major) The required credits are distributed as follows: The required credits are distributed as follows: 24 credits in ART/CGI: 18 credi ts in Art: (May be taken as CGI or ART)

510 Credits Credits Basic Drawing 3 ART 100 cations to the World Applied Imaging and Appli ART 221 Dimensional Design 3 ction to Two- ART 101 Introdu Wide Web I 3 ART 102 Introduction to Three- Dimensional Design 3 Applied Imaging and Applications to the World ART 222 Wide Web II 3 Or ART 321 Computer Modeling and Design I 3 ART 106 Introduction to Sculp ture 3 3 Photography ART 322 Evolving Techniques in Digital ART 108 Introduction to Photography 3 ART 325 Digital Multimedia 3 Introduction to Digital Imaging 3 ART 112 3 ART 421 Computer Animation I novation in the Art of the West ARH 167 3 Tradition and In 3 ART 422 3D Interactive Design ART 441 Broadcast Design 3 Or duction ARH 141 to the History of Modern Art of the Intro 11 credits in Computer Science: he US 3 19th & 20th Centuries in Europe & t Credits CMP 167 Programming Methods I 3 amming Methods II 4 CMP 326 Progr 24 credits in ART/CGI: CMP 342 Internet Programming 4 (May be taken as CGI or ART) 5 credits in Mathematics: Credits Credits MAT 155 Calculus I Laboratory 1 cations to the World Applied Imaging and Appli ART 221 4 MAT 175 Calculus I Wide Web I 3 ART 222 3 Introduction to Animation 18 credits in Art: 1 Computer Modeling and Design I ART 32 3 s Credit Computer Modeling and Design II ART 322 3 ART 100 Basic Drawing 3 Dimensional Design 3 ART 101 Introdu ction to Two- 3 ART 325 Digital Multimedia ART 102 Introduction to Three- Dimensional Design 3 3 Computer Animation I ART 421 ART 106 Introduction to Sculpture 3 3 Computer Animation II ART 422 3 ART 108 Introduction to Photography

511 ART 112 Introduction to Digital Imaging 3 Broadcast Design 3 ART 441 3 ion and In ARH 167 Tradit novation in the Art of the West Or Or Introd to the History of Modern Art of the 19th & ARH 141 ART 480 Senior Project 3 20th Centuries in Europe & the US 3 Or ART 487 Professional Experi ence in the Fine Arts 3 11 credits in Computer Science: Credits CMP 167 Programming Methods I 3 CMP 326 Programming Methods II 4 Internet Programming CMP 342 4 5 credits in Mathematics: Credits MAT 155 Calculus I Laboratory 1 MAT 175 Calculus I 4 Rationale: In the CGI sequence introductory art courses, students develop fundamental skills and build creative and technical foundations for the advanced courses. The Art Department has placed these foundation courses at the beginning of the curriculum in order to emphasize that they should be taken first (some of these classes also serve as prerequisites for the advanced courses). Currently, ART 441 (Br oadcast Design) is the final course in the sequence, and serves as a kind of capstone course. The Art Department would like to add two additional course options that students could take in lieu of ART 441. Each option

512 would allow students to pursue specifi c paths, depending on their interests within the major. Students could choose to take ART 441, and learn to incorporate the technical and creative aspects of their past coursework into the production of a broadcast package project. Alternatively, students could choose to take ART 487 (Professional Experience in the Fine Arts), and pursue an internship at a media production company (or related organization). This would be a hands -on elopment. As a third option, students could -world experience, and career dev opportunity for experiential learning, real related fine arts choose to take ART 480 (Senior Project), and would have the opportunity to pursue a digital media- project, which would be similar to the BFA thesis. credit BS in CGI. Three credits must There is an error in the current bulletin, and 61 required credits are listed for the 58- be removed, and the Art Department believes that it is not crucial for students in the CGI sequence to take both ‘Introduction to Sculpture’ ‘Introduction to Three- Dimen sional Design’ because many of the relevant principles for the and sequence ( ) are covered in both classes. In this proposal, students the fundamental principles of working with 3D form would have the opportunity to choose either class. Note: along with the proposed change in degree requirements, the Art Department has also submitted proposals (in separate curriculum change forms) for change of name, description, and prerequisites for several classes within the CGI sequence. Date of Art August 29 , 2018 Department Approval: : Date of Senate Approval October 10, 2018 AIII.3 Removed by reviewer Date of Biological Sciences September 7, 2018 Department Approval: Date of Senate Approval : October 10, 2018 AIII.4 Name of Program and Degree Award: Exercise Science, B.S.

513 Hegis Number: 1299.30 Program Code: 32639 2019 Effective Term: Fall for the Exercise Science, B.S. from the Department of Health Sciences. The following revisions are proposed FROM: TO: 63 Credit Major) Exercise Science Exercise Science B.S. ( 60.5- 62 Credit Major) B.S. ( 61.5- Lehman College BS in Exercise Science program offers two e BS in Exercise Science program offers two Lehman Colleg Pre tracks: -physical Therapy, and Exercise and Movement -physical Therapy, and Exercise and Movement tracks: Pre Science. The program utilizes the Human Performance Science. The program utilizes the Human Performance Laboratory with its state- of-the -art equipment and the Laboratory with its state- of-the -art equipment and the additional resources of the APEX facility, including the additional resources of the APEX facility, including the fitness and weight training centers. fitness and weight training centers. Exercise science, the study of physiological and functional ise science, the study of physiological and functional Exerc adaptations to movement, encompasses a wide variety of adaptations to movement, encompasses a wide variety of disciplines including, but not limited to: Exercise Physiology, disciplines including, but not limited to: Exercise Physiology, ogy, Motor Sports Nutrition, Sport Psychology, Motor Sports Nutrition, Sport Psychol Control/Development, and Biomechanics. T he study of Control/Development, and Biomechanics. The study of these disciplines is integrated into the academic preparation these disciplines is integrated into the academic preparation of exercise science professionals. Exercise science of exercise science professionals. Exercise science professionals work in health services and the fitness professionals work in health services and the fitness industry, and are skilled in evaluating health behaviors and industry, and are skilled in evaluating health behaviors and risk factors, conducting fitness assessments, writing risk factors, conducting fitness assessments, writing appropriate exercise prescriptions, and motivating appropriate exercise prescriptions, and motivating individuals to modify negative health habits and maintain individuals to modify negative health habits and maintain positive lifestyle behaviors for health promotion. They positive lifestyle behaviors for health promotion. They corporate, conduct these activities in health care, university, conduct these activities in health care, university, corporate, commercial and community settings where their clients commercial and community settings where their clients

514 participate in health promotion and fitness participate in health promotion and fitness related activities. related activities. - - Career opportunities for individuals graduating with an Career opportunities for individuals graduating with an undergraduate degree in exercise science are numerous. undergraduate deg ree in exercise science are numerous. tracks range from the exercise practitioner Common career Common career tracks range from the exercise practitioner in fitness and/or clinical settings to that of a test in fitness and/or clinical settings to that of a test technologist in a clinical setting. Additionally, career technologist in a clinical setting. Additionally, career opportunities in residential spas (defined as fac ilities that opportunities in residential spas (defined as facilities that include a fitness and nutrition component) include fitness include a fitness and nutrition compon ent) include fitness director, health and fitness instructors, and personal director, health and fitness instructors, and personal trainers. trainers. Also, students often pursue graduate degrees in exercise Also, students often pursue graduate degrees in exercise science, leading to management level positions in fitness or science, leading to management level positions in fitness or wellness settings or as research assistants. In addi wellness settings or as research assistants. In addition, tion, other disciplines find it helpful to include coursework in the other disciplines find it helpful to include coursework in the exercise sciences. A degree in exercise science is also a exercise sciences. A degree in exercise science is also a very appropriate background for those going into fields such very appropriate background for those going into fields such ts medicine, physical therapy, athletic as medicine, spor as medicine, sports medicine, physical therapy, athletic training, occupational therapy or exercise physiology. training, occupational therapy or exercise physiology. Aside from the workplace, the exercise science professional Aside from the workplace, the exercise science professional may seek employment opportunities in wellness settings may seek employment opportunities in wellness settings including schools, medical sites, YMCAs, YWCAs , Boys including schools, medical sites, YMCAs, YWCAs, Boys and Girls Clubs, and community centers. Additional and Girls Clubs, and community centers. Addi tional wellness opportunities can be found in nursing homes, wellness opportunities can be found in nursing homes, recreation departments, aquatic centers, health recreation departments, aquatic centers, health management systems, and lifestyle management management systems, and lifestyle management organizations. organizations. Alternative wellness careers include massage therapy, Alternative wellness careers include massage therapy, aromatherapy, reflexology, herbology, osteopathy, and aromatherapy, reflexology, herbology, osteopathy, and yoga, to name a few. yoga, to name a few.

515 Honors in Exercise Science Honors in Exercise Science Departmental honors in Exercise Science may be awarded Departmental honors in Exercise Science may be awarded to a student who has maintained an index of 3.5 in a to a student who has maintained an index of 3.5 in a minimum of 45 credits in all courses required for the major. all cours es required for the major. minimum of 45 credits in rcise and Movement Science Option 1: Exe Option 1: Exercise and Movement Science credits). The major field credits). The major field Major Requirements ( Major Requirements ( 60.5 61.5 credits in credits in requirements include the completion of 42 36 requirements include the completion of ; 12.5 Exercise Science core courses; 12.5 credits in science Exercise Science core courses; 4 credits in MAT 132 courses; 3 credits in Health Sciences; and 3 credits in a credits in scie nce courses; 6 credits in Health Sciences; Major Elect ive course. A total of 120 credits are required for and 3 credits in a Major Elective course. A total of 120 credits are required for this degree. this degree. 42 a. Exercise Science Courses ( a. Exercise Science Courses ( 36 credits): credits): Credits Credits on to Exercise Science 3 Introducti EXS 264 EXS 264 Introduction to Exercise Science 3 al Aspects of Physical Activity 3 Behavior EXS 265 EXS 265 Behavior al Aspects of Physical Activity 3 EXS 315 Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3 EXS 315 Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3 EXS 316 Motor Learning 3 EXS 316 Motor Learning 3 EXS 323 Exercise Physiology 3 EXS 323 Exercise Physiology 3 EXS 326 Ex EXS 326 Ex ercise Testing and Prescription 3 ercise Testing and Prescription 3 EXS 423 Exercise Physiology II 3 EXS 342 Sports Nutrition 3 EXS 424 Principles and Practices of Fitness and Wellness EXS 423 Exercise Physiology II 3 3 Programming EXS 424 Principles and Practices of Fitness and Wellness EXS 425 Theory and Methods of Strength and Programming 3

516 EXS 425 Conditioning 3 ds of Strength and Theory and Metho EXS 430 Research Methods in Exercise Science 3 Conditioning 3 EXS 470 Internship in Exercise Science I 3 EXS 427 Application of Training Principles 3 EXS 430 Research Methods in Exercise Science 3 EXS 471 Inte rnship in Exercise Science II 3 Internship in Exercise Science I 3 EXS 470 b. Mathematics course (4 credits): rnship in Exercise Science II 3 Inte EXS 471 Credits MAT 132 Introduction to Statistics 4 b. Science Courses (12.5 credits) Credits BIO 181 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 c . Science Courses (12.5 credits) BIO 182 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 Credits Essentia BIO 181 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ls of General Chemistry Lecture 3 CHE 114 CHE 115 1.5 BIO 182 Anatomy and Physi ology II 4 Essentials of General Chemistry Laboratory ls of General Chemistry Lecture 3 CHE 114 Essentia CHE 115 1.5 Essentials of General Chemistry Laboratory 3 credits) c. Health Sciences Courses ( Credits d. Health Sciences Courses ( 6 3 credits) HSD 240 Nutrition and Health Credits d. Major Electives (3 credits) HSD 269 Fundamentals of Biostat istics for Health 3 Professionals Select from EXS, REC, REH, DFN, HEA, HSA and/or HSD courses with approval of the adviser. 3 HSD 240 Nutrition and Health . Major Electives (3 credits) e GENERAL ELECTIVES:

517 Select from EXS, REC, REH, DFN, HEA, HSA and/or HSD cient credits to reach a total of 120 credits required for Suffi courses with approval of the adviser. graduation. Option 2: Pre -Physical Therapy GENERAL ELECTIVES: redits required for 62 Major Requirements ( Sufficient credits to reach a total of 120 c credits). The major field graduation. 33 requirements include the completion of credits in Exercise Science core courses; 29 credits in science courses. A total of 120 credits are required for this degree. -Physical Therapy Option 2: Pre 63 Major Requirements ( credits). The major field credits): a. Exercise Science Courses ( 33 30 credits in requirements include the completion of Exercise Science core courses; ; 29 4 credits in MAT 132 Credits credits in science courses. A total of 120 credits are EXS 264 Introduction to Exercise Science 3 required for this degree. EXS 265 s of Physical Activity 3 Behavioral Aspect EXS 315 Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3 a. Exercise Science Courses (30 credits): EXS 316 Motor Learning 3 Credits EXS 323 Exercise Physiology 3 EXS 264 Introduction to Exercise Science 3 EXS 326 Ex ercise Testing and Prescription 3 s of Physical Activity 3 Behavioral Aspect EXS 265 EXS 423 Exercise Physiology II 3 EXS 315 Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3 Theory and Methods of Strength and EXS 425 EXS 316 Motor Learning 3 Conditioning 3 EXS 323 Exercise Physiology 3 in Exercise Science 3 EXS 430 Research Methods ercise Testing and Prescription 3 EXS 326 Ex EXS 470 Internship in Exercise Science I 3 EXS 423 Exercise Physiology II 3 EXS 471 Internship in Exercise Science II 3 Theory and Methods of Strength and EXS 425

518 Conditioning b . Science Courses (2 9 credits) 3 Credits Internship in Exercise Science I 3 EXS 470 EXS 471 Internship in Exercise S cience II 3 BIO 181 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 BIO 182 Anatomy and Physiology I I 4 CHE 166 General Chemistry I 4 b. Mathematics course (4 credits): CHE 167 General Chemistry Laboratory I 1.5 Credits CHE 168 General Chemistry II 4 MAT 132 Introduction to Statistics 4 CHE 169 General Chemistry Laboratory II 1.5 PHY 166 General Physics I 5 c . Science Courses (29 credits) PHY 167 General Physics II 5 Credits Anatomy and Physiology I 4 BIO 181 omy and Physiology II 4 Anat BIO 182 GENERAL ELECTIVES: CHE 166 General Chemistry I 4 Sufficient credits to reac h a total of 120 credits required for graduation. CHE 167 General Chemistry Laboratory I 1.5 BIO 166 and BIO 167, MAT 172, PSY 166 and PSY 217 CHE 168 General Chemistry II 4 are recommended electives. CHE 169 General Chemistry Laboratory II 1.5 PHY 166 General Physics I 5 PHY 167 General Physics II 5 GENERAL ELECTIVES: Suffici ent credits to reach a total of 120 credits required for graduation. BIO 166 and BIO 167, MAT 172, PSY 166 and PSY 217

519 are recommended electives. Rationale: a basic understanding of statistical Based on our experience, students are getting the necessary information required for methods in EXS 430, which is already a required course in the Exercise and Movement Science Track (Option 1), and thus MAT 132 and HSD 269 are essentially superfluous. Moreover, EXS 430 provides additional insights in to the research process that are very important for the students’ development as a fitness professional. Thus, we feel the students would derive greater benefit from taking EXS 342 and EXS 427, which provide important knowledge into practical aspects of exercise science that will be beneficial to their careers as fitness professionals. Thus, we feel substituting EXS 342 and EXS 427 for MAT 132 and HSD 269 would be of benefit to students in the Exercise and Movement Science Track. Currently, those pursuing Physical Therapy Track (Option 2) are not required to take EXS 430, but rather are the Pre- information required for basic required to take MAT 132. Based on our experience, students will get the necessary understanding of statistical methods in EXS 430, and EXS 430 provides additional insights into the research process that Thus, we feel that substituting EXS 430 for are very important for the students’ development as a fitness professional. MAT 132 would be of benefit to students in the Pre- Physical Track. Date of Health Sciences Department Approval: September 5, 2018 Date of Senate Approval : October 10, 2018 Section AIV: New Courses Undergraduate Curricula AIV.1 is proposed from the Depa rtment of Art. The following new course Course Description: Department(s) Art

520 Career ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [x ] Remedial ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ Academic Level [x Art/CGI Subject Area Prefix & ART/CGI 334 Course Number Digital Media Production: Theory a nd Practice Course Title Description Concepts and techniques underlying the theory of transmedia storytelling. Hands - on development of the core technical skills related to the creation and distribution of digital content. Pre/ Co Requisites NA Credits 3 (may be rep eated twice) Hours (2 lecture, 2 lab) 4 ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts [x Course Attribute NA (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) General Education Not Applicable __ x _ Component ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity ___ _ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ S cientific World Rationale:

521 Over the past several years, this course has been running as ART/CGI 350 (Variable Topics in Studio Art), with students consistently drawn from Lehman and Macaulay Honors College. This course update would assign a unique number to the class and would make enrollment possible for students who have already taken another section of ART/CGI 350. -world, experiential Like the current version of the class, this updated course would provide the opportunity for real learning. Students would learn the fundamentals of creating transmedia stories: the art and theory of advancing narratives on a variety of media platforms. These skills could be applied to marketing campaigns for products, businesses, social causes, cultural outreach, fine art projects or personal entrepreneurship. S eminars would focus on key topics in digital content creation (including branding, marketing, analytics), and guest speakers would include creative leaders from relevant disciplines. In addition to the seminars, hands -on workshops would cover core technical skills related to the of interactive digital content (print and web design, video and audio production, creative writing, immersive creation media). For the final project, students would create an original campaign (on several media platforms) that would include a detailed proposal for developing the brand and building the community of a real -world organization. This course would also become part of a sequence that would serve to create dynamic connections between Lehman students, Macaulay students, Hostos students, and the larger CUNY community. The course would be the third class in a proposed digital storytelling course sequence that’s outlined in the CUNY 2020 grant proposal. In the beginning of the sequence, Lehman, Hostos, and Macaulay students would meet as a cohort and learn the fundamentals of digital design and video production. One goal of the sequence is to create a pipeline that encourages Hostos students to move on to Lehman: Hostos students could take the first two semesters of the sequence, enroll at Lehman, and then take the third Graduates of the course sequence would also become eligible to participate in and fourth semesters as Lehman students. -related resources through Macaulay. the Hostos incubator and would have access to career The course would also be an opportunity for students to forge connections with professionals in a variety of fields, leading to a greater familiarity with these fields, access to internships, and possible career opportunities. Note: The course would have a new group of visiting speakers e ach semester , and repeating students would be exposed , analytics to a whole of perspectives on branding , marketing range , and media production. Also, the core class new project (a creative branding campaign) would have a new theme and direction each semest er, and r epeating students new would have opportunity to work with a whole the set of ideas and creative challenges .

522 Da te of Art Approval: March 14 , 2018 Department October 10, 2018 Date of Senate Approval: AIV.2 The following new course is proposed fr om the Department of Art. Course Description: Department(s) Art [x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Career ] Developmental ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ [x [ ] Remedial Academic Level Subject Area Art/CGI Course Prefix & ART/CGI 335 Number Digital Media Production Course Title : Advancing the Narrative Description - driven course focused on production, marketing and brand building. Content creation and Project development of technical skills in video, creative writing and graphics for print , web and social media platforms. Pre/ Co Requisites NA 3 (may be repeated twice) Credits Hours 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute NA (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) General Education ble __ x_ Not Applica Component ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics

523 ____ Science ____ Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity ___ _ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ cientific World S Rationale: Over the past several years, this course has been running as ART/CGI 451 (Topics in Computer Imaging), with students consistently drawn from Lehman and Macaulay Honors College. This course update would assign a unique number t o the class and would make enrollment possible for students who have already taken another section of ART/CGI 451. Like the current version of the class, this updated course would serve as a link between academic study (theory and technical skill) and real -world experience and career opportunities. Students would have the chance to test out all that they have learned while working on behalf of a real -world client. Students would produce all aspects of a marketing, esponsibilities would include mastering a variety of technical skills including branding and production campaign, and r graphic design, creative writing, filming, editing, web design, and animation. Students would gain a significant amount of hands -on experience as they work closely with others and see how their projects directly impact a wide audience. Students would also have the opportunity to actively learn from these experiences in the context of a supportive academic framework. This course would also become part of a sequence that would s erve to create dynamic connections between Lehman students, Macaulay students, Hostos students, and the larger CUNY community. The course would be the fourth class in oposal. In the beginning of the a proposed digital storytelling course sequence that’s outlined in the CUNY 2020 grant pr sequence, Lehman, Hostos, and Macaulay students would meet as a cohort and learn the fundamentals of digital design and video production. One goal of the sequence is to create a pipeline that encourages Hostos students to move on to Lehman: Hostos students could take the first two semesters of the sequence, enroll at Lehman, and then take the third and fourth semesters as Lehman students. Graduates of the course sequence would also become eligible to participate in the Hostos incubator and would have access to career -related resources through Macaulay.

524 The course would also be an opportunity for students to forge connections with professionals in a variety of fields, leading to internships, and possible career opportunities in video and media to a greater familiarity with these fields, access production, journalism, animation, print and web design, marketing, and advertising. CGI 451), students To give an example of the possible class structure, in three prior iterations of the course (as ART/ produced all aspects of the CUNY Film Festival. Each semester, this included working closely with festival filmmakers, judges, and presenters, organizing the screening days and Gala Awards Evening, creating a new thematic branding identi ty for the festival, developing marketing strategies and social media campaigns, creating related video projects, and -on, project building a CUNY -wide community. This hands -based format enabled students from across CUNY campuses to ciplines while developing skills and gaining practical job experience. work together across dis Note: The course would focus on a completely new production campaign each year, so repeating students would have the would develop a new range of creative problem - opportunity to work with a whole new set of ideas and themes, and solving skills. Comparing the similarities, differences and specific challenges of unique campaigns would allow repeating students to gain a deeper understanding of the real eting, analytics, and hands -on -world applications of branding, mark media production. te of Art Department Approval: March 14 , 2018 Da Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AIV.3 The following new course is proposed from the Department of Art. Course Description: Department(s) Art [x ] Undergraduate Career [ ] Graduate Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Art

525 Course Prefix & ART 488 Number Professional Practices in the Visual Arts Course Title ategies for establishing a long - term art practice; documenting and preparing artworks for Str Description exhibition; developing statements, proposals and agreements. PREREQ: Pre/ Co Requisites - six credits in the major. Declared Art major with a minimum of thirty s 3 Credit 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [x ] No Course Attribute NA (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) General Education __ x_ Not Applicable Component ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Flexibl e ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity ___ _ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ S cientific World Rationale: The BFA is a professional degree as designated by organiz ations such as the National Association of Schools of Art and professional Design. such, the Art Department must offer a course that will specifically cover As principles and practices to best support student’s aspirations and career goals.

526 Da epartment Approval: May 9 , 2018 te of Art D October 10, 2018 Date of Senate Approval: AIV.4 The following new course is proposed from the Department of Health Sciences. Course Description: Department(s) Health Sciences [x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate Career Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Dietetics, Foods, and Nutrition Course Prefix & DFN 441 Number Seminar in professional practice of nutrition and dietetics Course Title Description Di scussion of the professional standards and code of ethics in Nutrition and Dietetics. Pre/ Co Requisites DFN 348 . PREREQ: Credits 2 Hours 2 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [x ] No Course Attribute NA (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) __ x_ Not Applicable General Education Co mponent ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics

527 ____ Science ____ Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity ___ _ Creative Expression ____ Indi vidual and Society ____ S cientific World Rationale: This seminar course will fulfill standards outlined by The Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics for our option 1 students pursuing the Didactic Program in Dietetics. The course will familiarize students with the professional practice of dietetics and provide opportunities to discuss and study issues of importance. Included will be professional code of ethics, inter based practice, attendance at professional meetings, improving critical -professional teams, evidence- thinking skills, professional mentoring and precepting. By the end of this course, students will be able to describe the allenges within the field. depth and breadth of the professional standards for dietitians as well as the opportunities and ch Da te of Health Sciences Department Approval: December 6, 2017 Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AIV.5 The following new course is proposed from the Depa rtment of Mathematics . Course Description: matics Department(s) Mathe [x ] Undergraduate Career [ ] Graduate Academic Level [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Area Mathematics Course Prefix & MAT 108

528 Number Trigonometry Course Title Unit Circle Trigon Description ometry, Radians, Graphing Trigonometric Functions, Inverse Trigonometric functions, Trigonometric Identities, Laws of Sines and Cosines, and Applications. Placement by the Department of Mathematics. Pre/ Co Requisites 2 Credits Hours 2 [x ] Yes [ ] No Liberal Arts NA Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) __ x_ Not Applicable General Education Component ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Science ____ Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity ___ _ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ S cientific World Rationale: The Department of Mathematics currently has no course offering students a thorough and rigorous treatment of trigonometry. MAT 108 fills this need. Da te of Mathematics Department Approval: March 22, 2018

529 Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AIV.6 is proposed from the Department of Sociology. The following new course Course Description: Department( s) Sociology Career ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [x Academic Level ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial [x Subject Area Sociology Course Prefix & SOC 221 Number The Sociology of Stress and Health Course Title iption Descr Health and stress from a sociological perspective, including social stressors and their consequences for mental and physical health. Pre/ Co Requisites NA Credits 3 Hours 3 Liberal Arts [x ] Yes [ ] No Course Attribute NA (e.g. Writing Intens ive, WAC, etc) General Education Not Applicable __ x_ ____ Required Component ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Science

530 _ _ __ Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity _ Creative Expression ___ ____ Individual and Society ____ S cientific World Rationale: This course covers a subtopic in sociology that is not addressed in the current course offerings (or may be minimally touched upon in a couple of other electives) and it is of general interest to the student body. The department’s other -level courses. As such, a 200- level course on this topic fills a departmental need for a lower - courses on health are upper ological research that invites students into the major. The level health course and can be a good introduction to soci course was originally offered in Fall 2018 as SOC 251: Special Studies in Sociology. te of Sociology Department Approval: September 12 , 2018 Da Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses Undergraduate Curricula AV.1 The following course changes are propos ed from the Department of Art . TO: FROM: rt A rt Departm Departm A ent(s) ent(s) ] Graduate Career [x ] Undergraduate [ Career [x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

531 [ Academi ] Compensatory [ ] ] [ ] Compensatory [ ] Regular [x Academi [x ] Regular Developmental [ ] Remedial ] Remedial c Level [ c Level Developmental ART/CGI Subject ART/CGI Subject Area Area Course ART/CGI 222 Course ART/CGI 222 Prefix & Prefix & Number Number Course Applied Course World Introduction to Animation the to Applications and Imaging II Web Wide Title Title Descripti dimensional Advanced methods of two - The th eory and practice of animation using Descripti traditional and digital techniques. Wide graphics, image processing, and World on on Web design leading to team projects in the Pre/ Co : ART 112 or the succe PRE or COREQ ssful fields of science and art. Requisit completion of any 100- level art course Pre/ Co es ART/CGI 221 Requisit 3 Credits es Hours 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Credits 3 [ ] Yes x [ Liberal ] No 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours Arts [ ] No x [ Liberal ] Yes NA Course Arts Attribute Course NA (e.g. Attribute Writing (e.g. Intensiv Writing e, WAC, etc) Intensiv e, WAC, General __x _ Not Applicable etc) _ Requir ed Educatio ___ ____ English Composition n Not Applicable x _ General __ Educatio ____ Required ____ Mathematics Compon n ____ English Composition ent _ ___ Science

532 Compon ____ Mathematics _ Flexible ___ Science ___ _ ent ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its ____ Flexible Diversity ____ World Cultures ____ Creative Expression ____ US Experience in its ____ Individual and Society Diversity _ Scientific World _ __ __ Creative Expression __ ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Rationale: In the current iteration of this course, students work on animation projects in the context of web design. Students will benefit from a more fo undational course that focuses on the technical and conceptual basics of animation before attempting to integrate it into a web platform. August 29 , 2018 Date of Art Department Approval: October 10, 2018 Date of Senate Approval: AV.2 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Art. FROM: TO: Art Art Departm Departm ent(s) ent(s) Career ] Graduate [ [x] Undergraduate Career [x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

533 Academi [ ] Compensatory [ ] [ ] Regular [x Academi ] C ompensatory [ ] [x ] Regular Developmental [ c Level ] Remedial c Level Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject ART/CGI Subject ART/CGI Area Area Course ART/CGI 321 Course ART/CGI 321 Prefix & Prefix & mber Nu Number Course Computer Modeling and Design I Computer Modeling and Design I Course Title Title An introduction to the theory and practice of Descripti An introduction to the theory and practice of Descripti and -dimensional modeling dimensional modeling. Topics include - and two three on three- on Mathematical and design concepts . rendering primitive objects, transformations, curve texture will be explored in the lecture room, on the creation and manipulation, symmetries, basic rendering. Topics include maps, and comput er, and in the studio. primitive objects, transformations, curve Pre/ Co ART/CGI 112 PREREQ: creation and manipulation, symmetries, Requisit surface creation and modification, es basic rendering. 3 Credits Pre/ Co 221 or together with 172 MAT or 221 CGI ART 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours any hands -on microcomputer course. Requisit [x Liberal ] No ] Yes [ es Arts 3 Credits NA Course 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours Attribute [ ] No [ Liberal x] Yes (e.g. Arts Writing NA Course Intensiv Attribute e, WAC, etc) (e.g. Writing General __x _ Not Applicable Intensiv Educatio __ _ _ Required

534 e, WAC, n ____ English Composition etc) ____ Mathematics Compon ent ___ Science _ _ x Not Applicable __ General Educatio ____ Required _ Flexible ___ n ____ English Composition ____ World Cultures Compon ____ Mathematics ____ US Experience in its _ ent ___ Science Diversity _ ___ Creative Expression ____ Flexible ____ Individual and Society ____ World Cultures Scientific World _ _ __ ____ US Experience in its Diversity __ Creative Expression __ ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Rationale: The Art Department has brought the course descripti on up to date and has edited it for concision. The words ‘surface creation’ have been replaced with ‘texture maps’, a more specific term. An introductory digital imaging course is a more appropriate prerequisite for a 3D modeling course than a web design c ourse or a math course. Approval: August 29 , 2018 Date of Art Department Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AV.3 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Art. FROM: TO:

535 Departm Art rt A Departm ent(s) ent(s) [x] Undergraduate ] Graduate ] Graduate [ Career Career [x] Undergraduate [ Academi ] [ ] Compensatory [ ] Regular [x ] Academi [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Remedial Developmental c Level c Level [ Developmental [ ] Remedial ART/CGI Subject Subject ART/CGI Area Area Course ART/CGI 322 Course ART/CGI 322 Prefix & Prefix & Number Number Course Course lving Techniques in Digital Photography Evo Computer Modeling and Design II Title Title - Advan ced techniques in three Descripti Descripti dimensional Computational algorithms an d software to use on on modeling. Topics include organic forms and multiple aspects of an image. Examples include panning in space and stitching the figures, advanced rendering and texture image together and exposure bracketing to mapping. manipulate dynamic range. 321 CGI or 321 Pre/ Co ART PREREQ: Requisit 321 ART or PREREQ: Pre/ Co 321 CGI Requisit es es Credits 3 3 Credits 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours ] No [ ] Yes [x Liberal [ Liberal x] Yes [ Arts ] No Arts Course NA te Course NA Attribu Attribute (e.g. (e.g. Writing Writing Intensiv Intensiv e, WAC, etc) e, WAC,

536 etc) General __x _ Not Applicable Educatio ___ _ Required x__ Not Applicable _ General ____ English Composition n Educatio ____ Required ____ Mathematics Compon ____ English Composition n ent ___ Science _ Compon ____ Mathematics ___ Science ent _ ___ _ Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ Flexible ____ US Experience in its ____ World Cultures Diversity ____ US Experience in its ___ Creative Expression _ Diversity ____ Individual and Society __ __ Creative Expression __ Scientific World _ _ ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Rationale: Th e current iteration of this course is redundant in the program because similar topics are taught in advanced photography classes. Art and CGI students would greatly benefit from a second semester of 3D modeling, which will cover the modeling of organic forms, figures and advanced rendering --topi cs that are not covered in Computer Modeling and Design I. This course will also be a great asset (and provide a stronger foundation) for students who go on to take the 3D animation classes in the department. Date of Art Department Approval: August 29 , 2018 Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AV.4 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Art. FROM: TO:

537 Art Departm Departm Art ent(s) ent(s) Career ] Graduate [ Career [x] Undergraduate ] Graduate [ [x] Undergraduate ] Regular [x Academi Academi ] Compensatory [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] [ ] [ c Level De velopmental [ c Level ] Remedial ] Remedial [ Developmental Subject ART/CGI Subject ART/CGI Area Area Course ART/CGI 325 ART/CGI 325 Course Prefix & Prefix & Number Number Digital Multimedia Course Digital Multimedia Course Title Title Web - Descripti - Descripti based and disk multimedia projects in Multimedia projects in the digital realm, on the digital realm, including digital audio, digital including digital audio, digital video, and on interactivity. video, and interactivity. ART 112 Pre/ Co Pre/ Co CGI or PREREQ: ART or 221 ART PREREQ: 321 221 Requisit or CGI 321 Requisit es es 3 Credits 3 Credits Hours 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) [ x] Yes [ ] No Liberal ] No Liberal ] Yes [x [ Arts Arts Course NA NA Course Attribute Attribute (e.g. (e.g. Writing Writing Intensiv Intensiv e, WAC, e, WAC, etc) etc)

538 General General __x _ x__ Not Applicable _ Not Applicable ____ Required Educatio Educatio ___ _ Required ____ English Composition n n __ __ English Composition Compon ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics Compon ___ Science ___ Science _ ent ent _ ____ Flexible e _ Flexibl ___ ____ World Cultures ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its ____ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity ___ Creative Expression _ __ Creative __ Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World __ _ _ Scientific World Rationale: The Art Department has brought the course description up to date and has edited it for concision. An introductory digital imaging course is a more appropriate prerequisite for a digital multimedia course than a web design course or a 3D ng course. modeli August 29 Date of Art Department Approval: , 2018 Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AV.5 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Art. FROM: TO: Art Art Departm Departm ent(s) ent(s)

539 Career [ ] Graduate ] Graduate [ [x] Undergraduate Career [x] Undergraduate Academi ] ] [ ] Compensatory [ ] Regular [x Academi [ [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory c Level c Level ] Remedial ] Remedial [ Developmental Developmental [ Subject Subject ART/CGI ART/CGI Area Area ART/CGI 421 Course Course ART/CGI 421 Prefix & Prefix & Number Number Computer Animation I Course Course Computer Animation I Title Title Introduction to computer animation Descripti Descripti . Frames, Introduction to computer animation including on on keyframes, hierar chical animation, morphing, keyframes, hierarchical animation, morphing, res, cameras, and lighting. textu expressions, character animation with skeletons. 321 CGI 321 or Pre/ Co PREREQ: ART 321 Pre/ Co PREREQ: and MAT 175 321 Requisit CGI or ART Requisit es es Credits 3 3 Credits Hours 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) [ ] Yes [x ] No Liberal [ ] No [ Liberal x] Yes Arts Arts NA Course Attribute N A Course Attribute (e.g. (e.g. Writing Writing Intensiv Intensiv e, WAC, etc) e, WAC, etc) General __x _ Not Applicable General _ Educatio x__ Not Applicable ___ _ Required _ Educatio __ Required n ____ English Composition _

540 Compon n ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ____ Mathematics ___ Science _ ent Compon ___ Science _ ent ___ _ Flexible ____ Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its ____ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity _ ___ Creative Expression __ __ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society Scientific World _ _ __ ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Rationale: The Art Department has brought the course description up to date and has edited it for concision. ‘Character animation with skeletons’ is a very advanced topic and would be better suited for the second semester of computer animation. A math course is an unnecessary prerequisite for computer animation. August 29 Date of Art Department Approval: , 2018 October 10, 2018 Date of Senate Approval: AV.6 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Art. FROM: TO: Departm Art Art Departm ent(s) ent(s) Career ] Graduate [ [x] Undergraduate Career [x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

541 Academi ] [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] [ ] Compensatory [ ] Regular [x Academi [ ] Remedial Developmental Developmental [ ] Remedial c Level c Level ART/CGI bject Su GI ART/C Subject Area Area ART/CGI 422 Course Course ART/CGI 422 Prefix & Prefix & Number Number 3D Interactive Design Course Course Computer Animation I I Title Title Descripti Advanced techniques in computer animation Techniques for designing and building Descripti on including cha computer based 3D interactive experiences racter rigging and effects. on using current software tools. Exporting Pre/ Co or 421 CGI 421 ART PREREQ: projects to the web and mobile comput8ing Requisit device s. Application to game design. es Pre/ Co CGI 421 ART 421 PREREQ: or 3 Credits Requisit Hours 2 lab) 4 (2 lecture, es ] No ] Yes [x Liberal [ Credits 3 Arts 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours Course NA Liberal ] No [ x] Yes [ Attribute Arts (e.g. NA Course Writing Attribute Intensiv (e.g. e, WAC, Writing etc) Intensiv General _ Not Applicable __x e, WAC, _ Required Educatio ___ etc) n ____ English Composition Not Applicable _ Compon ____ Mathematics General x__ _ Educatio quired __ Re ent _ _ ___ Science

542 n ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics ble _ Flexi ___ Compon ____ World Cultures ___ Science _ ent ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ Flexible ____ World Cultures _ ___ Creative Expression ____ US Experience in its ____ Individual and Society Diversity Scientific World _ __ _ __ __ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Rationale: Because 3D animation is such a complex medium, it is necessary to cover the material over two semesters (ART 421, Computer Animation I, is currently unable to cover an adequate range of topics). Creating a second semester of Computer Animati on will allow students to develop greater technical skill, build storytelling technique, and create stronger portfolios. Interactive Design is currently covered as part of ART 325 (Digital Multimedia). , 2018 August 29 Date of Art Department Approval: October 10, 2018 Date of Senate Approval: AV.7 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Art. TO: FROM: Art Art Departm Departm ent(s) ent(s) ] Graduate Career [x] Undergraduate [ Career [x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

543 Academi Academi ] [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] [ ] Compensatory [ ] Regular [x Developme c Level ] Remedial [ Developmental ntal [ ] Remedial c Level ART/CGI Subject Subject ART/CGI Area Area Co ART/CGI 441 Course urse ART/CGI 441 Prefix & Prefix & Number Number Broadcast Design Broadcast Design Course Course Title Title Descripti Creation of sophisticated title sequences, TV Creation of sophisticated title sequences, TV Descripti on on air promotions to be air promotions to be show packaging and on- show packaging and on- used as part of DVD, used as part of video and film production. and film video, uction. prod Pre/ Co ART 325 or 325 . PREREQ: CGI Pre/ Co Requisit CGI 325 . or 325 ART PREREQ: Requisit es es Credi 3 ts Credits 3 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours 4 (2 lecture, 2 lab) Hours ] Yes [x Liberal ] No [ [ x] Yes Liberal [ ] No Arts Arts Course NA NA Attribute Course Attribute (e.g. Writing (e.g. Intensiv Writing e, WAC, Intensiv etc) e, WAC, etc) General __x _ Not Applicable Not Applicable _ Required ___ _ Educatio General x__ n Educatio ____ Required ____ English Composition ____ E n nglish Composition Compon ____ Mathematics

544 Compon _ ____ Mathematics ___ Science ent ent ___ Science _ ___ _ Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ Flexible ____ US Experience in its ____ World Cultures Diversity ____ US Experience in its ___ Creative Expression _ Diversity __ __ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society _ _ _ Scientific World _ ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Rationale: The Art Department has brought the course description up to date (removed ‘DVD’). August 29 Date of Art Department Approval: , 2018 October 10, 2018 Date of Senate Approval: AV.8 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance. TO: FROM: Departm Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Departm ent(s) ent(s) Career ] Graduate ] Graduate [ [x] Undergraduate Career [x] Undergraduate [ Academi ] ] [ ] Compensatory [ ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Regular [x [x Academi c Level c Level medial ] Re [ Developmental Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Music Performance Su bject Music Performance

545 Area Area Course Course MSP 210 MSP 210 Prefix & Prefix & Number Number Course Instruction in Principal Instrument or Voice Course Instruction in Principal Instrument or Voice n Title n Private Instructio Title Private Instructio Descripti Descripti Intensive study of one instrument or voice. Intensive study of one instrument or voice. . on Instruction with a member of the Music faculty on Instruction with a member of the Music faculty. Note: Stude nts who study with a private Note: Students Pre/ Co PREREQ: Chair's permission. teacher approved by the Department of Music who study with a private teacher approved by Requisit and who can demonstrate satisfactory the Department of Music and who can es progress by audition may petition the demonstrate satisfactory progress by audition department to receive 1 to 6 credits. may petition the Chair to receive 1 to 6 credits. Credits in ex Pre/ Co permission. cess of 6 may be permitted by Department PREREQ: Department approval only. Requisit es Credits 1 may be Credits 1 ( repeated for a maximum of 8 Hours 2 credits) [ Liberal ] No [x ] Yes Hours 2 Arts ] No [ ] Yes [x Liberal Course NA Arts Attribute NA Course (e.g. Attribute Writing (e.g. Intensiv Writing e, WAC, etc) Intensiv e, WAC, General Not Applicable _ x__ etc) Educatio ____ Required ____ English Composition n General __x _ Not Applicable Educatio Compon ____ Mathematics __ _ _ Required

546 n ent _ __ _ Science ____ English Composition cs ____ Mathemati Compon ___ Science _ ____ Flexible ent ____ World Cultures _ Flexible ___ ____ US Experience in its Diversity ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its __ __ Creative Expression Diversity ____ Individual and Society _ ____ Scientific World ___ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society __ _ _ Scientific World Rationale: All of the performance instruction courses in our curriculum are currently repeatable up to 8 semesters, the equivalent of once every semester for the duration of a degree. This is advisable since master y of an instrument is a life- long pursuit and students in music studies are advised to continue their studies without interruption for the best outcomes. We make this change to this course in order to bring it in line with our other performance instruction courses and to permit students the opportunity to develop their musical skills during their complete 4 -year (8 semester) degree. Date of Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Department Approval: August 23 , 2018 Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AV.9 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance. TO: FROM: ic, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Mus Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Departm Departm ent(s) ent(s)

547 Career [x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate ] Graduate [ [x] Undergraduate Career ] Regular ] C [ ] ] [ ] Compensatory [ ompensatory [x Academi Academi [x ] Regular [ c Level c Level ] Remedial [ Developmental Developmental [ ] Remedial Subject Subject Theatre Theatre Area Area Course THE 205 THE 205 Course Prefix & Prefix & Number Number Course for the Stage Voice for the Stage Course Voice and Diction Title Title D techniques specific to the stage actor. Voice of vocal techniques specific to the The study escripti Descripti on on stage actor. Examines appropriate consonant and vowel production, the phonetic analysis of NA Pre/ Co text and the use of breath and intention to Requisit develop an expressive and audible vocal es instrument. ( 2 may be repeated once Credits ) Pre/ Co Departmental permission . 3 Hours Requisit ] Yes ] No [x [ Liberal es Arts (may be repeated for up to 4 credits) Credits 2 NA Course 3 Hours Attribute ] Yes Liberal [ [x ] No (e.g. Ar ts Writing Course NA Intensiv Attribute e, WAC, etc) (e.g. Writing cable __x _ Not Appli General Intensiv _ Required ___ Educatio e, WAC, ____ English Composition n etc) Compon ____ Mathematics

548 General ent _ x__ Not Applicable _ ___ Science ____ Required Educatio _ Flexible ___ n ____ English Composition Compon ____ World Cultures ____ Mathematics ent ____ US Experience in its _ ___ Science Diversity ___ Creative Expression _ ____ Flexible orld Cultures ____ W ____ Individual and Society ____ US Experience in its __ _ _ Scientific World Diversity __ __ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Rationale: The change in course title was created in order to clarify the content of the class as being specifically for the stage. The focus of this course is on voice training for actors on stage in a live setting. It is not a singing course or elocution cours e, so the name change reflects this pedagogical distinction. Also the same course name appears in the Music curriculum, but this co urse is a singing vocal course and the name change marks the distinction between the two courses. This course name change will ensure that the two courses are not confused with each other and are markedly different in nature. This name change in reflected in the “advanced” version of this course THE 305 as well. Date of Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Department Approval: January 25, 2018 Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AV.10 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance. FROM: TO:

549 Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Departm Departm ent(s) ent(s) ] Graduate Graduate ] [ [x] Undergraduate Career [x] Undergraduate [ Career Academi Academi [ ] Compensatory [ ] Regular [x ] [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] ] Remedial c Level [ c Level Developmental [ ] Remedial Developmental Subject Subject tre Thea Theatre Area Area Course THE 235 Course THE 235 Prefix & Prefix & Number Number Stagecraft Course Stagecraft Course Title Title Descripti Stagecraft as a foundation for theatre Descripti Stagecraft as a foundation for theatre production, including a s on production, including a survey of theatre urvey of theatre on architecture and construction backstage and onstage as well as machinery. Experience in its stage scenic construction, lighting methodology and machinery. Experience in scenic construction, lighting methodology and costuming tec hniques. Introduction to maintenance, shop organization, purchasing costuming techniques. Introduction to Participation in department maintenance and budgeting. shop organization. and as productions as assigned. Participation in department productions assigned. NA Pre/ Co Requisit NA Pre/ Co Requisit es es Credits 3 3 Credits 4 Hours 4 Hours Liberal ] No [ ] Yes x [ ] Yes ] No Liberal [ [x Arts Arts NA Course Attribute Course NA

550 (e.g. Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensiv Writing e, WAC, Intensiv e, WAC, etc) etc) x__ General _ Not Applicable Educatio _ Not Applicable __x General ____ Required n ____ English Composition _ Required ___ Educatio Compon n ____ English Composition ____ Mathematics _ Mathematics ___ ent ___ Science _ Compon ___ Science ent _ ____ Flexible ____ World Cultures _ Flexible ___ ____ US Experience in its ____ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its Diversity __ Creative Expression __ Diversity ____ Individual and Society ___ Creative Expression _ ____ Scientific World ____ Individual and Society __ _ _ Scientific World Rationale: The course description was changed in order to clarify the content of the class, as the current course description that is out of date. It was determined by the department to remove the language of “architecture,” “budgeting,” and “purchasing” which were part of an old curriculum that has since been modified, and the course description now reflects the current content of the course. Date of Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance proval: January 25, 2018 Department Ap Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AV.11

551 The following course changes are proposed from the Department of Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance. TO: FROM: Departm Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Departm Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance ent(s ) ent(s) ] Graduate [ [x] Undergraduate Career Career [x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate [ [x [ ] [ ] Compensatory ] ] Regular Academi Academi [x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory Developmental ] Remedial c Level c Level [ Developmental ] Remedial [ Theatre Subject Subject Theatre Area Area Course Course THE 305 THE 305 Prefix & Prefix & Number Number for the Stage Course Course r the Stage Advanced Voice fo Advanced Voice and Diction Title Title Continuation of vocal principles and Advanced Descripti Descripti vocal principles and techniques on . 205 THE techniques from on PREREQ: Pre/ Co THE 205 or Departmental Pre/ Co PREREQ: THE 205 or Departmental . Requisit permission Requisit permission . es es Credits Credits 2 2 3 Hours Hours 3 ] Yes [x ] No ] No [x ] Yes Liber al [ Liberal [ Arts Arts Course NA Course NA Attribute Attribute (e.g. (e.g. Writing Writing

552 Intensiv Intensiv e, WAC, e, WAC, etc) etc) Not Applicable General _ Not Applicable __x General _ x__ ___ io Educat Educatio ____ Required _ Required ____ English Composition n ____ English Composition n ____ Mathematics Compon Compon ____ Mathematics ent ___ Science _ _ ___ Science ent ____ Flexible ___ _ Flexible _ ____ World Cultures ___ World Cultures ____ US Experience in its ____ US Experience in its Diversity Diversity __ __ Creative Expression _ ___ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ____ Individual and Society ____ Scientific World Scientific World __ _ _ Rationale: fically for the stage. The The change in course title was created in order to clarify the content of the class as being speci focus of this course is on voice training for actors on stage in a live setting. It is not a singing course or elocution cour se, so the name change reflects this pedagogical distinction. Also the same course name appears in the M usic curriculum, but this course is a singing vocal course and the name change marks the distinction between the two courses. This course name change will ensure that the two courses are not confused with each other and are markedly different in nature. This change reflects the beginning THE 205 course as well, as this course is the “advanced” version of THE 205. Date of Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Department Approval: January 25, 2018 Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018 AV.12

553 The follow ing course changes are proposed from the Department of Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance. FROM: TO: Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Departm Departm Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance ent(s) ent(s) [x] Undergraduate Career [ Career [x] Undergraduate ] Graduate [ ] Graduate [ [x ] Regular [ ] ] Compensatory Academi [ ] Regular [x Academi ] [ ] Compensatory [ ] Remedial ] Remedial c Level [ Developmental c Level Developmental Subject Theatre Theatre Subject Area Area Course THE 435 THE 435 Course Prefix & Prefix & Number Number Course : Shakespeare and Company Advanced Acting Course Advanced Acting Title Title Explores Shakespeare and his classical Descripti Characterization and ensemble work for the Descripti actor. on on contemporaries in playwriting and performance, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Pre/ Co PREREQ: THE 331 OR Departmental Jonson, and John Webster, and their Requisit Permission . respective characters, language and rhythms, es in the rehearsing and presenting of classical Credits 3 monologues and duologues . 3 Hours Pre/ Co and Permission of PREREQ: THE 331 Liberal [ ] Yes [x ] No . Instructor Requisit Arts es Course NA 3 Credits Attribute Hours 3 (e.g. [ Liberal ] Yes [x ] No Writing Arts Intensiv

554 e, WAC, Course NA etc) Attribute (e.g. General _ x__ Not Applicable Writing Educatio ____ Required Intensiv n ____ English Composition e, WAC, ____ Mathematics Compon etc) ___ Science _ ent _ Not Applicable __x General _ Required ___ Educatio exible ____ Fl n ____ World Cultures ____ English Composition ____ US Experience in its Compon ____ Mathematics ent ___ Science _ Diversity __ __ Creative Expression ____ Individual and Society ___ _ Flexible ____ World Cultures ____ Scientific World ____ US Experience in its Diversity ___ Creative Expression _ ____ Individual and Society __ _ Scientific World _ Rationale: Students were determined by the department to need more classical text training in the acting of ver se texts for the stage, as well as their historical and contextual underpinnings. It was determined that the best place for this to happen was in the Advanced Acting course which will now focus on the work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, including C hristopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, and John Webster. This will give students much needed access to skills in classical performance, performance history, and stage practices that they will encounter throughout their academic and professional careers. Date o f Music, Multimedia, Theatre, and Dance Department Approval: January 25, 2018 Date of Senate Approval: October 10, 2018

555 Medgar Evers College Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters NOVEMBER 2018 to revise selection of courses for degree requirements (Financial A. Proposal Economics Core) in the Department of Economics and Finance. CURRICULUM INFORMATION BS Financial Economics ME OF PROGRAM NA Minor  Associate  Bachelor Concentration   PROGRAM TYPE COURSES ECON 356 Business & Econ Statistics II; ECON 474 Econometrics and Forecasting; FIN 452 Fixed Income Securities; FIN 458 Financial Management; F IN 474 Computer Modeling in Finance. TOTAL CREDITS 120 – There is no change in the number of credits required in the degree program STUDENTS SERVED All students CHANGES REQUESTED NAME OF PROGRAM BS Financial Economics COURSES Financial Economics Degree Requirements: For Intermediate Business Statistics: (1) Students may select one of ECON 356 (Business & Economic Statistics II) or ECON 474 (Econometrics and Forecasting) and (2) For Capstone Requirements: Students may select one of FIN 458 Financial Management of FIN 474 Computer Modeling in Finance or FIN 452 Fixed Income Securities. TOTAL CREDITS 120 – No change in number of credits required for the BS Degree in Financial Economics. To provide flexibility in choice of courses RATIONALE to reflect student sp ecial interests. Also, to mitigate offering of multiplicity of upper level courses that leads to low enrollments in courses that delay graduation for students.

556 Educational Objective of the Department of Economics and Finance The Department of Economi cs and Finance offers students at Medgar Evers College an educational foundation in the body of economic and financial theories and practices that are employed by businesses, governmental entities and nonprofit institutions. The Department also prepares st udents for careers at business and public organizations in economic analyses; financial management; and for positions in the private or public sector; for work and study leading to professional certification; and for graduate study. The BS in Financial Ec onomics The BS in Financial Economics will equip students with the skills necessary to operate in the financial industry. They will be skilled in an understanding of modern financial theory and the tools they need to conduct theoretical and applied researc h. Graduates will have a strong understanding of how financial instruments are priced in markets and how individuals and firms manage financial risk. Skills Developed: • Modern financial theory and practices, theoretical and applied research . • How financial ins truments are priced in markets. irms manage financial risk. • How individuals and f Career Opportunities Career Opportunities are available in the Private Sector as: • Bank Lending / Loan Officer, Real Estate Investment Analyst, Asset and Portfolio Manager, and Credit Analyst . • Equity Security Analyst, Fixed Income Analyst and Bond Trader, Career Opportunities are available in the Government sector as Bank Examiner, Budget Analyst, Compliance Officer, Economist, and Financial Analyst. Statistician -Economi and Research Analyst. • st, Enrollment Trend for the BS in Financial Economics Fall 2015 Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring 2016 2017 2017 2016 2018 4 10 15 19 36 39 2 Graduates 9** ** Candidates for June 2018 graduation.

557 B. Proposal for to add ECON 100 as a new course in the Department of Economics semester. and Finance starting Spring 2019 COURSE INFORMATION ECON Course ALPHA CODE COURSE NUMBER 100 Survey of Economics COURSE TITLE 3 COURSE CREDITS 3 COURSE HOURS COURSE DESCRIPTION AND This c ourse is an introductory survey of OBJECTIVES economics concepts, the methodology of economics as a science and the economic way of thinking. Topics include economic systems, consumer behavior, production, market structures and price determination for understanding the role of markets in market economies. Other topics include inflation, unemployment, and the role of government in a market economy in the context of our contemporary global economy at the individual and societal level. Emphasis will be more on economic policy analysis approaches to social and political problems. COURSE PRE - REQUISITES Pre - Requisite MTH 115 & ENGL 112 (Not available to Majors in Business degrees). Not a pre- requisite to any intermediate or advanced courses in Economics or Finance). SE CO - REQUISITES COUR None FREQUENCY Every semester including summer STUDENT SERVED All non - Business / Non - Economics Majors (Not available to Business & Economics Majors, Except as Free Elective) ANTICIPATED ENROLLMEN T Fall: 80 Spring:80 Summer:40 RATIONALE Currently at Medgar Evers College, some non- business degrees require their majors to take one course in economics. Currently, the only introductory course available to the student is “Introduction to Macroeconomics” (ECON 212). This course is d esigned for students in

558 business degrees and other students who intend to take advanced courses in economics. Furthermore, ECON 212 presents only one area of economics – Macroeconomics, which addresses only the whole economic system. It does not present students with the understanding that Macroeconomics is the sum of microeconomic activities. Students are not able to address specific markets, pricing systems, market structures and other microeconomic aspects of economic analysis. The new course (Sur vey of Economics) is designed for a one- semester issues- based comprehensive survey of economics (Microeconomics and Macroeconomics). Its purpose is to interest the nonbusiness, non- economics major in what the discipline of economics “issues approach” can do. Students of the will master basic economic theory that is necessary to explore a variety of real - world issues. If this is the only economics course they ever take, they will at least gain enough insight to be able to intelligently discuss the way econom ic theory applies to important issues in the world today .

559 University Course Catalog Description This course is an introductory survey of economics concepts, the methodology of economics as a science and the economic way of thinking. Topics include economic systems, consumer behavior, production, market structures and price determination for understanding the role of markets in market economies. Other topics include inflation, unemployment, and the role of government in a market economy in the contex t of our contemporary global economy at the individual and societal level. Emphasis will be more on economic policy analysis approaches to social and political problems. Course Pre- ENGL 112 Requisite: MTH 115 and Requisite: None Course Co- This course fulfills the following General Education Requirements: Individual and Society) General Knowledge Cluster II Flexible Core ( College Option: None Course Objectives Upon completion of this course, successful students would: 1. Be able to use the basic tool s of economic analysis . 2. Explain h ow market -based economies work. 3. Explain the role of competition and the role of government in market -based economies. 4. Apply basic economic tools to analyze hypothetical economic situations to make better economic decisions . for their lives 5. Apply the methodologies of economics to the analysis of Poverty, Discrimination, Income Inequality, Housing Policies, Government Fiscal Policies, Monetary Policies and various . other social and political issues th Robert Guell, Issues in Economics Today, 8 Required Text: Edition, McGrawHill, 2018 (Low Cost) nd Greenlaw, Shapiro and Taylor, Principles of Economics, 2 Edition (OpenStax – Zero Cost) Learning Objectives (Competencies) and Rubrics Pathways Student Learning Course Objectives jectives Ob Students will be able to demonstrate an 1. ways SLO #4 (Apply Path understanding of the Economic Analysis Methods fundamental methods of a including Cost Benefit Analysis, Resource Allocation discipline), #5 (Examine an under Conditions of Scarcity, Opportunity Costs and individual’s place in society). how they affect social and individual decisions.

560 2. Using national income data, students will be able to Pathways SLO #4 (Apply analyze the economy in quantitative terms such as fundamental methods of a the calculation of GDP, GNP, Consumer Price Index discipline), #5 (Examine an (CPI), etc. Students will also be able to explain how individual’s place in society). changes in CPI affect Real Incomes (purchasing Power) standards of living. esearch, the collection of ideas and 3. Through their r Pathways SLO #4 (Apply information / data from a variety of sources and fundamental methods of a their thesis / term projects, students will be able to discipline), utilize simple contemporary economic models to #5 (Examine an individual’s place describe and explain the interrelationships among in society) tructures, firms and how they affect prices, market s Pathways SLO #1 (Gather, output, pricing and optimization decisions by 3 Interpret information), D individuals. (Individual’s place and choices); #5 (Examine an individual’s place in society). Students will be able to explain different market 4. Pathways SL O #4 (Apply structures (Perfect Competition, etc.) and their effect fundamental methods of a on output and pricing decisions in the market place. discipline). 5. Students will be able to explain how prices affect the #5 (Examine an individual’s place demand and supply of goods and how government in society). policies such as minimum wages, rent control, public assistance and housing policies are applied to mit igate adverse effects of unfettered market forces on individuals. 6. Students will be able to explain the economic Pathways SLO #4 (Apply problems posed by unemployment, inflation, and fundamen tal methods of a economic growth. discipline), #5 (Examine an individual’s place in society). Students will be able to explain the economic 7. Pathways SLO #6 (Engage problems posed by unemployment, inflation, and national/global issues). economic growth. Students will be 8. able to describe the role of Pathways SLO #6 (Engage international trade and finance on domestic national/global issues). economic activity. Summary of Pathways Learning Objectives for Individual and Society (See table above) Pathways SLO #1 Gather, in terpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view. Pathways SLO #2 Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically. Pathways SLO #3 Produce well - reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support . Pathw ays SLO #4 Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring the relationship between

561 the individual and society. Pathways SLO #5 Examine how an individual’s place in society affects experiences, values, or choices. Pathways SLO #6 Identify and engage with local, national, or global trends or ideologies, and analyze their impact on individual or collective decision - making. RUBRIC for ECON 100 Survey of Economics and Issues During the semester, there will be several graded written assignments, research paper, quizzes and or cases. Besides timeliness of participation, students will be evaluated based on their ability to demonstrate competence in the analysis of contemporary problems in economic s. The rubric for assessing student performance are laid out below: some of 1. Correctly identifying the basic concepts in economics applicable to the analysis of a problem or question, but unable to answer the questions correctly (Below Minimum Standard ompetency: Needs substantial additional effort). of C 2. Correctly identifying all the basic concepts in economics applicable to the analysis of a problem but unable to answer some of the related questions correctly (Satisfactory: Minimum Standard of Competency: R oom for Improvement) . 3. Correctly identifying all the basic concepts in economics applicable to the analysis of a most of the related questions correctly (Above problem, and able to answer Standard of Competency) . Average 4. Correctly Identifying all the basic concepts in economics applicable to the analysis of a problem, and able to answer all of the related questions correctly (Superior Standard of Competency) . Conducting the Class in Blackboard The Course Information Folder : Has the syllabus and other ins tructions regarding the • course . The Announcements Folder • Periodic announcements about exams, assignments and : readings will be posted to the Announcements Folder. Please check the Announcements Folder at least twice to check for announcements. • The Assignments Folder : All homework assignments will be posted in this folder and will be linked directly to the Grade Book. Students can view their total scores during the semester by clicking on “TOOLS” and then check grades. NO ASSIGNMENTS WILL BE ACCEPTED BY EMAIL. • • The Course Documents Folder : Has illustrations, study guides, PowerPoint slides and solutions to homework assignments. Examinations and Assessment There will be ONE mid -term examination, six written Homework Assignments, eight (8) tutorial Pract ice Quizzes, three in- class short (15 – 20 minutes) written quizzes, a research project and

562 ONE Final Examination. All examinations will be multiple choice online. Students must take all the exams and score a C or above to pass the course. Written Assig nments and Quizzes will be selected mostly from readings taken from various sources. The written homework assignments are 2 – 3 page essays and short analysis developed from contemporary news articles and cases taken from the textbook. Each of the in- ss quizzes will be 15- 20 minutes long and will consist of an essay (written) question from a cla reading or case from the textbook. The readings will be assigned in advance of the Research Project. l final research paper in economics. For this course, each student is required to complete a smal The project topic should be a public policy or other academic issue of interest to the student. The project must state why the topic selected is important. The student must collect data on the topic on interest and us e the data to explain differences in theoretical or policy perspectives from different philosophical or ideological viewpoints. For example, a student could analyze current -economic issues such as differences in economic conditions over time in one or more socio . locations of interest and apply the concepts learned in class to explain the student’s conclusions The paper must be 7 – 11 pages long, written in APA style, including a bibliography of no less than seven documents, excluding data sources. Sources of information for the research may include books, newspaper or journal and magazine articles, data from the textbook or other public sources. The paper must be organized into different sections to include an Introduction, methodology, analysis and concl usions. The methodology section must include the principles and methods of economics learned during class. Summary of Competency Assessment and Pathways Student Learning Objectives (SLO) Pathways Student Learning Objective (PSLO) Instrument SLO #1 Gathe r, interpret, and assess Homework, Project information from a variety of sources and points of view. SLO #2 Project, Homework Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically. SLO #3 Produce well - reasoned written or oral Project arguments using eviden ce to support. SLO #4 Identify and apply the fundamental Project, Practice Quizzes, concepts and methods of a discipline or Review Quizzes, Exams interdisciplinary field exploring the relationship between the individual and society. SLO #5 Examin e how an individual’s place in Project, Homework, Exams society affects experiences, values, or choices.

563 SLO #6 Identify and engage with local, national, Review Quizzes, or global trends or ideologies, and Homework, Project analyze their impact on individual or collective decision - making. ECON 100 - Class Schedule for Survey of Economics Text Topic Assignments Week Chapter Module I: The Economic System and the Foundations of Economic Analysis . Economics Defined: What was your opportunity cost of d Economics an Opportunity Cost, Choices, attending college? What was your Consequences & the Production e with opportunity cost of buying a hous (SLO #4 – 1 Possibility Frontier and Modeling Fundamental your savings? Economic Growth Methods of discipline & #5 Individual’s Marginal Analysis; The Circular Flow Place in Society and Choices Wk1 of Income - Wk3 Markets – Defined: Supply and Home Sales in 2009 On Heels of a 2 Demand, Equilibrium and Surpluses Recession. SLO #5 (Individua l’s Place in Society and Shortages and Choices) Elasticity of Demand : Alternative How many pizzas can you eat and Ways to Understand Elasticity; More when do you stop? 3 on Elasticity Diminishing marginal utility of eating by-the - Consumer and Producer Surplus pizza. Why is demand for pizza- slice is downward sloping? (SLO #4 – Fundamental Methods of discipline) Module II: Microeconomic Issues and Applications inesses in a perfectly Are fast food bus Production, Costs and Revenues Profits, Pricing, Output and Input 4 competitive industry? ( SLO #4 – Wk4 – Decisions Fundamental Methods, SLO #2 - Evaluate Evidence SLO #1 Interpret information). Wk5 From Perfect Market Structures: Why did Walmart not drive small retailers Competition to Monopoly; Supply out of business? ( SLO #4 – – under Perfect Competition Fundamental Methods, SLO #2 5 Normal vs Economic Profit Evaluate Evidence SLO #1 Interpret information). Economics of Health Care: Where The pros and cons associated with the the Money Goes and Where It Comes Wk6 U.S. system of financing health care 24 relative to the U.K. and Canada. What is tates & From; Insurance in the United S Economic Models of Health Care; the opportunity cost? Comparing USA with the Rest of the SLO #6 National and Global Issues;

564 World SL O #5 (Individual’s Place in Society and Choices). Choices: More medical coverage for the - Provided Health Government Insurance: Medicaid, Medicare, and 25 elderly or more coverage for the poor? SLO #5 (Individual’s Place in Society the Children’s Health Insurance and Choices). Program Minimum Wages and Employment in Traditional Minimum Wage: Hartland Wk7 Economic Analysis of a Minimum – Practice Problems ( SLO #4 – Wage Rebuttals to the Traditional 33 Fundamental Met hods, SLO #2 – Analysis Evaluate Evidence). SLO #6 Engage Where Are Economists Now? National and Global Issues . Should there be provisions to apply rent Rents in a Free Market & Rent Control: control Reasons for Controlling Rents; Consequences only to the poor, who need the lower rent? SLO #5 35 of Rent Control (Individual’s Place in Society and Choices, SLO #6 Engage National and Global Issues; Why Does Rent Control Survive? Economics of Discrimination : The Economic Wk8 Would you feel comfortable going outside the social - SLO norms in your choices? Are social norms limiting? Status of Women and Minorities; Definitions #5 (Individual’s Place in Society and Choices, SLO and Detection of Discrimination; Discrimination Wk9 30 in Labor, Consumption, and Lending; #6 E ngage National and Global Issues . Affirmative Action 38 Poverty and Welfare: Measuring Poverty and The wealth of one person, Bill Gates, is about equal to the annual poverty gap in the Unite d States in one year, Programs for the Poor; Incentives, SLO #5 $96 billion. So, Bill Gates is the problem? Disincentives, Myths, Truths and Welfare (Individual’s Place in Society and Choices, Reform SLO #6 . Engage National and Global Issues Module III: Macroeconomic Issues, International Trade and Applications Text Week Assignments ic Top Chapter CPI may overstate the cost of living. Introduction to Macroeconomics: 6 Wk10 Correction may reduce Social S ecurity Measuring the Economy; Real Gross - checks and increasing taxes. Should Domestic Product; Measuring and Wk11 Describing Unemployment; Productivity; economic measures be subject to Business Cycles political debate? Pathways SLO #1 (Gather & Assess Information, SLO #4 (Apply fundamental Concepts) SLO #5 (individual’s place in Society). List and explain the three ways that the Aggregate Demand and Aggregate 8 Supply: Federal Reserve controls the money Aggregate Demand & Aggregate Supply; Shifts in Aggregate supply (i.e., tools of the m onetary Demand and Aggregate Supply; Causes authority) SLO #4 (Apply fundamental of Inflation; How Government Can Concepts); Influence the Economy

565 The third and fourth years of presidential Nondiscretionary and Fiscal Policy: Discretionary Fiscal Policy Using Fiscal terms have higher average rates of real 9 Wk12 Policy to Counteract “Shocks” growth than the first and second years. Evaluating Fiscal Policy; The Obama SLO #6 Is this coincidence or politics? Engage National and Global Issues; Stimulus Plan; Extraordinary Monetary SLO #3 Produce well -reasoned ulus Stim . written or oral argument s using Monetary Policy: Goals, Tools, and a Fed policy can favor financial interests 10 Wk13 or the interests of workers. Should Model of Monetary Policy; Central Bank Independence; Modern Monetary Policy unions the selection of the Fed chair? #6 Engage National and Global SLO Issues; SLO #3 Produce well - reasoned written or oral arguments; SLO #5 (individual’s place in Society) . – Recession of 2007 What could have realistically been 2009 : Before It attempted in the middle of the housing Began Late 2007: The Recession 14 Begins as Do the Initial Policy boom to forestall the bust that came ottom Falls Out in Fall Reactions; The B after? SLO #6 Engage National and 2008; The Obama Stimulus: An Global Issues; SLO #3 Produce well - reasoned written or oral arguments; Extraordinary Monetary Stimulus SLO #5 (individual’s place in Society . Trade and the US Economy : How can comparative and absolute -typing advantage explain why a fast What We Trade and with Whom; The Benefits of International Trade; Trade 17 business executive might dictate letters Barriers Trade as a Diplomatic Weapon; on a digital audio recorder for her Costs of Protect ionism Week 14 secretary to type rather than type them SLO #6 Engage National and herself? y Global Issues; SLO #4 (Appl fundamental methods of a discipline) . s import and Why would the United State Are Trade Agreements Good?: The 21 export cars, airplanes, chemicals, and Benefits of Free Trade; Why Do We petroleum products? North American Need Trade Agreements?; Trade Agreements and Institutions: Economic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) SLO #6 Engage National and Global Issues; and Political Impacts of Trade; The Bottom Line SLO #4 (Apply fundamental methods of a discipline) . Final Comprehensive Departmental Examinatio n and Submission of Final Project Grading

566 Mid Term Examination 1 15% Written Assignments (Short Essays & Discussions) 15% 10% In Class Short Quizzes 9Written Responses) Practices Quizzes – 10% Multiple Choice 20% Research Project Final Examination (Comprehensive) 30% Total 100% C. Proposal to add GEOG 303 as a new course in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences starting Spring 2019. COURSE INFORMATION GEOG COURSE ALPHA CODE COURSE NUMBER 303 COURSE TITLE: Geographic Information Systems COURSE CREDITS 3 3 COURSE HOURS This course introduces students to geographic information systems COURSE DESCRIPTION used to analyze spatial patterns and processes; it has (GIS). GIS is wide applications in the social sciences, environmental management, business administration, and public policy. The course introduces students to methods, data, and technology used in geospatial sis. Topics include spatial analysis, spatial data structures and analy databases, principles of cartography, and tools for data collection and editing. - COURSE PRE MTH 115 REQUISITES COURSE CO N/A - REQUISITES FREQUENCY Fall and Spring STUDENTS SERVED Studies BA; This course will be cross - listed with Public Liberal – PA 311 (GIS). Administration’s ANTIPATED Fall: 25 Spring 25 ENROLLMENT GIS is used for analyzing spatial patterns and RATIONALE processes, and for designing maps. It is a central com ponent of the discipline of Geography, and has wide applications in the social sciences, business administration, planning/public policy, and environmental management. It is important that students be given multiple opportunities to understand, analyze, an d interpret data. Data are

567 usually difficult for undergraduate students to analyze and interpret. GIS gives students another way to understand data by visualizing it. Given that this is about understanding data, it is important for different departments to create their own courses to interpret data that is influential to their respective field. The course will fulfill concentration requirements for the BA of Liberal Studies major (as shown in the attached course map). Our department intends to develop a mi nor and/or major in Geography; this course will be an important component of either program. GIS training is necessary career preparation for students wishing to enter any -related field. It will offer a useful career Geography SBS fields including skill for students in related Anthropology, History, and Sociology. The course will also be of relevance to students in programs like Public Administration or Business Administration. The College’s mission is to deliver “high quality, professional, career orient ed undergraduate degree programs in the context of liberal education.” This course will support that mission in two ways. First, the course trains students in a skillset that is in demand across a number of industries. The Bureau of Labor s job growth in this field as “much faster Statistics rate than average,” and GIS analysts in the New York metro Glassdoor’s earn an average of $58,000 accordingly to salary survey. Second, the course links the development of technical skills to the broader mission of a liberal arts education. The course has been designed to help designed to help students draw connections between technical analysis and the broader forms of critical thinking literacy emphasized in the social sciences. University Course Catalog Description This course introduces students to geographic information systems (GIS). GIS is used to analyze spatial patterns and processes; it has wide applications in the social sciences, environmental

568 management, business administration, and public policy. The course introduces students to methods, data, and technology used in geospatial analysis. Topics include spatial analysis, databases, principle of cartography, and tools for data collection and spatial data structures and editing. Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) Course Objectives and The objectives of this course are to: Introduce industry • -leading geospatial software and hardware. Apply basic theoretical concepts of spatial analysis. • Analyze geospatial problems using GIS tools. • By the end of the course, students should demonstrate the following student learning outcomes: • Manage spatial data collection, creation, and editing • Create maps using following fundamental cartographic practices Design a GIS research project by formulating a research question, i • mplementing analytical tools, and finding/using appropriate data Course Pre- Requisite: MTH 115 Course Co- Requisite: None Required Texts and Materials th Mic hael law & Amy Collins (2015) Getting to Know ArcGIS , 4 Required: edition. Redl ands, CA: ESRI Press. ISBN 978 -1589483828 Recommended: Paul Longley et al (2016) Geographic Information Science and th Systems edition. London: Wiley , 4 Supplementary Materials Software : The class will be using ESRI’s ArcGIS 10. This software has been installed in some computer labs on campus. Students will be provided with a trial license that you can install on a personal computer. The class will also be working with Google Earth Pro ( https://www.google .com/earth/ ). This program is installed in some labs on campus, and is free to download on a personal computer.

569 Hardware: Students are encouraged to purchase an external hard drive or flash drive for saving data. Students will need at least 50gb of storage for the semester. Basis for the Final Grade Lab reports (50% of course grade): The lab assignments are designed to teach students how to use GIS tools and manage/analyze data. For each assignment, a report will be turned in, which includes a writt en document and a map. Students are encouraged to work with one another on the labs, but writing/maps must be own work. Practical exam (20% of course grade): The practical exam tests ability to solve GIS problems using skills gained in the lectures and Students will be asked to diagram models, configure settings, and remember labs. the names of specific ArcGIS tools. will be allowed a cheat sheet on one 8.5”x11” They sheet of paper. Research project (30% of course grade): The research project is an independent project, in which you will be asked to: (i) design a research question; (ii) find, format, and analyze GIS data; and (iii) conduct a GIS analysis of the data. We will work on this throughout the semester. Deliverables include (10% of course grade) and a final poster (20% of course grade). a preliminary report Grading Scale A+ 97 -100 A > 93 - 96.9 A- 90 - 92.9 B+ 87.1 - 89.9 B 83 - 87 B- 80 - 82.9 C+ 77 - C 73 – 76.9 C- 70 – 72.9 79.9 D+ 67.1 - 69.9 D 63 - 67 D- 60 – 62.9 F < 59.9 Grade Dissemination Grades will be posted on Blackboard. Comments on maps and written work will be returned in class.

570 Course Policies: Grades is at the discretion of the instructor. Curving Extra credit is only offered at the discretion of the instructor. Grades will be posted on Blackboard. Feedback will be provided on materials handed back in class. Incomplete grades are only issued at the discretion of the instructor. The student must initiate the request and provide documentation of the exceptional circumstances preventing her/him from finishing coursework. Late submissions are not accepted, unless there is a documented conflict like university - sponsored travel, illnesses documented with a doctor’s note, unexpected work onflicts, or family emergencies scheduling c . I may request additional documentation. Course Policies: Technology and Media : Students Classroom devices are welcome to use laptops/tablets during lectures. In fact, will sometimes ask students to bring them for in -class exercises. However, instructor please silence and stow cell phones during class. Other devices (e.g. recorders) should be cleared with the instructor before use in class. Email is the best way to get in touch with me. Please use appropriate email etiquette in all communications (for more info, see http://www.wikihow.com/Email- a-Professor ). Course Policies: Student Expectations The CUNY academic integrity policy ( Academic integrity: http://web.cuny.edu/academics/info- central/policies/academic -integrity.pdf ) prohibits cheating, plagiarism, obtaining unfair advantage, and falsifying records. Students who violate the policy will receive a failing grade and will be reported to the Academic Integrity Officer. Announcements ses and/or posted on the will be sent to your university email addres course Blackboard webpage. Please check Blackboard regularly for upd ates. Attendance is required, unless there is a reason for an excused absence. Reasons for excused absences include university -sponsored travel, illnesses documented with a doctor’s note, unexpected work scheduling conflicts, or family emergencies, instructor may request additional documentation. Special accommodations: Instructor will provide special learning accommodations to students who need them. Please get in touch with the Office of Services for the Differently -Abled (1650 Bedford Avenue, R om 1011), so an accommodation plan can be developed. Important Dates

571 Due one week after the topic is discussed in class, on Saturday at 11:59pm Labs 1- 10 (e.g. Lab 1 is discussed in week 2, so it is due on Saturday of week 3) Week 10 Practical exam Research project Three deadlines in weeks 9, 13, and 14 deliverables Week 16 Research poster Schedule In class Objectives & Week Topic Readings Labs demos SLOs Appl y basic Law & theoretical Navigating What is 1 Collins Ch concepts of ArcGIS GIS? 1 & 2 spatial analysis Manage spatial Lab 1: Law & Loading data, Spatial data data collection, Collins Ch 2 Navigatin attribute tables, models g ArcGIS 3 creation, and summary

572 statistics, editing Longley et al joins/relates Ch 2 Create maps Law & Map using following Collins Lab 2: Make customization, Principles of fundamental Ch 4 3 a map layout view, cartography cartographic Longley et al map export practices Ch 11 Create maps Define using following Lab 3: Law & Projection, fundamental Projection Collins Ch Project, 4 Projections cartographic s 6 customize practices projections Create maps using following Symbology, Law & Lab 4: Data Data fundamental 5 Collins Ch classification, visualizati visualization cartogr aphic on labeling 7 & 8 practices Analyze Lab 5: Joins SQL, select by Law & geospatial Queries and 6 Collins Ch attribute, select problems using queries by location 15 & 16 GIS tools Analyze geospatial Law & Vector Dissolve, clip, problems using 7 Collins extract, append analysis 1 GIS tools Ch 18 Analyze Buffer, intersect, Lab 6: Law & geospatial Vector field calculator, Geoprocessi Collins 8 problems using tabulate analysis 2 Ch 19 ng GIS tools statistics

573 Apply basic theoretical concepts of Law & Geodatabases, Data spatial analysis Collins georeferencing, 9 creation & Ch 12 & editor tools, field Manage spatial editing 13 calculator data collection, creation, and editing Practical 10 exam Apply basic theoretical concepts of GPS receivers, spatial analysis Applications: et al Longley Lab 7: GPS 11 data Manage spatial GPS Ch 8 mapping interoperability data collection, creation, and editing App ly basic theoretical concepts of address Law & Lab 8: spatial analysis locators, Applications: 12 Collins Ch Geocoding matching, Manage spatial Geocoding addresses 14 rematching data collection, creation, and editing Apply basic Decennial theoretical census, concepts of Applications: American spatial analysis Tutorial using 13 Community handouts Manage spatial census data Survey, TIGER data collection, files, GEOID creation, and formatting editing Apply basic Discussing & theoretical developing concepts of final projects 14 Workshop spatial analysis in lab Design a GIS research project

574 Apply basic Discussing & theoretical developing concepts of final projects 15 Workshop spatial analysis in lab Design a GIS research project Apply basic theoretical Poster session concepts of during final Poster 16 spatial analysis exam period session Design a GIS research project D. Proposal to revise course title, description and pre- requisites for GEOG 402 in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences. CURRENT COURSE INFORMATION COURSE ALPHA GEOG CODE: COURSE NUMBER: 402 COURSE TITLE: Agricultura l Geography of the Humid Tropics COURSE CREDITS: 3

575 CLASS HOURS: Lab hours n/a 3 COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to familiarize students with the scope, methods, and position of agricultural Geography and the patterns, problems, and potentia l of sustainable agricultural land use in developing countries of the humid tropics. It defines and delimits the humid tropics and discusses its advantages and limitations for sustainable agriculture. The farming types found in the region are mapped, descr ibed, and explained. Problems of livestock production in the life zone will be discussed. This will be followed by an appraisal of some agricultural development schemes in selected countries and the extent to which they can contribute to sustainable agricu ltural development. Pre- requisites: GEOG 302 - COURSE PRE GEOG 302 REQUISITES: - None COURSE CO REQUISITES: Once annually FREQUENCY: STUDENTS Liberal Studies BA SERVED: CHANGES REQUESTED Title , Description CHANGE TYPE: Pre - Requisites and NEW ALPHA CODE GEOG NEW NUMBER 402 NEW TITLE: Environment and Society NEW CREDITS 3 HOURS 3 NEW LAB n/a NEW HOURS:

576 NEW DESCRIPTION This course examines the interaction between nature and society, with emphasis on natural resources and environmen tal conservation. The course familiarizes students with scholarship on human impacts on the environment. It analyzes the spatial dimensions of environmental conservation, environmental degradation, and natural resource management. The course applies these ideas to case studies of environmental conservation, environmental problems, and natural resources. It evaluates debates over sustainable development and environmental justice. - NEW PRE GEOG 101 or GEOG 201 or GEOG 202 REQUISITES - CO NEW None REQUISITES EW PRE/CO - None N REQUISITES EFF ECTIVE DATE Spring 2019 (Semester and Year) RATIONALE: GEOG 402 is already on the catalog and is offered every fall. However, the curriculum must be brought up to date, and so I am asking to revise the course title and course description. My goal is to update the Geography curriculum to reflect current work in the field. The course fulfills concentration requirements for the BA of Liberal Studies major (as shown in the attached course map). As an upper level course on environmental social science, this course is important training for students wishing to enter any Geography - related field. The topic is also relevant to students in related SBS fields including Anthropology and Sociology. The College’s mission is to de liver “high quality, professional, career oriented undergraduate degree programs in the context of liberal education.” This course is designed to train students in the types of critical thinking and cultural literacy which are emphasized in a liberal arts education. The course is designed to walk students through an independent social science research project. The project is developed through a series of workshops spread out across the semester. That design allows students opportunities to apply critical thinking skills, analyze secondary data, and refine academic writing skills. University Course Catalog Description

577 This course examines the interaction between nature and society, with emphasis on natural resources and environmental conservation. The course familiarizes students with scholarship on human impacts on the environment. It analyzes the spatial dimensions of environmental conservation, environmental degradation, and natural resource management. The course applies these ideas to case studies of environmental conservation, environmental problems, and natural resources. It evaluates debates over sustainable development and environmental justice. Course Objectives and Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) The objectives of this course are to: Analyze the spatial distribution of natural resources and environmental problems. • • Analyze the drivers and implications of human impacts on the environment. • Integrate social sciences and earth sciences to interpret environmental issues. students should demonstrate progress in the following SLOs: By the end of the course, Evaluate arguments and points of view related to environmental justice, environmental • degradation, natural resource use, and sustainable development . • Apply spatial analysis concepts to problems of natural resource use and environmental conservation. Conduct research using geographic data and technologies. • Course Credits This is a three credit course. Required Texts and Materials nd cal Introduction , 2 Robbins, Hintz, & Moore (2014) Environment and Society: A Criti edition. London: Wiley -1-118- 45156 -4 -Blackwell. ISBN 978 Supplementary Materials The class will read a variety of research in addition to the textbook, from sources including academic journals, academic books, and investigative journalism. These

578 readings will be posted as PDFs on the course Blackboard site, or are available at the library. will also be asked to use some GIS programs, especially Google Earth Pro Students (https://www.google.com/earth/) and Story Maps JS (https://st orymap.knightlab.com/). can will need a computer where they These programs are free to download, but students the program . Students cannot install them on the university lab computers. install Basis for the Final Grade Attendance/Participation (10% of c ourse grade): Attendance is required, and is monitored through attendance sheets. The lectures are based on the reading assignments, and you need to read the assigned class quizzes and the material before class. Participation is measured based on in- instru ctor’s records. Exams (40% of course grade): Exam 1 (20%) and Exam 2 (20%) will be used to evaluate your comprehension of lecture material and level of engagement with the course readings. The exams are a mix of multiple- choice, short answer, and essay -length questions. Research project (50% of course grade): The goal of the project is to analyze and evaluate the geography of a particular natural resource. It should analyze the product’s environmental impacts and governance, and should be based on soc ial science data/scholarship. The last days of class will be devoted to presenting these projects. More detailed instructions will be circulated separately. Grading Scale A+ 97 -100 A > 93 - 96.9 A- 90 - 92.9 B+ 87.1 - B 83 - 87 B- 80 - 82.9 89.9 C+ 77 - 79.9 C 73 – 76.9 C- 70 – 72.9 D+ 67.1 - D 63 - 67 D- 60 – 62.9 69.9 F < 59.9 Grade Dissemination Grades will be posted on Blackboard. Comments on written work will be returned in class.

579 Course Policies: Grades Curving is at the discretion of the instructor. is only offered at the discretion of the instructor. Extra credit will be posted on Blackboard. Feedback will be provided on materials handed Grades back in class. instructor. The student must Incomplete grades are only issued at the discretion of the initiate the request and provide documentation of the exceptional circumstances preventing her/him from finishing coursework. Late submissions are not accepted, unless there is a documented conflict like university - travel, sponsored illnesses documented with a doctor’s note, unexpected work scheduling conflicts, or family emergencies . I may request additional documentation. is measured through a combination of attendance surveys, in- Participation class quizzes, and my evaluati on of your contributions to the classroom conversation. Please show respect for your colleagues by arriving to class on time and prepared to discuss the material. Course Policies: Technology and Media Classroom devices : You are welcome to use laptops/ tablets during lectures. In fact, I will sometimes ask you to bring them for in- class exercises. However, please silence and stow cell phones during class. Other devices (e.g. recorders) should be cleared with the instructor before use in class. Email is the best way to get in touch with me. Please use appropriate email etiquette in http://www.wikihow.com/Email- all communications (for more info, see a-Professor ). Course Policies: Student Expectat ions Academic integrity: http://web.cuny.edu/academics/info- The CUNY academic integrity policy ( central/policies/academic -integrity.pdf ) prohibits cheating, plagiar ism, obtaining unfair advantage, and falsifying records. Students who violate the policy will receive a failing grade and will be reported to the Academic Integrity Officer. Announcements will be sent to your university email addresses and/or posted on t he course Blackboard webpage. Please check Blackboard regularly for updates. Attendance is required, unless there is a reason for an excused absence. Reasons for excused absences include university -sponsored travel, illnesses documented with a doctor’s note, unexpected work scheduling conflicts, or family emergencies. I may request additional documentation. Special accommodations: I am happy provide special learning accommodations to students who need them. Please get in touch with the Office of Services for the Differently -Abled (1650 Bedford Ave, Room 1011) so that we can develop an accommodation plan.

580 Important Dates to Remember Exam 1 Week 6 Exam 2 Week 13 Three deadlines in weeks 3, 7, and 11 Research project deliverables Week 14 or 15 Research presentations Schedule

581 Week Learning objectives Topic Readings Required: Environment Robbins et al (2014) (Chapter 1: and Society Introduction) Additional resources Integrate social Cronon, William (1995) The trou ble sciences and earth Human - with wilderness. In Uncommon sciences to interpret environment 1 ground: Rethinking the Human environmental geography . New York: Place with Nature issues. WW Norton (69- 90) Demeritt, David (2002) What is the ‘social construction of nature’? A typology and sympathetic critique. Progress in Human , 26(6): 767 Geography -790. Required: Analyze the drivers Robbins et al (2014) Environment f and implications o and Society (Chapter 2: human impacts on Population and Scarcity) the environment Additional resources: Evaluate arguments The Boserup, Ester (1965) and points of view 2 Scarcity Conditions of Agricultural related to Growth . London: Earthscan environmental justice, Ehrlich, Paul (1968) The Population environmental Bomb . Stanford University Press degradation, natural Malthus, Thomas (1798) An Essay resource use, and on the Principle of Population sustainable and its Future Impacts on development. Society . London: J. Johnson Analyze the Case study: water Required: 3 spatial Robbins et al (2014) distribution of Environment a nd Society natural (Chapter 15: Bottled

582 Water) resources and environmental problems. Additional resources: Barnes, Jessica (2014) Cultivating the Nile: The Everyday Politics of Water in Egypt . Durham, NC: Duke University Press Analyze the Required: 4 Markets drivers and Robbins et al (2014) implications of Environment and Society human impacts (Chapter 3: Markets and on the commodities) environment. Evaluate Additional resources: arguments and Crewe, Louise (2004) points of view Unraveling fashion’s related to commodity chains. In environmental Alex Hughes & Suzanne just ice, Riemer (editors) environmental Geographies of degradation, mmodity Chains Co . natural resource 214) Routledge (195- use, and Dunaway, Wilma (2014) sustainable Through the portal of the development. household: conceptualizing women’s subsidies to commodity chains. In Gendered Commodity Chains: Seeing Women’s Work and Households in Global Production . Stanford: Stanford 71) University Press. (55- The Pietra Rivoli (2015) Travels of a T -shirt in the . John Global Economy Wiley & Sons. Analyze the 5 Case study: agriculture Required: spatial Knox, Paul & Marston, distribution of Sallie (2015) natural resources

583 Geographies of food and and Human agriculture. In environmental Geography: Places & problems. Regions in Global . New Y ork: Context 341) Pearson (pp 298- Additional resources: Buchelli, Marcelo & Ian Read (2006) Banana boats and baby food: the banana in US history. In Marichal, Carlos et al From Silver to (2006) Cocaine: Latin American Commodity Chains and the Building of the Worl d . Durham: Duke Economy University Press. (204- 227) [film] (2014) Food Chains Exam 1 Review lecture & Exam 1 6 Analyze the Non -market Institutions Required: 7 drivers and Robbins et al (2014) implications of Environment and Society human impacts (Chapter 4: Institutions on the and the Commons) environment. Evaluate Additional resources: arguments and Hardin, Garret (1968) The points of view tragedy of the commons. related to -1248 162: 1243 Science environmental Harvey, David (2011) The justice, future of the commons. environmental Radical History Review , degradation, 107 109: 101- natural resource use, and Ostrom, Elinor (1990) sustainable Governing the development. Commons . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

584 Analyze the 8 Case study: fisheries Required: spatial Robbins et al (2014) distribution of Environment and Society natural resources (Chapter 13: Tuna) and environmental Additional resources: problems. Susanne Freidberg (2009) A Perishable Fresh: History . Harvard University Press Analyze the Required: Political economy 9 drivers and Robbins et al (2014) implications of Environment and Society human impacts (Chapter 7: Political on the economy) environment. Evaluate Additional resour ces: arguments and Bridge, Gavin (2008) Global points of view production networks and related to the extractive sector: environmental governing resource- justice, based development. environmental Journal of Economic degradat ion, Geography , 8(3): 389- natural resource 419 use, and Cook, Ian et al (2004) sustainable Tropics of consumption: development. ‘getting with the fetish’ of ‘exotic’ fruit. I n Alex Hughes & Suzanne Riemer (editors) Geographies of . New Commodity Chains York: Routledge (173- 192) Guthman, Julie (2009) Unveiling the unveiling: commodity chains, commodity fetishism, and the "value" of voluntary, ethical food labels. In r (editor) Jennifer Bai Frontiers of Commodity Chain Research.

585 Stanford University Press (190- 206). Analyze the Case study: climate Required: 10 spatial change Robbins et al (2014) distribution of Environment and Society natural resources (Chapter 9: Carbon and dioxide) environmental problems. Additional resources: Bridge, Gavin & Le Billon, Oil Phillipe (2012) . Polity Press Huber, Matt (2013) Fueling Capitalism: Oil, the regulation approach, and the ecology of capital. Economic Geography 89(2): 171- 194. O’Neill, Timothy (2007) Curse of the black gold. National Geographic Integrate social Social construction of 11 Required: sciences and nature Robbins et al (2014) earth sciences to Environment and Society interpret (Chapter 8: Social environmental construction of nature) issues. Evaluate Additional resources: arguments and Goodman, Michael (2004) points of view Reading fair trade: related to political ecological environmental imagina ry and the moral justice, economy of fair trade environmental foods. Political degradation, 23(7): 891- Geography natural resource 915 use, and Sheppard, Eric (2011) sustainable Geography, nature, and development. the question of development. Dialogues , in Human Geography 75 1(1): 46- Robbins et al (2014)

586 Environment and Society (Chapter 14: Lawns) Analyze the ste Required: Case study: Wa 12 spatial Heather Rogers (2005) distribution of Gone Tomorrow: The natural resources . Hidden Life of Garbage and The New Press. environmental [selections] problems. Additional resources: Davies, Anna (2008) Garbage and The governance. In Geographies of Garbage Governance: Interventions, Interactions, and Outcome s . Farnham: Ashgate (pp 3- 22) Grant, Richard & Martin Oteng -Ababio (2012) Mapping the invisible and real ‘African’ economy: waste circuitry. urban e- Urban Geography , 33(1): 1-21 Picking Nagle, Robin (2013) Up: On the Streets and Behind the Trucks with the Sanitation Workers of . Farrar, New York City Straus and Giroux. Exam 2 Review lecture and Exam 13 2 Research seminar Student research Apply spatial 14 - presentations and peer analysis review fee dback concepts. Conduct research using geographic data and technologies. 15 Research seminar Student research Apply spatial - presentations and peer analysis

587 review feedback concepts. Conduct research using geographic data and technologies.

588 CUNY School of Medicine City College / – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report AIV.1 NEW COURSE Program: BS/MD CUNY School of Medicine Department: HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 [] Undergraduate [X ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Course Number MED 71009 Title Emergency Medicine Clerkship Course None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 Liberal Art s [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc) This 4 Catalog Description week inpatient experience provides M4 students with increas ing responsibility for patient care - and an opportunity to function as a more fully integrated member of the medical team on an inpatient service. The students will deliver direct patient care and assume all the responsibilities of an intern with ork load. The student will be supervised at all times by the house staff and faculty. a reduce w General Education [X]Not Applicable Component ]Flexible [ ]Required[ [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathemati cs[ ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Science[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale The proposed course is specifically focused on the Medical School curriculum and re quirements to pass USMLE Board Examinations and prepare students for clinical practice as physicians. There are no courses with significant overlap currently offered at CCNY or elsewhere at CUNY. All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

589 AIV. 2 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 73009 Intensive Care Clerkship Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) Catalog Description - week inpatient experience introduces M4 students to the car e of patient in an intensive This 4 care unit. The focus will be on the continued development of clinical skills, including:conducting a medical interview and physical examination, documenting and communicating findings to the medical team, clinical reasoning and differential diagnosis, generation of treatment plan, and assessment/management of critically ill patients. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale The course is a required clinical clerkship in the medical s chool curriculum that will introduce students to the field of Intensive care . Students will participate in the full array of clinical activities in the care of all patients in the Intensive care unit. All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

590 AIV. 3 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70019 M4 Anesthesiology elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) This is a 4 - week clinical elective that may provide an overview of the principles and delivery of anesthesia for Catalog Description patients undergoing surgical, obstetric, diagnostic, or therapeutic procedures while monitoring the patient’s condition and supporting vital organ functions. It may include the diagnosis and treatment for acute, chronic, and/or cancer pain as well as provide resuscitation and medical management for patients with critical illnesses and severe injuries. This elective may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. [X]Not Applicable General Education Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkship. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions . In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

591 AIV. 4 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level C MED 70029 ourse Number M4 Dermatology elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, tc) WAC,e This is a 4 - week clinical elective that may provide an overview of the diagnosis and medical/surgical Catalog Description of the skin, hair and nails, and mucous membranes. This elective may offer management of diseases experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. [X]Not Applicable General Education Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composit ion[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curric ulum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care In keeping with the practices of other medic al school, this elective of patients with a variety of conditions. course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

592 AIV. 5 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine 1206.00 HEGIS Code: Program Code: 382861 Effective: ester, 2019 Fall Sem Career [] Undergraduate [X ] Graduate Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Course Number MED 70039 M4 Emergency medicine elective Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite Non e 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Hours Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts ] [ Yes[X] No riences. Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical expe Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) This is a 4 week clinical elective that may provide an overview of the immediate decision making and action Catalog Description - necessary to prevent death or any further disability both in the pre -hospital setting by directing emergency technicians and in the emergency department. It may include immediate recognition, evaluation, care, medical stabilization, and disposition of a generally diversified population of adult and pediatric patients in response to acute illness and injury General Educa tion X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ ety [ ]Individual and Soci [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to cl inical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis . course can be taken for credit up to five times

593 AIV. 6 Program: BS/MD Departm ent: CUNY School of Medicine 1206.00 HEGIS Code: 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70049 M4 Family medicine elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Student interaction and participation r equired. Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Catalog Description This is a 4 - week clinical elective that may provide an overview of the delivery of a range of acute, chronic, and preventive medical care services provided by the famil y medicine physician. This may include diagnosing and treating various illnesses, provision of preventive care, routine checkups, health risk assessments, immunization and screening tests, and personalized counseling on maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The se electives may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. [X]Not Applicable General Education Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experie nce in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical this care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, elective course can be taken for credi t up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

594 7 AIV. Program: BS/MD CUNY School of Medicine Department: HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 [] Undergraduate [X ] Graduate Career Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Course Number MED 79900 Title M4 Independent Study elective Course Prerequisite None Corequisite None 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Hours Credits 4 per electiv e Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Course Attribute Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) This is a 4 - week elective that is individ Catalog Description ually designed to meet proposed objectives in the area of study, under the supervision and guidance of a mentor. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]W orld Cultures ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are electives in the medical school curriculum selected by th e students with the goal of broadening their knowledge and/or clinical skills in a field that interest them. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

595 AIV. 8 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensat ory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70059 M4 Internal medicine elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) This is a 4 - week clinical elective that may provide an overview of the delivery of comprehensive care in the Catalog Description office and in the hospital, managing both common and complex illnesses of adults, and the elderly. This elective may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. [X]Not Applicable General Education Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this care of elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

596 AIV. 9 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine 1206.00 HEGIS Code: 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career [] Undergraduate [X ] Graduate [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70069 M4 Medical Genetics elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) experiences. This is a 4 week clinical elective that ma y provide an overview of the evaluation, diagnosis, Catalog Description - management and treatment of individuals of all ages with hereditary disorders. This may include exposure to the modern cytogenetic, molecular, genomic, and biochemical genetic testing creen and diagnose chromosomal disorders, congenital anomalies, inborn techniques used to s errors of metabolism and multifactorial conditions. This elective may offer inpatient and outpatient experiences. [X]Not Applicable General Education Component [ ]Required[ e ]Flexibl [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Science[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationa le The proposed course is specifically focused on the Medical School curriculum and requirements to pass USMLE Board Examinations and prepare students for clinical practice as physicians. There are no courses with significant overlap currently offered at CCNY or elsewhere at CUNY. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

597 AIV. 10 BS/MD Program: CUNY School of Med Department: icine 1206.00 HEGIS Code: 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Course Number MED 70079 M4 Neurosurgery elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, etc) This is a 4 - week clinical elective that may provide an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of pain Catalog Description ity of the central nervous system, the or pathological processes that may modify the function or activ peripheral nervous system, the autonomic nervous system, the supporting structures of these systems, -operative treatment and their vascular supply. The experience may include operative and non modalities. This electiv e may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ [ ]Science[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Individual and Society ]Scientific World [ Rationale These are required clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce In keeping with the practices of other students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

598 AIV. 11 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X cademic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial A Course Number MED 70089 M4 Neurology elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liber al Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Att ribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. ) (e.g. Writing Intensive This is a 4 - week clinical elective that may provide an ove rview of the evaluation and treatment of all Catalog Description types of disease or impaired function of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, muscles, and autonomic nervous system, as well as the blood vessels that relate to these structures. This elective may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is no t a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

599 AIV. 12 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Course Number MED 70099 M4 Obtestrics and gynecology elective Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite None 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Hours Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Student interaction and participation required. Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) e that focuses on the health of women before, during, and after Catalog Description This is a 4 - week clinical electiv childbearing years. It includes the diagnosis and treatment of conditions of the reproductive system and associated disorders. This elective may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient ar eas. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component ]Flexible [ ]Required[ ]World Cultures [ ]English Composition[ ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are required clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pa ss/Fail basis .

600 AIV. 13 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70119 M4 Ophthalmology elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective L iberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attr ibute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. ,etc) (e.g. Writing Intensive Catalog Description - week clinical elective that is focused on the medical and surgical treatment of the eyes This is a 4 and includes the diagnosis and management of various eye conditions and diseases. This elective may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical tients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this care of pa elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

601 AIV. 14 BS/MD Program: ool of Medicine Department: CUNY Sch HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70129 Title M4 Orthopedic surgery elective Course None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per electi ve Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Att ribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. ) (e.g. Writing Intensive This is a 4 - week clinical elective that may provi de an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of Catalog Description musculoskeletal problems include congenital deformities, trauma, infections, tumors, metabolic disturbances of the musculoskeletal system, deformities, injuries, and degenerative diseases of the spine, hands , feet, knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow in children and adults. This elective may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]Englis h Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are required clinical electives in the me dical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical ices of other medical school, this elective care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the pract course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

602 AIV. 15 CUNY School of Medicine (?) Program: Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education / Department: CCNY 0499.00(?) HEGIS Code: 77808(?) Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Course Number MED 70139 tle M4 Otolaryngology elective Course Ti None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Att ribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participati on required. ) (e.g. Writing Intensive This is a 4 - week clinical elective that may provide an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of Catalog Description throat, respiratory, and upper alimentary disorders, deformities, and injuries of the ears, nose, sinuses, systems, face, jaws, and the other head and neck systems. This elective may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are r equired clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective care of patients with a variety of course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

603 AIV. 16 Program: BS/MD CUNY School of Medicine Department: 1206.00 ode: HEGIS C 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Course Number MED 70149 M4 Pathology elective Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite None 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Hours Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. Course Attribute week clinical elective that may provide an overview of the various laboratory methods and techniques Catalog - This is a 4 Description utilized to examine tissue specimens, cells, and body fluids in order to diagnose and monitor di sease. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ [ ]Science[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Individual and Society ]Scientific World [ Rationale These are required clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can patients with a variety of conditions. be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

604 AIV. 17 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70159 M4 Pediatrics elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Libe ral Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. etc) (e.g. Writing Intensive, This is a 4 - week clinical elective that may provide an overview of the prevention, diagnosis and Catalog Description treatment of diseases, disorders, and conditions that affect children from birth to young adulthood. It may include exposure to developmental considerations that impact physical, emotional, and social children. This elective may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. health of General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to In keeping with the practices of other medical clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

605 AIV. 18 BS/MD Program: Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Fall Semester, 2019 Effective: Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70169 Title M4 Pediatric Neurology elective Course None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours p er week) 4 per elective Credits Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribut e Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. etc) (e.g. Writing Intensive, This is a 4 - we ek clinical elective that may provide an overview of the diagnosis, treatment and Catalog Description management of disorders of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and muscles affecting infants, children and adolescents. This elective may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creativ [ ]Science[ e Expression [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical this care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be grade d on a Pass/Fail basis .

606 AIV. 19 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70179 Title M4 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation elective Course None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Cre 4 per elective dits Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) - week clini cal elective that may provide an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of physical Catalog Description This is a 4 and/or cognitive impairments and disabilities that result from musculoskeletal conditions, neurological conditions, or other medical conditions that interfere with function. These electives may offer experiences in inpatient or outpatient areas. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component ]Flexible [ ]Required[ [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US E xperience in its Diversity [ ]Science[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective of patients with a variety of conditions. course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

607 AIV. 20 BS/MD Program: Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Fall Semester, 2019 Effective: Career ] Grad uate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70189 Title M4 Preventive Medicine elective Course None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week ) 4 per elective Credits Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) This is a 4 - week elective that may focus on the health of individuals and defined populations in Catalog Description -being, and to prevent disease, disability, and order to protect, promote, and maintain health and well premature death. This elective may include: the provision of clinical care, health systems science, diagnosis and treatment of environmental and occupational exposures, and biostatistical and epidemiologic methodologies. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are required clinical elec tives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keepin g with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

608 AIV. 21 BS/MD Program: Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70199 M4 Psychiatry elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute entirely of clinical experiences. Course consists almost Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) This is a 4 - week elective that may provide an overview of the evaluation and treatment of Catalog Description mental, addictive, and emotional disorders such as schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, mood disorders , anxiety disorders, substance related disorders, sexual and gender identity disorders, and adjustment disorders. This elective may include inpatient and outpatient experiences. General Education Component [X]Not Applicable [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale Th ese are required clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

609 AIV. 22 Progra BS/MD m: Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70219 ulation M4 P op Health elective Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participat ion required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) Catalog Description This is a 4 - week elective that may provide an overview of health promotion, injury prevention, ludes the implementation of and strategies to respond to diseases in various populations. It inc educational programs, development of health policies, or administration of services. It also may include conducting research and advocating for healthcare equity, quality and accessibility. [X]Not Applicable General Education [ ]Required[ ]Flexible Component [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific Wo rld Rationale These are required clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce student s to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

610 AIV. 23 Program: BS/ MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Cours MED 70229 e Number M4 Radiation Oncology elective Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite None 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Hours Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Student interaction and participation required. Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. (e.g. Writing Intensive, C,etc) WA Catalog Description This is a 4 - week elective that may provide an overview of ionizing radiation and other modalities some benign diseases. This elective may include inpatient and outpatient to treat malignant and experiences. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component ]Flexible [ ]Required[ ]World Cultures [ ]English Composition[ ics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathemat ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are required clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

611 AIV. 24 Program: BS/MD Department: CUNY School of Medicine 1206.00 HEGIS Code: Program Code: 382861 Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 [] Undergr aduate [X ] Graduate Career [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70239 Title M4 Radiology elective Course None Prerequisite Corequisite None Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours p er week) 4 per elective Credits Liberal Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) This is a 4 - Catalog Description week elective that may provide an overview of the imaging methodologies used to diagnose and manage patients and provide therapeutic options. This elective may include inpatient and outpatient experiences. General Education [X]Not Applicabl e [ ]Required[ ]Flexible Component [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are required clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

612 AIV. 25 Program: BS/MD nt: Departme CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level Course Number MED 70249 M4 Research elective Course Title None Prerequisite None Corequisite Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Libera l Arts [ ] Yes[X] No Course Attribute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) - week elective that may provide experie nce in clinical, basic science, or health science Catalog Description This is a 4 research. This elective may be in the inpatient, ambulatory, laboratory, or other setting that is appropriate for the specific area of study. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component ]Flexible [ ]Required[ [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures [ ]Mathematics[ ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Science[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Individual and Society ]Scientific World [ Rationale These are clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interests them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis . .

613 AIV. 26 BS/MD Program: Department: CUNY School of Medicine HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 Career ] Graduate [] Undergraduate [X [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Academic Level MED 70259 Course Number Title M4 Surgery elective Course Prerequisite None Corequisite None Hours 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Credits 4 per elective Yes[X] No [ ] Arts Liberal Student interaction and participation required. Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC,etc) This is a 4 - week elective that may provide an overvi ew of the diagnosis and care of patients with Catalog Description diseases and disorders affecting the abdomen, digestive tract, endocrine system, breast, skin, and blood may vessels. It may include care of the injured, critically ill, pediatric and cancer patients. This elective include inpatient and outpatient experiences. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures ]US Experience in its Divers ity [ ]Mathematics[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale These are required clinical electives in the medical school curriculum that will introduce students to the a field that interest s them but is not a required clinical clerkships. These electives will introduce students to clinical care of patients with a variety of conditions. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

614 27 AIV. Program: BS/MD CUNY School of Medicine Department: 1206.00 HEGIS Code: Program Code: 382861 Fall Semester, 2019 Effective: Career [] Undergraduate [X ] Graduate Academic [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Level Course Number MED 70269 M4 Urology elective Course Title None Prerequisite Corequisite None 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Hours Credits 4 per elective Liberal Arts [ ] Yes [X] No ibute Course Attr Student interaction and participation required. Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Catalog Description This is a 4 - week elective that may provide an overview of the diagnosis and treatment disorders of the urinary tracts of males and females, and on the reproductive system of males. It may include nonsurgical and surgical methods. This elective may include inpatient and outpatient experiences. General Education [X]Not A pplicable Component ]Flexible [ ]Required[ [ ]World Cultures [ ]English Composition [ ]Mathematics [ ]US Experience in its Diversity [ ]Science [ ]Creative Expression [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale This elective may be selected by students with the goal of broadening their knowledge and/or clinical skills in a field that interest them. In keeping with the practices of other medical school, this elective course can be taken for credit up to five times . All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

615 28 AIV. Program: BS/MD CUNY School of Medicine Department: HEGIS Code: 1206.00 382861 Program Code: Effective: Fall Semester, 2019 reer [] Undergraduate [X ] Graduate Ca Academic Level [ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial Course Number MED 72009 - internship CourseTitle Sub Prerequisite None Corequisite None 1 credit per week (50 hours per week) Hours Credits 4 Yes[X] Liberal Arts ] [ No ibute Course consists almost entirely of clinical experiences. Student interaction and participation required. Course Attr (e.g. Writing Intensive) Catalog Description This 4 - week inpatient experience provides M4 students with increasing responsib ility for patient care and an opportunity to function as a more fully integrated member of the medical team on an inpatient service. The students will deliver direct patient care and assume all the responsibilities of an intern with a reduce work load. The student will be supervised at all times by the house staff and faculty. General Education [X]Not Applicable Component [ ]Required[ ]Flexible [ ]English Composition[ ]World Cultures ]US Exp erience in its Diversity [ ]Mathematics[ ]Creative Expression [ ]Science[ [ ]Individual and Society [ ]Scientific World Rationale The course is a required clinical clerkship in the medical school curriculum that will ready students for gr aduation and internship. All students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

616 AV.1 Changes in Existing Courses Program: BS/MD CUNY School of Medicine Department: 1206.00 HEGIS Code: Program Code: 382861 Semester, 2019 Effective: Spring T o From MED 60039 Course same Course Number Number Neurology Clerkship Course Name same Course Name Description - week experience provides This two Description same students with the opportunity to participate in the evaluation and care of patients in the field of neurology. The focus will be on the development of clinical skills, including: obtaining a medical history and performing a neurologic examination, communicating with patients and their families, documenting and communicating findings to the medical team, caring for patients with acute and chronic neurologic disorders, clinical reasoning, and generation of a treatment plan. None Prerequisite Prerequisite same Corequisite None Corequisite same Hours 2 weeks Hours same Credits 2 credits Credits same Rationale Grading policy change: For all clerkships, assessment is done by direct observation of students b y clinical preceptors. This clerkship is only 2 weeks in length; all other clerkships are significantly longer and graded on an “honors, high pass, pass, fail” basis. The shorter duration of this Neurology leaves insufficient time to evaluate students fai rly in an “honors, high pass, pass, fail” grading system. Therefore, for this clerkship, all students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis .

617 Queensborough Community College – Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS Section AI: Special Actions . The table below includes a course in the Pathways common core II.A, World Cultures and Global Issues: AI.1 Course Title Credits Course Hours HIST 2 History of Germany 36 3 3 requisite: ENGL 101 Pre - Description: A history of the Germ an - speaking areas of central Europe with special focus on the time period since 1870. Topics include the first unification, the two world wars, Nazism, the Holocaust, and the contemporary Federal Republic. The course HIST 2 has been approv ed by Pathways review committee as a common core course under II.A . Rationale: 36 . The table below includes a course in the Pathways common core II.A, World Cultures and Global Issues: AI.2 Course Course Title Credits Hours HIST 2 38 History of Russia 3 3 Pre req uisite: ENGL 101 - Description: A history of the Russian state in modern times with special emphasis on the revolutionary and Soviet periods. Topics include the rise of Russian power, imperial government, Lenin, the two world wars, Stalin, Soviet economic development and decay, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and post - Soviet Russia.

618 Course Credits Hours Course Title 38 has been approved by Pathways review committee as a common core course under II.A. Rationale: The course HIST 2 . Section AIV: New Courses 1. Engineering Technology Department AIV. Course Number: ET -574 Programming and Applications with Python Title: Hours: 2.0; Laboratory Lecture : 2.0 Hours Credits: 3.0 Pre -requisite: None Co -requisite: -704 Networking Fundamentals I ET Course Description The course introduces computer programming, network programming and elementary data science using the Python : ng. Introductory programming language. Topics include: procedural programming, Python data structures and aspects of object oriented programmi examples of networ -on lab k socket and security programming, data analysis, data visualization and machine learning will be explored. Hands activities will complement lecture topics. Rationale: Th is entry -level course offer s students an introductory hands -on experience in Python computer programming and related modern applications for the Computer Engineering Technology (CT) and Internet and Information Technology (IIT) degree programs. Py thon is prominently utilized in the expanding areas of data science, cybersecurity, networking and web development. These topics are of significant interest for employers in the CT and IIT fields as well as prominent areas of concentration in numerous associated baccalaureate programs. Section AV: Changes in Existing Courses AV.1. PH -450 Introduction to Physics Research

619 FROM: TO: 450 Introduction to Physics Research PH - 450 Introduction to Physics Research - PH 3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours, 4 credits Hours and Credits Hours and Credits 2 laboratory hours, class hours, credits 2 3 - requisite: None Pre - requisite: Pre None requisite: None - - requisite: Co Co None Description: Description: introduction to current physics laboratory A This course provides a n introduction to responsible n and conscientious research techniques that can be techniques, methods and approaches, such as opics . T applied to a variety of research areas -based near field optical diffraction, microscopy include laboratory safety; research integrity; scientific lysis, biophysical analysis, and motion ana literature review; experiment design; analysis and opics include optical spectroscopy. Other t interpretation of data; and written and oral laboratory safety; research integrity; scientific communication of results. In the second half of the literature review; analysis and interpretation of course, students will be expected to carry out data; and written and oral communication of research projects under the direction of the ourse, results. In the second half of the c instructor. Students will prepare a final written and students will be expected to carry out research oral report. projects under the direction of the instructor. Students will prepare a final written report and give a presentation of their results at an undergraduate conference . The r eduction in the credits will make the course more accessible for students to fit it into their schedules. The updated course Rationale: description will allow the students to be better prepared to continue on to more specialized research in courses like PH900. Thes e two changes will also make the course more versatile to increase the enrollment. Thus, the three- hour lab periods can be very successfully shortened to two- hour lab periods: lab instruction with the most recent software can now be accomplished in a short er time period. AV.2. BI-110 Fundamentals of Life Science FROM: TO: BI - 110 Fundamentals of Life Science BI - 110 Fundamentals of Life Science Hours and Credits Hours and Credits 3 lecture hours, 3 credits 3 lecture hours, 3 credits

620 Satisfies the Non laboratory Science component - laboratory Science component of - Satisfies the Non the Science and Mathematics requirements for the of the Science and Mathematics requirements A.A. degree and the liberal arts core or elective for the A.A. degree and the liberal arts core or requirements for the A.S. degree elective requirements for the A.S. degree requisite: Pre - Pre - requisite: None None - requisite: Co requisite: Co - None None : Description : Description Presents basic concepts of the life sciences. Presents basic concepts of the life sciences. Includes scient ific measurement, the properties Includes scientific measurement, the properties of matter and energy on which life is dependent, and of matter and energy on which life is dependent, levels of organization. and levels of organization. Not open Especially recommended for those students to students who have successfully -140, BI -111, BI -301, -201, BI -160, BI completed BI who plan to take additional courses in the life -501 prior to taking BI or BI -110. sciences. e to students who hav Credit will not be given -160, -140, BI -111, BI successfully completed BI 501 prior to taking BI - 301, or BI - 201, BI - BI 110. - Rationale: The catalog description currently states “Especially The course is NOT designed for students who plan to continue with biology classes. recommended for those students who plan to take additional courses in the life sciences.” This is no longer true. There is a new course designed for those students. Life science students should be taking BI -111 instead of BI -110. Each semester students in the Medical Assistant Program register -110 by mistake and we must contact them to change to BI -111. for BI CIS -152 Computer Programming for Business I AV.3. FROM: TO: - CIS for Business I CIS - 152 Computer Programming for Business I 152 Computer Programming Hours and Credits Hours and Credits credits 2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours, 3 2 class hours, 2 labor atory hours, 3 credits - - requisite: Pre Pre requisite: None None Co - requisite: quisite: re Co - None None Description: Description: Introduction to algorithm development and This course provides an introduction to computer programming for business graphical user interface and event programming - level languages. Problem - applications in higher

621 solving and hierarchy chart development; oriented language to address - ng an object usi flowcharting and pseudocode fundamentals. business needs. Students will use this Input and output statement, conditional and environment and various programming unconditional control statements, the case constructs – decisions, repetitions, functions, structure, looping statements, string and matrices, structures, web apps and databases, numeric functions arrays, sequential files. to develop business classes and objects - ori ented applications. Laboratory hours and hands on practice complement coursework. Rationale: When the CIS program was changed in 2015, a revised course description for CIS152 (formerly BU520) never reached the Curricul um This revision will update the course description to a more Committee. The old BU520 course description is what appears in the College Catalog. -152. appropriate description for CIS PH AV.4. -401 General Calculus Physics A TO: FROM: - 401 PH PH - 421 Gen eral Calculus Physics A General Calculus Physics A Hours and Credits Hours and Credits 3 class hours, 3 recitation hours, 3 laboratory 3 class hours, 3 recitation hours, 3 laboratory credits hours, 5 hours, 5 credits - requisite: Pre : requisite Pre - 440 - MA - 440 MA Co - requisite: requisite: - Co MA 441 1 44 - MA - concepts course calculus concepts and and integrates calculus This This course integrates : Description Description : covers of physics principles fundamental covers in areas fundamental principles of physics in areas and heat, including kinematics, of mechanics of mechanics and heat, including kinematics, conservation conservation classical laws of motion, classical laws of motion, equilibrium, equilibrium, and work, mechanical laws, impulse laws, impulse and momentum, work, mechanical momentum, rotational motion, fluids, harmonic energy, harmonic simple energy, rotational motion, fluids, simple motion, heat and thermodynamics. motion, heat and thermodynamics.

622 Rationale: This course is part of a two -course sequence, PH -401 and PH -402. Because the course number PH -402 was used for recently approved in the past, making this course designation unavailable for a new - a different course course, both courses in the sequence will be renumbered, PH -402 to PH y the course numbers will change; there is no other change to the courses. -421 and PH -422. Onl 401 to PH -402 General Calculus Physics B AV. 5. PH FROM: TO: - 402 General Calculus Physics B PH - 422 PH General Calculus Physics B Hours and Credits Hours and Credits recitation hou 3 3 class hours, 3 recitation hours, 3 laboratory 3 class hours, rs, 3 laboratory hours, 5 credits hours, 5 credits - - s : Pre requisite requisite s : Pre - 401 PH MA - 441 , MA - 441, PH - 421 Co - site: requi requisite: - Co - MA MA - 442 442 : : Description Description his course integrates calculus concepts and rates calculus concepts and his course integ T T covers fundamental principles of physics in areas iples of physics in areas covers fundamental princ of wave phenomena, electrostatics, DC and AC of wave phenomena, electrostatics, DC and AC circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism, and optics. circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism, and optics. Rationale: This course is part of a recently approved two- course sequence, PH -401 and PH -402. Because the course number PH -402 was used for a different course in the past, making this course designation unavailable for a new - course, both courses in the sequence will be renumbered, PH -421 and PH -422. Only the course numbers will change; there is no other change t o the courses. 401 to PH -402 to PH Section AV I: C ourses Withdrawn BU- Typewriting/Keyboarding II 802 Rationale: To avoid redund ancy of material covered in the entry-level course of BU-801 and to allow stude nts to focus on dev eloping audio transcr iption skill s, which are needed in the medi cal offi ce environment when transcribing medical doc uments.

623 CUNY School of Professional Studies Part A: Academic Matters Chancellor’s University Report – PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS AV: 1 Changes to be offered General Education and the B.A. in Liberal Studies, program code 388892 FROM TO BA in Liberal Studies Departments Departments General Education, BA in Liberal Studies - Advanced Composition ENG 350 No Change Course Course ENG 101 & ENG 102 Prerequisite No Change Pre or co requisite Hours No Change Hours 3 3 Credits No Change Credits Introdu ces advanced composition, reading, Description Description No Change and interdisciplinary research skills. Reinforces the analysis and display of quantitative information, the selection of visual elements, and the creation of compelling presentations. Develops strategies for llaborative projects. Requires successful co students to demonstrate the research and writing competencies appropriate for senior undergraduate studies. Requirement Regular Liberal Arts Requirement College Option Designation Designation Liberal A Liberal Arts [x] Yes [] No rts [x] Yes [] No Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute ZERO Textbook Cost No Change (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Intensive, WAC, etc) WAC, etc) General Education General Education ____Required ____Not Applicable Component Component ____English Composition ____Required ____Mathematics ____English Composition ____Sc ience ____Mathematics ___Flexible ____Science ___Flexible ___World Cultures ___World Cultures ___US Experience in its Diversity ___US Experience in its Diversity ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Scientific World ___Individual and Society __X_College Option ___Scientific World Effective Effective Spring 2019 Rationale: Course to be added as a College Option in Gen Ed, f illing need for additional options for college writing instruction after required compositions courses are complete.

624 AV: 2 Changes to be offered in General Education TO FROM Departments No Change General Education Departments HIST 202 — Twenti eth Century World History Course HIST 202 — Contemporary World History: 1900 - Course Present None Prerequisite No Change Pre or co requisite Hours Hours No Change 3 3 Credits No Change Credits Examines social, cultural, political, and Description Examines social, cultural, political, and economic Description economic changes, events, and concepts that changes, events, and concepts that defined and shaped the contemporary world. Particular defined and shaped the 20th century. Particular emphasis includes height of emphasis includes height of European European imperialism, First World War, rise of imperialism, First World War, rise of totalitarian regimes, Second World War, Cold War, totalitarian regimes, Second World War, Cold War, decolonization and the rise of nation- decolonization and the rise of nation- states, genocides and civil wars, revolutions in Asia, states, genocides and civil wars, revolutions in Africa and Latin America, Middle East conflict, fall Asia, Africa and Latin America, Middle East conflict, fall of the Soviet bloc, social and of the Soviet bloc, social and intellectual intellectual movements, scientific and movements, scientific and technological technological breakthroughs, and economic breakthroughs, and economic globalization. Assesses the impact of these and other subjects globalization. Assesses the impact of these upon today's world. and other subjects upon today's world. Requirement No Change Requirement Designation Designation [] Yes [x] No Liberal Arts Liberal Arts No Change rse Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute Cou ZERO Textbook Cost No Change (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, WAC, etc) Intensive, WAC, etc) General Education General Education ____Not Applicable ____Not Applicable Component Component ____Required ____Required ____English Composition ____English Composition ____Mathematics ____Mathematics ____Science ____Science ___Flexible ___Flexible _X_World Cultures _X_World Cul tures ___US Experience in its Diversity ___US Experience in its Diversity ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Individual and Society ___Scientific World ___Scientific World

625 Effective Spring 2019 Effective Change would reflect that in order to reach the contemporary moment as promised in the course descri Rationale: ption, the course must cover more than the twentieth century. AV: 3 Changes to be offered in the General Education FROM TO General Education Departments Departments No Change — Evolutionary Biology Course BIO 250 — The Tree of Life: Unders tanding Course BIO 250 Evolution None Prerequisite None Pre or co requisite Hours Hours 3 3 3 Credits 3 Credits A broad survey of evolutionary biology. Description Description A broad survey of evolutionary biology. Includes a hought beginning with history of evolutionary t Includes a history of evolutionary thought Darwin. Outlines topics such as the origin and beginning with Darwin. Outlines topics such as history of life and the origin of genetic variation. the origin and history of life and the origin of genetic variation. Discusses mechanisms of Discusses mechanisms of evolution including evolution including natural selection, genetic natural selection, genetic drift, sexual selection, drift, sexual selection, and speciation. and speciation. Reconstructs evolutionary history and determines the place of an organism on the Examines molecular evolution and Tree of Life, which documents the evolutionary phylogenetic techniques to reconstruct relationships among all species. Concludes with story and determine the place evolutionary hi of an organism on the Tree of Life, which the origin and evolution of humans and the impact of evolutionary theory in contemporary society. documents the evolutionary relationships among all species. Concludes with the origin course is based in part upon materials This and evolution of humans and the impact of developed by the American Museum of Natural evolutionary theory in contemporary society. History and is used with permission by the School is based in part upon materials This course of Professional Studies for this course. developed by the American Museum of Natural History and is used with permission by the School of Professional Studies for this course. Requirement Requirement No Change Designation Designation Liberal Arts [x] Yes [] No Liberal Arts No Change Course Attribute (e.g. Course Attribute n/a No Change (e.g. Writing Writing Intensive, Intensive, WAC, etc) WAC, etc) General Education General Education ____Not Applicable ____Not Applicable Component Component __X__Required __X__Required ____English Composition ____English Composition ____Mathematics ____Mathematics

626 Science __X__ __X__Science ___Flexible ___Flexible ___World Cultures ___World Cultures ___US Experience in its Diversity ___US Experience in its Diversity ___Creative Expression ___Creative Expression ___Individual and Society ___Individual and Society ___Scientific World ___Scientific World Effective Effective Spring 2019 Rationale: Changes to course name and description emphasize both the organizing framewor k of the course and that the course is geared toward offering the students an understanding of evolution as part of the general education curriculum.

627 College of Staten Island Chancellor’s University Report – Part A: Academic Matters College of Staten Island October CUR 2018 PART A: Academic Matters SECTION AI: Special Actions n/a SECTION AII: Generic Degree Requirements AII.1 General Education Requirements: College Option (Contemporary World Course List) EFFECTIVE: Fall 2019 TO: FROM: Contemporary World Course List Contemporary World Course List Contemporary World Requirement: Courses fulfilling this Contemporary World Requirement: Courses fulfilling this requirement are designed to provide an understanding of ent are designed to provide an understanding of requirem global and regional contexts. This requirement will cover global and regional contexts. This requirement will cover contemporary global issues, ideas, and institutions. The contemporary global issues, ideas, and institutions. The courses will emphasize the interactions of societies along courses will emphasize the interactions of societies along dimensions. Courses will political, economic, and cultural political, economic, and cultural dimensions. Courses will cover the development, formation, and impact of the global cover the development, formation, and impact of the global context and ways in which different nations, societies, and context and ways in which different nations, societies, and forces. cultures influence and are influenced by global cultures influence and are influenced by global forces. Students will use comparative and historical analytic Students will use comparative and historical analytic frameworks for understanding the contemporary world. frameworks for understanding the contemporary world. At least one course taken to fulfill the Flexible Core and/or At least one course taken to fulfill the Flexible Core and/or College Option must fulfill the Contemporary World College Option must fulfill the Contemporary World y be the same course as the Requirement. This course ma Requirement. This course may be the same course as the

628 one selected to fulfill the Pluralism and Diversity one selected to fulfill the Pluralis m and Diversity Requirement, provided that the course appears on both Requirement, provided that the course appears on both approved course lists. Students are encouraged to select a approved course lists. Students are encouraged to select a course that fulfills this requirement in the Flexible Core. course that fulfills this requirement in the Flexible Core. These courses have ENG 151 and These courses have ENG 151 and COR 100 any US Experience as and Its Diversity course prerequisites, have a significant writing component, and as a prerequisite, have a significant writing component, and subscribe to the subscribe to the principle of writing across the curriculum. Courses satisfying this requirement are marked (cont. principle of writing across the curriculum. Courses . wld.) at the end of the course description satisfying this requirement are marked (cont. wld.) at the end of the course description. Courses that are marked with a (*) also satisfy the Courses that are marked with Pluralism and Diversity requirement and are identified as a (*) also satisfy the Pluralism and Diversity requirement and are identified as (p&d) at the end of the course descriptions. (p&d) at the end of the course descriptions. RATIONALE: This change will accommodate the transfer population SECTION AIII: Changes in Degree Requirements AIII.1 Removed by Reviewer

629 AIII.2 Department of Computer Science: Computer Science BS and MHC Computer Science BS (Program Code: 34902, 35543) EFFECTIVE: Fall 2019 TO: FROM: Major Requirements: 55- 58 credits 58 credits Major Requirements: 55- Students majoring in Computer Science must complete: Students majoring in Computer Science must complete: 4 credits CSC/ MTH 228 Discrete Mathematical Structures CSC/ MTH 228 Discrete Mathematical Structures 4 credits CSC 326 Data Structures 4 credits CSC 326 Data Structures 4 credits e Design 4 credits -Oriented Softwar CSC 330 Object CSC 330 Object -Oriented Software Design 4 credits CSC 332 Operating Systems I 3 credits CSC 332 Operating Systems I 3 credits 1 credit CSC 305 Operating Systems Laboratory CSC 305 Operating Systems Laboratory 1 credit 4 credits CSC/ENS 346 Switching and Automata Theory 4 credits CSC/ENS 346 Switching and Automata Theory CSC 347 Computer Circuits Laboratory 1 credit 1 credit CSC 347 Computer Circuits Laboratory CSC 382 Analysis of Algorithms 4 credits CSC 382 Analysis of Algorithms 4 credits CSC 430 Softw are Engineering 4 credits CSC 430 Software Engineering 4 credits CSC 446 Computer Architecture 4 credits CSC 446 Computer Architecture 4 credits CSC 490 Seminar in Computer Science 3 credits CSC 490 Seminar in Computer Science 3 credits And And Two courses in Two courses in Mathematics having MTH 232 or higher as a Mathematics having MTH 232 or higher as a prerequisite (MTH 306 may not be used to fulfill this prerequisite (MTH 306 may not be used to fulfill this requirement). requirement). Twelve -Fourteen credits from the following, at least eight Twelve -Fourteen credits from the following, at least eight credits must be taken in computer science courses. Students credits must be taken in computer science courses. Students -14 must take either CSC 226 and/or CSC 424 in these 12 must take either CSC 226 and/or CSC 424 in these 12 -14 credits. Only two 200- level courses may be included in the credits. Only two 200- level courses may be included in the twelve credits. twelve credits. 223 Computer Hacking Revealed 3 credits CSC CSC 223 Computer Hacking Revealed 3 credits CSC 225 Introduction to Web Development and the Internet 3 CSC 225 Introduction to Web Development and the Internet 3 credits credits

630 CSC 226 Web Database Applications 3 cr CSC 226 Web Database Applications 3 credits edits CSC 227 Introductory Computer Game Programming 3 credits CSC 227 Introductory Computer Game Programming 3 credits ng 3 credits CSC 229 Introduction to High Performance Computi CSC 229 Introduction to High Performance Computing 3 credits CSC 235 Robotic Explorations 3 credits CSC 235 Robotic Explorations 3 credits CSC 420 Concepts of Programming Languages 4 credits CSC 412 Machine Learning and Knowledge Discovery 4 credits CSC 421 Internet Data Communications and Security 4 credits CSC 420 Concepts of Programming Languages 4 credits 4 credits CSC 424 Database Management Systems CSC 421 Internet Data Communications and Security 4 credits CSC 427 Advanced Computer Game Programming 4 credits CSC 424 Database Management Systems 4 credits CSC 429 Advanced High Performing Computing 4 credits CSC 427 Advanced Computer Game Programming 4 credits CSC 432 Operating Systems II 4 credits CSC 429 Advanced High Performing Computing 4 credits CSC 434 Compiler Construction 4 credits CSC 432 Operating Systems II 4 credits CSC 4 35 Advanced Data Communications 4 credits CSC 434 Compiler Construction 4 credits CSC 438 Mobile Application Development 4 credits CSC 435 Advanced Data Communications 4 credits CSC 462/ ENS 362 Microcontrollers 4 credits CSC 438 Mobile Application Development 4 credits 4 credits CSC 470 Introductory Computer Graphics CSC 462/ ENS 362 Microcontrollers 4 credits 4 credits CSC 475 Image Processing in Computer Science 4 credits CSC 470 Introductory Computer Graphics 4 credits CSC 480 Artificial Intelligence CSC 475 Image Processing in Computer Science 4 credits 4 credits CSC 482 Discrete Simulation CSC 480 Artificial Intelligence 4 credits 4 credits CSC 484 Theory of Computation 4 credits CSC 482 Discrete Simulation OR CSC 484 Theory of Computation 4 credits An additional four credit MTH course having MTH 232 or higher OR as a prerequisite. MTH 306 may not be used to fulfill this An additional four credit MTH course having MTH 232 or higher requirement. as a prerequisite. MTH 306 may not be used to fulfill this ade of C or above is required in all CSC courses that are A gr requirement. prerequisites for courses in the major requirements. Students A grade of C or above is required in all CSC courses that are will be allowed to repeat courses, if necessary. prerequisites for courses in the major requirements. Students NOTE: Students planning to pursue a higher degree in will be allowed to repeat courses, if necessary. Computer Science are recommended t o take MTH 233. NOTE: Students planning to pursue a higher degree in Total Credits Required: 124 Computer Science are recommended to take MTH 233. Total Credits Required: 124 RATIONALE: The degree change adds the new course, CSC 421, to the computer science elective choices.

631 AIII.3 Department of Performing and Creative Arts: Change in existing Bachelor of Arts: Art and MHC Art (Program Code: 34898, 35538) EFFECTIVE: Spring 2019 FROM: TO: The program offers two concentrations in the BA degree in Art. Pre-Major Requirements: 17 credits ART 120 Introductory Drawing (RNL) 3 They are: Studio Art and Photography. ART 200 History of Art to the Renaissance (RLA) 4 ART 201 History of Art after the Renaissance (RLA) 4 Studio Art Concentration AND -Major Requirements: 17 credits Pre Two of the following three courses: (6 credits) 3 ART 120 Introductory Drawing (RNL) PHO 101 Introduction to 3 Photography (RLA) ART 200 History of Art to the Renaissance (RLA) 4 3 ART 130 Introductory Painting (RNL) 4 f Art after the Renaissance (RLA) ART 201 History o 3 ART 150 Introductory Sculpture (RNL) AND PHO 101: Students interested in the Photography Two of the following three courses: (6 credits) Concentration are required to choose PHO 101 as one of the 3 PHO 101 Introduction to Photography (RLA) two pre- major required courses. 3 ART 130 Introductory Painting (RNL) Major Requirements: 31- 35 credits 3 ART 150 Introductory Sculpture (RNL) It is recommended that students complete an internship with an PHO 101: Students interested in the Photography artist/photographer, museum, gallery or foundation. Concentration are required to choose PHO 101 as one of the A. Art History Courses (8 credits) major required courses. two pre- level. At least eight credits of art history courses beyond the 100- Major Requirements: 31- 35 credits nt World (RLA) ART 203 Art of the Ancie 4 It is recommended that students complete an internship with an 4 ART 205 Modern Art in Latin America (RLA) artist/photographer, museum, gallery or foundation. -Century Art (RLA) ART 207 Nineteenth 4 A. Art History Courses (8 credits) 4 ART 208 Twentieth- Century Art (RLA) level. At least eight credits of art history courses beyond the 100- ART 209 Art and Society in America (RLA) 4 4 ART 203 Art of the Ancient World (RLA) 4 ART 210 The Architect and Society (RLA) ART 205 Modern Art in Latin America (RLA) 4 ART 211 History of Printmaking (RLA) 4 ART 207 Nineteenth -Century Art (RLA) 4 ART 240 Women and the Fine Arts (RLA) 4 ART 208 Twentieth- Century Art (RLA) 4 ART 300 Medieval and Renaissance Art (RLA) 4 ART 20 9 Art and Society in America (RLA) 4 4 ART 301 Baroque Art (RLA) ART 210 The Architect and Society (RLA) 4 4 ART 303 History of Photography (RLA) ART 211 History of Printmaking (RLA) 4 4 ART 240 Women and the Fine Arts (RLA) 4 ART 308 American Art Since 1945 (RLA)

632 4 ART 314 Contemporary Issues in Photography (RNL) 4 ART 300 Medieval and Renaissance Art (RLA) 4 ART 301 Baroque Art (RLA) ART 401 Contemporary Art: Ideas and Practices (RLA) 4 ART 303 History of Photography (RLA) 4 ART 410 Major Artist I (RLA) 4 4 4 ART 411 Major Artist II (RLA) ART 308 American Art Since 1945 (RLA) 4 ART 314 Contemporary Issues in Photography (RNL) ART 440 Contemporary Art Theory I (RLA) 4 4 ART 401 Contemporary Art: Ideas and Practices (RLA) ART 441 Contemporary Art Theory II (RLA) 4 ART 410 Major Artist I (RLA) 4 B. Studio Art Courses (6 credits) ART 411 Major Artist II (RLA) 4 At least six credits of studio art courses beyond the 100 level. NOTE: ART 320, ART 325, ART 330, ART 350, and ART 445 4 ART 440 Contemporary Art Theory I (RLA) ART 441 Contemporary Art Theory II (RLA) may be repeated for credit and ART 212 may be repeated once 4 for credit. B. Studio Art Courses (6 credits) 3 At least six credits of studio art courses beyond the 100 level. ART 212 Visiting Artist Projects (RNL) 3 NOTE: ART 320, ART 325, ART 330, ART 350, and ART 445 ART 220 Intermediate Drawing (RNL) repeated once may be repeated for credit and ART 212 may be ART 225 Po rtrait Drawing II (RNL) 3 ART 230 Intermediate Painting (RNL) 3 for credit. ART 212 Visiting Artist Projects (RNL) 3 ART 245 Printmaking (RNL) 3 ART 250 Intermediate Sculpture (RNL) ART 220 Intermediate Drawing (RNL) 3 3 3 ART 225 Portrait Drawing II (RNL) ART 275 Studio Art Theory and Practice (RNL) 3 3 ART 230 Intermediate Painting (RNL) ART 320 Advanced Drawing (RNL) 3 3 ART 245 Printmaking (RNL) ART 325 Portrait Drawing III (RNL) 3 ART 250 Intermediate Sculpture (RNL) 3 ART 330 Advanced Painting (RNL) 3 ART 345 Intermediate Printmaking (RNL) dio Art Theory and Practice (RNL) 3 ART 275 Stu 3 ART 350 Advanced Sculpture (RNL) 3 ART 320 Advanced Drawing (RNL) 3 ART 325 Portrait Drawing III (RNL) ART 375 Intermediate Studio Art Theory and Practice (RNL) 3 3 3 ART 330 Advanced Painting (RNL) ART 445 Advanced Printmaking (RNL) 3 ART 345 Intermediate Printmaking (RNL) C. An additional 17 credits from art history or studio ar t courses 3 3 beyond the 100 level. ART 350 Advanced Sculpture (RNL) NOTE: ART 320, ART 325, ART 330, ART 350, and ART 445 ART 375 Intermediate Studio Art Theory and Practice (RNL) 3 may be repeated for credit and ART 212 may be repeated once ART 445 Advanced Printmaking (RNL) 3 for credit. ART 305 may only be used once toward fulfilling C. An additional 17 credits from art history or studio art courses these 17 additional credits; it does not fulfill any of the art history beyond the 100 level. requirements. ART 305 may be repeated once for elective NOTE: ART 320, ART 325, ART 330, ART 350, and ART 445 credit, with the permission of the instructor may be repeated for credit and ART 212 may be repeated once for credit. ART 305 may only be used once toward fulfilling

633 D. Foreign Language Requirement: (0 these 17 additional credits; it does not fulfill any of the art history - 4 credits) Demonstration of proficiency in a language through the requirements. ART 305 may be repeated once for elective intermediate level, 213 or above. credit, with the permission of the instructor 30 credits Electives: 26- Total Credits Required: 120 D. Foreign Lang uage Requirement: (0- 4 credits) Demonstration of proficiency in a language through the intermediate level, 213 or above. Photography Concentration 30 credits Electives: 26- Pre -Major Requirements: 17 credits Total Credits Required: 120 Students planning to major in Art with the Photography concentration must complete the following pre -major courses, some of which may also satisfy general education requirements. Photography Concentration: No Change Required Courses Total Credits Required: No Change ART 120 Introductory Drawing (RNL) 3 4 ART 200 History of Art to the Renaissance (RLA) ART 201 History of Art after the Renaissance (RLA) 4 PHO 101 Introduction to Photography (RLA) 3 And one of the following: (3 credits) ART 130 Introductory Painting (RNL) 3 ART 150 Introductory Sculpture (RNL) 3 Major Requirements: 34- 38 credits It is recommended that students complete an internship with an artist/photographer, museum, gallery or foundation. A. Photography Courses (12 credits) 3 PHO 201 Introduction to Darkroom Techniques (RLA) AND Nine additional credits of photography courses at or above the 200- level, including one course at the 300- or 400- level. (9 credits) 3 PHO 206 Digital Photography (RNL) PHO 215 Historical & Alternative Photographic Processes(RNL)4 PHO 220 Intermediate Photography (RNL) 3 PHO 230 Color Photography (RNL) 3 PHO 235 Fashion Photography (RLA) 3

634 PHO 240 Documentary Methods in Photography (RNL) 3 3 PHO 250 Studio Photography I (RNL) PHO 305 Photography In New York (RLA) 3 PHO 307 Fine Art Digital Printing (RNL) 3 PHO 314 Contemporary Issues in Photography (RNL) 4 PHO 315 Visiting Artist Workshop (RNL) 3 3 PHO 320 The Photographic Portfolio (RNL) (RNL) PHO 360 Studio Photography II 3 PHO 365 Conceptual and Aesthetic Concerns of Image Making - Photography III (RLA) 4 B. Art History Courses (8 credits) ART 303 History of Photography (RLA) 4 AND One additional art history course at or above the 200- level. (4 credits) C. The remaining 14 credits can be chosen from courses in ART and PHO beyond the 100 level. (14 credits) ART 305 may only be used once toward fulfilling these 14 additional credits; it does not fulfill any of the art history requirements. ART 305 may be repeated once f or elective credit, with the instructor permission. D. Foreign Language Requirement: (0- 4 credits) Demonstration of proficiency in a language through the intermediate level, 213 or above. Electives: 23- 27 credits Total Credits Required: 120 RATIONALE: Currently, the BA in Art is the default “Studio Art” curriculum when students declare. This was an error when the degree changed years ago. The University Registrar advised to include this degree change in the CUR in order to formally appr ove the creation of the Studio Art concentration.

635 IV. New Courses Program Code: 35043, 35557) AIV.1 Department of Social Work ( EFFECTIVE DATE: Fall 2019 Department/Program: Social Work Career: Undergraduate Academic Level: Regular Subject Area: Social Work Course Number: SWK 308 Community Service Learning Experience Course Title: Catalog Description: - based, human service agency. Students are expected to An experience where each student is placed at a community spend a minimum of 65 hours during the spring semester (5.5 hours per week) in the agency. The experience is designed to expose students to beginning engagement skills, with particular attention to professional roles and boundaries of social work, social work values and ethics, self -reflection, development of the professional self, the importance of social justice values, cultural competency and cultural humility in providing services to clients & the community context of services. The service learning experience will be graded as Pass/Fail. E: This course may be repeated once, but not for credit. NOT PREREQUISITE: Admission into the BSSW program COREQUISITE: SWK 306 Credits: 1 Contact Hours: 65 hours of Community Service Learning Experience Liberal Arts: No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.): n/a General Education Component: n/a RATIONALE: Service -learning is an experiential methodology that provides opportunities for to demonstrate the foundation -level social work competencies in values, knowledge, and skills. The new course is a required corequisite of the existing seminar, which is has changed in credits/hours.

636 AIV.2 Department of Computer Science (Program Code: 34902, 35543) EFFECTIVE DATE: Fall 2019 Department/Program: Computer Science Undergraduate Career: Academic Level: Regular Subject Area: Computer Science Course Number: CSC 412 Course Title: Machine Learning and Knowledge Discovery ned to provide students with Catalog Description: a background in fundamental and advanced concepts, tools and methodology Desig learning as well as their applicability to real world in machine An overview of algorithms used in machine learning and problems. machine models for supervised (classification, regression) and unsupervised learning (clustering), feature selection and learning reduction, introduced. estimation and empirical validation will be dimensionality Advanced concepts such as deep feedforward neural error batch and regularization, activation functions, loss function, backpropagation, normalization as well as key deep network networks architectures (convolutional neural networks, autoencoders, recurrent neural networks, long short -term memory (LSTM) networks) will be Students will gain hands - on experience in using various software packages and tools. discussed. PREREQUISITE: 326 or ISI 300 with a grade of C or CSC higher Credits: 4 Hours: 4 Liberal Arts: No Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.): n/a General Education Component: n/a RATIONALE: Machine learning is rapidly becoming a knowledge and an expertise that computer science students and those use from must acquire before graduation. Widespread discipline of personal computers and wireless communication related leads to “big data” and learning its structure leads to the state -of-the -art results in vision, speech, natural language processing, essential classification, and rapidly in other domains as well. Neural Networks and Deep Learning are clustering part of systems make that perform recognition, prediction, must decisions and operate machinery.

637 AV. Change in Existing Courses AV.1 Changes to be offered by the Department of Economics and Department of Accounting & Finance (Program Code: 34904, 34905, 35546, and 35545) FROM TO Department Department No Change ECONOMICS/ACCOUNTING & FINANCE ECO/FNC 315 Monetary Theory and Policy Course No Change Course Prerequisite ECO 112 and ECO/MGT 230 Prerequisite ECO 212 and (ECO/FNC 213 or ECO/FNC 214) n/a Corequisite No change Corequisite Credits Credits No change 4 Hours 4 No change Hours How ry policy. Theoretical and applied problems of Theoretical and applied problems of moneta Catalog Catalog monetary policy. Emphasis is placed on changes in money supply affect aggregate economic Description Description activities, particularly real GDP, real interest rates and contemporary developments. Current relative prices. controversies concerning the use of monetary Emphasis is placed on contemporary developments. Current controversies concerning the use of policy, relationship to fiscal policy, and impact monetary policy, relat ionship to fiscal policy, and impact on on economic activity. economic activity. General No change n/a General Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective Fall 2019 RATIONALE: ECO 112 and ECO/MGT 230 provides adequate preparation for ECO 315 AV.2 Changes to be offered by the Department of Social Work (Program Code: 35043, 35557) FROM TO Department Social Work Department No Change Course SWK 306 Community Service Learning and Course No Change Professional Development Seminar

638 Prerequisite No change Prerequisite Admission to the BSSW Program SWK 308 n/a Corequisite Corequisite Credits 2 Credits 3 3 Hours 2 Hours hour service learning Students will participate in a 65 - hour service - a 65 Seminar associated with Catalog Catalog learning experience within a local social experience within a local social service agency, school, or Description Description other human service organization. The purpose of the service agency, school, or other human service organization. seminar is to facilitate students' conceptualization and Concurrently, students two -hour weekly seminar integration of the community service learning experience. A -format will attend a in practices for engagement class. is placed on specific emphasis The purpose of the seminar service linking development of the self, professional the and learning experience of is t o expose students to -based human professional community work values and ethics to community service, social service practice and help students prepare for and cultural competency including social justice, cultural the senior field practicum (SWK 454). The the community context humility in of services. The course will also be directed towards preparing students for the course is designed to expose students to the beginning engagement skills, with particular senior field practicum (SWK 454), and the exploration with attention to professi peers of community service learning related challenges. onal roles and boundaries Note: a grade of B or higher is required for students to be of social work, social work values and ethics, eligible to e nter a field placement (SWK 454). This course -reflection, self development of the , but not for additional credit may be repeated once professional . self, the importance of social justice values, cultural competence and cultural humility in providing services to of services. cy contexts clients and the poli Note: a grade of B or higher is required for students to be eligible to enter a field placement (SWK 454). This course may be repeated once. General No change General n/a Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective Fall 2019

639 RATIONALE: The SWK 306 course serves as a required course for students enrolled in the BSSW program. A grade of B or higher is required for students to be eligible to enter senior -level field placement. This course may be repeated once, but not for additional credit. AV.3 Changes to be offered by the Department of Marketing (Program Code: 01585, 82436, and 60266) TO FROM Marketing Department No Change Department BUS 415 Global Strategy and Decision Course Course No Change Making Prerequisite No change Prerequisite BUS 200 or ECO 250 Corequisite FNC 300/ECO 370 Corequisite None Credits 4 Credits No change Hours 4 Hours No change No change This advanced course builds on lower level Catalog Catalog Business courses and is recommended for all Description Description students enrolled in the Business degree with a concentration in International Business. Students will have the opportunity to integrate earlier learning in the concentration to analyze business problems, develop strategies and policies and make specific business decisions. Students will choose a and product and develop a full global market business plan taking into account global and country macro and micro factors, ethical and cultural considerations, trade theory and knowledge from all functional areas. No change General General n/a Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective Fall 2019

640 RATIONALE: Through experience, it has become apparent that the class content can be addressed effectively with the stated prerequisites. The course does not draw upon content from FNC 300/ECO 370. This change in prerequisites reflects the recommendations of the BUS 415 assessment committee. AV.4 Changes to be offered by the Department of Engineering and Environmental Sciences (Program Code: 37997) TO FROM Geology Department No Change Department GEO 106 Earth Resources Course No Change Course Prerequisite No change Prerequisite MTH 020 or appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test GEO 107 Corequisite None Corequisite 3 Credits No change Credits Hours 3 Hours No change Catalog Catalog An introduction to Earth resources, An introduction to Earth resources, including energy, Description Description including energy, mineral resources, s. The class mineral resources, water supply and soil will explore how these resources are produced by water supply and soils. The class will geologic processes and how we find them. It will also explore how these resources are investigate how human population growth and produced by geologic processes and how we find them. It will also investigate how changing lifestyles put pressure on these resources h their and the environmental impacts associated wit human population growth and ch anging (FSWR) lifestyles put pressure on these resources use. A full day fieldtrip is required. and the environmental impacts associated with their use. A full day fieldtrip is required. General SCIENTIFIC WORLD n/a General Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective SPRING 2019 RATIONALE: This class is the corequisite lab of a course approved by the CCCRC to satisfy the Flexible Core/Scientific World.

641 AV. 5 Changes to be offered by the Department of Engineering and Environmental Sciences (Program Code: 37997) FROM TO Geology No Change Department Department Course No Change Course GEO 107 Earth Resources Lab Prerequisite No change Prerequisite MTH 020 or appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test Corequisite None Corequisite GEO 106 Credits 1 Credits No change Hours 2 Hours No change Catalog Catalog Laboratory class introducing Earth Laboratory class introducing Earth resources, their Description Description resources, their formation, use and formation, use and environmental impact. Hands on environmental impact. Hands on exercises using maps, photographs, online data sets and lab measurements to interpret the geologic exercises using maps, photographs, processes forming these resources, understand our online data sets and lab measurements to interpret the geologic processes forming use of these resources and analyze the environmental (COPR) impact of using these resources. these resources, understand our use of these resources and analyze the environmental impact of using these resources. COLLEGE OPTION n/a General General Education Education C Component: omponent: Effective Effective SPRING 2019 RATIONALE: This class is the corequisite lab of a course approved by the CCCRC to satisfy the Flexible Core/Scientific World.

642 AV.6 Changes to be offered by the Department of Engineering and Environmental Sciences (Program Code: 37997) FROM TO Department No Change Department Geology Course No Change Course Geologic Hazards and Natural GEO 111 Disasters Prerequisite No change Prerequisite MTH 020 or appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test GEO 112 Corequisite None Corequisite Credits 3 Credits No change Hours 3 Hours No change Catalog Catalog An introduction to geologic hazards, their An introduction to geologic hazards, their causes and Description Description the natural disasters that result. Processes at the causes and the natural disasters that surface of the Earth and in the atmosphere and result. Processes at the surface of the Earth and in the atmosphere and hydrosphere. Geologic hazards that occur due to surface processes, including slope failure, stream and hydrosphere. Geologic hazards that occur due to surface processes, including slope coastal flooding, severe weather events, wildfires, climate change and impacts. The Theory of Plate failure, stream and coastal flooding, severe weather events, wildfires, climate Tectonics, and the earthquakes, tsunamis and change and impacts. The Theory of Plate volcanoes produced as a result of tectonic processes. A full day fieldtrip is required. (FSWR) Tectonics, and the earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes produced as a result of tectonic processes. A full day fieldtrip is required. General n/a General SCIENTIFIC WORLD Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective SPRING 2019 RATIONALE: This class was approved by the CCCRC to satisfy the Flexible Core/Scientific World.

643 AV.7 Changes to be offered by the Department of Engineering and Environmental Sciences (Program Code: 37997) FROM TO Department No Change Department Geology No Change Course Course Geologic Hazards and Natural GEO 112 Disasters Lab No change Prerequisite Prerequisite MTH 020 or appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test GEO 111 Corequisite Corequisite None Credits 1 Credits No change Hours No change Hours 2 Catalog Catalog Laboratory class introducing geologic Laboratory class introducing geologic hazards, their Description Description causes and the natural disasters that result. Hands on hazards, their causes and the natural disasters that result. Hands on exercises exercises using maps, online data sets and lab using maps, online data sets and lab measurements to interpret geologic hazards that occur due to surface processes an measurements to interpret geologic d plate tectonics. (COPR) hazards that occur due to surface processes and plate tectonics. COLLEGE OPTION n/a General General Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective SPRING 2019 RATIONALE: This class is the corequisite lab of a course approved by the CCCRC to satisfy the Flexible Core/Scientific World.

644 AV.8 Changes to be offered by the Department of Engineering and Environmental Sciences (Program Code: 37997) FROM TO Geology No Change Department Department Course No Change Course Pollution and Waste Disposal GEO 113 Prerequisite No change Prerequisite MTH 020 or appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test Corequisite None Corequisite GEO 114 Credits 3 Credits No change Hours 3 Hours No change Catalog Catalog An introduction to pollution and waste disposal from a An introduction to pollution and waste Description Description class will provide an geologic perspective. The disposal from a geologic perspective. The overview of pollution sources and their impact on the class will provide an overview of pollution sources and their impact on the atmosphere and water supply, including global warming, ozone destruction and the drinking water atmosphere and water supply, including global warming, ozone destruction and supply. It will also explore of the sources of waste and e are disposed of. A full day how different types of wast the drinking water supply. It will also explore of the sources of waste and how fieldtrip is required. (FSWR) different types of waste are disposed of. A full day fieldtrip is required. SCIENTIFIC WORLD n/a General General Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective SPRING 2019 RATIONALE: This class was approved by the CCCRC to satisfy the Flexible Core/Scientific World.

645 AV.9 Changes to be offered by the Department of Engineering and Environmental Sciences (Program Code: 37997) FROM TO Department No Change Department Geology Course No Change Course Pollution and Waste Disposal GEO 114 Lab Prerequisite No change Prerequisite MTH 020 or appropriate score on the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test GEO 113 Corequisite None Corequisite Credits 1 Credits No change Hours 2 Hours No change Catalog Catalog Laboratory class introducing Earth resources, their Laboratory class introducing Earth Description Description formation, use and environmental impact. Hands on resources, their formation, use and exercises using maps, photographs, online data sets environmental impact. Hands on and lab measurements to interpret the geologic exercises using maps, photographs, processes forming these resources, understand our online data sets and lab measurements to interpret the geologic processes forming use of these resources and analyze the environmental f impact of using these resources. (COPR) these resources, understand our use o these resources and analyze the environmental impact of using these resources. COLLEGE OPTION General General n/a Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective SPRING 2019 RATIONALE: This class is the corequisite lab of a course approved by the CCCRC to satisfy the Flexible Core/Scientific World.

646 AV.10 Changes to be offered by the Department of Performing and Creative Arts (Program Code: 37997) FROM TO PCA Department No Change Department DRA 100 Course No Change Course Prerequisite No change Prerequisite N/A N/A Corequisite None Corequisite Credits No change 3 Credits 3 Hours No change Hours Students will have an opportunity to gain a basic Catalog Catalog Students will have an opportunity to gain understanding of theatre. Students will learn about theatre Description Description a basic understanding of theatre. through lectures, reading, viewing, in -class discussions, Students will learn about theatre through theatre exercis es, presentations, small group creative work lectures, reading, viewing, in- class and by attending one on -campus theater production and discussions, theatre exercises, professional performance. (FCER) presentations, small group creative work camp and by attending one on- us theater production and professional performance. n/a General General CREATIVE EXPRESSION Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective Spring 2019 RATIONALE: This class is the corequisite lab of a course approved by the CCCRC to satisfy the Flexible Core/Scientific World. AV.11 Changes to be offered by the Department of Performing and Creative Arts (Program Code: 37997) FROM TO Department Department No Change PCA PHO 101 Course Course No Change Prerequisite No change Prerequisite N/A Corequisite N/A Corequisite None Credits 3 Credits No change

647 Hours Hours No change 3 Catalog Catalog An introduction to the practice of An introduction to the practice of photography. It is an Description Description is an introduction to introduction to photographic seeing and the visual grammar photography. It of photography. The class combines basic design photographic seeing and the visual grammar problems, exercises in seeing elements of the medium, and of photography. The class combines basic y and development of photography as an art form the histor design problems, exercises in seeing as well as basic principles and techniques of camera, elements of the medium, and the history and development of photography as an art form photographic materials, processes, and techniques for and techniques of as well as basic principles FCER image processing and print production are covered. (arts & com) NOTE: This course is a prerequi camera, photographic materials, processes, site for all and techniques for image processing and other photography courses. NOTE: This course has a print production are covered. (arts & com) material fee. ) NOTE: This course is a prerequisite TALA ( for all other photography courses. NOTE This course has a material f ee. General and arts & com. (arts & com) ( TALA ) General CREATIVE EXPRESSION Education Education Component: Component: Effective Effective Spring 2019 RATIONALE: This class is the corequisite lab of a course approved by the CCCRC to satisfy the Flexible Core/Scientific World. AVI. Courses Withdrawn n/a

648 AVII: Affiliation Agreements

649

650

651 through Comments Comments 05/13/2019. 11/14/2018 extended from appointment Substitute Comments Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Page 1 of 268 5/13/2019 Eff To Eff To 6/30/2019 6/30/2019 6/30/2019 Eff To 1/1/2019 Eff From Eff From 11/14/2018 1/1/2019 Eff From 11/19/2018 Instructional $87,495.00 $90,871.00 $51,126.00 $55,837.00 Amount Amount Amount *Base Sal Salary Components *Base Sal Salary Components Salary Components *Base Sal *Base Sal November 2018 SW Y Y SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Type 13.3B 13.3B Heo Series Track Track Type Prior Ben >=6 Mo Or Substitute Heo Series Type Track Heo Series Chancellor’s University Report Name Melissa Name McGonagle,Rita T Pizzo,Joseph Ocasio,Evangelina Merolle,Colleen Name Program Specl Functional Title Functional Title Functional Title Admin Coord Student Career Mgr Education Mgr Continuing Comms Marketing He Associate Continuing & Profl Studies College Advancement He Associate Title Title Appointment Non-Teaching / Administrative He Assistant Baruch College Asst To Heo Campus Facilities & Operations Title

652 Comments Comments 10/28/18 - 11/30/18. extended from Sub appointment Comments Appt Hrs Appt Appt Hrs Hrs Page 2 of 268 Eff To Eff To 6/30/2019 5/25/2019 6/30/2019 6/30/2019 Eff To 11/30/2018 6/30/2019 6/30/2019 11/26/2018 1/1/2019 Eff From Eff From 11/26/2018 1/1/2019 10/28/2018 1/1/2019 Eff From 1/1/2019 $63,617.00 $44,308.00 $71,723.00 $61,593.00 $56,528.00 $117,120.00 $120,450.00 Amount Amount Amount Components Salary Components Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal Components *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal November 2018 Y Y Y SW Y SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Type 13.3B Track Heo Series Heo Series Type >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben 13.3B Substitute <6 Mo No Prior Svc Track Heo Series 13.3B Track Heo Series 13.3B 13.3B Type Track Heo Series 13.3B Track Substitute Chancellor’s University Report Mayer,Rebecca Hurst,Teresa Name Name Hardin,Annmarie Carlson Hurst,Teresa Charles,Nneka Name D Richaud,Amaranta Rendon Sarah Voznyak,Yevgeniya Continuing Education Specl Functional Title Continuing Financial Aid Specl Functional Title Functional Title Student Counseling Continuing Education Specl Education Coord Dir Dir Student Counseling Finance Specl Counseling & Psychological Svc He Assistant He Assistant Title Financial Aid He Assistant Asst To Heo He Assistant Title He Officer Title He Officer Grad Admission/Student Svc-SPA

653 11/30/18. 10/19/18 through extended from appointment Assistant Education Substitute Higher Comments Comments Comments Comments Hrs Appt Appt Appt Hrs Hrs Appt Hrs Page 3 of 268 Eff To 5/27/2019 6/30/2019 6/30/2019 Eff To Eff To 11/30/2018 6/30/2019 Eff To 6/30/2019 Eff From Eff From 10/19/2018 11/5/2018 11/28/2018 Eff From 11/26/2018 10/29/2018 Eff From 10/29/2018 $45,957.00 $56,528.00 $78,477.00 $45,957.00 $48,210.00 $101,043.00 Amount Amount Amount Amount *Base Sal Components Components *Base Sal Components Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal Salary Components Salary *Base Sal November 2018 SW SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Heo Series Type Prior Ben Type Substitute Heo Series Track 13.3B Heo Series Track Substitute 13.3B Track Type >=6 Mo Or 13.3B Track Heo Series Prior Ben Type >=6 Mo Or Chancellor’s University Report Name Johnson,Leora M. Yonica Sanders,LaTonia Damian,Arthur E Name Name Jethanandani,Madh u Smith,Marny Lynn Frei Watts,Rebecca Name Coord Functional Title Program Specl Admissions Coord Enrollment Registrar Admissions Coord Enrollment Mgr Student Career Functional Title Admissions Dir Functional Title Functional Title Asst To Heo Title Title Asst To Heo Asst To Heo He Assistant He Associate Undergraduate Admissions Title He Officer Registrar's Office Title Graduate Admissions - ZSB

654 Comments Eff To 6/30/2019 Comments Comments Hrs Appt 10/29/2018 Eff From Appt Hrs Page 4 of 268 $84,678.00 Eff To Eff To 5/18/2019 5/27/2019 Prev Amount tal Action Appointment-Title tal Action Appointment: 19 Eff From 11/19/2018 11/28/2018 Eff From Prev Salary Components *Base Sal $62,949.00 $45,957.00 Amount Amount $104,461.00 Amount Salary Components Salary Components *Base Sal *Base Sal November 2018 *Base Sal SW Salary Components SW Part B: Personnel Matters Prior Ben Heo Series Prior Ben >=6 Mo Or Substitute 13.3B Track Type Type 13.3B Substitute >=6 Mo Or Type To To Chancellor’s University Report Name Name Cano,Vanessa E Peterson,Keisha R Khan,Sadia Afzal Name Research Programs Dir Research Programs Functional Title Prior Func Title Functional Title Mgr Advisor-Aheo Admissions Admin Coord Functional Title Appointment-Title Chge/Reclass Chge/Reclass: 1 Election-Department Chair Prior Title Asst To Heo Title Title VP Academic Affairs & Provost Provost-Faculty Operations Asst To Heo He Officer He Associate Title Non-Teaching / Administrative Faculty Allen Aaronson Dept of Mkt/IB

655 increase effective Received merit Comments 11/26/18. Eff From 11/26/2018 International effective 01/25/19 Re Elected as Comments Comments Business 020. 07/01/18-06/30/2 effective Department Chair through 06/30/21. Elected as department chair of the Aaronson Department of Marketing and Page 5 of 268 $63,617.00 Prev Amount Eff To Eff To tal Action Election-Department Chair: 2 *Base Sal Eff From Prev Salary 1/25/2019 7/1/2018 Components Eff From $72,996.00 $65,817.00 $128,485.00 $128,485.00 Amount Amount Amount November 2018 Components *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal *SAB Components Components Salary Salary *Base Sal Part B: Personnel Matters Type Heo Series 13.3B - Type Tenured Type Tenured To Chancellor’s University Report Name Name Marquardt,Carol Shtembari,Alkida Eyuboglu,Nermin Name Functional Title Financial Aid Specl Professor Functional Title Professor Functional Title Salary Incr-Not New Step (INST He Assistant Financial Aid Title Title Stan Ross Dept Accountancy Non-Teaching / Administrative Professor Title Professor

656 02/22/2019, Reassignment Comments Leave 2018-2019 at full pay. Dates 02/11/2019, Professional 04/16/2019. 02/25/2019, 100 Pay Leave % of Page 6 of 268 Election-Department Chair Salary Incr-Not New Step (INST Library Reassignment Leave Appointment-Title Chge/Reclass Appointment Eff To Non-Teaching / Administrative: 19 Total Actions Reported: Instructional Non-Teaching / Administrative: 1 Faculty: 2 Non-Teaching / Administrative: 1 tal Action Salary Incr-Not New Step (INST: tal Action Library Reassignment Leave: 1 Eff From 2/11/2019 $94,248.00 Amount November 2018 Salary Components *Base Sal Part B: Personnel Matters Tenured Type To To Chancellor’s University Report Name Donnelly,Francis Functional Title Assc Professor-Librarian Library Reassignment Leave 1 Title Faculty Assc Professor Library

657 Page 7 of 268 Total Instructional: 24 Faculty: 1 November 2018 Part B: Personnel Matters Chancellor’s University Report

658 established List Line due to Comments Permanent COA Return to Comments Comments Hrs Appt Appt Hrs Hrs Appt Page 8 of 268 11/8/2019 11/8/2019 Eff To Eff To 10/29/2019 Eff To Eff From 11/9/2018 Eff From 11/9/2018 Eff From 11/25/2018 11/9/2018 Classified $38,407.00 $57,587.00 $45,412.00 $57,587.00 Amount Amount Amount Salary Components *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary Components Components November 2018 SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Probable Type Permanent Probable Permanent Permanent Probable Permanent Type Type Chancellor’s University Report Assimiou,Yaya Calero,Ana Name Allen,Sandrene A Name Name Rodriguez,Luis Maintenance Worker Cuny Office Asst 3 Maintenance Worker Cuny Admin Asst 1A Functional Title Functional Title Functional Title Cuny Admin Asst Maintenance Worker Cuny Office Assistant Title Appointment Competitive Buildings & Grounds Title History Title Maintenance Worker Human Resources Graduate Admissions - ZSB

659 Comments Employee being replaced by civil service list. Return to Permanent COA title. Comments Comments Comments Comments Hrs Hrs Hrs Appt Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Appt Page 9 of 268 Eff To 10/29/2019 Eff To Eff To 9/30/2019 10/29/2019 Eff To Eff To 10/29/2019 10/29/2018 Eff From 10/30/2018 Eff From 10/30/2018 Eff From 10/1/2018 Eff From Eff From 10/30/2018 11/25/2018 $37,440.00 $37,440.00 $29,497.00 $45,412.00 $45,412.00 $45,412.00 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Salary Components Salary *Base Sal Components Components *Hourly Rt *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary Components Components Salary *Base Sal November 2018 SW SW SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Type Probable Permanent Probable Permanent Permanent Type Probable Permanent Type Type Type Probable Permanent Permanent Chancellor’s University Report Maria Name Name Samantha Jethanandani,Madh Name John,Sherina Gerl,Robert Joseph Name Name Vasquez,Janet Rhoden,Carlene A. Brown,Tishima S Cuny Admin Asst 1A Cuny Office Asst 1 Functional Title Functional Title Cuny Admin Asst 1A Cuny Office Asst 3 Cuny Office Asst 3 Functional Title Functional Title Functional Title Cuny Admin Asst 1A Title Political Science Cuny Admin Asst Cuny Office Undergraduate Admissions Assistant Cuny Office Title Title Lawrence Field Ctr Ent/Sm Bus Asst Assistant Cuny Office Title Asst Cuny Admin Cuny Admin Public Safety Title

660 Comments Appt Hrs Page 10 of 268 Eff To Appointment Total Actions Reported: Classified Competitive: 10 Total Classified: 10 tal Action Appointment: 10 Eff From Amount Components Salary November 2018 SW Part B: Personnel Matters Type To Chancellor’s University Report Name u Functional Title Assistant Title

661 revised to read Comments rev to 10/18 CUR: end date 1/1/19 10/21/18. Comments Hrs Appt Appt Hrs Leave % of 100 Pay Page 11 of 268 Eff To 10/21/2018 Eff To tal Action Appointment: 1 tal Action Revision: 1 10/22/2018 Eff From Executive Compensation Eff From 7/2/2018 $125,000.00 Amount $120,450.00 Amount Salary Components *Base Sal November 2018 *Base Sal SW Salary Components Part B: Personnel Matters Type <6 Months Ecp Acting Type Ecp (Not Acting) To To Chancellor’s University Report Name Name ekhoe Ricardo Hector,Ronnie Oviawe,Deborah Omokha Eoc Exec Dir-Adm Functional Title Eoc Exec Dir-Adm Functional Title Revision Plan Bronx EOC Title Bronx EOC ECP Below Vice President Appointment Title ECP Below Vice President Bronx CC Administrator Administrator

662 a Page 12 of 268 Appointment Revision Total Executive Compensation Plan: 2 Total Actions Reported: Executive Compens ECP Below Vice President: 1 ECP Below Vice President: 1 November 2018 Part B: Personnel Matters Chancellor’s University Report

663 Comments Comments Comments Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Page 13 of 268 6/30/2019 Eff To Eff To 1/24/2019 Eff To 10/31/2018 1/24/2019 11/1/2018 10/23/2018 Eff From 10/22/2018 Eff From Eff From 10/19/2018 Instructional $60,749.00 $60,869.00 $52,127.00 $60,869.00 Amount Amount Amount *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal Components Salary Components Components Salary Salary November 2018 SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Prior Ben >=6 Mo Or Heo Series Track Type Substitute Type Prior Ben >=6 Mo Or Substitute >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben Substitute Type Chancellor’s University Report Buttafuoco,Paul J. Name Baez,Milagros Guerrero,Gino D. Name Name Guerrero,Gino D. Acad Testing Coord Acad Testing Coord Functional Title Asst Professor Sr College Lab Functional Title Functional Title Tech-Class Dept of Biological Sciences Laboratory / Research Title Asst Professor Tech Non-Teaching / Administrative Title Asst To Heo Asst To Heo Business And Information Sys Faculty Appointment Institutional Research Title Sr College Lab

664 Comments Comments Comments Comments Appt Appt Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Hrs Hrs Page 14 of 268 6/30/2019 Eff To Eff To 5/31/2019 Eff To 6/30/2019 Eff To Appointment Total Actions Reported: Instructional tal Action Appointment: 7 10/15/2018 Eff From Eff From 11/1/2018 Eff From Eff From 10/29/2018 $90,871.00 $84,678.00 $39,282.00 Amount Amount Amount Amount Components Salary *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal Components *Base Sal Salary Salary Components Components November 2018 SW SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Track Type Type Type 13.3B Track Heo Series 13.3B Type 13.3B Prior Ben >=6 Mo Or Substitute Heo Series To Chancellor’s University Report G Kavanagh,Angela Soraya Alvarez,Angel Name Name Name Name Molenaar,Ana Functional Title Acad Advising Coord Functional Title Enrollment Registrar Functional Title Functional Title Mgr Student Life Mgr Title Title VP for Academic Affairs He Associate Registrar Title Asst To Heo Student Support/Student Life He Associate Title

665 Page 15 of 268 Non-Teaching / Administrative: 5 Faculty: 1 Laboratory / Research: 1 Total Instructional: 7 November 2018 Part B: Personnel Matters Chancellor’s University Report

666 Comments Eff To Comments Comments 11/25/2018 Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Eff From Page 16 of 268 $37,440.00 10/21/2019 Eff To Eff To Prev Amount tal Action Appointment: 2 9/30/2018 Eff From 10/22/2018 Eff From Classified Components *Base Sal Prev Salary $29,497.00 $119,371.00 Amount Amount $37,440.00 Amount Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Components Components Salary November 2018 Salary *Base Sal SW SW Components Part B: Personnel Matters Permanent Probable Permanent Type Type Permanent Type To Chancellor’s University Report Harris,Kisha Sao,Sidney Bunny Name Name Name Ryan,Conal Shane Cuny Office Asst 1 Functional Title Functional Title Functional Title Prior Func Title Oiler Cuny Office Asst 3 Cuny Office Asst 3 Appointment-Title Chge/Reclass Competitive Title Library Resources Center Assistant Cuny Office Cuny Office Assistant Cuny Office Assistant Bursar Title Oiler Prior Title Appointment Competitive PPS-Maintenance Title

667 Page 17 of 268 Comments Appointment Appointment-Title Chge/Reclass Competitive: 1 Competitive: 2 Total Actions Reported: Classified tal Action Probation Period Transfer: 1 tal Action Transfer to Another College: 1 tal Action Appointment-Title 10/13/2018 Eff From $30,673.00 Amount *Base Sal Components Salary November 2018 SW Part B: Personnel Matters Type Probable Permanent To To To Chancellor’s University Report Comments Rodriguez,Lisandy Name Rights Only Perm/Disc Type Campus Security Mcaloney,Mark Name Functional Title Asst Chge/Reclass: 1 Probation Period Transfer Transfer to Another College Labor PPS-Maintenance Title Campus Laborer Security Asst Public Safety Title Competitive

668 Page 18 of 268 Probation Period Transfer Transfer to Another College Labor: 1 Competitive: 1 Total Classified: 5 November 2018 Part B: Personnel Matters Chancellor’s University Report

669 Comments Comments Comments Hrs Appt Eff From Hrs Appt Page 19 of 268 Eff To Eff To Prev Amount tal Action Appointment: 2 11/1/2018 Eff From Eff From 11/1/2018 Executive Compensation Components Prev Salary $130,000.00 $130,000.00 Amount Amount Amount Salary Salary Components *Base Sal *Base Sal Components November 2018 Salary Components SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Acting) Ecp (Not Type Acting) Ecp (Not Type Type To Chancellor’s University Report Name Name Bryan,Dave Smith,Moraima Name Affairs Asst Dn Student Life Asst Dean Student Functional Title Functional Title Functional Title Salary Change-Not Title (ECP) Plan Student Engagement/Judical Aff ECP Below Vice President Appointment ECP Below Vice President School of Vis Med Perf Arts Title Asst Dean VP for Student Affairs Asst Dean Title Brooklyn College Title

670 a salary effective Revert to original increase eff. 1/1/19 - 8/26/19. (11/18 CR). 1/1/19 - 8/26/19 increase eff. Temporary salary Temporary salary 8/27/19. Comments Eff From 1/1/2019 8/27/2019 Page 20 of 268 $196,450.00 $211,450.00 Prev Amount Appointment Salary Change-Not Title (ECP) Total Actions Reported: Executive Compens ECP Below Vice President: 2 Total Executive Compensation Plan: 4 ECP Below Vice President: 2 tal Action Salary Change-Not Title (ECP): *Base Sal Prev Salary *Base Sal Components $196,450.00 $211,450.00 Amount November 2018 *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal Components Part B: Personnel Matters Ecp (Not Acting) Type Ecp (Not Acting) To Chancellor’s University Report Conelli,Maria Ann Conelli,Maria Ann Name Med Perf Arts Med Perf Arts Dn School Of Vis Functional Title Dn School Of Vis 2 Dean Title Dean

671 Comments Waiver. Comments Experience Appointment with Comments Hrs Hrs Appt Appt Appt Hrs Page 21 of 268 5/6/2019 Eff To 6/30/2019 8/26/2019 Eff To Eff To 1/24/2019 11/5/2018 Eff From Eff From 11/1/2018 11/7/2018 Eff From 1/25/2019 Instructional $49,840.00 $49,840.00 $61,593.00 $44,308.00 Amount Amount Amount *Base Sal Components Salary Components Components Salary Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal November 2018 SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Type Substitute Prior Ben Prior Ben >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben 13.3B >=6 Mo Or Type Type Track >=6 Mo Or Substitute Heo Series Substitute Chancellor’s University Report Name Bologna,Ivana Name Tavarez,Jennifer Name Philogene,Sheena Philogene,Sheena Functional Title Functional Title Hr Affirmative Action Instructor-Librarian Specl Functional Title Admin Coord Instructor-Librarian Library Diversity and Equity Programs Title Title Instructor Asst To Heo Appointment Instructor Faculty Feirstein Grad School/Cinema Title He Assistant Non-Teaching / Administrative

672 Comments Comments Comments Hrs Appt Appt Hrs Hrs Appt Page 22 of 268 Eff To 6/30/2019 8/26/2019 6/30/2019 Eff To 6/30/2019 Eff To tal Action Appointment: 5 Eff From 11/8/2018 8/27/2018 Eff From 7/1/2018 Eff From 7/1/2018 $47,340.00 Amount $16,043.00 $56,528.00 $56,528.00 Amount Amount Components Salary *Base Sal November 2018 *Base Sal Y *Base Sal SW Components *Base Sal Components Salary Salary Part B: Personnel Matters Heo Series Heo Series Instructors And Others Psc 13.3B 13.3B Track Heo Series Track 13.3B Type Type Track Type To Chancellor’s University Report Name Name Davis,Da'Nashja I. Erskine,Kristine Sarrao,Michael Saint-Cyr,Sabine Tamara Name Student Career Adv Functional Title Functional Title Student Career Adv Sr-Heoa Student Life Specl Sr-Heoa Functional Title Graduate Assistant B Reappointment Non-Teaching / Administrative B Graduate Asst Title Earth and Environment Sciences He Assistant Title Magner Career Center Faculty He Assistant He Assistant Title VP for Student Affairs Transfer Student Services

673 Comments Comments Comments Comments 11/6/2018 11/5/2018 Eff From 11/5/2018 Eff From Eff From 8/27/2018 Appt Hrs Page 23 of 268 $68,351.00 $84,354.00 $56,528.00 $58,555.00 Prev Amount Prev Amount Prev Amount 8/13/2017 Eff To tal Action Reappointment: 4 Prev Salary Prev Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal Components 7/1/2017 Components Eff From Prev Salary Components $71,723.00 $61,593.00 $87,495.00 $55,782.00 $63,617.00 Amount Amount Amount Amount November 2018 *Base Sal Components Salary Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Components Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary Components Components Part B: Personnel Matters Type Type Heo Series Tenure 13.3B - Track Type Type Heo Series Track 13.3B Track Heo Series Track 13.3B 13.3B Heo Series To Chancellor’s University Report haka O Sainte,Peggy Name Name Johnson-Burkett,C elyna M Aniello Cacace,Stephen Gerstein,Miriam Quinones-Gomez,S Name Name Functional Title Functional Title Hr Payroll Specl Assc Professor Specl Enrollment Bursar Admissions Specl Hr Specl Functional Title Functional Title Salary Incr-Not New Step (INST Office of the Bursar Title Accounting Faculty Title He Assistant Assc Professor Non-Teaching / Administrative Human Resource Services He Assistant Title He Assistant Title He Assistant

674 Reported in 10/18 Comments Salary is revised 87,495.00. to read Comments Appt Hrs Eff From 11/5/2018 Pay Leave % of 100 Page 24 of 268 $58,555.00 Prev Amount Eff To tal Action Salary Incr-Not New Step (INST: tal Action Authorized Leave: 1 Eff From 9/1/2018 Components *Base Sal Prev Salary Leave end date Comments 4/9/2019. $87,495.00 $63,617.00 Amount Amount Eff To 6/30/2019 November 2018 Salary *Base Sal 2/26/2019 Eff From Components *Base Sal Components Salary Part B: Personnel Matters Track 13.3B Type Tenured Type Heo Series Track 13.3B Type Heo Series To To Chancellor’s University Report Name Jasper,Ariel Gerstein,Miriam Quercia,Ireen Name Name Functional Title Hr Coord Functional Title Functional Title Assc Professor Specl Acad Seek Std Suppt Authorized Leave Revision 5 Non-Teaching / Administrative Accounting Title Faculty Assc Professor Title He Assistant Human Resource Services Title SEEK Asst To Heo

675 revised end date Empl Class CR). 01/24/19 (10/18 from 08/26/19 to End date revised Changed Empl Class from CR). 01/24/19 (10/18 from 08/26/19 to End date revised Tenure Track to Instructional Other (10/18 CR) reprt. October 2018 appeared in the Comments CR. Comments Prior action to read 1/24/19. Comments Comments Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Leave % of Leave % of 100 Pay Pay Pay Leave % of 100 100 Pay 100 100 Leave % of Page 25 of 268 Eff To 1/24/2019 8/26/2019 1/24/2019 Eff To 1/24/2019 8/26/2019 Eff To Eff To Eff From Eff From Eff From 8/27/2018 8/27/2018 8/27/2018 8/27/2018 8/27/2018 Eff From $15,523.00 $17,600.00 $16,043.00 $97,628.00 $17,600.00 Amount Amount Amount Amount November 2018 Components Components Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal Components Salary Components Salary *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal Part B: Personnel Matters Psc Type Instructors Psc Psc And Others Instructors Type And Others And Others Instructors Type Instructors Type Psc And Others Instructors Chancellor’s University Report Name Name Name Koenig,Scott Spencer,Robyn C Pal,Rajat Kumar Wade Korsmo,Hunter Elie,Benelita Tina Name Visiting Assc Functional Title Graduate Assistant B Graduate Assistant B Functional Title Functional Title Graduate Assistant B Graduate Assistant B Functional Title Professor Psychology B Graduate Asst Graduate Asst B Graduate Asst Title Title Chemistry Graduate Asst History Title Visiting Assc Title Professor B

676 to INST HRLY. Secondary Job to corrected from Comments Job Indicator Primary Job revised from SUB (10/18 CR). (10/18 CR). to 06/30/2019 End date revised Comments 10/17 report. Comments End date was removed. CR Appt Appt Hrs Hrs Appt Hrs Pay 100 Leave % of Pay 100 Leave % of Pay Leave % of Page 26 of 268 Reappointment Appointment Eff To Non-Teaching / Administrative: 3 Faculty: 2 Total Actions Reported: Instructional Eff To 6/30/2019 Eff To tal Action Revision: 8 Eff From Eff From 10/15/2018 Eff From 7/5/2017 $69,193.00 $13,276.00 $128,485.00 Amount Amount Amount November 2018 Components Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary Components *SAB Components Salary Part B: Personnel Matters Type And Others Type Type Psc Tenured 13.3B Track Heo Series To Chancellor’s University Report Gould,Kenneth Name Name O'Connor,Patrick Name Admin Mgr Functional Title Functional Title Functional Title Professor Non-Teaching / Administrative B Institutional & Academic Prgms Sociology Title Professor Title Title He Associate

677 Page 27 of 268 Revision Authorized Leave Salary Incr-Not New Step (INST Non-Teaching / Administrative: 3 Non-Teaching / Administrative: 1 Non-Teaching / Administrative: 1 Faculty: 1 Non-Teaching / Administrative: 4 Total Instructional: 23 Faculty: 1 Faculty: 7 November 2018 Part B: Personnel Matters Chancellor’s University Report

678 Comments Comments Hrs Appt Appt Hrs Page 28 of 268 11/25/2019 Transfer to CSI Comments Eff To Eff To effective tal Action Appointment: 2 Eff From Eff From Eff From 11/19/2018 11/4/2018 11/26/2018 Classified $35,027.00 $33,084.00 $127,034.00 Amount Amount Amount Components Salary Components Components *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal Salary November 2018 SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Permanent Type Type Type Probable Permanent etitive Non-Comp To Chancellor’s University Report Gonzalez,Marciana Name Decicco,Janice Name Nowak,Patrick F Nikeira Name Custodial Asst Functional Title Stationary Engineer Functional Title Cuny Office Asst 2 Functional Title Transfer to Another College Heating Plant Title Facilities - Custodial Competitive Business Management Stationary Title Engineer Custodial Title Competitive Cuny Office Assistant Non-Competitive Appointment Assistant

679 Page 29 of 268 Comments Comments 11/5/2018 tal Action Authorized Leave: 3 tal Action Transfer to Another College: 2 Eff From 11/22/2016 Eff From $56,820.00 Comments date10/9/18. date 10/15/2018. Comments Return to work date 11/6/2018. Return to work Return to work Amount Amount Eff To Eff To Salary Components *Base Sal Salary Components November 2018 9/26/2018 Eff From Eff From 10/1/2018 SW SW 10/25/2018 Part B: Personnel Matters Type Type Type Permanent Rights Only Rights Only Perm/Disc Perm/Disc Type Permanent To To Chancellor’s University Report Sease,Lumisher Natera,Angela D Name Tucker,Allen Li,Steve X Name Name Name Electrician Helper Custodial Asst Custodial Asst Functional Title Functional Title Cuny Office Asst 3 Functional Title Functional Title Authorized Leave Reinstatement Custodial Non-Competitive Custodial Assistant Assistant Cuny Office Title Financial Aid Competitive Title Assistant Helper Electrician Title Facilities - Maintenance Title Facilities - Custodial

680 11/3/2018. permanency. Attained return to work to permanency. Attained date 12/14/2018. Revised expected Return to work 12/10/2018. work date to Revised return to Comments Comments Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Comments 100 Hrs 100 Leave % of Pay 600 100 Pay Leave % of 100 Appt 100 Page 30 of 268 Eff To Eff To Eff To 6/30/2019 tal Action Reinstatement: 1 Eff From 11/10/2018 11/5/2018 9/18/2018 Eff From 11/10/2018 6/30/2018 Eff From 3/29/2018 $15.00 $37,440.00 $55,370.00 $33,825.00 $47,579.00 $33,825.00 Amount Amount Amount November 2018 *Base Sal Components Salary *Base Sal Components Salary *Base Sal Salary Components *Base Sal *Hourly Rt *Base Sal Part B: Personnel Matters Permanent Permanent Classified Hourly >=6 Months Permanent Type Permanent Permanent Type Type To Chancellor’s University Report Name Name Caton,Tahaira J Guttadaro,Carol Ann Adams,Wendi Grullon,Andrew Name Samuels,Karen Vergara,Linda Campus Peace Cuny Office Asst 3 Campus Public Campus Peace Functional Title Officer 1 Officer 1 Functional Title Officer 1 College Assistant H Campus Peace Functional Title Safety Sgt Revision Non-Competitive Title Title SVP for Finance and Admin College Assistant Campus Peace Officer Title Cuny Office Assistant Campus Peace Officer Competitive Campus Peace Campus Pub Safety Sergeant Campus & Community Safety Svcs Classics Officer

681 Passed Return to work rights attained layoff Comments rights. Attained layoff date 12/27/2018. Comments probation; attained permanency. Empl class changed from Prob perm to Perm. Comments Appt Hrs Hrs Appt Appt Hrs Pay Leave % of Leave % of Pay Pay 100 100 100 Leave % of 100 Page 31 of 268 Appointment Eff To Total Actions Reported: Classified Eff To Eff To tal Action Revision: 9 Eff From 6/29/2018 Eff From 8/4/2017 Eff From 8/4/2017 6/26/2018 $33,084.00 $33,840.00 $33,084.00 $64,603.00 Amount Amount Amount November 2018 *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal Components Salary Components Salary *Base Sal Components Salary Part B: Personnel Matters Type Provisional Type etitive Type etitive Non-Comp Permanent Non-Comp To Chancellor’s University Report DeLouisa,Nicholas Name Spence,Ferne Mingo,Darral De Name Name Greenwood,Oliver Mail Message Svc Functional Title Custodial Asst Functional Title Wkr 1 Electrician Helper Custodial Asst Functional Title Title Custodial Assistant Facilities - Custodial Mail Message Svcs Worker Non-Competitive Mailing Services Assistant Title Facilities - Maintenance Custodial Helper Electrician Title

682 Page 32 of 268 Transfer to Another College Revision Reinstatement Authorized Leave Non-Competitive: 2 Non-Competitive: 1 Competitive: 2 Competitive: 1 Non-Competitive: 1 Non-Competitive: 2 Total Classified: 17 Competitive: 1 Competitive: 7 November 2018 Part B: Personnel Matters Chancellor’s University Report

683 Comments Comments Comments Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Page 33 of 268 6/30/2019 Eff To Eff To Eff To 6/30/2019 6/30/2019 6/30/2019 Eff From Eff From 10/22/2018 Eff From 11/19/2018 11/7/2018 10/22/2018 Instructional $56,528.00 $65,028.00 $56,528.00 $94,248.00 Amount Amount Amount Components Salary Salary Salary Components *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal Components November 2018 SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Track Heo Series Heo Series Heo Series 13.3B Type Track 13.3B Heo Series Track Type 13.3B Type Track 13.3B Chancellor’s University Report Jordan,Andrew Name Name Henson,Richard T Porter,Andrea F Alexandra,Paris A Name Specl Functional Title Functional Title Admin Exec Coord Admissions Mgr Acad Std Suppt Functional Title Specl Acad Std Suppt CUNYstart Program Title Borough of Manhattan CC Appointment Asst To Heo Non-Teaching / Administrative Admissions Services Title He Associate Computer Center Operations Title He Assistant He Assistant

684 Comments Hrs Appt Page 34 of 268 6/30/2019 Eff To 6/30/2019 Appointment Total Actions Reported: Instructional Non-Teaching / Administrative: 6 Total Instructional: 6 tal Action Appointment: 6 11/12/2018 11/12/2018 Eff From $42,407.00 $42,407.00 Amount *Base Sal *Base Sal Components Salary November 2018 SW Part B: Personnel Matters Heo Series Heo Series Track 13.3B Type 13.3B Track To Chancellor’s University Report Richards,Arielle J Bonilla,Melanie Name Acad Advisor-Aheo Acad Advisor-Aheo Functional Title Asst To Heo Asst To Heo Title office of Academic Affairs

685 Comments Comments Comments Appt Appt Hrs Hrs Appt Hrs Page 35 of 268 12/31/2018 Eff To 12/31/2018 Eff To Eff To Eff From Eff From 10/29/2018 10/29/2018 Eff From 7/19/2018 11/22/2018 11/12/2018 Classified $29,342.00 $25,967.00 $76,350.00 $66,710.00 $106,953.00 Amount Amount Amount Salary Salary Components *Base Sal Components *Base Sal Components *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal November 2018 SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Temporary Provisional 6 Months Type Provisional Provisional Temporary Type Type Or More <6 Months Chancellor’s University Report Figueira,Jason G Pena,Christopher Name Soh,Eng Leng Gonzalez,Cesar A Sobiesiak,Garry F Name Name Asst Media Services Functional Title Functional Title Painter Tech Asst Media Services It Associate 1 Tech Functional Title Electrician Asst Media It Associate Technician Services Asst Media Title Technician Services Painter Facility Maint Operation Title Title Audio & Visual Operations Competitive Appointment Electrician Computer Center Operations

686 Comments Comments Appt Hrs Appt Hrs Page 36 of 268 Eff To Eff To tal Action Appointment: 5 tal Action Reappointment: 9 11/10/2018 11/2/2018 11/10/2018 11/10/2018 Eff From 11/10/2018 11/10/2018 11/10/2018 Eff From 11/10/2018 11/10/2018 $33,825.00 $33,825.00 $33,825.00 $35,027.00 $33,825.00 $33,825.00 $33,825.00 $33,825.00 $33,825.00 Amount Amount November 2018 Components Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Components *Base Sal *Base Sal Part B: Personnel Matters Permanent Permanent Permanent Type Permanent Type Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent To To Chancellor’s University Report Name Rogers,Sarah Anne Montalvo,Jonathan Infante,Anthony Name Neumann,Tyler Gordon,Itisha C Martinez,Julio C Deleon Ramirez,Samantha Baksh,Leon Ezekiel Stokes,Stephanie Officer 1 Officer 1 Campus Peace Campus Peace Officer 1 Officer 1 Campus Peace Officer 1 Officer 1 Functional Title Cuny Office Asst 2 Campus Peace Officer 1 Campus Peace Functional Title Campus Peace Campus Peace Officer 1 Campus Peace Reinstatement Reappointment Officer Campus Peace Officer Campus Peace Officer Campus Peace Officer Campus Peace Officer Campus Peace Officer Campus Peace Campus Peace Officer Title Campus Peace Assistant Cuny Office Title Counseling Academic Competitive Officer Security Operations

687 Comments Comments Hrs Appt Appt Hrs Page 37 of 268 Appointment Reinstatement Reappointment Eff To Competitive: 9 Competitive: 2 Eff To Competitive: 5 Total Classified: 16 Total Actions Reported: Classified tal Action Reinstatement: 2 10/16/2018 11/5/2018 Eff From Eff From $35,027.00 $35,027.00 Amount Amount November 2018 Salary *Base Sal Components *Base Sal Components Salary Part B: Personnel Matters Type Permanent Permanent Type To Chancellor’s University Report Esposito,Joanne M J Sepulveda,Richard Name Name Cuny Office Asst 2 Functional Title Cuny Office Asst 2 Functional Title Library Cuny Office Assistant Office Of Student Affairs Title Title Cuny Office Assistant Competitive

688 Comments Comments Comments Hrs Hrs Appt Appt Hrs Appt Page 38 of 268 12/31/2018 9/30/2018 9/30/2018 5/11/2019 Eff To Eff To Eff To 5/20/2019 10/1/2018 8/14/2018 Eff From Eff From 8/21/2018 11/21/2018 11/12/2018 Eff From Instructional $90,871.00 $90,871.00 $75,110.00 $78,477.00 $94,248.00 Amount Amount Amount *Base Sal *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary Components Components Salary *Base Sal Salary Components *Base Sal November 2018 SW SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Prior Ben Substitute >=6 Mo Or Prior Ben >=6 Mo Or Substitute Prior Svc Substitute <6 Mo No Prior Svc Type <6 Mo No Type Type Substitute Substitute Chancellor’s University Report Name Adhiya,Aabha Name Ng,Daria Name Rose,Mari Forero,Laura Patricia Rose,Mari Functional Title Univ Financial Aid Affairs Dir Functional Title Univ Academic Affairs Dir Mgr Univ Academic Acad Program Specl Functional Title Acad Affairs Mgr Exec VC And Univ Provost Title He Assistant Accelerated Studies/Assoc Prog Title Academic Affairs Non-Teaching / Administrative Appointment He Associate He Officer He Associate Central Office Comm Colleges Title He Officer

689 Comments Comments Appt Appt Hrs Hrs Page 39 of 268 Eff To 6/30/2019 6/30/2019 6/30/2019 Eff To 12/31/2018 Appointment Non-Teaching / Administrative: 9 Total Instructional: 9 Total Actions Reported: Instructional tal Action Appointment: 9 11/12/2018 11/26/2018 Eff From Eff From 10/29/2018 10/1/2018 $53,758.00 $78,477.00 $40,815.00 $87,495.00 Amount Amount Components Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Salary *Base Sal Components *Base Sal November 2018 SW SW Part B: Personnel Matters Type >=6 Mo Or Track 13.3B Heo Series Track Heo Series 13.3B Prior Ben 13.3B Substitute >=6 Mo Or Type Prior Ben Track Heo Series To Chancellor’s University Report Adhiya,Aabha Name Vithaldas Dhar,Rimi Name Carolina Tiffer,Roxana Vithaldas Anthony Anders,William Univ Academic Acad Program Coord Acad Affairs Mgr Functional Title Admin Coord Affairs Mgr Functional Title Asst To Heo He Associate He Associate Asst To Heo VC for Research Title Title

690 a Comments Change in title University Assistant effective 10/11/18 from HEO to Administrator Hrs Appt Page 40 of 268 Eff To 10/10/2019 Appointment Total Actions Reported: Executive Compens Total Executive Compensation Plan: 2 ECP Below Vice President: 2 tal Action Appointment: 2 Eff From 10/11/2018 10/11/2018 Executive Compensation $135,000.00 $135,000.00 Amount Salary *Base Sal *Base Sal Components November 2018 SW Part B: Personnel Matters Prior Ben Acting) >=6 Mo Or Ecp Acting Type Ecp (Not To Chancellor’s Univers