Pedestrian Environmental Quality Index Part I

Transcript

1 Pedestrian Environmental Quality Index (P.E.Q.I.) San Francisco Department of Public Health The PEQI is a quantitative observational tool that was originally developed in 2008 by the to assess the quality and can help build social capital and safety of the physical pedestrian environment and inform pedestrian planning needs. Beyond assisting planning, PEQI campaigns political visibility for neighborhoods and communities. The PEQI has two survey forms and gathers data in six categories: intersection safety, traffic, street design, land use, perceived safety and perceived walkability. Since the urban fabric of San Francisco differs greatly from Los Angeles, UCLA COEH needed to adapt the original PEQI to better fit Los Angeles street conditions. The survey has also been translated into Spanish. To date, UCLA has implemented the PEQI with four Los Angeles co mmunity groups. Two of these improvements they sought; the other two groups are currently creating their advocacy campaigns using groups have already lobbied for and received the safety the findings from their PEQI data. See below for a summary of our work with an East Los Angeles community group, Proyecto Pastoral. paper version paper version offers a low -tech option to the smart phone application. Everything needed to implement the The of the PEQI is below. 1. PEQI Full Protocol UCLA v2 (pdf) 2. Training Slides in English 2. Training Slides in Spanish 3. Intersection Form in English (pdf) 3. Intersection Form in Spanish (pdf) 4. Segment Form in English (pdf) 4. Segment Form in Spanish (pdf) 5. Intersection Form Coder’s Version (pdf) 6. Segment Form Coder’s Version (pdf) 7. Data Entry Spreadsheet with examples 8. Intersection Training Quiz 8. Intersection Training Quiz 9. Cheatsheet Field Guide in English 9. Cheatsheet Field Guide in Spanish Please direct any questions about the UCLA PEQI to: Christina Batteate [email protected] Photo credits: Christina Batteate and Elina Nasser

2 & PEDESTRIAN SAFETY IN BOYLE HEIGHTS Using the Pedestrian Environmental Quality Index (PEQI) History of Camino Seguro In February 1999, residents of the Pico-Aliso community in Boyle Heights joined together with Proyecto Pastoral to create Camino Seguro (“Safe-Passage” in Spanish) to protect the safety of their children. Camino Seguro arose to combat the gang-violence crisis in Boyle Heights. People were afraid to go out on the street as shootings victimized adults, youth and children alike. The community came together to stand at street corners, schools and churches, held Peace Walks, met with elected officials and law enforcement asking for a response to the crisis. Today, gang-violence has subsided in Boyle Heights but residents are aware that if they don’t maintain their efforts, violence can break out again. Camino Seguro has evolved with the community and in addition to providing escorts to children Piloting the PEQI with community-members WALKABILITY

3 Using the Pedestrian Environmental Quality Index (PEQI) for walkability and pedestrian safety in Boyle Heights on their way to school and to cross dangerous streets, the program has expanded to address issues of environmental health, youth drug and alcohol abuse, preventing gang-activity and relieving post-traumatic stress from living with the many years of violence. Community-Based Partcipatory Research In 2009 Proyecto Pastoral teamed up with UCLA’s Center for Occupational and Environ - mental Health (UCLA COEH) with support from The California Endowment to create the academic-community partnership ACCION. Community members collecting PEQI data This partnership allowed UCLA COEH to ful - tions in their neighborhood were supported by fill its mandate to provide technical assistance statistical data collected by UCLA COEH. Boyle to Los Angeles-area communities and offered Heights’ (10%) exceeds the Los Angeles City Proyecto Pastoral the opportunity to develop average (7%) for percent of collisions that in - their capacity to organize for positive environ - volved pedestrians. Seventy-five percent of those mental change in their service area. collisions occurred in the daytime and thirty- At the outset of the partnership, focus groups nine percent injured a child or minor under 19 - determined that pedestrian safety and walkabil years of age. Furthermore, the intersection at - ity were a priority for Proyecto Pastoral mem 4th St and Gless St, identified by members as bers. Walkability is a term used to describe how very dangerous, was found to be the third most well a neighborhood lends itself to walking as a dangerous intersection in Boyle Heights. means of transportation for residents. It is often To assist Camingo Seguro in addressing walk - expressed as a function of sidewalk and roadway ability, UCLA COEH introduced and trained design and presence of pedestrian amenities such the members in how to implement the Pedes - as crosswalks, lights and signs. Walkability is an trian Environmental Quality Index (PEQI). The important factor of the built environment that - PEQI is a quantitative observational tool that al can have long-term impacts on health depending lows users to assess pedestrian safety and needs, - on its presence or absence. Walkable communi prioritize planning for future improvements and ties promote physical activity and lower-risk for - build social capital. The PEQI has distinct sur obesity and other chronic diseases and also con - vey forms for intersections and street segments fer protection to pedestrians from physical harm. and gathers data in six categories: intersection Camino Seguro members’ perceptions about the safety, traffic, street design, land use, perceived poor pedestrian safety and walkability condi - safety and perceived walkability. All catego - WALKABILITY ries evaluated in the PEQI are based in current scientific research and have been reviewed by Collision Statistics Heights Boyle City LA international experts on walkability. UCLA COEH adapted this tool specifically for use in Total collisions 5,600 364,029 Boyle Heights. 562 25,565 Pedestrian/vehicle collisions 10% % of pedestrians in collisions 7% To implement the PEQI involved a time-con- # pedestrians in collisions 634 28,724 suming process and strong commitment from 1.12 # pedestrians per collision 1.13 Camino Seguro members. Members chose the 12 Pedestrian fatalities 664 geographic area to be evaluated (see Figure 1). Members then were trained how to collect Source: Los Angeles Department of Transportation 1994-2000 data using the survey forms. Following the

4 Categories evaluated by the PEQI Intersection Safety Crosswalks Countdown Signal Traffic Signal Crossing Speed No Turn on Red Traffic Calming Features Pedestrian Signs Traffic Number of Lanes Two-Way Traffic Vehicle Speed Traffic Volume Traffic Calming Feature Street Design Sidewalk Width Sidewalk surface Sidewalk obstructions Presence of Curb Driveway Cuts Trees, Gardens Public Seating Buffers Perceived Safety Illegal Graffiti Litter Pedestrian-Scale Light Construction Sites Abandoned Buildings Land Use Public Art Historic Site Retail Proyecto Pastoral PEQI results with priority area for improvement circled in black Figure 1 Perceived Walkability Visual Attractiveness The Path Forward trainings, members took to the streets filling Feeling of Safety out surveys until their area was covered. Once all the PEQI results were in, UCLA Smells Once the street surveys were complete, COEH and Proyecto members met to discuss Noise UCLA COEH calculated the street and the data and to decide where to focus initial Overall Walkability intersection scores. Each category in the improvements. Members were encouraged PEQI receives weighted scores based on their - that the scientific data reflected their percep contribution to pedestrian safety and walk- tions of problem areas and were proud to ability. The final scores of the streets and are see their hard work validated in the maps. reflected in Figure 1. Using members on-the-ground experience,

5 UCLA COEH research and the community- collected PEQI results, members decided that - 4th Street between the 101 freeway and Clar ence street were in the most dire need of im - mediate improvement (see black circle in Figure 1). Through a consensus building and voting process members decided on the design recom - mendations in the chart below to make the 4th St segment safer for pedestrians. Due to nearby Dolores Mission Church, School and Youth Technology Center an ideal means of funding these improvements is through col- laboration with the local City Council District 14 office and Safe Routes to School funding. While Proyecto Pastoral will take the lead in applying for the Safe Routes to School funds, they recognize that longer-term changes will need to occur in their area to improve safety. Community members reviewing pedestrian statistics maps Longer term change will focus on cleaning up the area’s alleyways that are hot-spots for gang- Proyecto Pastoral member recommendations activity and advocating for land use policy for improvement on 4th Street segment change that would mitigate pollution from 1. Lights embedded in the crosswalk for increased pedestrian visibility industrial uses adjacent to homes and schools. 2. Installation of a crosswalk mid-block at 4th Street and Clarence street With the continued commitment of Camino 3. Give more time to cross at crosswalk at 4th Street and Gless street Seguro members, Boyle Heights is on its way to 4. Enforce speed limit at 25 mph achieving a more healthy and safe environment for all. This work was made possible by: For more information visit www.coeh.ucla.edu or www.proyectopastoral.org

6 Pedestrian Environmental Quality Index: Los Angeles Toolkit for Implementation PEQI Full Protocol UCLA v2 Table of Contents - Pg 2 This lists the terminology used in the PEQI assessment 5 Glossary of key terms and training, along with definitions. 3 This explains how to use the PEQI instrument in a new 1 - Pg 5 Data c ollection protocol by step study area. It includes a complete step - - description of how to scope and plan a new project. 4 1 This is the form used to actual ly perform data collection. Pg PEQI data collection English & Spanish and should be available in ( Intersection Form ) downloaded individually from the website below 17 - Pg 15 Same as above PEQI data collection Segment Form 8 1 Pg These versions of the forms include the numeric values PEQI Intersection that are entered during data entry. They are a guide for coder’s versions — form the person performing data entry. 1 2 - Same as above Pg 1 9 — PEQI Segment form coder’s versions - This lists the formulas we have us ed to calculate the 2 6 Pg 22 Formulas to calculate PEQI index. It also includes the weights you need to PEQI scores calculate the scores. 3 3 Pg These show you how to get the Minimum and Maximum 27 - PEQI sample Min and scores to be used to calculate final scores. If you do not Max scores the PEQI in any way you can use these Min and modify Max scores as your own. Additional Items Needed for the PEQI http://www.coeh.ucla.edu/node/127 can be downloaded from: This MS E xcel spreadsheet can be used to enter data see Data entry sheet from a PEQI data collection, so it can be analyzed. website This PowerPoint presentation can be used to train new see Training slides website PEQI data collection volunteers. (English & Spanish) see This handout is useful during the training and for users Illustrate d Guide website while collecting data. (English & Spanish) ―Cheatshee t‖ These PowerPoint Intersection & Segment quizzes can see Training Quizzes bsite we help to refresh or reinforce your trainings. See Document originally produced by the San Francisco Original PEQI S.F. Dept of Public Health to accompany the original PEQI. website training guide & documentation This is a brief description of the PEQI, from the San See S.F. PEQI Summary website Francisc o Department of Public Health, that can be useful for outreach.

7 Glossary of Terms Term Definition A building which appears to be uninhabited and uncared for, r ary chain - link often with boarded windows and/or a tempo fenc e surrounding its lot. abandoned buildings any sign about pedestrians additional pedestrian signage A designated place for bikes to ride on the street. bike lanes A designated place for bikes to park, usually a metal U - shaped object bolted to the sidewalk. bike racks A distance of 2 - 3 feet between the pedestrian sidewalk and moving motor vehic le traffic. Often this is a grassy median, parallel street parking, and/or a bike lane. fer buf Where the curb and sidewalk are extended into the street at an intersectio n in order to reduce the distance pedestrians have to cross (see picture). bulbouts A type of traffic calming feature which creates a serpentine path down the street, slowing traffic (see photo). chicanes Anywhere that construction is impacting the quality of being a pedestrian on the street. May be on the street or sidewalk itself, or a nearby building/lot. construction sites How fast a pedestrian must be moving in order to cross the intersection in the allowed time. crossing speed trians are allowed to cross the intersection by The time pedes the signal. crossing time Crosswalk a designated place for pedestrians to safely cross the street, usually marked on the street surface in using paint A special type of signal where motor traffic stops in every direction while pedestrian traffic is allowed to go in every direction at once. crosswalk scramble curb cuts Where pedestrians exit the sidewalk to cross the street at an intersection, a curb cut is a part of the curb shaped like a ramp that allows wheelchair ac cess. A part of the street hardscape preventing cars from driving from the street onto the pedestrian areas. curbs In this case, any imperfection in the street surface which forces motor traffic to slow down. Particularly storm drains. drains & dips Where the curb is broken in order to allow traffic to pass into and out of driveways driveway cuts 2

8 s Graffiti is distinct from art (usually) because of its ae thetic qualities; it is informal and illegal. illegal graffiti Intersection eets come together. place where two str Intersection identifiers Unique identification numbers (or letters) used to identify each intersection in this PEQI study. The distance from one curb to the other across an intersection. intersection length - ladder crosswalks (aka ze bra stripe crosswalks) Crosswalks with large stripes painted in them. Trash on the street and sidewalk. litter - Major graffiti includes large illegal graffiti, either mural style or gang - style or otherwise. major graffiti The part of the street h ardscape in between the sidewalk and the motor vehicle area. margin A strip of land, usually landscaped, in between the two directions of traffic on a street. medians A type of intersection where motor traffic moves around a small circle. mini - circles Minor graffiti includes very small "tagging" on signs, posts, walls, and newspaper stands. It also includes graffiti stickers and small pieces of spray - painted graffiti. minor graffiti no turn on red signs - turn on a A sign indicating that it is not legal to make a ri ght red stoplight at this intersection. Where motor traffic is prohibited from driving on part of the street segment. partial closures A different texture or color or material in the pavement at signed to be aesthetically pedestrian crossing areas, de pleasing and hilight the safe area for crossing. pavement treatments pedestrian a person who is on foot or is using a wheelchair to move down the street. A place where pedestrians can safely wait to cross all or part of a street . Often these are place on medians at large streets. pedestrian refuges pedestrian signal part of a stop light that tells pedestrians when they have the - of - way right Street lighting that illuminates the pedestrian areas of the street (does not include the large overhead lights that are intended to illuminate the motor vehicle part of the street). scale street lighting pedestrian - Your overall impression of how much the physical environment supports and encourages walking on this street segment. perceived walkability 3

9 Any obstruction which cannot be removed readily, such as a large pole or fence. anent sidwalk obstruction perm In this case, any well tended landscaping should be counted - as a garden or planter. planters/gardens Any attractive publ ic artwork, fountain, historical site, or historic building on this street segment. public art/historical sites A bench or other seating designed to be used by the public, including bus stop benches. public seating - of - way right the Laws and conventions governing who has precidence, or right to proceed first through traffic lights and other traffic settings. A type of intersection where motor traffic moves around a large circle. roundabouts A pavement treatment which makes noise when it's driven upon, alerting moto rists to be aware. rumble strips Segment, or street segment - this is the part of a street in between two intersections. Barriers preventing the movement of motor traffic in certain directions only; for example bollards which prevent a right turn at an intersection. semi - diverters The part of the street hardscape that is designed for pedestrian use. sidewalk Anything in the surface of the sidewalk that might obstruct a pedestrian's smooth motion down a sidewalk or pose a tripping hazard. sidewalk impedement any object which reduces the width of the sidewalk so that two people could not walk side - by - side past it, or that reduces the overhead clearance so that someone would have side walk obstruction or large to duck to pass under it. sidwalk obstruction The smoothness of the surface of the sidewalk. surface condition sidewalk traffic light signal Any sign or other special reminder/enforcement of the speed limit. speed enforcements A bump or hump in the street designed to slow motor vehicles down. speed humps The maximum allowed speed on this street. speed limit A sidewalk which is built on top of a wide speed bump. speed tables stop light The electronic signal directing traffic at an intersection; always includes signals for motor traffic. May also includ e signals directing pedestrian traffic. 4

10 stop signs A sign indicating that motor traffic must come to a stop at an intersection. Any retail establishment whose entrance is on the street segment. storefront/retail use Street segment identifiers dentification numbers (or letters) used to identify Unique i each street segments in this PEQI study. The number of feet in each of a person's steps. stride length Any obstruction which could be removed easily, such as a temporary sidewalk car, trees and shrubs, or temporary construction. obstruction any street feature which slows the speed of traffic, increases dirver aweareness, increases pedestrian visibility, or provides extra safety for pedestrians. traffic calming feature in two directions on the street (as Traffic that moves way traffic) - opposed to one two way traffic - Lanes are designated to keep motor traffic orderly. They do not need to be painted on the street to be counted. Do not count dedicated turning lanes. vehicle lanes r overall impression of how visually attractive the street You segment is. visually attractive Walkability the physical environment's ability to support and encourage walking. The measured width of the sidewalk in feet and inches. It should be measured at the middle of the block, not at the intersections where it is often much wider. width of sidewalk 5

11 Data collection protocol This document explains how to collect the PEQI instrument in a new study area. It includes a complete step- by-step description of how to scope and plan a new project. Introduction to the PEQI instrument What it is and what it can do for your community. The Pedestrian Environmental Quality Index (or ―PEQI ‖ ) is a survey of the street environment from the perspective of pedestrians. This survey allows a community to collect specific data about the elements of the physical environment that determine ―walkability ‖ of their neighborhood. It’s based on trained observers who fill out a set of specific questions about the elements they see on each block and intersection in your study. This information can be aggregated to produce an index of walkability, known as the PEQI. Some examples of the data that are captured are displayed on a map and shown below. Data about walkability can be used to identify priority areas for improving the walkability of an area. Either the individual data elements or the index, or both together, can be used to show what elements and what specific streets/intersections need the most help. The PEQI is designed to be collected by volunteer data collectors. This toolkit includes a training to instruct data collectors in how to fill out each of the items on the form on each block and intersection in your study area. It also includes the form itself. PEQI was developed in 2008 by the San Francisco Department of Public Health. The original survey instrument and materials about its development are available at their website: http://www.sfphes.org/HIA_Tools_PEQI.htm The PEQI was modified for use in Los Angeles by Malia Jones, MPH. Key changes were made to the original instrument in order to make it applicable to the Los Angeles Environment. 6

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14 Step 1. Scoping What is the area we will study? First thing, you should go out onto a nearby block with the PEQI form and a pencil and try to complete it. This will give you a very good sense of what is involved with the form and what you will need. Once you have a sense of what is on the form, the first step in performing a PEQI assessment in your neighborhood is to identify the area of study—that is, what blocks and interse ctions will we need to capture data about? When deciding what area to include in your assessment, think about the following:  What areas do key stakeholders want data about? What are our priority areas? What areas are most amenable to change?  How many volunteers will I have? How much time will they have to give?  How much time do I have to spend organizing the project? The PEQI is best collected by teams of at least 2 volunteers working together. Each team can probably collect about 1/2 linear miles of street in one data collection session, lasting between 2 and 4 hours. So if you decide to capture 3 linear miles of street, you will need to have 12 volunteers at your data collection event. 3 miles / ½ miles per team = 6 teams of at least 2 people = 12 people Mark out the study area on a map. It can be helpful to draw on the map what areas you will assign to each data collection team to give you a sense of how many volunteers to recruit. Step 2. Tailoring the survey que to my area? What is uni In this step, talk with your stakeholders to learn what walkability means to them in your study area. Are there specific problems they are concerned about? For example, in a recent project in Carson, CA, residents were concerned about whether pedestrians had enough time to cross wide streets. Read through the PEQI forms to see if these important areas are captured. If they are not, you may want to modify the form to include new elements. Ask additional questions of your volunteers. For example, in Boyle Heights, we asked volunteers to note the number of idling trucks they passed as they walked down each block. Each new question should LY ONE thing—don’t bunch multiple ideas into one question. It should ask about ON ific, well-defined answers printed on the form to make it as simple as possible have spec for your data collectors to answer. It’s well worth pilot testing your new questions on a few people to make sure they are easy to understand and answer. Don’t add too many items or your data collectors will get tired and be unable to finish. 9

15 We do not recommend deleting items. This could lead to a situation where you can’t use the formulas for calculating the indexes because you did not collect some parts of the formulas. Step 3. Planning the data collection Next you will need to plan your volunteer training and data collection event. Logistics You will need to print enough PEQI forms to have one for every intersection and segment in your study. The PEQI form is divided into two parts. There is one part for each intersection and a second part for each street segment. The segment form can be each completed once for side of the street once for the worse side of the segment. OR recommend that you print the forms on different colored paper to help your We volunteers keep them separated. Note that you will need twice as many street segment forms as you have street segments, if you choose to evaluate both sides of the segment. In addition to forms, each team will also need:  1 clipboard  Pencils  1 tape measure, at least 12 feet long 1 stop watch   Nametags Training takes two hours. Data collection usually takes between 2-4 hours for each ½ mile segment (including the intersections). We have performed training from 10 am – 12pm, followed b y a break and lunch, followed by the data collection event in the afternoon. This works fairly well. We have also conducted an evening training, followed by morning data collection. It is important to conduct data collection soon after your training, to make sure your volunteers remember how to fill out the forms. You may want to consider the liability situation of your study. When the first Neighborhood Council (NC) project was completed in 2009, NC events were covered by of Los Angeles’ liability policy. Your situation might be different. the City Assigning your study area to teams It is extremely important that your data collectors accurately identify the street segment or intersection they are assessing on each and every form they fill out. In fact this is the most important thing they will do. If they don’t identify them well, you’ll get a pile of forms back that cannot be attached to individual streets. This is useless. How do you identify segments and intersections? Label each street segment in your study area with its own unique number, and each intersection with its own unique letter. It is helpful to write them on a map. 10

16 Assign a set of segments and intersections to each team. You should do this in advance of the training, because it takes some time to complete. Try to divide the study area evenly across your teams according to how much distance they will have to cover. For example: Intersections Segments Team # 1 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 a, b, c, d e, f, g, h 2 6, 7, 8 3 i, j, k 9, 10 4 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 l, m, n, o, p Prepare a map for each team indicating which street segments and intersections they wi ll be responsible for. You may even want to fill in the segment and intersection ID’s on the forms they will use, and include these in a packet that you will give to the team. Step 4. Training your volunteers Use the included PowerPoint presentation to train your volunteers. The first section is about walkability and why it is important for health. The second section, which is much longer, goes through each item on the PEQI form one at a time, providing instructions about how to answer the questions. At the end of training, you should lead your volunteers to a nearby block and have them complete one full set of practice forms. Stand nearby to answer questions as they come up. Training and practice should take about 2 hours in total. This may vary depending on volunteers’ comfort with the training materials. your You should practi ce the training and practice completing the entire form to make sure you understand how to collect each item in advance of your training event. It is recommended to practice with your volunteers on the street. However, if group size or other factors do not allow, a set of quizzes are included in the toolkit. If you have made modifications to the PEQI survey form, you will need to add these to the training slides. Explain exactly how you want your data collectors to handle your new items. For training, you will need: A projector and computer to run the presentation   Practice PEQI forms (1 per person) Pencils, tape measures, stopwatches to use for practice   Supplies to mark out a stride length measuring range, at least 25 feet long. We have used tape applied to a carpeted floor and marked with a marker, and chalk applied to a sidewalk. 11

17 Before training begins, mark out a stride length measuring range on the ground. Place a line across the beginning of the range and mark it with the word ―Star hen use a tape t‖. T measure to measure in a straight line across the floor. Mark the following distances: mark this number At this distance... 120 inches 1 feet 130 1.1 1 40 1.2 150 1.3 160 1.4 170 1.5 1.6 180 190 1.7 200 1.8 210 1.9 220 2.0 230 2.1 240 2.2 250 2.3 260 2.4 2.5 270 280 2.6 290 2.7 300 2.8 During the training, you will have each of your volunteers stand with her heels at the ―star t‖ line. Then she will take 10 natural steps and stop. The place where she stops will be marked with her stride length in feet. Round to the nearest marker. Step 5. Collecting Data After your volunteers have been trained, assign them to teams and give them their materials—forms, pencils, clipboards, tape measures, stop watches, name tags, and area nments. Tell them to complete each of their team’s assigned segments and assig intersections, and return their completed forms at a specific time and location. Step 6. Data entry and cleaning Now that you have the data about walkability, enter it into an MS Excel spreadsheet so you can use it. The included data entry sheet can be used for this purpose. There is one tab for each of the two kinds of forms. Within each tab, there is one row for each intersection or side of each street segment. An example has been provided at the top of each form, which shows how we set up the scoring sheets and calculated the weighted values and final scores. 12

18 The person doing your data entry should use the ―coder’s ve rsion‖ stand forms to under how to convert the checks and boxes to numeric data. If you have modified the PEQI forms you will need to modify this sheet and give your data entry person instructions about how to code the responses, turning them from checkboxes to numeric data. Step 7. Data analysis and mapping First, your data analyst should condense your data so that there is only one row per intersection and one row per street segment. Because you have separate information on the two sides of each street segment, you need to consolidate these rows to create an overall score for each street segment. You may also find that two or more teams surveyed the same parts of the neighborhood, resulting in having more than one record for each street/intersection. You should use the average (or mean) value for each item between the two sides of the street segment. Now that your data are entered, you can look at them in aggregate or individually. To calculate overall PEQI scores for each segment and intersection in your study area, first create weighted items according to the weights listed on the formula sheet included in the toolkit. Then add the items according to the formulas. You can sort the data from lowest to highest to see what streets perform the worst on specific elements or overall. You can adjust the weights on the items that go into the PEQI score to emphasize the concerns of your community. An expert in GIS software can help you show your results on a map by attaching the individual data e lements or the index scores to the map. You may also use an image editing software, like Adobe Photoshop, to draw in lines on a map over the streets with colors reflecting each intersection and segments’ final score. Step 8. Presenting your results Once you know exactly what the walkability situation of your neighborhood is, present your results to your stakeholders! Be sure to highlight the elements they identified as being most important to them, and suggest approaches to fixing the problems. For example you might notice that almost every segment had some graffiti. A graffiti cleanup program might be a good approach to improving the physical environment in this case. Or, you might notice that many of the intersections did not allow enough time for pedestrians to safely cross the street. You can use this information to ask the City to make them safer. 13

19 PEQI: Intersection Form - download original form from website) (sample only Date: Team (names): Intersection ID: ______ This is the intersection of : ____________________ and ____________________ Street 1 Street 2 0 directions 1 directions 2 directions 3 directions 4+ directions 1. Crosswalks 2. Ladder crosswalks a. WITH 3. Pedestrian signals countdowns b. NO countdowns 4. Stop signs 5. No Turn On Red signals/signs 6. Curb cuts at pedestrian crossings 7. Signal at intersection  yes  no  if no, skip to item 8 Cross st ONLY with a green light or walk signal. Measure across larger street. reet a. Crossing time: Measure crossing time (in seconds): _______ seconds b. Crossing distance: Measure crossing distance (in paces): _______ paces Length of my stride: _______ feet in my stride  yes  no 8. Crosswalk scramble Yes No 9. Intersection Traffic pavement treatments   Calming Features   median or middle - divider ts circles or roundabou   mini -  speed tables, speed humps or speed bumps  Indicate if any of the   bike lane at intersection following are present   partial closures   drains, dips or other unintentional features that slow traffic   curb extensions/bulb - outs   lights set in crosswalk  other (explain: _____________________________________________) no  yes  10. Additional signs for pedestrians 14

20 PEQI: Segment Form (sample only download original form from website) - Date: Team (names): Segment ID: ___________ This street is _______ ___________________ Name of this street Between: _______________________ and _______________________ Cross Street 1 Cross Street 2 Vehicle Traffic 4 or more lanes  11. Number of lanes 3 lanes   2 lanes ly lanes Do not include turn on  1 lane  no lanes no   yes way traffic - 12. Two  35 mph  not posted  10 mph 13. Vehicle Speed / Posted Speed Limit  15 mph  40 mph  20 mph  45 mph 25 mph   50 mph 30 mph 55+ mph   Yes No 14. Street Traffic street median   Calming Features speed tables, speed humps or speed bumps     drains, dips or other unintentional features that slow traffic Indicate if any of the following are present   chic anes rumble strips    speed limit enforcements  ________________________________________)  other (explain: Sidewalks  no sidewalk 15. Width of sidewalk  less than 5 feet  5 feet – 7 feet 11 inches 8 feet – 11 feet 11 inches   12 feet or more 15

21  no sidewalk surface condition -- 16. Sidewalk  significant impediments in surface An impediment is anything which poses a tripping hazard or interrupts the smooth surface of the few impediments in surface  sidewalk. no impediments in surface  Choose only one option from the right no sidewalk  obstructions 17. Large sidewalk permanent obstructions  An obstruction is any object which reduces the width of the sidewalk or hangs low so that people temporary obstructions  must duck to pass under while on the sidewalk.  both permanent and temporary obstructions Choose only on e option from the right. no obstructions    no yes 18. Presence of curb how many present 19. Driveway cuts driveway cuts ____ continuously lined  20. Trees a few trees; sporadically lined  Choose the one that best describes this street  no trees yes   no 21. Planters/gardens public and private  yes  no 22. Public seating including bus stops Yes No 23. Presence of buffers bike lane    restricted  parallel street parking — not time - Indicate if any of the following are present   parallel street parking — time - restricted  grassy or paved margin  Land Use 24. Storefront/retail use ___ shops or businesses of any type Count the number of stores  yes  no 25. Public art/historical sites Safety and aesthetic qualities Major graffiti  26. Illegal graffiti  Little or no graffiti no   yes 27. Litter 16

22 yes, private  28. Pedestrian - scale street lighting  yes, public Choose only one option from the right.  yes, both private and public  no pedestrian - scale street lighting  yes  no 29. Construction Sites no  yes  30. Abandoned/boarded up buildings no   yes 31. Vacant Lots  no  yes 32. Bike rack(s) present on this street segment Perceived Walkability: Please circle the number that your team thinks best describe this street segment. 33. Street segment is visually Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree attractive for walking. 1 2 3 4 34. Street segment feels safe for Strongly Agree Agree Disagree St rongly Disagree walking. 1 2 3 4 35. Are there obvious strong odors No Odors A Little Odor Some Odors A lot of Odors anywhere on this street segment 1 2 3 4 (e.g., vehicle exhaust, urine stench, rotting ? garbage, etc) 36. How noisy do you find this street e A lot of Noise No Noise Little Noise Some Nois segment? 1 2 3 4 37 . On a scale of 1 to 10, how Very Walkable Not Walkable walkable do you find this street 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 segment? 17

23 —CODER’S VERSION Pedestrian Environmental Quality Index (PEQI) Neighborhood: Date: Team Number: Intersection Form Intersection ID: ______ This is the intersection of: ____________________ and ____________________ Street 1 Street 2 0 1 4+ directions 3 2 directions directions directions directions 0 1 2 3 1. Crosswalks 4 2. Ladder cr 0 1 osswalks 2 3 4 3. Pedestrian a. WITH 4 0 1 2 3 countdowns signals b. NO 4 0 1 2 3 countdowns 4. Stop signs 0 1 2 3 4 0 1 5. No Turn On Red signals/signs 2 3 4 1 6. Curb cuts at pedestrian 4 0 2 3 crossings 0 1 yes  no  if no, skip to item 8  7a. Signal at intersection Cross street with a ONLY 7b. Crossing time: Measure crossing time (in seconds): green light or _______ sec onds See weights and walk signal. sheet measures Measure for how to 7c. Crossing distance: Measure crossing distance (in paces): across larger calculate 7b, 7c _______ paces street. and 7d. 7d. Length of my stride: _______ feet in my stride no  1 yes  0 8. Crosswalk scramble none  9. Intersection Traffic Calming  curb extensions/bulbouts Features pavement treatments or lights set in crosswalk  None = 0 circles or roundabouts - mini   speed tables, speed humps or speed bumps 1 2 features = 1 - bike lane at intersection  4 features - 3 = 2  partial closures  dips, drains, or bumps in s treet 5+ features = 3  other (explain: _________________________________________) no 0   1 yes 10. Additional signs for pedestrians 18

24 Street Segment Form CODER’S VERSION - Fill out this form once for each side of the street. od: Team Number: Neighborho Date: Segment ID: ______ This street is_____________________ Name of this street Between : ____________________ and ____________________ Cross Street 1 Cross Street 2 Side of street: N S E W Vehicle Traffic 4 or more lanes 4  11. Number of lanes (do not include turning - 3  3 lanes only lanes)  2 2 lanes  1 1 lane  no lanes 0   1 0 no yes - way traffic 12. Two 35 mph not posted  10 mph  0 35  1 0 13. Vehicle Speed / Posted Speed Limit  1 5 15 mph  40 40 mph 45 45 mph  20 20 mph   50 50 mph  25 25 mph   55 30 30 mph 55+ mph none  14. Street Traffic Calming Features  chicanes  street medians None = 0 speed tables, speed humps or speed bumps  1 or more = 1  rumble strips  speed limit enforcements  dips, drains, or other unintentional features that slow traffic  other (explain: - ________________________________________) 19

25 Sidewalks  0 no sidewalk 15. Width of sidewalk than 5 feet  1 less 20

26  2 – 7 feet 11 inches 5 feet 11 feet 11 inches – 3  8 feet  4 12 feet or more no sidewalk  0 -- 1 6 . Sidewalk surface condition anything which poses a An impediment is  1 significant impediments in surface tripping hazard or interrupts the smooth 2 few impediments in surface  surface of the sidewalk. 3 no impediments in surface  no sidewalk 0  . Large sidewalk obstructions 1 7 An obstruction is any object which reduces the 1 permanent obstructions  hangs low so that width of the sidewalk or  2 temporary obstructions le on the people must duck to pass under whi sidewalk. both permanent and temporary obstructions  3 4 no obstructions in sidewalk  0 1 yes   no 18. Presence of curb 19. Driveway cuts ____ driveway cuts  1 continuously lined 20 . Trees  a few trees; sporadically lined 2 3 no trees   1  0 no yes 21. Planters/gardens  no 1 yes  0 22. Public seating (including bus stops) 1 bike lane  3 . Presence of buffers 2 -  restricted 1 parallel street parking — not time (check all that apply) parallel street parking — time - restricted  1  grassy or paved margin 1  1 none Land Use 24. Storefront/retail use ___ shops or businesses of any type no  1 yes  0 25. Public art/historical sites Safety and aesthetic qualities Major graffiti 1  26. Illegal graffiti 21

27  Little or no graffiti 0  1  0 no yes 27. Litter  1 yes, private scale street lighting 28. Pedestrian -  2 yes, public 3 yes, both private and public   0 no no 0   1 yes 29. Constructi on Sites 0  1 no yes  30. Abandoned/boarded up buildings no  1 yes  0 31. Vacant Lots no 0   1 yes 32. Bike rack(s) present on this street segment Perceived Walkability: Please circle the number that your team thinks b est describe this street segment. 33. Street segment is visually Strongly Disagree Disagree Strongly Agree Agree attractive for walking. 1 2 3 4 34. Street segment feels safe for Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Disagree Disagree walking. 1 2 3 4 3 5 . Are there obvious st rong o dors A lot of Odors Some Odors A Little Odor No Odors anywhere on this street segment 1 2 3 4 vehicle exhaust, (e.g., urine stench, ? tc) rotting garbage, e 36. How noisy do you find this A lot of Noise No Noise Little Noise Some Noise street segment? 1 2 3 4 On a scale of 1 to 10, how 37 . Very Walkable Not Walkable walk able do you find this street 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 segment? Weights and Formulas --INTERSECTION ights for creating PEQI overall score We 22

28 Item Weighted Value Original Value Crosswalks 8 1. 0 1 11 2 15 3 18 4+ 21 Ladder Crosswalks 0 8 2. 1 11 2 16 3 20 4+ 24 Pedestrian signals 4 with countdowns 21 3a. WITH coutdown 17 3 with countdowns 2 with countdowns 13 1 with countdown 9 3b. Pedestrian signals 4 without countdowns 19 WITHOUT countdown 3 without countdowns 15 11 2 without countdowns 1 without countdown 7 3b. 3a or None 5 4. Stop signs 0 8 1 11 16 2 3 20 4+ 24 No turn on red signs 0 5 5. 1 8 2 11 3 15 4 19 6. Curb cuts 0 5 1 8 2 11 3 15 4+ 19 7a. Signal at Intersection See Step 1 below 0 See Step 1 below 1 7 . crossing speed = 9 b,c <=3. 5 stride)/crossing time) ((paces* 20 >3.5 23

29 8. Scramble 0 5 1 19 9 Count of intersection TCF’s 9. 0 15 1 or 2 3 or 4 17 5+ 20 Additional pedestrian 0 7 10. signs 1 17 Intersection formula: How you calculate the score will depend on whether or not there was a traffic signal at the intersection. TRAFFIC SIGNAL NO TRAFFIC SIGNAL Step 1. Step 1. IF traffic_signal==1, IF traffic_signal==0, then take: (stop_signs * 2) then add: (pedestrian_signals + no_turn_on_red + crossingspeed+scramble) NO TRAFFIC SIGNAL TRAFFIC SIGNAL Step 2. Step 2. Add above to: (crosswalks + dd above to: (crosswalks + A ladder_crosswalks + curb_cuts + ladder_crosswalks + curb_cuts + TCF_count + addl_ped_signs) TCF_count + addl_ped_signs) TRAFFIC SIGNAL NO TRAFFIC SIGNAL Step 3. Step 3. 100 - Adjust the score so that it’s range is 0 Adjust the score so that i t’s range is 0 - 100 using this formula: using this formula: (unadjusted score – minimum score) * (unadjusted score – minimum score) * (100/(max score - min score)) (100/(max score - min sc ore)) 24

30 Weights for creating PEQI overall score — SEGMENTS Original Value Weighted Value Item 0 24 lanes 22 1 2 19 3 9 4 4+ - 0 7 two way traffic 1 10 speed limit <20 27 0 (not posted) 22 20 25 22 - 26 35 12 - 35+ 2 Count of TCF’s in segm ent 1+ 20 0 7 Sidewalk width 4 0 1 7 2 13 3 19 4 22 Sidewalk surface condition 24 3 2 17 1 7 4 0 4 (no obstructions) 15 Sidewalk obstructions 2 (temp obstructions) 10 9 1 (perm obstructions) 3 (both temp and perm) 8 0 (no sidewal k) 5 Curb 1 17 0 7 Driveway cuts 17 0 1 5 15 - 5+ 5 Trees 1 16 2 11 3 7 Planters 1 9 0 4 Public seating 1 13 7 0 25

31 Buffers bike and parking and 24 (all three) margin 21 two of the above (any two) bike only 13 parking only 13 margin only 13 4 none 19 Retail use 3+ - 2 11 1 0 9 Public art 14 1 0 6 1 5 Graffiti 0 9 Litter 0 10 1 5 Ped scale lighting 3 (both pub and priv) 25 - 2 ( public only ) 20 1 ( private only ) 15 0 (n one ) 7 Construction 13 0 1 7 0 Abandoned build ings 13 1 7 1 10 Bike racks 0 5 13 Vacant lots 0 1 7 1 20 Visually attractive 2 15 3 10 4 5 1 Feels Safe 20 2 15 3 10 5 4 Strong Odors 1 20 2 15 3 10 4 5 26

32 Noise 1 20 2 15 3 10 5 4 1 1 Overall subjective walkability 2 3 3 5 4 7 5 9 11 6 7 13 8 15 9 17 10 19 Segment formula: Step 1. Add up the weighted values using this formula: Segment PEQI = (number_lanes + two_way + speed_limit + tcf_count + sidewalk_width + surface + obstructions + curb + cur b_cuts + trees + planters + seating + buffers + retail + public_art + graffiti + litter + ped - scale_lights + construction + abandoned_bldgs + bike_racks + vacant_lots + attractive + feels_safe + strong_odors + noisy + walkable) Step 2. Adjust the score s o that it’s range is 0 - 100 using this formula: (unadjusted score – minimum score) * (100/(max score - min score)) 27

33 Sample Minimum and Maximum Scores : INTERSECTION FORM Stop sign (s) With a Traffic Signal(s) only Original Value Max Item Min Weighted MAX MIN Score (from With Value With Score Coder's signal signal version) s s 0 8 8 Crosswalks 8 1 11 2 15 3 18 4+ 21 21 21 Ladder Crosswalks 8 8 0 8 1 11 2 16 20 3 4+ 24 24 24 4 with 21 Pedestrian signals 21 countdowns 19 4 without countdowns 3 with 17 countdowns 3 without 15 countdowns 2 with 13 countdowns 2 without 11 countdowns 1 with 9 countdo wn 1 without 7 countdown 28

34 5 5 None 0 8 Stop signs 16 1 11 16 2 3 20 24 4+ 48 0 5 No turn on red signs 5 1 8 2 11 3 15 4 19 19 b cuts 5 5 Cur 0 5 1 8 11 2 3 15 4+ 19 19 19 9 9 <=3.5 crossing speed = stride)/cross ((paces* ing time) >3.5 20 20 0 Scramble 5 5 1 19 19 29

35 Count of intersection 9 9 0 TCF’s 9 1 or 2 15 3 or 4 17 20 20 5+ 20 Additional 0 7 7 pedestrian signs 7 1 17 17 17 53 149 180 61 Max Min Score Score : Max Min Score stop : stop Score : sign : with sign with signal only only signal 30

36 Sample Minimum and Maximum Scores : SEGMENT FORM Original Value Weighted Value Min Max Item Score Score 0 24 lanes 24 22 1 19 2 3 9 4+ 4 4 - 0 7 two way traffic 7 1 10 10 speed limit <20 27 27 osted) 22 0 (not p 22 20 - 25 35 26 - 12 35+ 2 2 Count of 1+ 20 TCF’s in segment 20 0 7 7 0 4 Sidewalk width 4 7 1 2 13 19 3 4 22 22 Sidewalk 24 3 surface condition 24 2 17 1 7 0 4 4 31

37 Sidewalk none (4) 15 obstructions 15 temporary only (2) 10 9 permanent only (1) both temp and permanent 8 (3) no sidewalk (0) 5 5 Curb 1 17 17 0 7 7 0 17 Driveway cuts 17 - 5 15 1 5+ 5 5 Trees 1 16 16 2 11 3 7 7 Planters 9 1 9 0 4 4 13 1 Public seating 13 7 0 7 Buffers 24 bike and parking and margin (all three) 24 two of the above (any two) 21 13 bike only parking only 13 margin only 13 ne 4 no 4 Retail use 3+ 19 19 - 2 11 1 32

38 9 0 9 Public art 14 1 14 6 0 6 0 10 Litter 10 1 5 5 1 5 Graffiti 5 9 0 9 Ped scale - Private and public 25 lighting 25 public only 20 private only 15 7 None 7 onstruction 0 13 C 13 1 7 7 Abandoned 0 13 buildings 13 1 7 7 1 10 Bike racks 10 0 5 5 Vacant lots 13 0 13 1 7 7 Visually 20 1 attractive 20 2 15 10 3 4 5 5 Feels Safe 1 20 20 2 15 3 10 4 5 5 33

39 Strong 1 20 Odors 20 2 15 3 10 5 4 5 Noise 1 20 20 2 15 10 3 4 5 5 Overall 1 1 subjective walkability 1 2 3 5 3 4 7 5 9 6 11 13 7 8 15 17 9 1 0 19 19 463 146 Max Min Score Score Segment Segment 34

40 1/24/2013 Quality Environmental Quality Index Pedestrian Environmental Index Pedestrian Agenda Program Training Program Training to have it does what and walkability is 1. What with do health? 2. Street and identification intersection assessment Q I 3 ii Q 3 ons i nstruct i .PE PEQI 4. Practice using the Health and modified of Department Francisco San the by developed was PEQI The for the Los Public Angeles MPH of Jones, UCLA Malia by environment street Last 2010 April 1, modified What is “walkability”? health: your and “Walkability” 1 our dependence on cars reduces 1. Walking • the physical means Walkability environment’s air reduces This • traffic pollution, noise pollution, encourage and walking support to ability accidents safety of the environment • The quality and of the perspective of pedestrians from the perspective pedestrians from • Includes: Safety – features conditions – Traffic conditions – Aesthetic and your What health: 2 is obesity? “Walkability” • 30 ‐ 40 or lbs activity 2. physical Increases more above moderate • Regular weight healthy physical activity (such or walking as cycling) • De p on p ends risk of reduces the height disease serious and • For people who obesity still growing, are depends on age gender & 1

41 1/24/2013 Obesity Adults U.S. Among Trends* BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) ≥ The Obesity Epidemic 1985 ‐ 2007 Maps CDC from No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults Adults U.S. Among Trends* 1987 1986 BRFSS, BRFSS, (*BMI ≥ (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) person) No Data <10% 10%–14% No Data <10% 10%–14% Trends* Among U.S. Adults Obesity Adults U.S. Among Obesity Trends* BRFSS, 1988 BRFSS, 1989 ≥ (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% No Data <10% 10%–14% 2

42 1/24/2013 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults Adults U.S. Obesity Trends* Among 1990 BRFSS, BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI ≥ No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Among U.S. Adults Adults U.S. Obesity Trends* Trends* Among 1992 BRFSS, BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% Obesity Obesity Among U.S. Adults Adults U.S. Trends* Trends* Among 1994 BRFSS, BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI ≥ No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% 3

43 1/24/2013 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults Adults U.S. Among Trends* Obesity BRFSS, 1997 1996 BRFSS, ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% ≥ 20% Obesity Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults Adults U.S. Among Trends* BRFSS, BRFSS, 1999 1998 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI ≥ (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) ≥ 20% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% ≥ 20% Adults Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults U.S. Among Trends* Obesity BRFSS, 2000 BRFSS, 2001 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) ≥ (*BMI ≥ 20% 25% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% ≥ No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% 20-24% ≥ 4

44 1/24/2013 Among Adults U.S. Trends* Obesity Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI ≥ ≥ ≥ No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% 20-24% 25% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% 20-24% ≥ 25% Among Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults Adults U.S. Trends* Obesity BRFSS, 2005 BRFSS, 2004 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI ≥ (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) 25% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% 20-24% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% 20-24% 25-29% ≥ 30% ≥ Adults Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults U.S. Among Trends* Obesity BRFSS, 2006 BRFSS, 2007 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) ≥ (*BMI ≥ 30% 30% No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% 20-24% 25-29% ≥ No Data <10% 10%–14% 15-19% 20-24% 25-29% ≥ 5

45 1/24/2013 your and 4: Walkability health 2050? Health Physical Belief Model and Activity The people are Why getting more overweight? on Constraints factors Personal factors Personal behavior •Traditional foods/eating family or •Barriers in the environment prevent habits healthy eating •Other time on demands prevent environment the in •Barriers parents •Obese physical activity •Financial situation Adapted from Northern Territory Government Australia. "Health Belief Model." 32 health_promotion/bushbook/images/model.gif Available at: http://www.nt.gov.au/health/healthdev/ . Accessed March 2009. walking in the Barriers environment to Helps Assessment How & crime from violence DangerDanger •• vehicles, motor When • the assess we pedestrian environment, we can: sidewalks Lack of sidewalkssidewalks or • poor repair/design of – areas problem Identify the of Aesthetic qualitiesqualities Aesthetic •• area (shade, noise, attractiveness of paths) – priorities Identify ( e.g., d l f flfl f ( • Existence an d qua l ity o f f aci l ities f aci l ities f or exercise priorities our on focus to city – Ask the etc) sports fields/courts, parks, walking paths, an ground we • When we do on ‐ the ‐ assessment destinations •• DistanceDistance to get to: also Meet our neighbors – Get – to know our neighborhood as pedestirans day! – Eat free food and have a fun 33 Form: overview PEQI the • Developed by Health SF Dept of Public segment items intersection • Street + The PEQI Form Grouped • into 5 Domains: – Intersection safety – Traffic – Street Design – Land Use safety – Perceived 6

46 1/24/2013 Example Results works How it You complete the PEQI • on every street form segment and intersection • We enter the data and use them to compute a PEQI score score PEQI location Identifying your THIS DO RIGHT. Intersection Identifiers Identifiers Intersection 10 Carson 1/30/2010 t y q s r n wv Carson Dolores bb bb aa aa Grace & Double cc u Carson & Dolores p mo n z x dd 7

47 1/24/2013 Identifiers Street Segment Segment Identifiers 59 49 60 2 54 51 50 10 Carson 1/30/2010 61 1 52 32 37 Ca o s r Ca s n n 55 55 53 47 38 48 61 36 46 45 Ravenna Grace 56 Carson between Grace & Ravenna 39 57 35 32 33 34 40 41 43 58 44 42 1. Crosswalks Measuring 1: Intersection Part Quality Designated • places for to pedestrians street cross the Heighten driver & • pedestrian pedestrian awareness • X the box in indicating the number of crosswalks 1. 2. Ladder Crosswalks Crosswalks Crosswalks • with large stripes. X • Encourage pedestrians to stay within the safer locations • More visible to motorists • X the number of ladder crosswalks present 8

48 1/24/2013 b. Pedestrian Signal 3a 4. Stop Signs and down much time • Tell pedestrians how • Force motorists slow to to making cross, it have they more pedestrians Allow to • time to easier for them make smart cross choices • of number Count of directions the number Count the directions h t ount C • num b f h C b er o f e di rect i ons di i WITH that have pedestrian signals this signs stop has intersection countdowns • Count the number of directions signals that have pedestrian countdowns WITHOUT X the • appropriate boxes • Mark both items on 5. No Turn crossings Red Sign pedestrian at cuts Curb 6. Motorists • people for Necessary • often look to making a left wheelchairs in when the to forget right turn, but for Handy • people to for right look the using and strollers pedestrians carts of • number the Count • Count the of # which for directions a directions where on red” sign “no is turn cuts curb there are X and posted the box appropriate Curb at pedestrian 6. cutouts crossings pedestrian at cutouts 6. Curb crossings • NOT the curb of number cuts! 9

49 1/24/2013 signal at Intersection 7. Traffic Time Crossing 7a. light Signal traffic • = DO • if COMPLETE there is no traffic light NOT • no or yes Check to stopwatch Use • your much how measure then YES, IF • the measure to continue crossing are pedestrians time cross to given in & 7a 7b allowed time and distance how larger street the cross to given is Time long – Time how long is given to cross the larger street IF NO SIGNAL, DO NOT • ATTEMPT TO MEASURE. – Use your stopwatch light – Start when the sign turns green OR the walk DO NOT CROSS comes on WHERE THERE IS – Stop when the light turns red OR the walk sign turns solid red NO TRAFFIC LIGHT. – the time in seconds Record 7a. Time to Paces cross: practice scenario 7b. Intersection Length in Avalon • DO NOT COMPLETE if there is pedestrian no signal. Cross the larger street • b f h i k • Count t h e num b er o f your steps t h at i t ta k es h to the street cross Count – from curb to curb Carson St – Follow the crosswalk if there is one Record the number of • steps you took • down your stride length in feet Write & 7b. The real story is 7a 7b. Estimate now length stride your Speed Crossing there pedestrians, for safe be to to street a For • the • stride length Go range! must measuring to time enough be cross • with heels at line Start • Take 10 steps in a straight line • Take 10 steps in a straight line th landed • step 10 the on Mark heel your where • LENGTH STRIDE NOW YOUR DOWN WRITE to form You’ll • have intersection every on it enter 10

50 1/24/2013 Traffic Features Calming Intersection 9. 8. Scramble Crosswalk • scramble A stops • traffic, Traffic calming features slow the speed of all visibility, pedestrian and awareness driver increase all traffic in provide while directions or extra safety for pedestrians pedestrians cross Check • of for the presence each one on the form and in all directions. not others you see that are listed – Check all that apply – If the same one appears once twice, just check it “other” – see one not listed, write it down under you If Traffic Calming Features 9. Features Calming 9. MORE Traffic Tables Speed Lanes Bike ‐ Treatments Mini Circles Pavement Bulbouts Closures Median Partial Humps Speed Traffic MORE Calming 9. Features Signage Pedestrian Additional 10. increase • Signs can Bumps & Drains driver and pedestrian awareness • Mark ‘yes’ if there are any signs related to pedestrians at the intersection (other than signal) the walk 11

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