Water 2120 Approved Policy Document

Transcript

1 Water 2120: Securing our Water Future Water Resources Management Strategy September 2016

2 Table of Contents ... ... ... 1 Overview ... Introduction ... ... ... ... 1 A. Policies ... ... ... ... 2 B. Projects ... ... ... ... 3 C. ... ... Public ... ... Involvement 5 D. ... ... Policies ... 8 ... A. Water Budget Planning and Reporting ... ... .. 8 ... 9 B. Fully Utilize and Protect Existing Water Rights and Water Resources Establish and Maintain a Groundwater Reserve ... ... 10 C. ... ... D. 11 Update and Maintain the Water Conservation Strategy ... E. 12 Support Regional Water Resources Planning and Management F. Utilize Conjunctive Management and Diversify Water Resources Portfolio ... 14 G. Develop and Implement Long - Term Water Resources Acquisition Plan ... 16 H. ... 17 Implement the Water Quality Protection Policy and Action Plan Protect and Enhance Storage of Native, San Juan Chama Water and other water I. - ... ... ... 18 resources ... Protect Valued Environmental and Cultural Resources ... ... 19 J. K. ... ... 20 Preserve and Enhance the Quality of Life in the Region ... anagement ... L. 21 Link Land Use Planning with Water M Encourage and Facilitate Public Involvement ... ... 22 M. Strategy for Use of Existing Supplies ... ... ... 23 A. ... ... ... 23 Use of Groundwater Juan - Chama Drinking Water Project (DWP) B. ... ... 23 San C. Reclamation and Reuse Projects ... ... ... 23 D. Aquifer Storage and Recovery ... ... ... 24 Appendix A ... ... ... ... 25

3 Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority E. Jones, Chair Councilor Trudy L - Chair e Commissioner Art D a Cruz, Vice Berry Mayor Richard J. Councilor Pat Davis Debbie O’Malley Commissioner Councilor Ken Sanchez Commissioner Maggie Hart Stebbins Trustee Pablo Rael, Ex Officio Customer Advisory Committee Technical Laurie Firor, Chair Amy Ewing, Vice - Chair David Brookshire Elaine Hebard Mike Hightower Dave Hill Laura McCarthy Ege Richardson Scott Verhines Water Authority Staff Mark S. Sanchez, Executive Director John Stomp, P.E., Chief Operating Officer Stan Allred, Chief Financial Officer Frank Roth, Senior Policy Manager David Morris, Public Information Officer Katherine Yuhas, Water Resources Manager Andrew Lieuwen, Water Rights Manager Rick Shean, Water Quality Hydrologist Angelique Maldonado, Water Use Compliance Supervisor Patty Jenkins, Executive Services Coordinator

4 Overview A. Introduction document sets forth the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority’s This ) 2017 Water Resources Management Strategy (Strategy) – ( a 100 - year Water Authority long range water supply plan for the metropolitan area. The name of the Strategy, - Water 2120 Securing our Water Future, was selected by the Water Authority rate : payers during a series of public meetings (Customer Conversations) in May and June 2016. The purpose of Water 2120 is to provide a safe, sustainable and resilient water supply for the m etropolitan area by (1) Utilize an adaptive management planning approach using the best available science to periodically update this water supply plan; (2) Use the existing water resources and rights already owned by the Water Authority including excess s upplies when available; (3) Work proactively with Federal, State, regional and local entities to seek solutions working cooperatively together and (4) Set a management level of the aquifer to manage long term use leaving water in the aquifer - unities it provides for future generations. The and the opport Strategy is designed 2017 to ensure Water Authority customers a safe, sustainable and resilient water supply to the year 2120. The Strategy provides for a continuation of the policies in the original Strategy adopted by the Albuquerque City Council in 1997 and updated and adopted by the Water Authority in 2007. The 2017 Strategy provides policies and sub - policies including a new water conservation goal and projects to be implemented starting in about year 2035. The Water Authority has been a leader in water resources management in the Southwest starting with the implementation of the 1997 Strategy almost twenty ye ars ago. The hi ghlights of our planning efforts include the following:  Per capita use has dropped almost 50% (251 gallons per person per day to 130 gpcd) Overall water use in 2015 as low as water usage in 1983  Reuse and recycling proje cts are providing non - potable water to large turf areas  in the north and south part of the metropolitan area Water Project (DWP) has been on -  Drinking line since December 2008  Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) projects are operational with large scale program underway Th amazing and tell an incredible story of what happens when you e results have been plan for the future:  Aquifer levels have been and continue to rise when the DWP came on - line  River depletions are declining d ue to reduced groundwater usage e  Consumptive us e continues to declin ( less than 40,000 acre - feet in 2015 ) Overall supply resilience has increased  1

5 B. Policies Water 2120 consists of thirteen policies and more than sixty sub - policies to guide provide a safe implementation of the plan including programs and projects needed to and sustainable water supply for the next 100 - years. Many of the policies below are a continuation of the existing policies set forth in the 1997 and 2007 Strategies and are listed in no particular order or priority. Policy A - Water Budget Planning and Reporting   - Fully Utilize and Protect Existing Water Rights and Water Resources Policy B -  Establish and Maintain a Groundwater Reserve Policy C  Policy D - Update and Maintain the Water Conservation Strategy  Policy E - Support Regional Water Resources Plan ning and Management  - Utilize Conjunctive Management and Diversify Water Resources Policy F Portfolio Policy G -  Develop and Implement Long - Term Water Resources Acquisition Plan  Policy H - Implement the Water Quality Protection Policy and Action Plan  Polic y I - Protect and Enhance Storage of Native, San Juan - Chama Water and other water resources  Policy J - Protect Valued Environmental and Cultural Resources  Policy K - Preserve and Enhance the Quality of Life in the Region  Link Land Use Planning with Water Management Policy L - Policy M Encourage and Facilitate Public Involvement  - - policies include the following: Some of the highlights of the new sub Policy A – 1: The Water Authority should update the Water Resources  ble science following the Adaptive Management Strategy using the best availa Management Approach (AMA) every ten years or more frequently as requested by the Water Authority Board. Water Authority Policy B – 3: The  should utilize all available excess return flows as part of a reuse and recycling pla n that consists of aquifer storage and - recovery, indirect potable and non potable reuse. Policy C  2: If drawdown in the Working Reserve should fall below the – Management Level, then projects should be implemented to add supply to the Water Authority portfol io to restore it to the Management Level. The  Policy E - 5: Water Authority shall collaborate with the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District (MRGCD) to develop and implement a plan to support and promote agriculture in the Middle Rio Grande. 1907  Policy G - 5: The Water Authority shall discontinue acquisition of native pre - water rights. 2

6 should develop and implement a Rio Grande  4: The Water Authority - Policy I Water Authority storage space working with the Compact pool within the Interstate Stream Commission (ISC) and the Office of the State Engineer (OSE). Policy J - 4: The Water Authority should work collaboratively and provide  - Chama and Rio funding to protect and restore watersheds of the San Juan G rande. Policy J - 6: The Water Authority should work with the City and County to  provide incentives to increase beneficial tree canopy coverage within Bernalillo County and the MRG.  - 2: The Water Authority should continue to reduce its carbon footpri nt Policy K by taking advantage of opportunities to reduce the energy usage of current infrastructure and by building new infrastructure with energy efficiency in mind. C. Projects This updated Strategy incorporates the projects previously identified to be implement ed in the 2007 Strategy he first phase of large scale aquifer storage consisting primarily of t and recovery flood flows , enhance d storage in Abiquiu Reservoir and native (ASR) storage in Abiquiu Reservoir. Water 2120 includes implementation of several a new water conservation goal and projects (Portfolio 1) over the 100 additional year planning period . The implementation - medium dates were determined comparing the medium projected demand and pply . T he actual need and time for implem entation su projected of the additional will be determined using the adaptive management approach (Policy A) as projects emand a nd supply data is known which can then be used to update this plan actual d Water Authority which would be presented to the Board. The combin ation of these projects over the planning period eliminated the supply gap for the medium demand/medium supply while staying above the groundwater management level – Filling in Future Gaps in Supply) . Although the (see Chapter 6 projects are listed in dat e order, they do not necessarily have to follow the specific order as listed or the date shown as some projects could be implemented earlier depending on water resources availability, permitting and funding.  Additional Full Sc ale ASR ( 2020 ) Connect the Northside I - 25 Reuse to the Southside Reuse including additional  eastside reuse sites (2035)  Additional ASR/ Indirect Potable Reuse (IDPR) Phase 1 and Stormwater Capture and Use (2045)  Westside - Channel Storage and ASR/ IDPR Phase II (2055) Reuse, Off ASR/  Eastside Reuse and IDPR Phase III (2065) 3

7 Figure 1 – Projected Timeline of Projects and Estimated Costs Portfolio 1 with were analyzed and ranked based on many factors Each of the alternatives listed above l, permitting, frequency of availability and others (see including environmental, financia 5 – Alternatives). Further detailed analysis will be needed as these projects Chapter are developed and implemented. In addition to the development and implementation of the above listed conceptual projects, several activities must be undertaken, including: Reuse and Recycling Plan – utilize excess return flows for aquifer storage and  - potable use. recovery, indirect potable and non Groundwater Management Plan –  develop plan for annual measurement a nd reporting of aquifer levels, incorporate groundwater quality, location and size of existing groundwater contamination sites and the need for and siting for replacement and aquifer storage and recovery wells. Water Conservation Plan – implementation plan  for 110 gpcd over the next 20 - years including education and rebates.  Storage Plan – this plan will include existing storage capabilities and the need for future a - channel storage sites for excess return flows . dditional off emble overall plan including watershed Environmental Plan – need to ass  . restoration, endangered species, Bosque restoration and other activities 4

8 D. Public Involvement There was extensive public involvement as part of the development of Water 2120 including the following: Water Authority Board Updates –  September 2015 to May 2016 Technical Customer Advisory Committee Meetings – 14 Meetings over 2 Years  Two Initial Public Meetings – February 2016   Five Technical Reports Four Customer Conversations – May/June 2016  Town Hall – July 2016  July/August 2016 stside Neighborhood Coalition Meetings – Westside and Ea  Water Authority Board Updates Public presentations were mad e to the Water Authority Board during their regular meetings in September 2015, January 2016, March 2016 and May 2016. The Water 2120 Plan was introduced to the Water Authority Board in August 2016. The presentations to the Board including demand, supply, climate change, groundwater reserve management plan, alternatives, range of potential supply gaps, and supp ly portfolios to fill the medium demand/medium supply gap. Technical Customer Advisory Committee (TCAC) Meetings The Water Authority Board established a citizen board consisting of nine members of other important matters of the the public to meet and discuss important water policy and Water Authority. There were fourteen meetings over two years working collaboratively with the TCAC on the update to the 2007 Water Resources Management Strategy cal documents were (WRMS). Extensive presentations were provided and five techni ent. The documents produced were as follows: produced for review and comm  Chapter 2 – Water Demand  Chapter 3 – Supply  – Groundwater Management Chapter 4  Chapter 5 – Alternatives  Chapter 6 – Filling in Future Gaps in Supply There were more than 1,300 comments received and addressed from the TCAC on the documents which were posted and available to the public on the Water Authority’s website starting in June 2016 with Chapter 6 posted prior to the Town Hall meeting. The TCAC r ecommended adoption by the Water Authority Board of the new policies at the August 1, 2016 meeting. 5

9 Two Initial Public Meetings The hosted two public meetings (around 40 participants) in February Water Authority nity to discuss the need for a new 100 2016 to provide the public with the opportu year - water supply plan and to provide feedback on the plan prior to the plan elements and alternatives established. The meetings went very well and overall there was very positive feedback on discussing what the new plan might consist of. Four Customer Conversations (about 200 There were four customer conversations held in May and June 2016 customers) . These meetings were held over a two hour period and provided our customers the opportunity to provide feedback on a number of topics related to the new water supply plan. The meetings included a presentation on the update and status of the development of the plan, followed by two exercises examining several alternatives in an effort to afford our customers the opport unity to experience what it was like trying to fill the supply gaps. The customers were separated into groups at tables where they were provided three different supply scenarios (historical, central tendency climate change, and hot - dry climate change al ong with a water conservation alternative. Given the gaps presented to them, they worked together to select alternatives based on a variety of criteria including the amount of water they would provide, environmental and financial impact to e selected alternatives provided an opportunity to obtain productive name a few. Th feedback about customer choices. For example, the customers really liked the idea of capturing and using stormwater as a future alternative water supply. Based on that d stormwater as a component of Portfolio 1. feedback, we adde Town Hall The purpose of the Town Hall was to obtain community input on the revised policies to ensure a safe and sustainable water supply into the future. The Water Authority seeks to reach its water resource s management decisions through a public process so that they may reflect community values. The Town Hall brought significant input regarding community values and priorities and how they can be reflected in water resources activities. nd held July 22 The Town Hall was a nd over 200 customers attended the four hour meeting. The morning was spent in informational plenary sessions where customers learned about different elements of the proposed strategy and were able to ask questions of the presenters. Th e afternoon was spent in small groups discussions led by individual facilitators and recorders to gather input on customer preference on supply alternatives and proposed policies. Water Authority staff were also circulating through ns to address questions on the strategy as they arose. The close the small group sessio 6

10 of the meeting brought all the participants back together for a report out on the results of their small group discussions. Customer preferences for supply alternatives were very similar to the preferences expressed in the Customer Conversations. Results of the Town Hall meeting are in the appendix. Westside and Eastside Neighborhood Coalition Meetings Water Authority The year water supply plan to members of five presented the new 100 - d ifferent neighborhood coalitions including the Westside Coalition of Neighborhoods and five Eastside Coalition of Neighborhoods. The plan was presented and questions and answers were provided to give another opportunity for public feedback on the plan. 7

11 Policies A. Water Budget Planning and Reporting The Water Authority POLICY A. shall utilize an adaptive management approach to water resources planning and reporting. The water budget established shall be reported annually to the Water Authority Board and updated no less than every five years. RATIONALE: The Adaptive Management Approach (AMA) adopted as part of the 2017 WRMS is intended to provide an iterative process by which supply and demand can be re evaluated as needed in the future. - The in tent of AMA is to provide an iterative process for robust decision - making in the face of uncertainty, with the aim or reducing uncertainty over time via monitoring. Since both supply and demand projections are uncertain and may be revised in the future, AM A allows for re - evaluation of currently - identified predicted supply gaps, and subsequent revision of these gaps, if necessary. Future revisions to the supply and demand analyses including continued examinations of climate change may be made based on new te chnical understanding, availability of new technical tools, and/or revisions to current predictions of supply and/or demand. A key aspect of the Water Authority ’s AMA will be monitoring groundwater levels in the Groundwater Reserve. - POLICIES: SUB 1. The Wat er Authority should update the Water Resources Management Strategy using the best available science following the Adaptive Management Approach (AMA) every ten years or more frequently as requested by the Water Authority Board. 2. The Water Authority shall re port on an annual basis to the Water Authority Board to provide a water budget for the upcoming year which includes estimated groundwater - potable water reuse. and surface water use along with estimated non 3. The Water Authority shall report to the Water Aut hority Board every five years regarding the aquifer level and the projected level for the next five years as compared to the groundwater management level established in Policy C. 8

12 B. Fully Utilize and Protect Existing Water Rights and Water Resources The Water Authority shall protect its right to fully use its San Juan - POLICY B. Chama and Rio Grande surface water as a direct water supply and transition to Water Authority other renewable supplies when available and appropriate. The shall limit the use of groundwater except when exercising wells, providing supply during peak demand periods or when surface water supplies are not available (e.g., droughts). RATIONALE: The Water Authority holds the rights to about 26,396 acre - feet of vested and acquired R io Grande water rights and 48,200 acre feet of San Juan - Chama water. Meeting future water demands will - require full utilization of these water rights and resources, including the increasing volume of excess wastewater which will be available for reuse. A safe and sustainable water supply for the Water Authority is based on using the existing water rights and resources which will reduce the need for long - term acquisition of additional water supplies. This involves using groundwater and limiting the long - t erm use of the aquifer to preserve a portion for future generations while preserving the right to fully utilize our groundwater permits during droughts and when surface water supplies are unavailable. - POLICIES: SUB 1. The Water Authority shall take all the necessary steps to protect its existing water rights and water resources. 2. The Water Authority should utilize a combination of renewable supplies including the groundwater reserve, direct diversion of San Juan - Chama and native surface water, industrial an d municipal effluent, impaired groundwater and recycled water. 3. The Water Authority should utilize all available excess return flows as part of a reuse and recycling plan that consists of aquifer storage and recovery, indirect potable and non - potable reuse. should prepare for a basin adjudication or seek alternative 4. The Water Authority legal strategies (negotiated settlements) in addition to the traditional adjudication process. 9

13 C. Establish and Maintain a Groundwater Reserve Water Authority shall establish a groundwater reserve that POLICY C: The maintains sufficient water in aquifer storage to provide water supply during catastrophic drought or other unforeseen, largely unquantifiable events. The gro undwater reserve shall be accessible without causing a dverse impacts to the . The aquifer and shall be partitioned into a safety reserve and a working reserve safety reserve is that portion of the groundwater reserve prudently maintained for emergency use only, while the working reserve is the balance of the groundwater reserve above the safety reser ve. A management level goal of aquifer drawdown set within the work ing reserve . The management level provides explicit shall be operational guidance to the implementation of Policy B in that it balances full util ization of the Water Authority ’s existing water rights with no long - term change in groundwater storage. RATIONALE: The aquifer is generally rising throughout the Middle Rio Grande. This began in 2008 with the implementation of the Drinking Water Project. The water levels are expected to rise for more than a decade longer and it is important to develop and implement an explicit policy for managing the aquifer in the future to prevent a return to pre - 1997 practice under which continuing drawdown was unsust ainable. This augmented Policy C makes minimal nomenclature changes to the 2007 Policy C and adds specific language to guide management of the aquifer itself. SUB - POLICIES : The reserve terminology should be implemented by reference to average level of 1. - development conditions drawdown in Water Authority wells from pre as currently defined by the Office of the State Engineer’s Administrative model . Accordingly, the reserve settings should be: initial 2017 a. Groundwater Reserve . This reserve extends from fifty feet of drawdown to three hundred feet of drawdown, the latter constituting the threshold of irreversible subsidence. b. Safety Reserve . That portion of the Groundwater Reserve extending from two hundred and fifty feet of drawdown to three hundred feet of drawdown. c. Working Reserve . The residual portion of the Groundwater Reserve extend ing from fifty feet of drawdown to two hun dred and fifty feet of drawdown . d. Management Level . T his is set at one hundred and ten feet of drawdown from pre - development conditions as determined by examining a variety of groundwater and monitoring wells. This new management level will maintain seventy percent of the Working Reserve. 2. If drawdown in th e Working Reserve should fall below the Management Level, then projects should be implemented to add supply to the Water Authority portfolio to vel. restore it to the Management Le 10

14 D. Update and Maintain the Water Conservation Strategy POLICY D. Implementation of the Water Conservation Plan has been a key aspect of the success of the 2007 Water Resources Management Strategy. Continued progress in conservation to achieve a gallons per capita per day (GPCD) water usage of 110 will further extend ou r water supplies even in the face shall of climate change. The Water Authority utilize the conservation program to reduce GPCD to 110 by 2037. RATIONALE: Water conservation has proven to be a powerful tool for managing water resources over wenty years. GPCD has been reduced from 250 in 1995 to 127 in 2015. This has led to an the past t overall reduction in production from approximately 125,000 acre - feet in 1995 to approximately 98,000 - 00 - year planning period are a key acre feet in 2015. Further water conservation efforts over the 1 element to secure a resilient, affordable water supply for the Water Authority’s service area. In addition to representing wise stewardship and management of our water resources, successful e conservation plan is required by the State for obtaining future permits implementation of an effectiv and funding water projects. SUB - POLICIES : 1. in extending the need Conservation is the primary way in which customers participate Water Authority shall continue its public outreach for additional water resources. The efforts to involve all customer classes in water conservation efforts. 2. The Water Authority shall update the Water Conservation Plan consistent with the 110 GPCD goal. 3. The Water Conservation Plan shall be updated at lea st every ten years and shall be reviewed annually so that updates to incentive, education and deterrent programs can be kept current with program needs. 4. The Water Authority shall work with the City and County to foster the efficient management and use of water in development and infrastructure. 11

15 E. Support Regional Water Resources Planning and Management POLICY E. The Water Authority shall pursue efforts to enhance regional water resources planning and management activities within the Middle Rio Grande Water Authority shall work cooperatively with its neighbors — the Valley. The Pueblos, the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District, Middle Rio Grande Valley Water Authority cities and counties, and involved state and federal agencies. The shall continue to be involved in and monitor the progress of regional and interstate water management initiatives that may affect the and Water Authority the region. RATIONALE: The Water Authority recognizes the need to work in cooperation with other entities that de Valley’s water resources. share use of the Middle Rio Gran Regional water resources planning needs to address uses for public and domestic water supply, irrigated agriculture, livestock, commerc e , industr y , fish, recreation and wildlife . The Water Authority , neighboring jurisdictions, and other water users need to work with State, regional, and federal agencies with water management responsibilitie s. SUB - POLICIES : continue its proactive role to ensure that the necessary 1. The Water Authority shall technical investigations with U.S. Geological Survey and others are completed efficiently ditiously and that they result in an improved understanding of surface and and expe . groundwater 2. The Water Authority is committed to seek common solutions within a regional context. The Water Authority shall work with others in the Middle Rio Grande Valley on updates and implementation of the Regional Water . Plan 3. When appropriate, the Water Authority should share their experience in groundwater management to assist other planning efforts in transitioning to renewable supplies and to limit long term groundwater usage. - 4. Water Authority shal l work with fede ral and state agencies including the U.S. The Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the State Engineer and the Interstate Stream New Mexico Office of the Commission to continue to find common solutions for wate r management on the Rio Chama and the Rio Grande. 5. The Water Authority shal l collaborate with the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District (MRGCD) to develop and i mplement a plan to support and promote agriculture in the . Middle Rio Grande 12

16 ty 6. The Water Authori shall promote and develop green infrastructure including storm water infrastructure to promote efficient water resources management and aquifer storage. 13

17 F. Utilize Conjunctive Management and Diversify Water Resources Portfolio The Water Authority POLICY F. shall enhance the resiliency and sustainability of the water supply by effectively combining the use of surface water, recycled and reclaimed water, the shallow and deep aquifer, and other supplies as needed to meet current and future demand. TIONALE: Enhancing the efficienc y of the Water Authority ’s water use, requires conjunctive RA industrial supply and for management and use of all available resources: surface water for municipal and irrig ation, groundwater for exercising wells, peaking, and w hen surface water supplies are not available (e.g., drought), ASR for municipal and industrial supply, and other supplies as available . Reclamation and reuse of existing water supplies, where economically feasible and protective of human health and the e nvironment, represent s a method of maximizing and increasing the usefulness of a limited water supply. Consideration must also be given to satisfying the return flow needs of the Rio permitting, Rio Grande Compact Compliance and en Grande from water - rights - vironmental standpoints. . The use of groundwater will always be a key component of the Water Authority ’s supply portfolio Following a conservative Groundwater Management Plan that limits long - term groundwater production and establishes a Safety Reserve positions the Water Authority for indefinite use of the aquifer while Using the Water Authority ’s surface n events. maintaining a significant volume of water for unforesee and other sources for municipal and industrial supply will protect the aquifer so that it is available water meet seasonal peak demands and when surface water is not available (e.g., drought) . Without a to to abandon use of significant Water Authority would need component of supply, the groundwater surfa ce water storage facilities investment in groundwater assets and transition to expensive additional larger and more costly treatment facilities to mee t seasonal peak demands. adding Aquifer storage and recovery is a key component of balancing groundwater use during times when surface water is not available (e.g., droughts). Using stored surface water during these times will reduce overall long term use of g roundwater during the planning period . In Albuquerque, this requires artificial - recharge of expanded . Stored the aquifer with deep recharge wells. It is essential that this capability be surface water will not increase overall groundwater use because ther e will always be a need to utilize groundwater to exercise wells or to meet seasonal peak demands which will provide the native water - Chama water. component needed to facilitate use of imported San Juan In addition, the Water Authority should be opportuni stic in utilizing other sources to extend supply that may not always be available. These sources could include relinquishment credit water, contaminated groundwater, excess San Juan - Chama water and native flood flows in addition to leased San Juan - Chama ater. Each of these sources has been available for use in the Middle Rio Grande in the past and may be w available for limited use in the future. Utilizing these sources extends supply by saving other resources for future use. 14

18 SUB - : POLICIES 1. The Water Auth ority shall use various sources of supply ( potable and contaminated groundwater, surface water, reuse water, etc.) to meet demand over the planning period. The q uality of the water suppli ed will be matched to its use to reduce treatment costs and to optimize available excess supplies when available. 2. The Water Authority shall prepare and implement plans to utilize water sources that are typically excess San Juan - Chama water, relinquishment only available sporadically ( credit water, etc.) . 3. The Water A uthority should investigate and enter into agreements for short - term leases in times when wet water is available to be stored and used during times of drought and for aquifer recharge. 4. The Water Authority shall develop a reuse and recycling master plan to address current and future reuse demand, excess available wastewater supplies and the associated infrastructure needs over the planning period. 5. The Water Authority shall use pumping from the aquifer to meet seasonal demands, well exercising and when surf ace water is not available (e.g., droughts). 6. The shall continue to develop and implement methods to store Water Authority available surface water and other reuse supplies in the aquifer and to recover it from storage as needed to me emands. et current and future d 7. The Water Authority should develop and implement the use of storm water and native water flood flows when supplies are available considering permitting and environmental criteria along with Rio Grande Compact Compliance. 15

19 G. Long - Term Water Resources Develop and Implement Acquisition Plan The Water Authority shall pursue a portfolio of potential additional POLICY G. sources of supply. RATIONALE: Establishing and maintaining a groundwater reserve (Policy C) will require the Water Authority to rely less on the local aquifer and to secure additional sources of supply to meet future demands. A more diversified water supply portfolio that includes more renewable sources is essential to provide a resilient and sustainable water supply that can meet customer demands in perpetuity. While this Water Resources Management Strategy does not contemplate the need for acquisition of additional supplies, the Water Authority should continue to pursue these additional supply sources over the long - term which wi ll allow the Water Authority to be ready when those supplies become available. Full consideration will be given to the financial implications in addition to the regional context including agricultural and environmental issues. SUB - POLICIES : 1. should seek legislation to allow for water leasing and banking on a The Water Authority local, regional and interstate basis. The Water Authority 2. should continue to develop the potential for use of brackish groundwater as a future supply considering financial, envi ronmental and carbon footprint criteria. 3. The should stay active in evaluating other water rights transfers in the Water Authority Middle Rio Grande and should take proactive stances when necessary. should investigate the opportunity t The Water Authority 4. o import water supplies outside of the Middle Rio Grande when available considering financial, environmental and other criteria. 5. The Water Authority shall discontinue acquisition of native pre - 1907 water rights. 16

20 H. licy and Action Plan Implement the Water Quality Protection Po POLICY H. The Water Authority shall take steps to fully implement the Water Quality Protection Policy and Action Plan. RATIONALE: The Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Water Protection Policy and Action Plan (Coun ty Quality Resolution No. AR 121 93 and City Enactment No. 81 - 1994) is another cornerstone of this Water - Resources Management Strategy. The Water Authority revised the Groundwater Protection Policy and Action Plan in 2009 to add surface water protection measures, recognizing the use of San Juan - Chama water as a primary drinking water source. Protection of both groundwater and surface resources from known or potential sources of contamination is essential for maintaining a safe drinking water supply and aquifer st orage and recovery program. Their protection from contamination is of paramount importance . SUB - POLICIES : Water Authority 1. The should continue to be proactive in identifying potential water quality threats to surface and groundwater resources and sho uld implement programs to the extent possible to protect the water resources in the MRG. 2. The Water Protection Advisory Boar d (WPAB) shall provide annual updates on the implementation of the Water Quality Protection Policy and Action Plan (WQPPAP) to the W Board through submission of the Annual WPAB Reports and ater Authority presentations at regular WPAB meetings. 3. The Water Authority shall provide pertinent information regarding updates to the water resource management strategy activities to the WPAB durin g its triennial review of the WQPPAP implementation activities. 4. Water Authority should consider the occurrence, fate and potential treatment of The emerging contaminants in current and future water supplies and should actively participate in research which will become more important as the availability of water resources becomes more constrained. 5. The Water Authority should coordinate with the City, County and State to maintain the quality of groundwater and surface waters. 17

21 orage of Native, San Juan - Chama Water I. Protect and Enhance St and other w ater resources POLICY I. The Water Authority shall protect the rights to store native, San Juan - Chama and other water resources including reuse and recycled water in a variety of storage facilities includin g Heron, Abiquiu and Elephant Butte Reservoirs. The Water Authority should seek additional off - channel storage capacity locally or within the Middle Rio Grande as needed to maximize the use of excess wastewater or other water resources in the future. SUB - POLICIES: 1. The Water Authority should protect and enhance its storage rights in Abiquiu Reservoir for native and San Juan - Chama water which will provide opportunities to continue to cooperate with environmental, local, state and federal entities to maximize the benefit for the MRG. Water Authority 2. The - should examine the need for additional short and long - term off channel storage locally and within the MRG to be prepared when excess San Juan - Chama water, native flood flows, or other water resources are available. 3. The Water Authority should consider the aquifer as a reservoir to be used conju nctively with above ground storage to optimize the use of current and future water supplies. - 4. The Water Authority should develop and implement a Rio Grande Compact pool within the Water Authority storage space working with the Interstate Stream Commission (ISC) and the Office of the State Engineer (OSE). 5. The should continue providing space in Abiquiu Reservoir for Water Authority environmental purposes. 6. The Water Authority should seek long - term storage of San Juan - Chama water in Elephant Butte Reservoir. 18

22 J. Protect Valued Environmental and Cultural Resources The shall identify and provide resources to preserve POLICY J. Water Authority and protect valued environmental resources of the region. The Water Authority shall work independently and in partnerships to ensure that its activities do not irrepar Bosque , source watersheds and the cultural ably harm the aquifer, river, resources. The regional aquifer, Bosque and Rio Grande are exceptional resources of great economic, RATIONALE: . The should cooperat e to develop and Water Authority ecological, aesthetic and cultural value implement environmentally conscious water resource development activities that protect the environmental and cultural values of our community. SUB - POLICIES : The Water Authority should continue to participate in the Endangered Species 1. Collaborative Program and Recovery Implementation Efforts for multiple species in the MRG. 2. The Water Authority should encourage the State to recognize instream flows as a beneficial use. 3. The Water Authority should consider the impacts on environmental and cultural resources when implementing new water resources projects and take appropriate steps to mitigate unav oidable effects. 4. The Water Authority should work collaboratively and provide funding to protect and restore watersheds of the San Juan Chama and Rio Grande. - 5. The Water Authority should work with the City, Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District and others to protect and enhance the Rio Grande State Park and the Bosque. 6. The Water Authority should work with the City and County to provide incentives to increase beneficial tree canopy coverage within Bernalillo County and the MRG. 19

23 K. Quality of Life in the Region Preserve and Enhance the POLICY K. The Water Authority seeks a Water Resources Management Strategy The that will preserve and enhance the quality of life within the region. Water Authority ’s water resources strategy will take implementation of the ad vantage of opportunities to enhance the quality of life in the region whenever possible. RATIONALE: A s the largest water utility in New Mexico , the Water Authority recognizes its obligation to protect and enhance the quality of life . Factors influencing quality of life include within the region continued socioeconomic growth and development, support of public amenities , healthy ecosystems and green spaces , and minimizing environmental impacts . The Water Authority will provide sustainable water servi ces to meet indoor demands, optimize efficiency of outdoor demands by utilizing recycled, reused and non - potable supplies, and return quality water to the Rio Grande for downstream users in the region. POLICIES SUB - : 1. The Water Authority shall work with the City of Albuquerque, Albuquerque Public Schools, Bernalillo County and others to ensure that green spaces (parks, golf courses, athletic fields, etc.) are water efficient and provide incentives where appropriate . 2. The Water Authority should continue to reduce its carbon footprint by taking advantage of opportunities to reduce the energy usage of current infrastructure and by building new infrastructure with energy efficiency in mind. 3. The Water Authority shall expand its curre nt green energy projects (solar and biogas) and implement additional green energy projects to reduce its water and energy footprints. 20

24 L. Link Land Use Planning with Water Management POLICY L. Water Authority shall coordinate and cooperate with the City, The County and all other entities with planning authority to integrate water Water Authority management policies with land use decisions. The recognizes sing existing water that managing the use of groundwater while conserving and u resources including maximizing the use of excess resources when available should significantly reduce acquisition of new supplies to serve future customers. With the membership of the Water Authority consisting of elected of ficials from the City RATIONALE: of Albuquerque Bernalillo County and Village of Los Ranchos, future growth and development in the region , s coordination to integrate land use, transportation, infrastructure, economic improvement, require planning eff orts urban infill and with water resources management. SUB - POLICIES : 1. The Water Authority should work with the City and County to update the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Comprehensive Plan and/or other plans to ensure that system expansion is concurrent with infrastructu re service levels and that the extension of facilities and services be phased in an efficient and orderly manner. The Water Authority should ensure that its capital planning process is based on the City 2. and County growth and development master plans so th at land use and infrastructure policies are consistent. 3. The Water Authority should support the increase of urban building densities and infill development consistent with adopted land use plans as higher density development uses less water. 4. The Water Aut hority should encourage the City, County and State to adopt low - water - use Building Codes and low - water - use landscaping standards for all new construction. 5. The Water Authority should continue its review process so that each new residential, commercial, industrial and institutional development will have a resilient, sustainable water supply. 21

25 M. Encourage and Facilitate Public Involvement Water Authority shall continue its education programs for both POLICY M. The children and adults to keep the public informed about the choices and tradeoffs involved in making water management decisions and invite public comment and participation in implementation of these policies. LE: When the Water Authority partners with the public, the educated public can help shape the RATIONA policies that are the foundation of the Water Resources Management Strategy. The public then contributes to the successful implementation of water resource mana gement solutions, because they have been part of their design. Children who attend Water Authority field trips will know the value of water and be wise stewards of our resources for many years to come. SUB - POLICIES: 1. The Water Authority continue its water resource education programs and field shall trips to teach children the importance, value and appropriate use of water in the region. 2. The Water Authority shall continue its interactive public meeting process to give customers information and get their input on upcoming programs, policies and projects. 3. shal l continue its adult education programs so that all customers The Water Authority resilient and sustainable water supply . can participate in a The Water Authority shall continue to partner with real estate, design, building and 4. construction groups, building managers, etc. to educate their membership concerning water resources. 5. The Water Authority sha ll continue its current marketing and public relations campaigns to keep everyone in the se rvice area informed about effective water resource management . 6. ll continue its process of involving the public in updates to the The Water Authority sha Water Resources Management Strategy in all future updates to the strategy. 22

26 Strategy for Use of Existing Supplies This section describes the Water Authority ’s strategy for using the existing supplies to provide a years. - safe and sustainable water supply for the next 100 Use of Groundwater A. The aquifer will no longer be the primary source of water as we have successfully transitioned to using our San Juan Chama water along with reuse/reclamation projects . Under the new - groundwater management reserve policy, groundwater will be used when surface water is not , well exercisi ng and to meet peak demands . As population increases available (e.g., droughts) over time, groundwater use will increase, but the Water Authority ’s policies are to implement projects over the 100 - - term use of the aquifer to stay at or year timeframe to minimize long water management level. The aquifer is rising and is projected to rise for above the ground another decade or two which will be monitored using both existing groundwater monitoring wells rage and and production wells. The combination of less groundwater use along with aquifer sto recovery will provide a long - term source of water for this community for many decades to come. B. San Juan - Chama Drinking Water Project (DWP) The San - Juan Chama Drinking Water Project (DWP) has been operati onal since December 2008. The DWP was slo wly implemented into the system over the first three to four years to address potential chemical compatibility issues and water quality concerns that have plagued other municipalities (e.g., Tucson, AZ and Flint, MI). The DWP will be our primary source of supply over the next ten years and many decades to come. However, consumptive use in the Water Authority - feet per year which means that system has reduced to less than 40,000 acre e San Juan - we must implement additional aquifer storage and recovery projects to stor Chama water for use when surface water is not available. Water Authority ’s ability to utilize San Juan - The OSE permit has many conditions that limit the Chama water especially during low flows commonly associated with droughts in the Middle Rio Water Authority will shutdown the DWP and utilize Grande. During those times, the line - ASR groundwater or stored San Juan - Chama water when the large scale projects are on and operational. San Juan - Chama not used during one year will be stored and be ava ilable for the following year(s) depending on hydrology conditions. Based on the OSE conditions and our current water usage patterns, the Water Authority can most likely meet about 70% of demand r unscheduled events. For the next using the DWP with no interruptions due to low flows or othe few years and sometime after that, the target will be to use at least 70% surface water and - potentially more when the large scale ASR projects come on line and water is stored which can be used to meet peak demands or when the DWP is reduced or shutdown. C. Reclamation and Reuse Projects The Water Authority will continue to operate and maintain the two existing reuse and recycling projects. As additional customers connect, additional reuse and recycled water will be use d for large turf areas and potentially industrial demands. The Water Authority is committed to reuse projects under this plan including connecting the two existing reuse systems on additional 23

27 the eastside of the Rio Grande, construction of a new reuse sys tem on the Westside and an additional system to treat effluent for reuse near Mesa del Sol. D. Aquifer Storage and Recovery The Water Authority has implemented the Bear Canyon Arroyo aquifer storage and recovery project. That project can provide about 1,00 0 acre - feet of supply over a two year period until changes are made as planned to connect the Northside Reuse system to the Southside Reuse system whereby non - potable municipal effluent can be used for irrigation and more water will be available for infilt ration of San Juan - Chama water during the winter months. The Large Scale ASR project is underway with the permit submitted to the OSE and approval from NMED for the demonstration project. Under this project, purified San Juan - Chama water directly into the aquifer via the construction of a new well and also through will be injected infiltration via a newly constructed vadose system well. Water stored during the winter months will be available for recovery from the new well during the summer months. The d emonstration project will attempt to get up to 5,000 acre - feet of water into the aquifer annually and then recovery that amount later in the same year or store it for future withdrawal. 24

28 Appendix A 2016 Water Resources Town Hall Report 25

29 2016 Hall Town 26

30 Town Hall July 22, 2016 Introduction The Water Authority conducted a four hour Town Hall on July 22, 2016 that focused on the update to the Water Resources Management Strategy (now called Water 2120: Securing our Water Future) and the Policies to i mplement the strategy. The meeting was held at the Uptown Marriot in Albuquerque and hosted over 200 customers. The Town Hall (Agenda – Attachment D) opened with two presentations in plenary to provide background information on:  Future Supply Alternativ es  Water Resource Policies The Town Hall participants were then divided into ten groups and with the support of professional facilitators and recorders were asked to participate in the below activities.  Activity 1: Prioritizing Future Supply Alternatives  Activity 2: Focused Input on Four Water Resource Policies. ACTIVITY 1 alternatives commenting on those alternatives they most The small groups first reviewed the supply ups labeled with the name of each liked and why. They were then given six marbles to place in plastic c alternative. They were asked to place 3 marbles in their first choice, two in second, and one in third. ACTIVITY 2 The goal of Activity 2 was to review four key policies for discussion and input (Attachment E). The four policies were:  Policy B: Fully Utilize and Protect Existing Water Rights and Water Resources  Policy D: Update and Maintain the Water Conservation Strategy  Policy J: Protect Valued Environmental and Cultural Resources ublic Involvement Policy M: Encourage and Facilitate P  27

31 Small Group Work ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Group A Ed McCorkindale, Facilitator Lily Gates , Recorder ACTIVITY 1 #2 – Connect Southside Re use to Northside with Expansion in the Middle  Like: It’s low cost and is relatively well balanced. – Lease Additional San Juan — Chama Water #3 #4 – Interbasin Transfer  Concern: It’s expensive. #5 – Indirect Potable Reuse  Like: It has worked in other places. We already have the resources. Like: We already have the plant.  28

32 #6 Rio Grande Compact Relinquishment Credit Water –  Concern: Issues with Texas and the amount of water we gave to them - Brackish Groundwater #7 Concern: It’s the most expensive and it’s just “a last resort”.  – Stormwater Capture #8  Like: It’s environmentally friendly and we might as well take advantage of it. #9 Additional Reuse — – Westside/ Eastside and ASR #10 – Watershed Restoration  It’s good for in surance. General  We should promote xeriscaping.  Continue educating public about where water comes from (especially adults) What is the relative priority of alternatives after the vote?  Aquifer Storage and Recovery Connect Southside to Northside with Expa nsion in the Middle   Stormwater Capture ACTIVITY 2 P OLICY B: CONCERN:  Will our water rights conflict with other city’s water rights? P OLICY D: LIKE:  Should encourage xeriscaping P OLICY J: LIKE: 6 –  Key sub policies: J – 4 and J 29

33 P M: OLICY LIKE: Key sub policies: M –  3 On which sub - policies should we focus our educational efforts with the public to build understanding and support? Why?  The group didn’t choose one in particular. What types of outreach are most effective?  Didn’t choose just one, need to com bine all of them ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Group B , Scott McKitrick Facilitator Raye Myers , Recorder ACTIVITY 1 – Aquifer Storage and Recovery #1  Like: Meets all of the criteria and good for the environment  Like: Meets for all of the reasons and a blend of all factors  Like: Provides the highest volume of water  Like: It has less (negative) impact on the environment. #2 – Connect Southside Re use to Northside with Expan sion in the Middle Like: Provides a high yield for water  30

34  Like: Is low cost and efficient Question: Why is the environmental impact less? Is it due to new infrastructure?  Lease Additional San Juan Chama Water – #3 — No comment .  Interbasin Transfer #4 – comment .  No #5 – Indirect Potable Reuse No comment  . #6 Rio Grande Compact Relinquishment Credit Water – No comment .  - Brackish Groundwater #7  No comment . #8 – Stormwater Capture  Like: Has impressive yield  Like: The cost is negligible.  Like: It is an easy resource to capitalize on.  Comment: Nature gives us the water, so let’s make use of it. – Additional Reuse — #9 Eastside and ASR Westside/  No comment . – Watershed Restoration #10  Like: Provides long - term environmental benefits  rotects water quality and is available Like: P  Comment: We should protect what we have and be proactive. General  Do these alternatives only apply to the source of the water and not the uses?  Why is it the law that we can only have water for 96 hours after a power outage?  We should use what we have by capturing stormwater.  We should protect what we have, which is why it is proactive to go with the Watershed Restoration alternative. we do all of these alternatives?  Why can’t 31

35  How does the Water Authority interact with PNM? What percent of the water goes where/for what purpose?  What is the relative priority of alternatives after the vote?  Aquifer Storage and Recovery Connect Southside Reuse to  Northside with Expansion in the Middle Stormwater Capture   Watershed Restoration ACTIVITY 2 OLICY P B: MMENTS CO :  Every resource has different people and purposes associated with it.  n so that people are There needs to be an introduction that says it is a plan and more educatio aware of it and see that it’s written down somewhere (in regard to all of the policies and goal of 110 GPCD). QUESTIONS :  Are there things we need to do now that are more forward - thinking?  Are these policies permanent?  ater rights related to the Juan - Chama River? What are the w legal strategies (in reference to sub - policy 4)?  Why would we need alternative SUB POLICIES MISSING : - None  P OLICY D: QUESTIONS :  Is it always the case that conservation is the cheapest thing to do?  How do the conservation efforts of the Water Authority compare to other desert communities and conservation goals?  What can you attribute the success of Albuquerque water conservation to?  How are agriculture, reduction (of resources), and growth (populati on) bringing the volume numbers down? : SUB - POLICIES MISSING 32

36  None P J: OLICY QUESTIONS : Would this policy include restoration in the Bosque?  J – 6: Are there environmental benefits of tree canopy coverage other than quality of life?  LIKE:  Provides watershed planning and funding  Gives tree canopy importance  Includes watershed protection and restoration in case of fires SUB - POLICIES MISSING :  None P OLICY M: LIKE:  graders and Like current education programs and how the Water Authority is keeping 4th children in general informed — education 10 years from now, will really be able to see the impact  The website is awesome, well designed, and is a good way to inform the public.  Like the newsletter, very informational : COMMENTS  Need to tell peop le that they have water when the power goes out  Social media depends on the age and is good way to communicate with millennials.  The app can be used more, and not many people know about it.  ore. Some people like paying bills electronically, so advertise that m QUESTIONS :  Do you have programs on channel 16?  Is it the state that sets service areas where the water reaches?  Is billing based on meter size and are there separate meter sizes based on house size? - POLICIES MISSING : SUB n water usage/conservation Try to get people focused o  33

37 On which sub policies should we focus our educational efforts with the public to build - understanding and support? Why? D – 2: It is important that the public understands that this is the goal so that we can try and meet  it and als o that we have met a previous goal.  J – 4: Agree that watershed restoration is important and not many people know about it, put information in Bosque walks  Support water reuse but need to get a better understanding of issues and health concerns  What types of outreach are most effective?  Provide information in with the bill because people have to open the bill anyway  Use app/website notifications and updates on the Water Authority GENERAL :  Town hall was a very well organized event. Like how the Water Autho  rity is getting high school students involved  Think the Water Authority seems very committed and interested in public involvement  Want the Water Authority to tell the public more about the successes  Interested in a comparison with other cities ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Group C Sara Douglas , Facilitator Recorder , Bernadette Mitchell 34

38 ACTIVITY 1 – Aquifer Storage and Recovery #1  Like: A recovery process that will eventually replenish the aquifer. Like: It may one day put us back to the water levels we once had.   Like: Storage is not subject to evaporation, so no water will be lost. Like: It has already been proven effective.   Like: This option does not disrupt t he environment.  Like: Creates the most options for water use  Concern: Testing standards  – Connect Southside Re use to Northside with Expansion in the Middle #2  Connecting the two will give the benefit of using waste water. Chama Water – Lease Additional San Juan — #3  Concern: It took time to get these contracts in place so we should consider this option thoroughly before dismissing it. – #4 Interbasin Transfer  ater can be fully consumed with a portion being returned for reuse. W #5 Indirect Potable Reus e –  Reclaimed highly treated water can be reused after a storage period. – Rio Grande Compact Relinquishment Credit Water #6  No comment . Brackish Groundwater #7 -  . No comment – Stormwater Capture #8  Like: Collects and uses another source of water  Like: Doesn’t take any water from storage #9 Additional Reuse — Westside/ Eastside and ASR – Allows for more uses of waste water  35

39 #10 – Watershed Restoration  Like: Will help advert wildfires and protect water gains  Like: We need to take care of the water we have. General  The environment should be the most important consideration when choosing an option. What is the relative priority of alternatives after the vote?  Aquifer Storage and Recovery  Additional Reuse – Westside/ Eastside and ASR  Connect Southside r euse to Northside with Expansion in the Middle  Watershed Restoration  Stormwater capture  Lease additional San Juan – Chama water  Interbasin Transfer Indirect Potable Reuse  ACTIVITY 2 OLICY P B: LIKE : Protecting water rights that we already have   working so water rights are not limited or lost by seeking legal strategies Actively SUB POLICIES MISSING : -  None P D: OLICY : LIKE  1 10 GPCD is a great goal in water conservation. SUB - POLICIES MISSING :  None P OLICY J: LIKE: 36

40  icial use. Instream flows will be seen as a benef  Restoring and protecting the watersheds help insure that water will not be wasted. Very important to enhance public green areas as long it is fully accessible to the public and  doesn’t just benefit a small percentage (i.e. golf courses).  Trees a re very important for our environment. Will increasing the tree canopy keep us in line with the 110 GPCD goal? SUB - POLICIES MISSING :  I ncentives should apply to residential areas to increase canopy and to upkeep older trees in established neighborhoods. P OLICY M: LIKE:  Supports youth educational programs  Support commercials - POLICIES MISSING : SUB  None On which sub - policies should we focus our educational efforts with the public to build understanding and support? Why? M  – 3: Work with neighborhood associ ations by having someone from the Water Authority come to HOA meetings and teach about conservation and show ways water is being wasted (i.e. over watering, washing vehicles).  M – 5: Commercials are a great reminder, but would like them to be more detailed, including how long to water. What types of outreach are most effective?  Technology and Social Media (apps, twitter, Facebook) Public Meetings  37

41 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Group D , Facilitator Ildi Oravecz Ruby Gates , Recorder ACTIVITY 1 #1 – Aquifer Storage and Recovery  Like: It will protect the water from evaporating.  Like: It will be good for times of drought. #2 – Connect Southside Re use to Northside with Expansion in the Middle  We can reuse water, and get more out of it. Like: #3 Lease Additional San Juan — Chama Water – Like: Accessing more for water conservation  – Interbasin Transfer #4  No input . – Indirect Potable Reuse #5  Like: Reuse is an essential long term necessity.  Like: It is the only one with no apparent issues. “Gross”  38

42 #6 Rio Grande Compact Relinquishment Credit Water –  Like: Is all around good economically and at a low price #7 - Brackish Groundwater Concern: Alternative is not cheap  – Stormwater Capture #8  Like: If it is not used it will be polluted. This is a solution.  Like: With the technology today we could do a lot.  Like: The water is already there, now we just need to use it.  Concern: Legal issues #9 – Additional Reuse — Westsi de/ Eastside and ASR  Like: This option is all around good.  Like: Volume  Like: It is easy to continue. #10 Watershed Restoration –  Like: Wildfires do a lot of damage. They are less likely with this option or better controlled.  Concern: It takes away from o ur drinking water projects. Like: It keeps some heat/sunlight off the ground that cause evaporation.   Concern: There is not a lot of gain.  Is this already done? General  Everyone is interested in reuse. Price and availability are important to everyone.  Wha t is the relative priority of alternatives after the vote?  Stormwater capture ACTIVITY 2 P OLICY B: LIKE : - policy 3.  Like everything about sub 39

43  Taking advantage of everything ONCERN C :  Legal issues POLICIES MISSING: SUB -  Direct potable reuse Water quality control, not just water policy  P D: OLICY LIKE: The fact of giving and showing small things makes people think more about water use.  CONCERN: Population will grow.   We need to look into this more often (every other year).  Will we be adjust ing rates?  How will we actually get there? We know the end result, just not everything in the middle.  We need to break down the global GPCD into smaller more specialized categories (Turf, household...). SUB - POLICIES MISSING :  Requiring updated utilities P OLICY J: Concerns:  Dead trees and dirt are disturbing.  Is this really what we want to spend money on?  Like:  Sub - policy 5 Sub - Policies Missing: Protecting the urban environment  40

44  We need to work on Bosque restoration and management. P M: OLICY LIKE:  The younger you learn, the better. SUB - POLICIES MISSING :  Social media (Instagram)  Go back to what does work and then make it better  Get the information to everyone  Provide more reminders on bills, websites, and everything  Add more nonprofits on sub - policy 4. - On which sub policies should we focus our educational efforts with the public to build understanding and support? Why? B  5: Get the information to everyone, especially the people who want to do something. – What types of outreach are most effective?  Social Media ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Group G Elizabeth Phillip , Facilitator Recorder , Celina Hill 41

45 ACTIVITY 1 – Aquifer Storage and Recovery #1 Like: Protects aquifer  Like: Stores excess water   Like: Has no evaporation, high yield, available and low cost #2 – Connect Southside Re use to Northside with Expansion in the Middle  No comments #3 – Lease Additional San Juan — Chama Water  No comments #4 – Interbasin Transfer  No comments Indirect Potable Reuse #5 –  Like: Low environmental impact #6 – Rio Grande Compact Relinquishment Credit Water  No comments - Brackish Groundwater #7  No comments Stormwater Capture #8 –  Concern: Stormwater is being wasted.  Like: Has no evaporation, high yield, available and low cost #9 – Additional Reuse — Westside/ Eastside and ASR  No comments #10 – Watershed Restoration Like: Has more than one benefit  42

46 General Cost was a low priority for the group.  priority of alternatives after the vote? What is the relative Aquifer Storage and Recovery   Stormwater Capture  Indirect Potable Reuse  Watershed Restoration ACTIVITY 2 P OLICY B: LIKE :  Uses something that we already have  It is cost effective to continue work rather than to crea te new infrastructure. SUB - POLICIES MISSING: P OLICY D: LIKE: Supports continuous review  - POLICIES MISSING : SUB Involve the state more   Provide services or financial aid for homes that want to do xeriscaping or remove sprinklers but do not have the means to do it. P OLICY J: Like:  Continues environmental efforts Sub - Policies Missing:  In addition to taking out non - native plant species, add new plants that will be helpful. P OLICY M: LIKE: 43

47  Makes information available SUB POLICIES MISSING : - Gives more attention to climate change  On which sub - policies should we focus our educational efforts with the public to build understanding and support? Why?  Without attention on climate change, all of our conservation efforts will be ineffective. What types o f outreach are most effective?  Pamphlet in their bill  Involving neighborhood associations in the conservation and educational process Face to face meetings  ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Group H , Facilitator Karen Klein Anna Horner , Recorder ACTIVITY 1 #1 – Aquifer Storage and Recovery  Like: Useful to store water and use it later, makes sense  Like: Provides long term solution, is easy on the environment, highly available with net to low cost  Like: Aquifer has been depleted and we’ve seen success restoring it so far, stick with this practice to keep water in the ground for gra ndkids. Like: We’ve seen success and allows water for a long time.  44

48  Like: Is fiscally responsible Like: Dilutes any bad things in the water  Like: Provides better quality water for the future  Like: Provides water for future generations and is good for the en vironment   Like: Allow more water for environment and cost is low  If you have the first alternative, then the 8th alternative (storm water catchment) makes sense. #2 Connect Southside Re use to Northside with Expansion in the Middle –  Like: Like the descri ption, frees up water on Northside for other purposes  Like: Provides for reuse Like: New communities are being built and old communities are being rebuilt.  Like: It improve neighborhoods, improve communities, uses routes that are already established  and sa ves money. Chama Water #3 Lease Additional San Juan — –  Like: Is low cost and a clean source – #4 Interbasin Transfer  Concern: Viability of this option #8 Stormwater Capture –  Like: It is good for the environment and a reasonable price. Cost of the alternative should be the bottom line.   Like: keeps water out of the gutter Like: The practice is cost effective.   Like: Don’t like to see all that water wasted. ACTIVITY 2 OLICY P B: : LIKE  Continues to improve what is in place  B – 3: It is recyc ling and reusing  We are fortunate to have this alternative because when there is drought we have options. SUB - POLICIES MISSING: Capture and use stormwater as a part of using the water resources we have  45

49  Provide understanding how we can legally capture and use rainwater and still fulfill our obligations to Texas Provide clear articulation of current utilization of existing water rights   Are we fully using the rights we have?  of the current water rights haven’t been adjudicated, then they need Policy should state if any to be validated and incorporated into Water Authority. P OLICY D: LIKE:  We can adapt and change as needed.  The Water Authority can and will stay on top of changes. SUB POLICIES MISSING : -  D - 3: We need equity of conservation requirements, no discounts for big business, and an even playing field where we all conserve.  Be aware of potential high cost to consumer off from Use language that requires a buffer between sidewalks and streets to catch water run -  watering public parks  Improve regulations for Parks and Engineers in regards to efficient water use, such that consumers are not stuck with inefficient water use systems in their homes Improve options for conversation – t schools with healthy options, not  such as xeriscaping a artificial turf that has carcinogens  This policy talks a lot about external changes and conservation efforts. What is the Water Authority doing internally to conserve? P OLICY J: LIKE :  More trees mean less pollution.  Tree canopy is very important to the health of the city and protects the future for grandkids and the city. SUB - POLICIES MISSING:  Involvement of boy scouts and prisoners in watershed management r?  This is the desert — why do we need to have water in the rive  Need to include the history of water and rivers in the desert Consider recreational use of water in Albuquerque  46

50  Reconcile cultural use and importance of acequias with environmental impact P M: OLICY LIKE: Rebates and lunch bring people in  SUB POLICIES MISSING : -  We need community representation on the board.  Location of the meeting is very important.  There should be more meetings downtown and throughout the city. Concerns about cost of this meeting  have meetings in schools, rather than in hotels –  Business representation is not present at the town hall. There needs to be more outreach to businesses to get them to attend.  Increase age range present at the meeting  Encourage attendees to spread the word by word of mouth, tell everyone to tell at least one person about this opportunity  Continue to use age appropriate methods to educate young folks to help hit 2120 goals On which sub policies should we focus our educational efforts with the public to build - understanding and support? Why? We did not get to this  What types of outreach are most effective? This seemed to be addressed in response to Policy M  PARKING LOT:  Need to understand how implementing stormwater capture requires change of state law  er law — especially in regards to farms’ water Need to increase public understanding of wat — don’t use them they lose them rights  This requires farmers to water fallow fields!  How do we get out more information about the rebate for planting trees?  Concern about water unnecessarily going down the drain  47

51 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Group I , Facilitator Susan Chaudoir Recorder , Nicki Villansenor ACTIVITY 1 #1 – Aquifer Storage and Recovery  Like: This offers good environmental protection.  Like: This reserves water for the future. By reducing evaporation the groundwater levels increase.  Like: This alternative is not as expensive over the long run.  Like: Here is high volume and frequency of a vailability. #2 – Connect Southside Re use to Northside with Expansion in the Middle  Like: This connection creates opportunity for other alternatives and expansion in the future.  Like: Green spaces are important for the public to enjoy, this alternative su stains the existing parks.  Like: This is a known strategy, with known yield and evidence that it works. Chama Water #3 – Lease Additional San Juan — 48

52 #4 – Interbasin Transfer – #5 Indirect Potable Reuse – Rio Grande Compact Relinquishment Credit Water #6 #7 - Brackish Groundwater #8 – Stormwater Capture  Like: This alternative supports conservation, and if reused it can support he landscape.  Like: Water is usable without treatment, which saves money.  Like: It is a local supply, so it is not coming f rom elsewhere.  Like: This is self - sustaining and recharges naturally. #9 – Additional Reuse — Westside/ Eastside and ASR #10 Watershed Restoration –  Green infrastructure requires us to focus on areas that require attention.  The Bosque has many nonnative species. What is the relative priority of alternatives after the vote?  Aquifer Storage and Recovery  Connect Southside reuse to Northside with expansion in the middle.  Stormwater capture. ACTIVITY 2 OLICY B: P P OLICY D: LIKE:  This is helpful if they encourage education on how to use gray water safely.  This can be reused with no treatment and can help meet conservation goals.  I'm very concerned about the trees. They are dying. If rates go up more trees will die. the personal responsibility of the individual.  The trees are 49

53 SUB - POLICIES MISSING : OLICY J: P Like: No comments  P OLICY M: LIKE:  This is currently being implemented. We are involved and participating. We are making decisions.  We have the third largest canopy die off because education was not on trees but on lawns.  Trees encourage mental health and provide shade.  Technology will become available and we need aggressive education on what is out there.  Rebates for smart controllers should be part of the strategy.  We need education on how trees work. On which sub policies should we focus our educational efforts with the public to build - understanding and support? Why? Education on how to water trees correctly can help keep trees alive without wasting water.   the meter alternatives can help customers track their use and conserve more water. Knowing  Understanding gray water, the available systems, and how it can be used at home would be great information. What types of outreach are most effective?  Bill inserts are not great.  For online billing an email attachment would work great.  Facebook and other social media work well because not many read the newspaper anymore.  Weekly stories on the evening news can update the community on usage and other projects. Target all ages  through a variety of avenues 50

54 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Group J , Facilitator Lucy Moore , Recorder Ross Hibbett ACTIVITY 1 #1 – Aquifer Storage and Recovery  Like: Relatively cheap, high yield, good for the environment, always available, efficient, long term conservation, but can use in the meantime #2 – Connect Southside Re use to Northside with Expansion in the Middle  Like: High yield, available, low cost, reuse, a bility to move water allows for greater flexibility, logical #3 – Chama Water Lease Additional San Juan — – Interbasin Transfer #4  This alterative is high yield but also high cost. #5 – Indirect Potable Reuse  We will have to reuse water sometime in Like: the future, so the sooner we start the better.  Like: With increase in technology it can be done and is good for the long term.  Concern: It is costly, but we should start investing.  Concern: Doesn’t like the thought of “toilet to tap.” pact Relinquishment Credit Water #6 – Rio Grande Com 51

55 #7 - Brackish Groundwater Concern: Is low yield, bad for environment, not available often, very high cost  Concern: On a list it should be at the bottom.  – Stormwater Capture #8 Like: Is good for environment, low cost  Conce rn: Regulations would have to be changed and water is not always available.  – #9 Additional Reuse — Westside/ Eastside and ASR – Watershed Restoration #10  Like: This is most important  When fire damage is severe, river can run black.  Like: This is good for environment, good availability, low cost General  Provide gray water at the personal scale “Reuse” water for recreation such as rafting on releases   Need criteria of “time nucleoids? -  Has there been an increase in radio Personal large scale conservation can have a large impact.  What is the relative priority of alternatives after the vote?  Watershed Restoration  Indirect Potable Reuse  Connect Southside reuse to Northside with expansion in the middle  Aquifer Storage and Recovery  Stormwater capture Brackish  groundwater ACTIVITY 2 P OLICY B: LIKE :  It is important to keep our right to use San Juan - Chama water we have neighbors  Let’s collaborate, expand it — 52

56 SUB - POLICIES MISSING: - 4: Clarification — could be intergovernmental  B P OLICY D: LIKE: Willing to pay more for future generations  CONCERN: 110 gpcd is more than twice the world average.  QUESTION :  How will Albuquerque change because of the 110 gpcd goal?  Provide running paths, buffer around parks, and use less turf where it isn’t used P OLICY J: Like:  1. S upports watershed s, but should be connected to H – Concerns:  How would this impact work on the Bosque?  Mayor’s development proposition doesn’t support J. Sub - Policies Missing: dead one.  J - 6: Dead trees are a fire hazard and need a beautiful tree canopy not a  Elms have a short life. P M: OLICY LIKE: SUB - POLICIES MISSING :  Place emphasis on kindergarten and elementary school, get them young Teach kids about planting, watering, and the water cycle (how it all works).  53

57 On which sub - policies should we focus our educational efforts with the public to build understanding and support? Why?  Not much said, refer to M. What types of outreach are most effective? Advertising - water bill inserts, messages of the mayor, social media for younger people, news  apps , new feeds, TV promotional stories ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Las Cruces Group Leslie Kryder , Facilitator Cristina Hoberg , Recorder ACTIVITY 1 #1 – Aquifer Storage and Recovery Like: Should not have #1 without #10   Agreement: #1 and #10 need to be a pair  With new technologies there is a possibility of capturing humidity from the air.  Like: Prefer to save, sensible to use less  Like: Banking for the fut ure, not taking natural resources for granted -  Like: Volume wise we should go with this option vs. #10.  Like: Believe in saving, reusing, recycling  Like: Water is not subject to evaporation and keeps aquifer from draining. #2 – Connect Southside Re use to N orthside with Expansion in the Middle  Like: Increase the yield now Like: Low cost, long term strategy, less environmental  54

58 #3 – Lease Additional San Juan — Chama Water  No comments – Interbasin Transfer #4  No comments #5 – Indirect Potable Reuse  No comments #6 Rio Grande Compact Relinquishment Credit Water –  Question: What is the status of the State of Texas law suit about the compact? What is the amount of water they receive and potential that we will have to give them more? #7 - Brackish Groundwater  No comments #8 – Stormwater Capture Like: Has potential but has limitations   - term storage; we cannot do this with our Concern: The option requires dams designed for short ent of arroyos because current design (or regulations); it will require more naturalistic treatm need impervious elements. – Additional Reuse — Westside/ Eastside and ASR #9  Like: An economical option to build on current system – Watershed Restoration #10  Concern: Not well defined, should also promote grassland - deep root prai rie grass not just trees in forests  Like: We should do this from the beginning to protect water quality.  Like: We could easily hire 5,000 people to clear excess deadwood/logs for watershed and forest management. This would provide both employment and econ omic resources. General  Everyone is interested in reuse.  Price and availability are important to everyone. What is the relative priority of alternatives after the vote? Aquifer Storage and Recovery  55

59  Watershed Restoration h Expansion in the Middle  Connect Southside to Northside wit ACTIVITY 2 OLICY B: P : LIKE  – 3: We need to get all use out of water instead of letting it disappear. B C ONCERN :  The challenge with reuse is that we don’t get return flow credit when we discharge back to Rio delicate balance and creates internal deficit in regards to the compact. Grande. It is a  B – 1 is too general. QUESTION :  How are amounts of water quantified? COMMENT :  Needs main diversion channel  returned through Needs EPA quality water treatment facility so storm water discharged is Alameda drain P OLICY D: LIKE: D – 2: We should be able to do this before 2037. The Water Authority has done a phenomenal  job.  D – 3: Comprehensive and incorporates D – 2  – 1: Good job with consumer education/rebates and water audits. D  D – 3: Supp ort updating every 10 years, especially with climate change it good to review as innovation and new ways to conserve always come up  D – 1: Educator should focus on public outreach and education because it is affordable. People need to know about water use an d conservation. CONCERN: 4: Flesh it out better, too passive of a statement, needs to be more of a practice statement -  D 56

60  Work with companies like Intel to put water back into river as a more proactive strategy more active to encourage and promote better  “Development and infrastructure” needs to be city - wide developments and plans (medians with grass). Reach out to other groups, public sessions, churches  P OLICY J: QUESTION :  How does food production and agriculture impact our dependence on water? Isn’t it part of the issue? We need to maintain and develop additional food supply. LIKE: J  2 seems practical but not sure but beneficial in - stream activities on Bosque. -  Need more canoeing/fishing  You build awareness of resources when people use them.  Enginee r flows to provide recreational opportunities and big value of water in desert CONCERNS:  eed to recognize beneficial use to include economic impact of tourism in state. N OLICY M : P LIKE:  M – 4: Glad because takes care of commercial buildings, informs m anagers/owners on environment in building  M – 4 and M – 5: Supports partnering with builders and designers  Passage of time is fast for children to grow to the future, children’s education has great returns. : QUESTION  Can we have an educational focus on how to retrofit homes for graywater use?  What distinguishes “shall versus “should”? Is should is more adaptive? - policies should we focus our educational efforts with the public to build On which sub understanding and support? Why?  Broadcast successes and tie into policy M2/5 such as national award for children’s edu cation. It . should be a headline 57

61 What types of outreach are most effective? - term strategy.  Conservation should be the focus of public announcements and be a long Place emphasis on what community ha s accomplished, 50% reduction in 10 years   Albuquerque Museum exhibit shows how water is being used and how much we have reduced. Really l ike the exhibit. QUESTION :  Policy G – 5, pre - 1907 water rights: It is a bad decision to stop buying because Intel is actively pursuing/buying those water rights (as are other corporations) and so they won’t stay in agricultural use just because the city does not buy them. It is contrary to good management to keep them in agriculture and to buy them and preserve them for that use. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Cimarron Group Heidi Howley , Facilitator , Megan Lovato Recorder ACTIVITY 1 – #1 Aquifer Storage and Recovery  Like: Provides frequen cy of availability once it’s in the aquifer  Like: “ I see it working physically out of an Arroyo”  Comment: I am willing to pay for this because I live in a desert.  Comment: Has best returns across the board except for the cost  Like: It has been proven to work.  Like: It is available and that it’s already been tested. Like: Allow water volume and has a positive effect on the environment  58

62  Comment: This is good in all 4 categories and there are a lot of advantages to living in a desert r water. so I am willing to pay fo Environment is most important.  Comment: The cost is okay since we live in a desert.   Like: Protects the environment at a low cost – Indirect Potable Reuse #5  Like: Provides huge volumes of water and is reliable  Like: We always will have waste water available. #6 Rio Grande Compact Relinquishment Credit Water –  Like: Less costly and we can receive a credit for our water  Like: Our storage space is good so we can hold more water.  Comment: Cost is most important. – Stormwater Capture #8  Like: In frastructure is in place already and free rain! Additional Reuse #9 – — Westside/ Eastside and ASR  Like: Includes alternative #1 and reuse  Like: Provides reasonable water volume, good cost and availability #10 – Watershed Restoration Comment: There are a  lot of impacts from fires so preservation of our watersheds is important for the environment and this is low cost. Soil is important and we need to consider the environmental consequences in all aspects and for  everyone. General  Being proactive is helpfu l, but who is paying for these alternatives? Who is shouldering these costs? We would like to see what is best for the community as a whole – cost wise. Alternatives 1 & 10 work well together.   Comment: Should be used in conjunction with each other What is the relative priority of alternatives after the vote?  Aquifer Storage and Recovery  Stormwater Capture  Additional Reuse/Westside and Eastside and ASR Watershed Restoration  59

63 ACTIVITY 2 OLICY P B: C ONCERN : Is there a potential threat that our water rights wil l be taken away?  - POLICIES MISSING: SUB We have to demonstrate that we are using our rights so “use it or lose it” needs to be made  clearer.  In Sub - policy 1, the “necessary steps” needs to be defined. What are the “steps”? P D: OLICY CONCERN:  “I am all abou t conserving water, but I don’t want to preserve too much since I need to preserve trees as well. SUB - POLICIES MISSING :  Equitable use of water needs to be added to “efficiency” because water justice is important and needs to happen. P OLICY J: : CONCERNS  Use arroyos draining north so that a north detention pond can be incorporated with the Bosque. Does the city have a regulation that it is required to maintain landscape?  SUB - POLICIES MISSING :  “In stream flow” needs a definition.  Sub - policy 6 needs t he word sustain added to it: “sustain and increase” OLICY M: P CONCERN :  Concern with $80,000 spent on TV commercial SUB - POLICIES MISSING : There should be public education added in all areas.  60

64 We need to educate on use of rainwater harvesting,  s of outreach are most effective? What type  Newspapers  Email list updates  Workplace training programs  Collaborations with organizations such as appliance businesses and nurseries to educate about rebates available to their customers and the importance of water conservation ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Large Group Report Out of Prioritization Results 61

65 #1 – Aquifer Storage and Recovery – 264 votes #2 Connect Southside Reuse to Northside with Expansion in the Middle – 122 votes – #3 – Lease Additional S an Juan – Chama Water – 28 votes – Interbasin Transfer – 5 votes #4 #5 – Indirect Potable Reuse – 38 votes Rio Grande Compact Relinquishment #6 – 22 votes Credit Water – – Brackish Groundwater – 9 votes #7 #8 – Stormwater Capture – 125 votes Additional Reuse #9 – / Westside and Eastside and ASR – 22 votes – Watershed Management – 97 votes #10 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Large Group Q and A Questions/Comments after Presentation on Supply Alternatives: 62

66  Need to swamp coolers with refrigerated air/using evaporat ive cooling as a means of conserving water  Are some of the supply alternatives mutually exclusive?  Did the mine spill complicate the San Juan Chama drinking water project? Does the Water Authority work with other agencies?  What is the quality of the water  that is stored in the aquifer? Why choose 135 GPCD as a goal if we are currently below that?   Please provide information on swamp cooler thermostat rebates Why not plan further into the future (100 years versus every 10 for example)?   of water do we have? How many actual sources How are the sources of water categorized?   What is the security of our water supply like? How is the Water Authority handling heavy metals in the water supply? (testing)  Questions/Comments after Presentation on Water Policies:  How much are TV commercials costing the Water Authority?  How many water agencies are in NM and how often do you collaborate?  Will these presentation power points be available?  What is the extent of the Aquifer in ABQ?  Is water going back into the aquif er when watering the lawn during good times of the day? Does this data include the city of Albuquerque only?   Does the city of Rio Rancho and Intel effect our plan and aquifer?  In collaborations with the MRGCD do you consider flood irrigation and how it recharges the aquifer?  What is the delta between the current demands and how much do we need for high use water supply with and without conservation? How much money would a 1% increase in rate generate?   What is the Cost per acre foot in respect to drops and alternatives?  What can we do as citizens to educate on water conservation especially among young people and social media?  There are new products of swamp coolers at the moment that can save water. The Water Authority claims six sources of water when there are only two, ground and surface, the rest is just maintenance.  Thank you for having this, it's great to see such a great turn out. 63

67 Town Hall Agenda 2016 July 22, 2016 • 10am – 2pm – 10:00 10:10 Welcome from ABCWUA Board Chair - Trudy Jones 10:10 – 10:20 Overview of Town Hall, Head Facilitator – Mary Davis Hamlin – 10:30 Video 10:20 10:30 – 11: 00 Presentation on Water 2120: Securing Our Water Future, Intera Vice President – David Jordan, P.E. 11:00 – 11:15 Panel Q & A 11:15 11 : 35 Presentation on Water 2120: Policies, ABCWUA COO - John M. Stomp III, P.E. – 11:35 – 11:50 Panel Q & A 11: 50 – 12:10 Get lunches and go to break - out groups out group activities – 1:30 Break - 12:10 A. Future Supply Alternatives B. Water Resource Polic ies 64

68 1:30 – 1:40 Return to Main Room Report Out and Raffle 1:40 – 2:00 65

69 Town Hall Policies A. WATER BUDGET PLAN NING AND REPORTING POLICY A. The Authority shall utilize an adaptive management approach to water resources planning The and reporting. water budget established shall be reported annually to the Authority Board and updated no less than every five years. RATIONALE: The Adaptive Management Strategy (AMS) adopted as part of the 2017 WRMS is intended to provide an iterative process by which supply and demand can be re evaluated as needed in the - - future. The intent of AMS is to provide an iterative process for robust decision making in the face of uncertainty, with the aim or reducing uncertainty over time via monitoring. Since both supply and - evaluation of demand projections are uncertain and may be revised in the future, AMS allows for re - identified predicted supply gaps, and subsequent revision of these gaps, if necessary. Future currently revisions to the supply and demand analyses may be ma de based on new technical understanding, availability of new technical tools, and/or revisions to current predictions of supply and/or demand. A key aspect of the Authority’s AMS will be monitoring groundwater levels in the Groundwater Reserve. SUB POLICI ES: - 1. The Authority should update the Water Resources Management Strategy using the best available science following the Adaptive Management Strategy (AMS) every ten years or more frequently as requested by the Authority Board. 2. The Authority shall report o n an annual basis to the Authority Board to provide a water budget for the upcoming year which includes estimated groundwater and surface water use along with - potable water reuse. estimated non 3. The Authority shall report to the Authority Board every five years regarding the aquifer level and the projected level for the next five years as compared to the groundwater management level established in Policy C. 66

70 PROTECT EXISTING WAT ER RIGHTS B. FULLY UTILIZE AND AND WATER RESOURCES shall protect its right to fully use its San Juan - Chama and Rio Grande surface POLICY B. The Authority water as a direct water supply and transition to other renewable supplies when available and appropriate. The Authority shall limit the use of ground water except when exercisin g wells, providing supply during peak demand periods or when surface water supplies are not available (e.g., droughts). - feet of vested and acquired Rio RATIONALE: The Water Authority holds the rights to about 26,396 acre Grande water rights and 48,200 acr e - feet of San Juan - Chama water. Meeting future water demands will require full utilization of these water rights and resources, including the increasing volume of excess wastewater which will be available for reuse. A safe and sustainable water supply for the Authority is based on using the existing water rights and resources which will reduce the long - term acquisition of term use of the aquifer additional water supplies. This involves using groundwater and limiting the long - generations while preserving the right to fully utilize our groundwater to preserve a portion for future permits during droughts and when surface water supplies are unavailable. SUB - POLICIES: 1. The Authority shall take all the necessary steps to protect its existing water rights and wat er resources. 2. The Authority should utilize a combination of renewable supplies including the groundwater reserve, direct diversion of San Juan - Chama and native surface water, industrial and municipal effluent, impaired groundwater and recycled water. 3. The Authority should utilize all available excess return flows as part of a reuse and recycling plan that consists of aquifer storage and recovery, indirect potable and non - potable reuse. 4. The Authority should prepare for a basin adjudication or seek alternat ive legal strategies (negotiated settlements) in addition to the traditional adjudication process. 67

71 NTAIN A GROUNDWATER C. ESTABLISH AND MAI RESERVE POLICY C: The Authority shall establish a groundwater reserve that maintains sufficient water in aquifer storage to provide water supply during catastrophic drought or other unforeseen, largely unquantifiable events. The groundwater reserve shall be partitioned into a safety reserve and a ndwater reserve prudently maintained working reserve. The safety reserve is that portion of the grou for emergency use only, while the working reserve is the balance of the groundwater reserve above the safety reserve. A management level goal of aquifer drawdown set within the working reserve shall be maintained so tha t the groundwater reserve shall be accessible without causing adverse, irreversible impacts to the aquifer. The management level provides explicit operational guidance to the implementation of Policy B in that it balances full utilization of the Authority’ s existing water rights with no long term change in groundwater storage. - RATIONALE: The aquifer is generally rising throughout the Middle Rio Grande. This began in 2008 with the implementation of the Drinking Water Project. The water levels are expected t o rise for more than a decade longer and it is important to develop and implement an explicit policy for managing the aquifer in the future to prevent a return to pre – 1997 practice under which continuing drawdown was unsustainable. This augmented Policy C makes minimal nomenclature changes to the 2007 Policy C and adds specific language to guide management of the aquifer itself. SUB - POLICIES: The reserve terminology should be implemented by reference to average level of drawdown in 1. Authority wells from pr e - development conditions. Accordingly, the initial 2017 reserve settings should be: a. Groundwater Reserve . This reserve extends from fifty feet of drawdown to three hundred feet of drawdown, the latter constituting the threshold of irreversible subsidence. b. Safety Reserve . That portion of the Groundwater Reserve extending from two hundred and fifty feet of drawdown to three hundred feet of drawdown. c. Working Reserve . The residual portion of the Groundwater Reserve extending from fifty feet of drawdown to two h undred and fifty feet of drawdown. Management Level . This is set at one hundred and ten feet of drawdown which would d. maintain seventy percent of the Working Reserve. 68

72 2. If drawdown in the Working Reserve should fall below the Management Level, then projects should be implemented to add supply to the Authority portfolio to restore it to the Management Level. D. UPDATE AND MAINTA IN THE WATER CONSERV ATION STRATEGY POLICY D. Implementation of the Water Conservation Plan has been a key aspect of the success of th e 2007 Water Resources Management Strategy. Continued progress in conservation to achieve a gallons per capita per day (GPCD) water usage of 110 will further extend our water supplies even in the face of climate change. The Authority shall utilize the cons ervation program to reduce GPCD to 110 by 2037. RATIONALE: Water conservation has proven to be a powerful tool for managing water resources over the past twenty years. GPCD has been reduced from 250 in 1995 to 127 in 2015. This has led to an overall reduction in production from approximately 125,000 acre - feet in 1995 to approximately 98,000 acre - feet in 2015. Further water conservation efforts over the 100 - year planning period are a key ater Authority’s service area. In addition element to secure a resilient, affordable water supply for the W to representing wise stewardship and management of our water resources, successful implementation of an effective conservation plan is required by the State for obtaining future permits and funding water . projects SUB - POLICIES: 1. Conservation is the primary way in which customers participate in extending the need for additional water resources. The Authority shall continue its public outreach efforts to involve all customer classes in water conservation efforts. 2. The Authority shall update the Water Conservation Plan consistent with the 110 GPCD goal. 3. The Water Conservation Plan shall be updated at least every ten years and shall be reviewed annually so that updates to incentive, education and deterrent programs c an be kept current with program needs. 4. The Authority shall work with the City and County to foster the efficient management and use of water in development and infrastructure. 69

73 SUPPORT REGIONAL WAT E. G ER RESOURCES PLANNIN AND MANAGEMENT POLICY E. The Authority shall pursue efforts to enhance regional water resources planning and management activities within the Middle Rio Grande Valley. The Authority shall work cooperatively — the Pueblos, the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District , Middle Rio Grande with its neighbors Valley cities and counties, and involved state and federal agencies. The Authority shall continue to be involved in and monitor the progress of regional and interstate water management initiatives that may affect the Authority and the r egion. RATIONALE: The Authority recognizes the need to work in cooperation with other entities that share use of the Middle Rio Grande Valley’s water resources. Regional water resources planning needs to address irrigated agriculture, livestock, commerce, industry, fish, uses for public and domestic water supply, wildlife and recreation. The Authority, neighboring jurisdictions, and other water users need to work with State, regional, and federal agencies with water management responsibilities. SUB - POLICI ES: 1. The Authority shall continue its proactive role to ensure that the necessary technical investigations with U.S. Geologic Survey and others are completed efficiently and expeditiously and that they result an improved understanding of surface and groun d water. The Authority is committed to seek common solutions within a regional context. The Authority 2. shall work with others in the Middle Rio Grande Valley on updates and implementation of the Regional Water Plan. 3. When appropriate, the Authority should share their experience in groundwater management to - term assist other planning efforts in transitioning to renewable supplies and to limit long groundwater usage. 70

74 The Authority shall work with federal and state agencies including the Bureau of Reclamation , 4. Corps of Engineers and Bureau of Land Management, the State Engineer and the Interstate Stream Commission to continue to find common solutions for water management on the Rio Chama and the Rio Grande. 5. The Authority shall collaborate with the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District (MRGCD) to develop and implement a plan to support and promote agriculture in the Middle Rio Grande. 6. The Authority shall promote and develop green infrastructure including storm water esources management and aquifer storage. infrastructure to promote efficient water r 71

75 F. UTILIZE CONJUNCTI VE MANAGEMENT AND DI VERSIFY WATER RESOURCES PORT FOLIO POLICY F. The Authority shall enhance the resiliency and sustainability of the water supply by effectively combining the use of surface wa ter, recycled and reclaimed water, the shallow and deep aquifer, and other supplies as needed to meet current and future demand. RATIONALE: Enhancing the efficiency of the Authority’s water use, requires conjunctive management and use of all available resources: surface water for municipal and industrial supply and for irrigation, groundwater for exercising wells, peaking, and when surface water supplies are not available (e.g. , vailable. drought), ASR for municipal and industrial supply, and other supplies as a Reclamation and reuse of existing water supplies, where economically feasible and protective of human health and the environment, represents a method of maximizing and increasing the usefulness of a be given to satisfying the return flow needs of the Rio limited water supply. Consideration must also - Grande from water - permitting, Rio Grande Compact Compliance and environmental standpoints. rights The use of groundwater will always be a key component of the Authority’s supply portfolio. Following a conservative Groundwater Management Plan that limits long - term groundwater production and establishes a Safety Reserve positions the Authority for indefinite use of the aquifer while maintaining a significant volume of water for unforeseen events. Using the Authority’s surface water and other sources for municipal and industrial supply will protect the aquifer so that it is available to meet seasonal peak demands and when surface water is not available (e.g. , drought). Without a groundwater supply, the Authority would need to abandon use of significant investment in component of groundwater assets and transition to expensive additional surface water storage facilities and larger and more costly treatment facilities to meet seasonal peak demands. Aquife r storage and recovery is a key component of balancing groundwater use during times when surface water is not available (e.g., droughts). Using stored surface water during these times will reduce overall long - term use of groundwater during the planning per iod. In Albuquerque, this requires artificial recharge of the aquifer with deep recharge wells. It is essential that this capability be expanded. Stored surface water will not increase overall groundwater use because there will always be a need to utilize groundwater to exercise wells or to meet seasonal peak demands which will provide the native water component needed to facilitate use of imported San Juan - Chama water. In addition, the Authority should be opportunistic in utilizing other sources to extend supply that may not always be available. These sources could include relinquishment credit water, contaminated - Chama water and native flood flows in addition to leased San Juan Chama groundwater, excess San Juan - 72

76 water. Each of these sources has been avail able for use in the Middle Rio Grande in the past and may be available for limited use in the future. Utilizing these sources extends supply by saving other resources for future use. - POLICIES: SUB 1. The Authority shall use various sources of supply (potabl e and contaminated groundwater, surface water, reuse water, etc.) to meet demand over the planning period. The quality of the water supplied will be matched to its use to reduce treatment costs and to optimize available excess supplies when available. 2. Th e Authority shall prepare and implement plans to utilize water sources that are typically only available sporadically (excess San Juan - Chama water, relinquishment credit water, etc.). rm leases in times when 3. The Authority should investigate and enter into agreements for short - te wet water is available to be stored and used during times of drought and for aquifer recharge. 4. The Authority shall develop a reuse and recycling master plan to address current and future pplies and the associated infrastructure needs reuse demand, excess available wastewater su over the planning period. 5. The Authority shall use pumping from the aquifer to meet seasonal demands, well exercising and when surface water is not available (e.g., droughts). 6. The Authority shall continue to develop and implement methods to store available surface water and other reuse supplies in the aquifer and to recover it from storage as needed to meet current and future demands. 7. The Authority should develop and implement the use of storm water and nativ e water flood flows when supplies are available considering permitting and environmental criteria along with Rio Grande Compact Compliance. 73

77 G. DEVELOP AND IMPLEMEN T LONG - TERM WATER N PLAN RESOURCES ACQUISITIO POLICY G. The Authority shall pursue a p ortfolio of potential additional sources of supply. RATIONALE: Establishing and maintaining a groundwater reserve (Policy C) will require the Water Authority to rely less on the local aquifer and to secure additional sources of supply to meet future deman ds. A more diversified water supply portfolio that includes more renewable sources is essential to provide a resilient and sustainable water supply that can meet customer demands in perpetuity. While this Water Resources Management Strategy does not conte mplate the need for acquisition of additional supplies, the Authority should continue to pursue these additional supply sources over the long - term which will allow the Authority to be ready when those supplies become available. Full consideration will be g iven to the financial implications in addition to the regional context including agricultural and environmental issues. - POLICIES: SUB The Authority should seek legislation to allow for water leasing and banking on a local, regional 1. and interstate basis. 2. The Authority should continue to develop the potential for use of brackish ground water as a future supply considering financial, environmental and carbon footprint criteria. the Middle Rio 3. The Authority should stay active in evaluating other water rights transfers in Grande and should take proactive stances when necessary. 4. The Authority should investigate the opportunity to import water supplies outside of the Middle Rio Grande when available considering financial, environmental and other criteria. 1907 water rights. 5. The Authority shall discontinue acquisition of native pre - 74

78 H. IMPLEMENT THE WAT ER QUALITY PROTECTIO N POLICY AND ACTION PLAN POLICY H. The Authority shall take steps to fully implement the Water Quality Protection Policy and Action P lan. RATIONALE: The Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Water Quality Protection Policy and Action Plan (County Resolution No. AR 121 - 93 and City Enactment No. 81 - 1994) is another cornerstone of this Water Resources Management Strategy. The Authority revised t he Groundwater Protection Policy and Action Plan in 2009 to add surface water protection measures, recognizing the use of San Juan - Chama water as a primary drinking water source. Protection of both groundwater and surface resources from known or sources of contamination is essential for maintaining a safe drinking water supply and aquifer potential storage and recovery program. Their protection from contamination is of paramount importance. POLICIES: - SUB The Authority should continue to be proactive in identifying potential water quality threats to 1. surface and ground water resources and should implement programs to the extent possible to protect the water resources in the MRG. 2. The Water Protection Advisory Board (WPAB) shall provide annual updates on t he implementation of the Water Quality Protection Policy and Action Plan (WQPPAP) to the Authority Board through submission of the Annual WPAB Reports and presentations at regular WPAB meetings. The Authority shall provide pertinent information regarding 3. updates to the water resource management strategy activities to the WPAB during its triennial review of the WQPPAP implementation activities. 75

79 4. The Authority should consider the occurrence, fate and potential treatment of emerging d future water supplies and should actively participate in research contaminants in current an which will become more important as the availability of water resources becomes more constrained. The Authority should coordinate with the City, County and State to maintain the quality o 5. f groundwater and surface waters. I. PROTECT AND ENHANCE STORAGE OF NATIVE, SAN JUAN - CHAMA WATER AND OTHE R WATER RESOURCES. POLICY I. The Authority shall protect the rights to store native, San Juan - Chama and other water cluding reuse and recycled water in a variety of storage facilities including Heron, Abiquiu resources in and Elephant Butte Reservoirs. The Authority should seek additional off - channel storage capacity locally or within the Middle Rio Grande as needed to maximize the use of excess wastewater or other water resources in the future. - POLICIES: SUB 1. The Authority should protect and enhance its storage rights in Abiquiu Reservoir for native and San Juan - Chama water which will provide opportunities to continue to cooperate with environmental, local, state and federal entities to maximize the benefit for the MRG. - The Authority should examine the need for additional short and long - term off 2. channel storage locally and within the MRG to be prepared when excess San Juan - Chama water, native flood flows, or other water resources are available. h above The Authority should consider the aquifer as a reservoir to be used conjunctively wit 3. ground storage to optimize the use of current and future water supplies. 76

80 4. The Authority should develop and implement a Rio Grande Compact pool within the Authority the State storage space working with the Interstate Stream Commission (ISC) and the Office of Engineer (OSE). 5. The Authority should continue providing space in Abiquiu Reservoir for environmental purposes. 6. The Authority should seek long - term storage of San Juan - Chama water in Elephant Butte Reservoir. PROTECT VALUED ENVIR ONMENT J. AL AND CULTURAL RESOURCES POLICY J. The Authority shall identify and provide resources to preserve and protect valued environmental resources of the region. The Authority shall work independently and in partnerships to ensure that its activities do not irreparably harm the aquifer, river, Bosque, source watersheds and the cultural resources. RATIONALE: The regional aquifer, Bosque and Rio Grande are exceptional resources of great economic, ecological, aesthetic and cultural value. The Authority should c ooperate to develop and implement environmentally conscious water resource development activities that protect the environmental and cultural values of our community. - POLICIES: SUB 1. The Authority should continue to participate in the Endangered Species Co llaborative Program and Recovery Implementation Efforts for multiple species in the MRG. The Authority should encourage the State to recognize instream flows as a beneficial use. 2. 77

81 3. ources when The Authority should consider the impacts on environmental and cultural res implementing new water resources projects and take appropriate steps to mitigate unavoidable effects. The Authority should work collaboratively and provide funding to protect and restore 4. watersheds of the San Juan - Chama and Rio Grande. 5. The Au thority should work with the City, Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District and others to protect and enhance the Rio Grande State Park and the Bosque. The Authority should work with the City and County to provide incentives to increase beneficial 6. py coverage within Bernalillo County and the MRG. tree cano PRESERVE AND ENHANCE K. THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN THE REGION POLICY K. The Authority seeks a Water Resources Management Strategy that will preserve and enhance the quality of life within the region. The implementation of the Authority’s water resources strategy will take advantage of opportunities to enhance the qua lity of life in the region whenever possible. RATIONALE: As the largest water utility in New Mexico, the Water Authority recognizes its obligation to protect and enhance the quality of life within the region. Factors influencing quality of life include continued socioeconomic growth and development, support of public amenities and green spaces, and minimizing environmental impacts. The Water Authority will provide sustainable water services to meet 78

82 indoor demands, optimize efficiency of outdoor demands by utilizing recycled, reused and non potable - supplies , and return quality water to the Rio Grande for downstream users in the region. - POLICIES: SUB 1. The Authority shall work with the City of Albuquerque, Albuquerque Public Schools, Bernalillo County an d others to ensure that green spaces (parks, golf courses, athletic fields, etc.) are water efficient and provide incentives where appropriate. 2. The Authority should continue to reduce its carbon footprint by taking advantage of opportunities to reduce the energy usage of current infrastructure and by building new infrastructure with energy efficiency in mind. 3. The Authority shall expand its current green energy projects (solar and biogas) and implement nd energy footprints. additional green energy projects to reduce its water a L. LINK LAND USE PLANNI NG WITH WATER MANAGEMENT POLICY L. The Authority shall coordinate and cooperate with the City, County and all other entities use decisions. The with planning authority to integrate water management policies with land 79

83 Authority recognizes that managing the use of groundwater while conserving and using existing water resources including maximizing the use of excess resources when available should significantly reduce ve future customers. acquisition of new supplies to ser RATIONALE: With the membership of the Water Authority consisting of elected officials from the City of Albuquerque, Bernalillo County and Village of Los Ranchos, future growth and development in the egrate land use, transportation, infrastructure, economic region requires coordination to int improvement, urban infill and planning efforts with water resources management. SUB - POLICIES: The Authority should work with the City and County to update the Albuquerque/Bernalillo 1. County Compreh ensive Plan and/or other plans to ensure that system expansion is concurrent with infrastructure service levels and that the extension of facilities and services be phased in an efficient and orderly manner. 2. The Water Authority should ensure that its capi tal planning process is based on the City and County growth and development master plans so that land use and infrastructure policies are consistent. The Water Authority should support the increase of urban building densities and infill 3. development consis tent with adopted land use plans as higher density development uses less water. 4. The Water Authority should encourage the City, County and State to adopt low - water - use Building Codes and low water - use landscaping standards for all new construction. - 5. The Water Authority should continue its review process so that each new residential, commercial, industrial and institutional development will have a resilient, sustainable water supply. 80

84 M. ENCOURAGE AND FAC ILITATE PUBLIC INVOL VEMENT POLICY M. The Autho rity shall continue its education programs for both children and adults to keep the public informed about the choices and tradeoffs involved in making water management decisions s. and invite public comment and participation in implementation of these policie RATIONALE: When the Water Authority partners with the public, the educated public can help shape the policies that are the foundation of the Water Resources Management Strategy. The public then contributes to the successful implementation of water reso urce management solutions, because they have been part of their design. Children who attend Water Authority field trips will know the value of water and be wise stewards of our resources for many years to come. SUB POLICIES: - 1. its water resource education programs and field trips to teach The Authority shall continue children the importance, value and appropriate use of water in the region. 2. The Authority shall continue its interactive public meeting process to give customers information and get their inpu t on upcoming programs, policies and projects. 3. The Authority shall continue its adult education programs so that all customers can participate in a resilient and sustainable water supply. 4. The Authority shall continue to partner with real estate, design, building and construction groups, building managers, etc. to educate their membership concerning water resources. The Authority shall continue its current marketing and public relations campaigns to keep 5. everyone in the service area informed about effecti ve water resource management. 6. The Authority shall continue its process of involving the public in updates to the Water Resources Management Strategy in all future updates to the strategy. 81

85 EVALUATIONS Town Hall 2016 July 22, 2016 1. 4.4 My time was well sp ent. – 2. – 4.6 I felt the Water Authority truly wanted my input. I would participate in this type of session again. – 4.2 3. – 4. 4.6 The meeting structure allowed participants to provide feedback. 5. I learned something about our long - term water supply needs and how we will address them in – 4.6 the future. COMMENTS July 22, 2016 John was great.   I would like to receive any mailing through the mail; we do not own a computer.  Great job organizing this! Reach the current future generations by promoting the pho ne app. Once downloaded it can be used to promote events, education, and conservation via push notifications.  Large water users should pay more for the water they use — use more than the average of 110gpcd should pay more, those that use less pay less. er the next 100 years ABQ’s population will quadruple, but the water supply will remain  Ov relatively static. Why isn’t the Water Authority doing anything to slow growth?  Bottom line: How much is this going to cost the customers?  ple, everybody did not get a chance to ask questions. Due to a large number of peo  More reuse plans.  Good job, tough audience, nice morning presentations.  Clarify #5 — I have been to community conversations plus years of foll owing the utility — great work 100 year plan is great. —  Ver y Informative — great proactiveness  Inform the uneducated general public regarding agricultural versus municipal uses – irresponsible flooding of farms is 100 times more than our municipal use - $$ impact ext to impossible n  Inform regarding challenges of stormwater usage — 82

86  Toot your own horn because we are in great shape and have access to groundwater and surface sources because of visionaries from the 60’s. Cities grow or die, we need solid growth to remain pulation. viable in the SW, or we will continue to lose po  The facilitators were great! This was a really good way to voice our ideas, concerns and hopes for the future in a controlled environment. I learned a great deal.  I appreciate the enthusiasm of the presenters. undwater and surface water – remind people about the cost  Explain the difference between gro of water public service messages re: water, trees, rebates, and conservation, desert living, — rain barrels Well Done. The design was balanced, low tech with high involvement.  Watersheds need to be the key focus of long -  term planning for protection of water sources. Direct potable use could be another alternative.  There was not enough time for feedback and not all feedback was captured despite the fact that  captured. The voting of top 3 seems silly considering it was stressed that all feedback would be the fact it was said many of these were synergistic and not mutually exclusive. The panel was not that old. The Water Authority needs to start a social media campaign, set up a FB and LN page, hold t add technology as a hese meetings at a time when younger people can attend, such as sensors and smart controllers etc. We need an alternative for direct component — potable water reuse. Place PSA’s on TV and local news and add info on conservation to the quarterly water quality mailings. Town Hall not perfect but worth the time.  Good combination of large meeting and small work group yielded positive results I left thinking the Water Authority is proactive, environmentally awar e and open minded. Keep  p thank you and good work. — it u  In the future, giving us more info that would be covered would be very helpful. We could be better prepared to ask intelligence questions. Well planned and executed! Good use of student helpers - breakout sessions good size and  — imiting some proposals is good — all would be too much l well prepared speakers.  - term prospects should Well organized and informative. WA successes and improvement to long be more publicized. Great job, I really enjoyed this.  Great presentations I am muc h more aware and educated. I appreciate the City Board and  – how you are organized for our water conservation and our future. Good job of making the community feel like their input matters, many thanks   Excellent question and format – excellent job of educat ing public and all the planning and detail that goes into running a water program  Thank you very much.  I was impressed with the organized way this conference proved to be. It was reassuring to know that in the past 6 years of d ro ught, our water supply was increasing instead of decreasing.  Thank you, very well done. Thank you for this opportunity.   This time was well spent.  This was a well thought out seminar — very interesting — I really liked it.  Great program — highly informative and well run  Information in Spanish and sessions in Spanish as Spanish is a predominate language and very patient. The crises of  The people running these sessions were really very good — climate change should be increasingly addressed by the Water Authority and other utilities in their public outreach and education for both adults and children; it is critical. 83

87  I really appreciate the town hall type of agenda. Some was a repeat of the Customer Conversations  Excellently run, on time, well organized, structures well to optimize what p  eople needed to know and giving them the chance to provide both open ended feedback/complaint and targeted feedback based on the Water Authority’s needs and questions to the group. Coordinate resources to prevent extra waste: recycling of plastic cans  were cooperators contacted? From and agency perspective having an invitation would be How  nice rather than knowing from receiving at residence. reate a clever message to inform public The elephant metaphor insults my intelligence — c  about intelligent water use  - line to see the exact water usage — not just With regards to new water meters, be able to go on in units but by gallons  I can never digest/process John Stomps discourse because it is way too fast.  Elder neighbors are not getting message and wasting enormous amount of water on driveways and tiny strips of dirt that can’t hold it. Neighborhood Associations could educate.  Very well thought out and organized event and thanks for the lunch and the $20 great job — — credit. Thank you for the opportunity t o learn more. The program was well organized and there were  many opportunities for people to share their thinking. Thank you for keeping of time and keeping people on track! Would be nice to have recycling for plastic cups and cans. rocess —  Kudos for the whole p well done!  Why can’t golf courses be covered with plastic grass? The golf course between the McKinley Light to Wyoming on Alameda for example. The amount of water distributed there is enormous! This is only one golf course! How many golf courses exist in Albuquerque using the same style and amount of water? We as resident here try our very best to be sparing in our use we did have a roof leak amount — and we have ground scape in place and use a minimum recently due to the swamp cooler. Spoke with Frank today, he is very good listener.  Very informative, well done!  Graywater use for residential, commercial, schools, motels etc. —  one of the most important things that I felt was Please break the down on an individual basis water efficiently how to save our trees and not go bankrupt – imputed was how and when to also for giving us an understanding of the problems faced by our water authority.  Agree you must use social media more to educate and persuade younger people — promote greywater use provide save the d ying trees all over the city will kept the city cooler — — education on how to water tree 84

88 ALBUQUERQUE BERNALILLO COUNTY WATER UTILITY AUTHORITY 12 R - 16 | BILL NO. - RESOLUTION 1 ADOPTING – SECURING OUR WATER FUTURE (2016 WATER 2 WATER 2120 ) AS THE WATER AUTHORITY’S WATER 3 RESOURCES MANAGEMENT STRATEGY SUPPLY AND DEMAND POLICY . 4 WHEREAS, t Albuquerque/ Bernalillo County Comprehensive Plan requires the 5 he 6 water resources in the metropolitan area to be managed to provide a permanent, ; and 7 adequate water supply WHEREAS, a water resources management policy is needed to help guide and 8 plan for water resources and to meet the Comprehensive Plan directive ; and 9 WHEREAS, the Albuquerque Water Resources Management Strategy was 10 adopted in 1997 as the City of Albuquerque ’s water supply policy; and 11 WHEREAS, the Water Authority adopted the 2007 Water Resources 12 Management Strategy as the water supply policy; and 13 WHEREAS, the Water Authority successfully implemented the majority of the 14 has d in the 2007 Strategy; and 15 policies and projects describe the Water Authority established a Technical Customer Advisory WHEREAS, 16 Committee (TCAC) the Authority’s policies, 17 , whose purpose was to provide input on plans and programs. The CAC reviewed the technical documents and worked on 18 T revising the policies of the current Strate gy over the last two years ; and 19 WHE REAS, Water Authority had an extensive public process for the 20 the 21 community to provide input on the plan including selection of the name for the Strategy (Water 2120 – Securing our Water Future); and 22 WHEREAS, there were two public meetings early during th e process, four 23 Customer Conversations and a Water Resources Town Hall in July 2016 where the 24 community provided input on the policies and assisted with selection of the various 25 water supply alternatives; and 26 WHEREAS, a large majority of the participants o f the Town Hall felt that there 27 28 time was well spent and that the Water Authority really cared about their input ; and 1

89 WHEREAS, the new 100 - 1 year plan was presented to a variety of entities including Federal, State and regional water management entities; and 2 T WHEREAS, the 2016 Water 3 CAC has endorsed the revised policies of the Resources Management Strategy . 4 BE IT RESOLVED BY THE AUTHORITY: 5 WATER Section 1. The 2016 Water Resources Management Strategy entitled Water 6 , attached a 2120 – Securing Our Water Future s “Exhibit A”, is hereby adopted as the 7 Water Authority . 8 ’s water supply and demand policy . Section 2 The Executive Director is direct ed to implement the policies , technical 9 studies and projects identified in the Strategy . 10 11 Section 3. r is direc ted to report to the Water Authority The Executive Directo Board on an annual basis regarding the progress on the implementation of the Strategy . 12 13 2

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SUBSTITUTE FOR SENATE BILL NO. 1 A bill to amend 1956 PA 218, entitled "The insurance code of 1956," by amending sections 150, 2118, 2120, 3101, 3101a, 3104, 3107, 3111, 3112, 3113, 3114, 3115, 3135, ...

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Career Fire Fighter Dies and Another is Seriously Burned Fighting Arson Fire at a Commercial Strip Mall   Texas

Career Fire Fighter Dies and Another is Seriously Burned Fighting Arson Fire at a Commercial Strip Mall Texas

17 20 14 August 13, 2018 Fire Fighter D ies and Ano er h Career is Seriously Burned Fighting t Arson Fire at a Commercial Strip Mall — Texas Executive Summary On May 18 , 2017, a 31- year -old male ca...

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